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The Ultimate SolidWorks PC for under $6000

I have an opportunity to spec an "ultimate" system for a SolidWorks
workstation for somebody with a budget of $6000.  Can I get some good
suggestions from the group on this?  Here are some of the basic
guidelines that I know of right now:

Video card to be the best possible since this is probably going to be
the limit to speed for most of the work.
Processor / Motherboard choice to be latest available.
More than likely will have >1G of RAM (what speed and considerations
necessary?)
SCSI hard drive may be considered, but not a major concern as load
times are not a major issue with the type of work being done.

What about dual processors?

Thanks for the help guys and gals.
0
info
11/26/2003 7:56:27 PM
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If it is for a work station, where in the files are stored on a remote
server, then a local 10,000 rpm IDE drive will out perform a scsi drive on
multiple files. Please include a 1G network card too! I would check with SW
about the dual processor option though.
"Steve Fye" <info@rhapsodydesignsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:2e772407.0311261156.5d58a52e@posting.google.com...
> I have an opportunity to spec an "ultimate" system for a SolidWorks
> workstation for somebody with a budget of $6000.  Can I get some good
> suggestions from the group on this?  Here are some of the basic
> guidelines that I know of right now:
>
> Video card to be the best possible since this is probably going to be
> the limit to speed for most of the work.
> Processor / Motherboard choice to be latest available.
> More than likely will have >1G of RAM (what speed and considerations
> necessary?)
> SCSI hard drive may be considered, but not a major concern as load
> times are not a major issue with the type of work being done.
>
> What about dual processors?
>
> Thanks for the help guys and gals.


0
pete
11/26/2003 8:05:41 PM
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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SATA(Serial ATA) HardDrives(Specifically the 10,000 RPM Western Digital =
36GB) have the fastest data transfer times.

Look for a motherboard with 6 dimm slots so you can run 3GB of DDR Ram.

If I were building today, I'd use an AMD processor.

The newest nvidia video cards(FX3000G, FX3000, FX2000, FX1000, and =
FX500) are approved for SolidWorks 2004.
1. FX3000's =3D Approx. $1,500 - $2,000
2. FX2000 - FX1000 =3D $1,200 - $1,500
3. FX500 =3D $299

Prices change all the time.

Go to www.tomshardware.com for lots of info about computers.

Best Regards,
Devon T. Sowell
www.3-ddesignsolutions.com

  "Steve Fye" <info@rhapsodydesignsolutions.com> wrote in message =
news:2e772407.0311261156.5d58a52e@posting.google.com...
  I have an opportunity to spec an "ultimate" system for a SolidWorks
  workstation for somebody with a budget of $6000.  Can I get some good
  suggestions from the group on this?  Here are some of the basic
  guidelines that I know of right now:

  Video card to be the best possible since this is probably going to be
  the limit to speed for most of the work.
  Processor / Motherboard choice to be latest available.
  More than likely will have >1G of RAM (what speed and considerations
  necessary?)
  SCSI hard drive may be considered, but not a major concern as load
  times are not a major issue with the type of work being done.

  What about dual processors?

  Thanks for the help guys and gals.
------=_NextPart_000_000F_01C3B422.C75EEA80
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	charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

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<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html; =
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<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>SATA(Serial =
ATA)&nbsp;HardDrives(Specifically the=20
10,000 RPM Western Digital 36GB) have the fastest data transfer=20
times.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Look for a motherboard with 6 dimm =
slots so you can=20
run 3GB of DDR Ram.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>If I were building today, I'd use =
an&nbsp;AMD=20
processor.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>The newest nvidia video cards(FX3000G, =
FX3000,=20
FX2000, FX1000, and FX500) are approved for SolidWorks =
2004.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>1. FX3000's&nbsp;=3D Approx. $1,500 -=20
$2,000</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>2. FX2000 - FX1000 =3D $1,200 - =
$1,500</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>3. FX500 =3D $299</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Prices change all the =
time.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Go to <A=20
href=3D"http://www.tomshardware.com">www.tomshardware.com</A> for lots =
of info=20
about computers.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Best Regards,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Devon T. Sowell</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><A=20
href=3D"http://www.3-ddesignsolutions.com">www.3-ddesignsolutions.com</A>=
</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE=20
style=3D"PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; =
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  <DIV>"Steve Fye" &lt;<A=20
  =
href=3D"mailto:info@rhapsodydesignsolutions.com">info@rhapsodydesignsolut=
ions.com</A>&gt;=20
  wrote in message <A=20
  =
href=3D"news:2e772407.0311261156.5d58a52e@posting.google.com">news:2e7724=
07.0311261156.5d58a52e@posting.google.com</A>...</DIV>I=20
  have an opportunity to spec an "ultimate" system for a=20
  SolidWorks<BR>workstation for somebody with a budget of $6000.&nbsp; =
Can I get=20
  some good<BR>suggestions from the group on this?&nbsp; Here are some =
of the=20
  basic<BR>guidelines that I know of right now:<BR><BR>Video card to be =
the best=20
  possible since this is probably going to be<BR>the limit to speed for =
most of=20
  the work.<BR>Processor / Motherboard choice to be latest =
available.<BR>More=20
  than likely will have &gt;1G of RAM (what speed and=20
  considerations<BR>necessary?)<BR>SCSI hard drive may be considered, =
but not a=20
  major concern as load<BR>times are not a major issue with the type of =
work=20
  being done.<BR><BR>What about dual processors?<BR><BR>Thanks for the =
help guys=20
  and gals.</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>

