f



When to use "." and when to use "!"

I'm still confused about this and I can't find anywhere that explains
it properly.

I have the MS book "Access 2003" in front of me and I'm reading Part 5
about VB and so on.  It's telling me about how to refer to a specific
database and has the example:-

    Dim dbMyDb As DAO.Database
    Set dbMyDb = DBEngine.Workspaces(0).Databases(0)

but, but, but, but - what do those dots (periods, full stops, call
them what you will) mean?  (OK, it appears to be the same usage as
C/C++/Java when referring to class/structure members, but I wish it
would tell me that somewhere)

Why are there dots used in referring to object members in this case
but when referring to controls on forms (for example) one uses "!".

Surely there must be somewhere that helps one understand this basic
syntax.

-- 
Chris Green

0
usenet34 (89)
4/3/2006 8:38:50 PM
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Generally, a dot exposes properties and methods and a bang (!) exposes
members of a collection. So forms!frmMyForm.Visible refers to the
visible property of frmMyForm, which is a member of the forms
collection. What makes this harder (or easier, depending on your
perspective) to grasp, is that Access has gotten more and more
forgiving about using the "wrong" notation.

0
blgilbert (4)
4/3/2006 7:06:22 PM
usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote in news:44316bba.0@entanet:

> I'm still confused about this and I can't find anywhere that explains
> it properly.
> 
> I have the MS book "Access 2003" in front of me and I'm reading Part 5
> about VB and so on.  It's telling me about how to refer to a specific
> database and has the example:-
> 
>     Dim dbMyDb As DAO.Database
>     Set dbMyDb = DBEngine.Workspaces(0).Databases(0)
> 
> but, but, but, but - what do those dots (periods, full stops, call
> them what you will) mean?  (OK, it appears to be the same usage as
> C/C++/Java when referring to class/structure members, but I wish it
> would tell me that somewhere)
> 
> Why are there dots used in referring to object members in this case
> but when referring to controls on forms (for example) one uses "!".
> 
> Surely there must be somewhere that helps one understand this basic
> syntax.

I always use .

It always works.

-- 
Lyle Fairfield
0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/3/2006 7:20:46 PM
usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote:

> Well the book "Access 2003" does actually explain it further down the
> same chapter - I should have kept reading.  However it does seem
> backwards to me using syntax like this before explaining it.

What does it say?
0
rkc1870 (593)
4/3/2006 8:37:51 PM
usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote:
> I'm still confused about this and I can't find anywhere that explains
> it properly.
> 
> I have the MS book "Access 2003" in front of me and I'm reading Part 5
> about VB and so on.  It's telling me about how to refer to a specific
> database and has the example:-
> 
>     Dim dbMyDb As DAO.Database
>     Set dbMyDb = DBEngine.Workspaces(0).Databases(0)
> 
> but, but, but, but - what do those dots (periods, full stops, call
> them what you will) mean?  (OK, it appears to be the same usage as
> C/C++/Java when referring to class/structure members, but I wish it
> would tell me that somewhere)
> 
> Why are there dots used in referring to object members in this case
> but when referring to controls on forms (for example) one uses "!".
> 
> Surely there must be somewhere that helps one understand this basic
> syntax.
> 
Well the book "Access 2003" does actually explain it further down the
same chapter - I should have kept reading.  However it does seem
backwards to me using syntax like this before explaining it.

Mumble, mumble, moan, moan.......  :-)

-- 
Chris Green

0
usenet34 (89)
4/3/2006 8:44:32 PM
Per usenet@isbd.co.uk:
>Why are there dots used in referring to object members in this case
>but when referring to controls on forms (for example) one uses "!".
>
>Surely there must be somewhere that helps one understand this basic
>syntax.

Dunno about the Good-Right-And-Holy-Path, but what I do is use a dot when doing
so allows auto complete to find the property and bang otherwise.

i.e.  I'd use Me.txtWhatever because as soon as I type .t, Access will pop a
list of control names.    OTOH, I'd use Forms!frmFund!txtWhatever to refer to
the same control from outside of the form's frame of reference.
-- 
PeteCresswell
0
PeteCresswell
4/3/2006 9:50:42 PM
usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote in news:44316bba.0@entanet:

> I'm still confused about this and I can't find anywhere that
> explains it properly.
> 
> I have the MS book "Access 2003" in front of me and I'm
> reading Part 5 about VB and so on.  It's telling me about how
> to refer to a specific database and has the example:-
> 
>     Dim dbMyDb As DAO.Database
>     Set dbMyDb = DBEngine.Workspaces(0).Databases(0)
> 
> but, but, but, but - what do those dots (periods, full stops,
> call them what you will) mean?  (OK, it appears to be the same
> usage as C/C++/Java when referring to class/structure members,
> but I wish it would tell me that somewhere)
> 
> Why are there dots used in referring to object members in this
> case but when referring to controls on forms (for example) one
> uses "!". 
> 
> Surely there must be somewhere that helps one understand this
> basic syntax.
> 
A google groups search will reveal many previous disacussions of 
this. Basically the dot(.) refers to a property or method, while 
a bang(!) refers to a member of a collection.

Since the controls on a form are members of that form's 
collection, and the form itself is a member of all the forms, 
they get a bang. The form's recordsource, allowedits and such 
are properties, so the get dots.

In real applications, If Microsoft named it, it takes a dot 
ahead of it.
If you the developer named it, it takes a bang.

-- 
Bob Quintal

PA is y I've altered my email address.
0
rquintal7643 (498)
4/3/2006 10:15:28 PM
blgilbert@gmail.com wrote:
> Forms!frmMyForm.Visible

This notation is antiquated and inefficient.

The HasModule of a form should be set to true.

All the properties and objects of the form, whether it is open or not,
whether it is a main form or not, can now be referenced with
Form_frmMyForm.Property.
eg.
Form_frmMyForm.Visible will open and show frmMyForm. If frmMyForm is
already open it will ensure that (the default instance of) frmMyForm is
visible.

And multiple instances of a form can be dimmed and intialized with
Dim SomeForms(5) as Form_frmMyForm
For z = 0 to 4
   Set SomeForms(z) = New Form_frmMyForm
   SomeForms(z).Caption = SomeForms(z).Ca ption & ":" & z
Next z

The bang is an ancient unnecessary ludicrous notation. All objects and
their properties can be referred to with the dot.

It's things like "Forms!frmMyForm.Visible" that make Acess
"programming" a laughing-stock. When we get to referring to subforms
this way people should be rolling on the floor.

(Yes, I know MS recommends it; what further proof do you want?)

I can hear the Cro-Magnons bellowing and pawing right now... they will
arrive soon to defend their archaic turf. They will find or think they
find some syntax error in my code, they will find some case where the
bang is faster, but they're not going anywhere; they're just hanging
on.

Let me respond right now:
Get a fucking life and learn how to program and write code and stop
spewing your stupidity here!
And in case you were wondering, "Yes, I have written more creative and
stable code than you; and for almost all of you, a lot more!"

And now rkc is going to accuse me again of being disrespectful of
people here. Gee, what's a guy going to do?

0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/4/2006 2:39:17 AM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> blgilbert@gmail.com wrote:
>> Forms!frmMyForm.Visible
> 
> This notation is antiquated and inefficient.
> 
> The HasModule of a form should be set to true.
> 
> All the properties and objects of the form, whether it is open or not,
> whether it is a main form or not, can now be referenced with
> Form_frmMyForm.Property.
> eg.
> Form_frmMyForm.Visible will open and show frmMyForm. If frmMyForm is
> already open it will ensure that (the default instance of) frmMyForm is
> visible.
> 
> And multiple instances of a form can be dimmed and intialized with
> Dim SomeForms(5) as Form_frmMyForm
> For z = 0 to 4
>    Set SomeForms(z) = New Form_frmMyForm
>    SomeForms(z).Caption = SomeForms(z).Ca ption & ":" & z
> Next z
> 
> The bang is an ancient unnecessary ludicrous notation. All objects and
> their properties can be referred to with the dot.
> 
> It's things like "Forms!frmMyForm.Visible" that make Acess
> "programming" a laughing-stock. When we get to referring to subforms
> this way people should be rolling on the floor.
> 
> (Yes, I know MS recommends it; what further proof do you want?)
> 
> I can hear the Cro-Magnons bellowing and pawing right now... they will
> arrive soon to defend their archaic turf. They will find or think they
> find some syntax error in my code, they will find some case where the
> bang is faster, but they're not going anywhere; they're just hanging
> on.
> 
> Let me respond right now:
> Get a fucking life and learn how to program and write code and stop
> spewing your stupidity here!
> And in case you were wondering, "Yes, I have written more creative and
> stable code than you; and for almost all of you, a lot more!"
> 
> And now rkc is going to accuse me again of being disrespectful of
> people here. Gee, what's a guy going to do?
> 

"What's a guy going to do?"  Any particular reason for not explaining 
this without being offensive?  Perhaps some of us aren't as well 
informed as you, but that doesn't make us Cro-Magnon or stupid.

-- 
Randy Harris
tech at promail dot com
I'm pretty sure I know everything that I can remember.
0
please4457 (103)
4/4/2006 3:20:30 AM
Just to add to the confusion there is yet another notation:

as an alternative to
Forms!frmMyForm.Visible
one can write:
Forms("frmMyForm").Visible
or
Forms("frmMyForm").Form.Requery
or
Forms("aForm").Controls("aControl").FormatConditions.FontBold = True

I prefer this style because I find it easier to read.  Others may
complain about having to type too many extra characters.

Elsewhere, wherever possible I use the dot notation.  The real
advantage this, apart from the autocompletion mentioned by someone else
is that errors are picked up at compile time.  Errors (eg misspelled
names) when using ! are only picked at run time.

Jim


blgilbert@gmail.com wrote:
> Generally, a dot exposes properties and methods and a bang (!) exposes
> members of a collection. So forms!frmMyForm.Visible refers to the
> visible property of frmMyForm, which is a member of the forms
> collection. What makes this harder (or easier, depending on your
> perspective) to grasp, is that Access has gotten more and more
> forgiving about using the "wrong" notation.

0
4/4/2006 8:51:50 AM
"Lyle Fairfield" <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote in message 
news:1144114443.377993.147720@v46g2000cwv.googlegroups.com...

> Get a fucking life and learn how to program and write code and stop
> spewing your stupidity here!
> And in case you were wondering, "Yes, I have written more creative and
> stable code than you; and for almost all of you, a lot more!"
>
> And now rkc is going to accuse me again of being disrespectful of
> people here. Gee, what's a guy going to do?
>

Someone needs a hu-ug! :-)

Keith. 


0
here9 (1031)
4/4/2006 9:34:10 AM
rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote:
> usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote:
> 
> > Well the book "Access 2003" does actually explain it further down the
> > same chapter - I should have kept reading.  However it does seem
> > backwards to me using syntax like this before explaining it.
> 
> What does it say?

There's a section actually entitled - When to Use "!" and "."

It is quite long but gets the essential point across by saying "Use
an exclamation point preceding a name when the name refers to an
object that is *in* the preceding object or collection", then lots of
expansion on this. Then "Use a period preceding a name that refers to
a collection name, a property name or the name of a method ..... use a
period when the following name is *of* the preceding name".

What worries me slightly is that this absolutely fundamental
information is on page 800, to my mind it should be much, much earlier
in the book.  It also seems not to be in the Access help at all.

-- 
Chris Green

0
usenet34 (89)
4/4/2006 10:44:00 AM
blgilbert@gmail.com wrote:
> Generally, a dot exposes properties and methods and a bang (!) exposes
> members of a collection. So forms!frmMyForm.Visible refers to the
> visible property of frmMyForm, which is a member of the forms
> collection. What makes this harder (or easier, depending on your
> perspective) to grasp, is that Access has gotten more and more
> forgiving about using the "wrong" notation.
> 
Thanks and, yes, I think Access' forgiving nature is part of the
problem, something (wrong) that works in one context often doesn't
work in another context and this can be the source of endless
confusion.

-- 
Chris Green

0
usenet34 (89)
4/4/2006 10:45:48 AM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:

> And now rkc is going to accuse me again of being disrespectful of
> people here. Gee, what's a guy going to do?

Mr. Fairfield, my friend from the north, you are what you are.
You have my respect regardless.  That and a 3 dollars Canadian
will get you a cup of coffee with a poofy name.












0
rkc1870 (593)
4/4/2006 10:55:48 AM
Per Lyle Fairfield:
>I can hear the Cro-Magnons bellowing and pawing right now... they will
>arrive soon to defend their archaic turf. They will find or think they
>find some syntax error in my code, they will find some case where the
>bang is faster, but they're not going anywhere; they're just hanging
>on.

Not me.   I'm grateful to know about his.

Thanks.
-- 
PeteCresswell
0
PeteCresswell
4/4/2006 11:54:06 AM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> blgilbert@gmail.com wrote:
> 
>>Forms!frmMyForm.Visible
> 
> 
> This notation is antiquated and inefficient.

<snip>

While I certainly don't think any of the respondents so far to Lyle's 
post are Cro-Magnon nor anywhere close to any form of primitive man at 
any stage other than homo sapiens sapiens, I thought this post was 
hilarious.

Unfortunately, I still ascribe to parts of the notation Lyle describes 
negatively, but for the most part use dots.  I'm not sure why 
Forms!myFormName is inefficient, though - does VBA allow 
Forms.myFormName?  Good heavens, I just checked a nomenclature field on 
the hidden values form of an app on my debug window and it does!

?forms.frmv.txtnomworker
Worker

Is this faster or slower or what significnat advantage does it offer 
other than providing a cone of silence around me to fend off the 
laughter on the floor of non-Access people?  8)

-- 
Tim    http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/
^o<
/#) "Burp-beep, burp-beep, burp-beep?" - Quaker Jake
/^^ "Whatcha doin?" - Ditto  "TIM-MAY!!" - Me
0
Tim
4/4/2006 12:54:36 PM
Jim Devenish <internet.shopping@foobox.com> wrote:
> Just to add to the confusion there is yet another notation:
> 
> as an alternative to
> Forms!frmMyForm.Visible
> one can write:
> Forms("frmMyForm").Visible
> or
> Forms("frmMyForm").Form.Requery
> or
> Forms("aForm").Controls("aControl").FormatConditions.FontBold = True
> 
> I prefer this style because I find it easier to read.  Others may
> complain about having to type too many extra characters.
> 
> Elsewhere, wherever possible I use the dot notation.  The real
> advantage this, apart from the autocompletion mentioned by someone else
> is that errors are picked up at compile time.  Errors (eg misspelled
> names) when using ! are only picked at run time.
> 
It also makes slightly more sense to my confused little mind as I can
conceive of a default 'method' of the Forms collection that returns a
named form.  Calling this as Forms("frmMyForm") makes sense to my C/Java
mind.

-- 
Chris Green

0
usenet34 (89)
4/4/2006 1:33:15 PM
usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote in news:4432597b.0@entanet:

> Jim Devenish <internet.shopping@foobox.com> wrote:
>> Just to add to the confusion there is yet another notation:
>> 
>> as an alternative to
>> Forms!frmMyForm.Visible
>> one can write:
>> Forms("frmMyForm").Visible
>> or
>> Forms("frmMyForm").Form.Requery
>> or
>> Forms("aForm").Controls("aControl").FormatConditions.FontBold =
>> True 
>> 
>> I prefer this style because I find it easier to read.  Others may
>> complain about having to type too many extra characters.
>> 
>> Elsewhere, wherever possible I use the dot notation.  The real
>> advantage this, apart from the autocompletion mentioned by
>> someone else is that errors are picked up at compile time. 
>> Errors (eg misspelled names) when using ! are only picked at run
>> time. 
>> 
> It also makes slightly more sense to my confused little mind as I
> can conceive of a default 'method' of the Forms collection that
> returns a named form.  Calling this as Forms("frmMyForm") makes
> sense to my C/Java mind.

The autocomplete issue is a red herring, as you can get autocomplete
with the ! by hitting Ctrl-Spacebar after you've typed a couple of
letters. 

As to the compile time checking:

1. this depends on the fact that when you use Me.ControlName
(instead of Me!ControlName) you are depending on a mechanism over
which you have no control, a hidden wrapper that Access creates
around your control that behaves like a property of the form. 

2. using the . syntax for controls on forms can very rarely lead to
some very severe kinds of corruption. 

I use the ! exclusively for controls and don't need the compile-time
syntax checking. If you use Ctrl-Spacebar and pick from the list,
you never mistype. If you change a control name, you follow with a
Search/Replace in the code editor as the second step of the rename
process. This happens so seldom that I just don't feel it's worth
the corruption risk. The . method also offends my sensibilities as
objects on a form are not methods nor properties nor members of that
form (they are members of the default collection of the form). 

There's another advantage to never using the . for controls or field
references, and that's that when you start referring to fields in
recordsets, you're accustomed to using ! so you never make the
mistake of trying to use the . in that context (which fails). 

As to the Forms("frmMyForm") syntax, I use it only when using a
variable name to refer to an object in a collection. I have a
suspicion that it's slower than Forms!frmMyForm, but no actual
justification for that suspicion (and when I think about it, I
conclude that there probably isn't any performance difference). 

-- 
David W. Fenton                  http://www.dfenton.com/ 
usenet at dfenton dot com    http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
0
XXXusenet (2387)
4/4/2006 2:50:49 PM
"Lyle Fairfield" <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote in
news:1144114443.377993.147720@v46g2000cwv.googlegroups.com: 

> blgilbert@gmail.com wrote:
>> Forms!frmMyForm.Visible
> 
> This notation is antiquated and inefficient.
> 
> The HasModule of a form should be set to true.

These are really two completely different issues that are quite
orthogonal to the present discussion. 

I have no problem with your very clever suggestion.

I *do* have a problem with using the . for controls and fields on
the form for reasons that I've stated in another post. 

[]

> I can hear the Cro-Magnons bellowing and pawing right now... they
> will arrive soon to defend their archaic turf. They will find or
> think they find some syntax error in my code, they will find some
> case where the bang is faster, but they're not going anywhere;
> they're just hanging on.
> 
> Let me respond right now:
> Get a fucking life and learn how to program and write code and
> stop spewing your stupidity here!
> And in case you were wondering, "Yes, I have written more creative
> and stable code than you; and for almost all of you, a lot more!"

I don't understand why you have to always make these kinds of
statements in categoricals. There are good and logical reasons for
the use of the ! vs. the . and we disagree on where this judgment
call comes down in the end. I have good reasons for avoiding the .
notation for controls/fields on forms and no one has ever disputed
them, so far as I know. 

But I wouldn't object to your suggestion above. It is a very clever
use of the monolithic save model's Access project. 

I wonder if it works in Access97?

-- 
David W. Fenton                  http://www.dfenton.com/ 
usenet at dfenton dot com    http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
0
XXXusenet (2387)
4/4/2006 2:57:52 PM
"Lyle Fairfield" <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote

 > I can hear the Cro-Magnons bellowing and pawing
 > right now... they will arrive soon to defend their
 > archaic turf.

UG like ! cuz look like UG's club. . only look like gob of spit. UG has 
spoken.


0
bouncer (4168)
4/4/2006 7:46:08 PM
Larry Linson wrote:

> "Lyle Fairfield" <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote
> 
>  > I can hear the Cro-Magnons bellowing and pawing
>  > right now... they will arrive soon to defend their
>  > archaic turf.
> 
> UG like ! cuz look like UG's club. . only look like gob of spit. UG has 
> spoken.

I hear that Mr Linson is old enough to qualify as Lucy's husband? 
Australopithecus Afarenses, I believe.... long before Cro-Magnon...

8)
-- 
Tim    http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/
^o<
/#) "Burp-beep, burp-beep, burp-beep?" - Quaker Jake
/^^ "Whatcha doin?" - Ditto  "TIM-MAY!!" - Me
0
Tim
4/4/2006 7:49:20 PM
"Larry Linson" <bouncer@localhost.not> wrote in
news:42AYf.15666$Up2.9230@trnddc07: 

> "Lyle Fairfield" <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote
> 
> > I can hear the Cro-Magnons bellowing and pawing
> > right now... they will arrive soon to defend their
> > archaic turf.
> 
> UG like ! cuz look like UG's club. . only look like gob of
> spit. UG has spoken.
> 

LOL! UG has spoken wise words. 


-- 
Bob Quintal

PA is y I've altered my email address.
0
rquintal7643 (498)
4/4/2006 9:22:28 PM
Here's my recollection of Access 97, but I haven't used Access 97 for a
long time. There is no Form HasModule property in Access 97. The form
!!!Really!!!has to have a module, some piece of code, useful or not.
Private Sub Doolittle
Me.Visible=Me.Visible
End Sub

I doubt the second line is required. Then it all works swimmingly.

But that's my recollection only and subject to correction.

0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/4/2006 9:43:48 PM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:

I don't seem to be able to get a form to open using
Form_FormName.Visible (invalid use of property)
or
Form_Form2.Visible = True (nothing happening at all)

The rest of your rant checks out and it's truely
amazing.

Some things you didn't mention.

You can set a recordset to the RecordsetClone
of an unopened form and the data will be there.

You can call an unopened form's user defined Subs
and Functions.

You can access the values of an unopened form's controls
which will be on the first record if the form is bound.

Not sure how any of this is useful. I'm probably to stupid
for that. It was interesting though.



0
rkc1870 (593)
4/5/2006 1:56:46 AM
A small caveat. When you do those things you mention, you have opened
the form. Probably it is hidden, but it's open.
And you may want to close it when you are done with it, although this
is not necessarily so. Because as we know, forms, visible or not, close
when Access closes; there is almost never any ghost form (although
Larry has been mistaken for one) hanging around.

Of course, when you talk about using the form's public methods you have
reached the stage where you have a class which does not need to be
intialized, (Dim cl as MyClass Set cl = New MyClass), if you need only
one copy of it, as the form has a default instance. And going back to
the form closing when Access closes, this "class" cleans up after
itself.

If you want to use controls on your forms for holding values, you can
enumerate these, much more easily than public class properties.

Of couse, if you need multiple copies of your class, you need to
initialize them as previously described. (with an array), or some other
way.

And last, (maybe), if you want to use Form as Class, you can mess with
its visibility turning it on again, off again to show messages,
progress, pictures of Lauren Bacall, whatever, as your class form runs.

At one time in Access 97 one could expose forms in library dbs; combine
this with the form as class idea and you can get to some very generic
type of objects for your library.  But forms do not seem to be so
exposable in Access >=2000

Enough! I run off at the mouth too much.

0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 2:16:48 AM
Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.

0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 2:21:05 AM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> A small caveat. When you do those things you mention, you have opened
> the form. Probably it is hidden, but it's open.

It may be initialized, but it's not really open. Calling a Public
Sub that issues a docmd.gotorecord raises a form not open error.

> And you may want to close it when you are done with it, although this
> is not necessarily so. Because as we know, forms, visible or not, close
> when Access closes; there is almost never any ghost form (although

I'm thinking close it when you're done. I actually ran into a
situation where the form I was messing with was listed twice in
the 'Do you want to save the changes to' dialog. Clicking yes
caused Access to crash-n-burn.

> Of course, when you talk about using the form's public methods you have
> reached the stage where you have a class which does not need to be
> intialized, (Dim cl as MyClass Set cl = New MyClass), 

Like if they were declared as static methods in C# or Java.

> If you want to use controls on your forms for holding values, you can
> enumerate these, much more easily than public class properties.

DW's often wished for auto-magical class properties collection.

> Enough! I run off at the mouth too much.

Ya think so?

0
rkc1870 (593)
4/5/2006 11:08:09 AM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
> I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.

It's a mystery.

0
rkc1870 (593)
4/5/2006 11:08:31 AM
rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote in news:tyNYf.40221
$jf2.17346@twister.nyroc.rr.com:

>> Enough! I run off at the mouth too much.
> 
> Ya think so?

Well, not if everybody else does for sure; in that case I'll be sure to 
think something else!

-- 
Lyle Fairfield
0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 11:36:40 AM
Per rkc:
>It's a mystery.

Have you written some code in the form's module and compiled/saved it yet?

When I tried it, it didn't work the first time.   Then I added some code to 
the form's module and it did work.
-- 
PeteCresswell
0
PeteCresswell
4/5/2006 12:02:55 PM
rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote:
> Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> > Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
> > I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.
> 
> It's a mystery.
> 
One of the many that causes me problems when trying to program in
Access!   :-)  (Which is where we came in)

-- 
Chris Green

0
usenet34 (89)
4/5/2006 2:30:27 PM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> Here's my recollection of Access 97, but I haven't used Access 97 for a
> long time. There is no Form HasModule property in Access 97. The form
> !!!Really!!!has to have a module, some piece of code, useful or not.
> Private Sub Doolittle
> Me.Visible=Me.Visible
> End Sub
> 
> I doubt the second line is required. Then it all works swimmingly.
> 
> But that's my recollection only and subject to correction.

AC97 does indeed have the HasModule property. If referred to in VBA, the 
Form must be open or you get an error. It seems that only open forms are 
part of the Forms collection.

--
Bri

0
not32 (1022)
4/5/2006 4:43:39 PM
"(PeteCresswell)" <x@y.Invalid> wrote in
news:ddc732dc1b5l3r45pitpreqsj8g3jcdrt8@4ax.com: 

> Per rkc:
>>It's a mystery.
> 
> Have you written some code in the form's module and compiled/saved it
> yet? 
> 
> When I tried it, it didn't work the first time.   Then I added some
> code to the form's module and it did work.

I have used this for more than five years exclusively, ie noe Forms
(FormName)!!!!!.....Bullshit. If it won't work, won't compile then there 
may be something wrong with your code, objects. Find out what it is, 
please. It probably needs fixing regardless.

But, please, don't say it doesn't work. It WORKS!

-- 
Lyle Fairfield
0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 4:56:42 PM
usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote in news:4433b863.0@entanet:

> rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote:
>> Lyle Fairfield wrote:
>> > Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
>> > I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.
>> 
>> It's a mystery.
>> 
> One of the many that causes me problems when trying to program in
> Access!   :-)  (Which is where we came in)

I know about these many problems. You see, Bill Gates has sent me special 
copies of the Access executables and dlls since Access 95 (maybe before). 
In these are many short simple methods and properties that work for me 
every time (things like Recordset.Collect(0) which is the second fastest 
and very simple way to get the value of a recordset field) and work for 
almost no one else in the world. You see I post about these things and then 
some yahoo responds with "It didn't work!". Now, who knows why it didn't 
work? I am so glad I can't see how they made it not work, because, would I 
say, "It didn't work because you are incredibly stupid!"? No, never me.

-- 
Lyle Fairfield
0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 5:07:08 PM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:

> I am so glad I can't see how they made it not work, because, would I 
> say, "It didn't work because you are incredibly stupid!"? No, never me.

By calling Form_Form2.Visible=True from a command button on another
form.

Lighten up. You're gonna pop a blood vessel.
0
rkc1870 (593)
4/5/2006 5:43:55 PM
"Lyle Fairfield" <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote in
news:1144187028.335023.301160@g10g2000cwb.googlegroups.com: 

> Here's my recollection of Access 97, but I haven't used Access 97
> for a long time. There is no Form HasModule property in Access 97.

A97 was the first to introduce this property. The goal was to allow
the creation of those "lightweight" forms, which were supposed to be
blazingly fast in comparison to "heavyweight" forms. That was, of
course, ridiculous, as most of the performance drain in a form is
not in the loading of the code module, but in the loading of the
data. 

> The form
> !!!Really!!!has to have a module, some piece of code, useful or
> not. Private Sub Doolittle
> Me.Visible=Me.Visible
> End Sub
> 
> I doubt the second line is required. Then it all works swimmingly.
> 
> But that's my recollection only and subject to correction.

As I said, I expected it not to work in A97, since it did not use
the monolithic Access project. My suspicion is that the reason it
works in A2K is that all the code is in the same object. Even though
you see separate modules, they're all part of the same code project,
and thus interconnected in a way that was not the case in A97. 

-- 
David W. Fenton                  http://www.dfenton.com/ 
usenet at dfenton dot com    http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
0
XXXusenet (2387)
4/5/2006 6:19:11 PM
Lyle Fairfield <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote in
news:Xns979C857008D6Clylefairfieldaimcom@216.221.81.119: 

> usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote in news:4433b863.0@entanet:
> 
>> rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote:
>>> Lyle Fairfield wrote:
>>> > Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
>>> > I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.
>>> 
>>> It's a mystery.
>>> 
>> One of the many that causes me problems when trying to program in
>> Access!   :-)  (Which is where we came in)
> 
> I know about these many problems. You see, Bill Gates has sent me
> special copies of the Access executables and dlls since Access 95
> (maybe before). In these are many short simple methods and
> properties that work for me every time (things like
> Recordset.Collect(0) which is the second fastest and very simple
> way to get the value of a recordset field) and work for almost no
> one else in the world. You see I post about these things and then 
> some yahoo responds with "It didn't work!". Now, who knows why it
> didn't work? I am so glad I can't see how they made it not work,
> because, would I say, "It didn't work because you are incredibly
> stupid!"? No, never me. 

Well, it does show that your recommendation does not work in all
cases, but we don't know what it is that's different about the ones
where it doesn't work. Thus, it seems to me like something to be
avoided in general, clever as it may be, since we can't say when it
will actually work properly and when it won't. 

-- 
David W. Fenton                  http://www.dfenton.com/ 
usenet at dfenton dot com    http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
0
XXXusenet (2387)
4/5/2006 6:20:30 PM
Per Lyle Fairfield:
>But, please, don't say it doesn't work. It WORKS!

That's what I said - in the end it worked.

-- 
PeteCresswell
0
PeteCresswell
4/5/2006 7:01:24 PM
"David W. Fenton" <XXXusenet@dfenton.com.invalid> wrote in 
news:Xns979C91E2FC577f99a49ed1d0c49c5bbb2@127.0.0.1:

> Lyle Fairfield <lylefairfield@aim.com> wrote in
> news:Xns979C857008D6Clylefairfieldaimcom@216.221.81.119: 
> 
>> usenet@isbd.co.uk wrote in news:4433b863.0@entanet:
>> 
>>> rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote:
>>>> Lyle Fairfield wrote:
>>>> > Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
>>>> > I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.
>>>> 
>>>> It's a mystery.
>>>> 
>>> One of the many that causes me problems when trying to program in
>>> Access!   :-)  (Which is where we came in)
>> 
>> I know about these many problems. You see, Bill Gates has sent me
>> special copies of the Access executables and dlls since Access 95
>> (maybe before). In these are many short simple methods and
>> properties that work for me every time (things like
>> Recordset.Collect(0) which is the second fastest and very simple
>> way to get the value of a recordset field) and work for almost no
>> one else in the world. You see I post about these things and then 
>> some yahoo responds with "It didn't work!". Now, who knows why it
>> didn't work? I am so glad I can't see how they made it not work,
>> because, would I say, "It didn't work because you are incredibly
>> stupid!"? No, never me. 
> 
> Well, it does show that your recommendation does not work in all
> cases, but we don't know what it is that's different about the ones
> where it doesn't work. Thus, it seems to me like something to be
> avoided in general, clever as it may be, since we can't say when it
> will actually work properly and when it won't. 
> 

I can say when it works for me. ALWAYS! 

-- 
Lyle Fairfield
0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 8:18:23 PM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
> I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.

Okey Dokey then.  Since I know you are always right I created
a new .mdb file and tried again. The form opened just as
nice as could be.  Apparently my testing Lyle's shit .mdb
file is screwed up in some way that caused it not to.  It's
odd that everything else about it worked as you said, but
this didn't.

There you have it.
0
rkc1870 (593)
4/5/2006 9:24:48 PM
rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote in news:AAWYf.36507
$Da7.35450@twister.nyroc.rr.com:

> Lyle Fairfield wrote:
>> Form_Form1.Visible = True works for me.
>> I don't know what would prevent it from working for you.
> 
> Okey Dokey then.  Since I know you are always right I created
> a new .mdb file and tried again. The form opened just as
> nice as could be.  Apparently my testing Lyle's shit .mdb
> file is screwed up in some way that caused it not to.  It's
> odd that everything else about it worked as you said, but
> this didn't.
> 
> There you have it.

I rejoice at your success.

-- 
Lyle Fairfield
0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 9:58:30 PM
Lyle Fairfield wrote:

> I rejoice at your success.

I doubt it.
0
rkc1870 (593)
4/5/2006 10:31:34 PM
rkc <rkc@rochester.yabba.dabba.do.rr.bomb> wrote in news:azXYf.16651
$Mj.11876@twister.nyroc.rr.com:

> Lyle Fairfield wrote:
> 
>> I rejoice at your success.
> 
> I doubt it.

You are quite wrong.

-- 
Lyle Fairfield
0
lylefairfield (1852)
4/5/2006 10:33:05 PM
Reply:

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Hello, I have a mini-ruby quiz. Guess what this line of code writes to the console, then try it for yourself: puts "\\".gsub("\\", "\\\\") Why is that so? Martin From: martinus [mailto:martin.ankerl@gmail.com]=20 # Hello, I have a mini-ruby quiz. Guess what this line of code writes to # the console, then try it for yourself: # puts "\\".gsub("\\", "\\\\") puts "\\".gsub("\\", "\\\\") \ #=3D> nil # Why is that so? faq. escaping the escape in sub/gsub. search the archives. maybe you want somethin...

Gary Sokolich """"""
"""""""""" http://www.manta.com/c/mmlq5dm/w-gary-sokolich W Gary Sokolich 801 Kings Road Newport Beach, CA 92663-5715 (949) 650-5379 http://www.tbpe.state.tx.us/da/da022808.htm TEXAS BOARD OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS February 28, 2008 Board Meeting Disciplinary Actions W. Gary Sokolich , Newport Beach, California �V File B-29812 - It was alleged that Dr. Sokolich unlawfully offered or attempted to practice engineering in Texas (...) Dr. Sokolich chose to end the proceedings by signing a Consent Order that was accepted by ...

Question about "sprintf" "@" "do for"
Hello, this works: A1=3D1 A2=3D2 A3=3D3 i=3D1 vari=3Dsprintf("A%.f",i) print vari,"=3D",@vari i=3Di+1 vari=3Dsprintf("A%.f",i) print vari,"=3D",@vari i=3Di+1 vari=3Dsprintf("A%.f",i) print vari,"=3D",@vari do for [i=3D1:3]{ vari=3Dsprintf("A%.f",i) print vari } But I want to have "print vari,"=3D",@vari" in the loop. But it dosen't=20 work. Why can't I use "print vari,"=3D",@vari" in the loop? Is there a=20 solution for? J=C3=B6rg Jörg ...

Cannot Use "ifconfig" nor "iwconfig" effectively
Hello, I am having difficulty in bringing up the commands of "ifconfig" and "iwconfig" up through a terminal. I am running Linux Fedora Core 3 and for some reason, when I log in as the root user, I receive the error message "command not found". Any reason for this? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance. Jeff In comp.os.linux.networking Jeffrey D. Yuille <jeffy5@optonline.net>: > Hello, > I am having difficulty in bringing up the commands of "ifconfig" > and "iwconfig" up through a terminal. I am running Linux Fedora Core 3 > and for some reason, when I log in as the root user, I receive the error > message "command not found". Any reason for this? Any help would be > appreciated. Thanks in advance. Show us the output of the following commands: ls -l /sbin/ifconfig rpm -V net-tools -- Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig > GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94) mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/' #bofh excuse 115: your keyboard's space bar is generating spurious keycodes. "Jeffrey D. Yuille" <jeffy5@optonline.net> wrote: >Hello, > > I am having difficulty in bringing up the commands of > "ifconfig" and "iwconfig" up through a terminal. I am > running Linux Fedora Core 3 and for some reason, when I > log in as the root user, I receive the error message > &...

specifier "%n" when using "scanf"
Hi, I used to see a format specifier "%s%n" for "scanf", like follows. ------------code--------- #include<iostream> using namespace std; int main(){ char xx[20]; strcpy(xx, "ab ad ef"); char yy[20]; int jj; cout<<sscanf(xx, "%s%n", yy, &jj)<<endl; cout<<yy<<" "<<jj<<endl; } --------code----------- But I didn't find any explaination about the "%n" usage in the web or text books. Can anyone give some references? thomas wrote: > Hi, > I used to see a format spec...

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