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Suggest books for beginner, and good as a reference for later use

This is my first Database course, and we are going to have two projects in 
oracle (which I know nothing about).

The professor suggested

(1) Oracle 9i Programming: A Primer (Paperback)
by Rajshekhar Sunderraman
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321194985/qid=1137458079/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-8270393-5917651?n=507846&s=books&v=glance

I did a search on amazon, and found those two books with good reviews:

(2) Oracle9i: The Complete Reference (Paperback)
by Kevin Loney, George Koch

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0072225211/ref=ord_cart_shr/002-8270393-5917651?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance&n=283155

(3) Expert Oracle9i Database Administration (Paperback)
by Sam R. Alapati

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590590228/qid=1137458854/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-8270393-5917651?s=books&v=glance&n=283155


which book do you suggest for beginners, but also can remain as good 
reference for later use!
any book, not just those 3 ^^
(from previous experince, the books suggested in our university to learn and 
reference are not always the best).

thx in advance!!

-- 
Quotes from The Weather Man:
Robert Spritz: Do you know that the harder thing to do, and the right thing
to do, are usually the same thing? "Easy" doesn't enter into grown-up
life... to get anything of value, you have to sacrifice. 


0
Someonekicked
1/17/2006 12:50:46 AM
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"Someonekicked" <someonekicked@comcast.net> wrote in
news:HO2dnW8S97f0olHenZ2dnUVZ_sSdnZ2d@comcast.com: 

> This is my first Database course, and we are going to have two
> projects in oracle (which I know nothing about).
> 
> The professor suggested
> 
> (1) Oracle 9i Programming: A Primer (Paperback)
> by Rajshekhar Sunderraman
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321194985/qid=1137458079/sr=8-1/ref=p
> d_bbs_1/002-8270393-5917651?n=507846&s=books&v=glance 
> 
> I did a search on amazon, and found those two books with good reviews:
> 
> (2) Oracle9i: The Complete Reference (Paperback)
> by Kevin Loney, George Koch
> 
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0072225211/ref=ord_cart_shr/002-827039
> 3-5917651?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance&n=283155 
> 
> (3) Expert Oracle9i Database Administration (Paperback)
> by Sam R. Alapati
> 
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590590228/qid=1137458854/sr=1-1/ref=s
> r_1_1/002-8270393-5917651?s=books&v=glance&n=283155 
> 
> 
> which book do you suggest for beginners, but also can remain as good 
> reference for later use!
> any book, not just those 3 ^^
> (from previous experince, the books suggested in our university to
> learn and reference are not always the best).
> 
> thx in advance!!
> 

1) do NOT cross post
2) Visit http://tahiti.oracle.com & RTFM - Concepts Manual
3) Any book by Tom Kyte and/or visit http://asktom.oracle.com
0
IANAL_Vista (516)
1/17/2006 2:09:23 AM
I would suggest "Expert One-on-One" by Tom Kyte.
Also there are couple of books from Oreilley:  (Oracle PL/SQL
Programming, 2nd Edition, ISBN 1-56592-335-9E) which will help you to
get started. 

Ashish

0
Ashish
1/17/2006 9:21:06 AM
Someonekicked wrote:
> This is my first Database course, and we are going to have two projects in 
> oracle (which I know nothing about).
> 
> The professor suggested
> 
> (1) Oracle 9i Programming: A Primer (Paperback)
> by Rajshekhar Sunderraman
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321194985/qid=1137458079/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-8270393-5917651?n=507846&s=books&v=glance
> 
> I did a search on amazon, and found those two books with good reviews:
> 
> (2) Oracle9i: The Complete Reference (Paperback)
> by Kevin Loney, George Koch
> 
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0072225211/ref=ord_cart_shr/002-8270393-5917651?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance&n=283155
> 
> (3) Expert Oracle9i Database Administration (Paperback)
> by Sam R. Alapati
> 
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590590228/qid=1137458854/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-8270393-5917651?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
> 
> 
> which book do you suggest for beginners, but also can remain as good 
> reference for later use!
> any book, not just those 3 ^^
> (from previous experince, the books suggested in our university to learn and 
> reference are not always the best).
> 
> thx in advance!!

Personally I'd suggest several things beginning with getting a course in
10g rather than 9i. But since you are where you are ... I personally
think Tom Kyte's books far superior to "The Complete Reference" ... 
which isn't.

You need to check with your instructor ... but from where I sit as an
instructor ... http://tahiti.oracle.com is far superior t the Database 
Admin. book too. I don't have my students buy any books for the course
except those by Kyte, Jonathan Lewis, and a few other members of the Oak
Table that "really" have something to say beyond just the syntax.

Another resource you might want to access is Morgan's Library which I
created for my students. You will find it at www.psoug.org.

Hope this helps.
-- 
Daniel A. Morgan
http://www.psoug.org
damorgan@x.washington.edu
(replace x with u to respond)
0
DA
1/17/2006 6:54:34 PM
I find the Complete Reference useful, as it is easier to use than the
SQL Reference for remembering how to do those "common" things that I
hardly ever do, even though Complete is, as Daniel implied, a misnomer.
 Kyte's books are better for finding why things work, and for putting
in the effort to learn things by example, to really understand what is
going on ( see
http://tkyte.blogspot.com/2006/01/new-questionanswer-site.html#comments
and search for "I Suck" for a good explanation why).

But one thing I learned early that has served me well - Follow The
Instructions.  Even if your professor steers you slightly wrong, you
will do best if you do well in his class by his rules.  Being able to
show how someone is wrong by example within their own mindset is a very
useful skill, too.  Especially true with difficult people, like many
managers you will run across.  You need to have a good understanding of
what is going on to know when to break the rules.  Crank through that
Concepts manual!

Also see http://www.dbaoracle.net/readme-cdos.htm

jg
--
@home.com is bogus.
"It's a pleasure to meet you, Professor Knuth, I've read all of your
books." - Steve Jobs
"You're full of shit." - Don Knuth

0
joel-garry (4553)
1/17/2006 7:38:28 PM
Someonekicked wrote:
[snip]

I would suggest you stop yelling over every newsgroup that has
oracle in it (including cdo.marketplace), if you want replies
from regulars here.
Most of them do monitor all three cdo.* groups (cd.oracle is dead),
and do not appreciate reading the same post over and over again.
-- 
Regards,
Frank van Bortel

Top-posting is one way to shut me up...
0
Frank
1/17/2006 7:51:59 PM
Joel Garry wrote:

> But one thing I learned early that has served me well - Follow The
> Instructions.  Even if your professor steers you slightly wrong, you
> will do best if you do well in his class by his rules.

Wait just a .... minute ... we aren't all like that.

I mean all of my professors were but ....

Good point.
-- 
Daniel A. Morgan
http://www.psoug.org
damorgan@x.washington.edu
(replace x with u to respond)
0
damorgan3 (6326)
1/17/2006 9:50:59 PM
THX A LOT for all the replies..

I really appreciated!


-- 
Quotes from The Weather Man:
Robert Spritz: Do you know that the harder thing to do, and the right thing
to do, are usually the same thing? "Easy" doesn't enter into grown-up
life... to get anything of value, you have to sacrifice.
"Someonekicked" <someonekicked@comcast.net> wrote in message 
news:HO2dnW8S97f0olHenZ2dnUVZ_sSdnZ2d@comcast.com...
> This is my first Database course, and we are going to have two projects in 
> oracle (which I know nothing about).
>
> The professor suggested
>
> (1) Oracle 9i Programming: A Primer (Paperback)
> by Rajshekhar Sunderraman
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321194985/qid=1137458079/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-8270393-5917651?n=507846&s=books&v=glance
>
> I did a search on amazon, and found those two books with good reviews:
>
> (2) Oracle9i: The Complete Reference (Paperback)
> by Kevin Loney, George Koch
>
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0072225211/ref=ord_cart_shr/002-8270393-5917651?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance&n=283155
>
> (3) Expert Oracle9i Database Administration (Paperback)
> by Sam R. Alapati
>
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590590228/qid=1137458854/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-8270393-5917651?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
>
>
> which book do you suggest for beginners, but also can remain as good 
> reference for later use!
> any book, not just those 3 ^^
> (from previous experince, the books suggested in our university to learn 
> and reference are not always the best).
>
> thx in advance!!
>
> -- 
> Quotes from The Weather Man:
> Robert Spritz: Do you know that the harder thing to do, and the right 
> thing
> to do, are usually the same thing? "Easy" doesn't enter into grown-up
> life... to get anything of value, you have to sacrifice.
> 


0
Someonekicked
1/18/2006 3:07:42 AM
Someonekicked wrote:

> This is my first Database course, and we are going to have two projects in
> oracle (which I know nothing about).
>
> The professor suggested
>
> (1) Oracle 9i Programming: A Primer (Paperback)
> by Rajshekhar Sunderraman
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321194985/qid=1137458079/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-8270393-5917651?n=507846&s=books&v=glance

It sounds like you are doing a programming/software engineering course?


> I did a search on amazon, and found those two books with good reviews:
>
> (2) Oracle9i: The Complete Reference (Paperback)
> by Kevin Loney, George Koch
>
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0072225211/ref=ord_cart_shr/002-8270393-5917651?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance&n=283155
>
> (3) Expert Oracle9i Database Administration (Paperback)
> by Sam R. Alapati
>
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590590228/qid=1137458854/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-8270393-5917651?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
>

I'll agree with others that Tom's books are superior to the first (I
haven't read the second). I'd suggest that as well as Tom's Expert
Oracle Architecture
(http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590595300/qid=1137596610/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-2312107-7152754?n=507846&s=books&v=glance)
you have a look for programming and design references for the
technologies you will be using. If it is PL/SQL then Steven
Feuerstein's PL/SQL book should probably be on your shelf
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0596009771/qid=1137596758/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-2312107-7152754?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
and I'd suggest you supplement it with Connor McDonald's (et al)
Mastering PL/SQL
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590592174/qid=1137596758/sr=2-3/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_3/104-2312107-7152754?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
which as the title implies does assume some pl/sql knowledge but will
a) introduce to appropriate ways of thinking about database coding, b)
grow with you in your career and c) introduce you to the wonders of
debug.f nice and early before you've *learned* as so many seem to that
you don't need debug code.

If you are going to be using java or .net then there will probably be
other books that people can recommend - for .net I recommend Pro .Net
Oracle Programming by Mark Williams
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1590594258/qid=1137597036/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-2312107-7152754?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
(I am one of the tech reviewers if you consider that affects how
relevant my recommendation is.

Niall Litchfield
Oracle DBA
http://www.niall.litchfield.dial.pipex.com

0
1/18/2006 3:12:50 PM
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