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0
Devon
11/26/2003 9:38:37 PM
Oooooh... $6000 is a LOT of PC these days.  For that amount of money, 
here is what I would suggest:

2X - AMD Athlon 64 FX51	       $1598
1X - Tyan K8W (Dual Opteron MB)	$449
2GB - PC3200 DDR RAM (4 X 512MB)	$522
2X - 10k RPM Western Digital 36GB	$260
1X - PNY Quadro FX 3000           $1730
1X - DVD/CD Burner                $250
1X - Good Case/Power Supply       $250
Floppy/keyboard/mouse/sound...    $300

Total (less taxes and S&H) NO MONITOR	$5359

This is pretty much the best system money can buy at the moment.  Almost 
nothing can touch it in terms of raw performance, Plus is is ready for 
64 bit computing when that happens.

All for under $6000, boy this was fun...drool...

-- 
Arlin
(remove '351' from email to reply)
0
Arlin
11/26/2003 10:17:00 PM
Slightly off topic, but may help Steve! Does anyone have experience with
running Solidworks 2004 on the new Opteron or Athlon64 processors? I'm also
looking to put together a new workstation in the next month and my current
thoughts are:
Athlon 3200+ running at 400mhz FSB
2Gb RAM matched to the motherboard - as fast as poss.
SATA main HD (RAID 0 them sounds like a recipe for problems and I don't have
the money for a fast / redundant RAID) - no running over networks required.
quadro 980XGL video card
a 20" dell TFT monitor ( I already have a 21" old CRT monitor that can be
used as a second unit)

I figured this gave me the best "bang for the buck" at around �1600
excluding monitor and would make a blindingly fast Solidworks machine for
most modelling tasks, but my local computer dude is trying to persuade me to
go for a 64bit processor (he's an AMD fan) and I am wondering if it is worth
stretching the extra dosh for a twin processor MB and a set of  Athlon 64's
(I aim to be doing some rendering / animation work as well - hence the twin
processor gig, I understand Solidworks doesn't gain from having 2
processors?)

would going for one of the new 64bit processors gain anything over the 3200+
(not working on a "bang for buck" scenario) - most of the results on the
Toms hardware page seem very software dependent and they don't use the
Solidoworks benchmark in their tests!
Hope this provides some side illumination and best of luck with the spec
Steve!
Regards
Deri

"Steve Fye" <info@rhapsodydesignsolutions.com> wrote in message
news:2e772407.0311261156.5d58a52e@posting.google.com...
> I have an opportunity to spec an "ultimate" system for a SolidWorks
> workstation for somebody with a budget of $6000.  Can I get some good
> suggestions from the group on this?  Here are some of the basic
> guidelines that I know of right now:
>
> Video card to be the best possible since this is probably going to be
> the limit to speed for most of the work.
> Processor / Motherboard choice to be latest available.
> More than likely will have >1G of RAM (what speed and considerations
> necessary?)
> SCSI hard drive may be considered, but not a major concern as load
> times are not a major issue with the type of work being done.
>
> What about dual processors?
>
> Thanks for the help guys and gals.


0
Deri
11/26/2003 10:24:27 PM
I look at system performance as a means to get past bottlenecks. There are 
many sources of bottleneck. You can buy a fast system and load it down with 
many unecessary processes and then wonder why it is so slow. You can put 
your CAD box on a network backbone forcing it to look at every packet that 
flows by on a busy network, thus slowing it down. The ultimate system may 
very well be a "fast box" to run SW and a slow box to run Office and other 
programs not related to CAD, tied together with a KVM switch. 



Steve Fye wrote:

> I have an opportunity to spec an "ultimate" system for a SolidWorks
> workstation for somebody with a budget of $6000.  Can I get some good
> suggestions from the group on this?  Here are some of the basic
> guidelines that I know of right now:
> 
> Video card to be the best possible since this is probably going to be
> the limit to speed for most of the work.

Probably not. CPU and I/O performance will limit your speed. You will run 
into this bottleneck in parts that have a great deal of "swoopy surfaces", 
fillets, draft or other complex geometry, in assemblies with lots of 
overdefined mates or flexible sub assemblies with lots of configurations to 
manage and in drawings of large assemblies, drawings having many section 
views or other compute intesive processes. A fast graphics card will 
probably not help much on a drawing and drawings are where it all comes 
together to slow down a system. 

> Processor / Motherboard choice to be latest available.

Well, you better consider chipset here. Look at http://www.anandtech.com and 
http://www.tomshardware.com for reviews of various motherboards, chipsets 
and memory. 

Also consider going to 64 bit computing. AMD makes 64 bit processors that 
will surpass the latest Pentiums in the 32 bit realm. 

> More than likely will have >1G of RAM (what speed and considerations
> necessary?)

Consider the ability of the OS to utilize RAM as well if you have more than 
1 GB. 

> SCSI hard drive may be considered, but not a major concern as load
> times are not a major issue with the type of work being done.

SCSI may help but also consider your networks involvement. Will you need a 
fiberoptic network connection to a server to prevent bottlenecks there?

> 
> What about dual processors?

Waste of money.

> 
> Thanks for the help guys and gals.

0
kellnerp
11/27/2003 5:55:25 PM
Reply: