f



db file sequential read, where does it read to?

9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L

I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
solve my problem though... 

I hope that wasn't too confusing.

0
balvey (229)
11/1/2006 9:28:20 PM
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Ben wrote:
> 9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L
>
> I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
> table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
> is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
> the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
> getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
> of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
> I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
> solve my problem though...
>
> I hope that wasn't too confusing.

It reads the blocks to the buffer, but puts them on the least recently
used end of the LRU list, so they get aged out first.
http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96524/c08memor.htm#8550

You do run into aging each other's blocks out when you do lots of
indexed reads.  That's when it helps to use another buffer pool.

You can look at what segments are in the buffer with v$bh.
http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96533/memory.htm#33797

Table scans aren't necessarily bad.  If you really do need most of the
table, for example.  Poke about in asktom.oracle.com for more info.
You could make things worse going from full table scans to thrashing
your buffers.

jg
--
@home.com is bogus.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/nation/20061101-1133-paypal-halloween-explosion.html

0
joel-garry (4553)
11/1/2006 9:46:37 PM
Ben wrote:
> 9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L
>
> I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
> table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
> is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
> the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
> getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
> of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
> I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
> solve my problem though...
>
> I hope that wasn't too confusing.

DB File Scattered Reads are associated with full table scans, contrary
to what the wait event name implies.  DB File Sequential Reads are
associated with single block reads, usually reading indexes.  Blocks
read end up in the buffer cache before the contents of the blocks are
compared/utilized by Oracle.

Charles Hooper
PC Support Specialist
K&M Machine-Fabricating, Inc.

0
hooperc2000 (791)
11/1/2006 9:48:00 PM
Ben wrote:
> 9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L
>
> I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
> table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
> is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
> the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
> getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
> of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
> I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
> solve my problem though...
>
> I hope that wasn't too confusing.

As other responders have noted, full table scans do get dumped into the
buffer cache but will tend to get flushed back out immediately
depending on how many blocks are read in the full scans and how big the
buffer cache is.

If you set a 10046 trace and set it to level 12 you will get wait
information that includes exactly what blocks are being read.

Some long running batch process do better with full scans, it all
depends.

Cary Millsap has a good book optimizing oracle performance that might
be of use.

0
johnbhurley (2707)
11/1/2006 10:41:54 PM

"joel garry" <joel-garry@home.com> wrote in message 
news:1162417597.219001.165100@e64g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>
> Ben wrote:
>> 9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L
>>
>> I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
>> table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
>> is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
>> the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
>> getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
>> of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
>> I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
>> solve my problem though...
>>
>> I hope that wasn't too confusing.
>
> It reads the blocks to the buffer, but puts them on the least recently
> used end of the LRU list, so they get aged out first.
> http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96524/c08memor.htm#8550
>
> You do run into aging each other's blocks out when you do lots of
> indexed reads.  That's when it helps to use another buffer pool.
>
> You can look at what segments are in the buffer with v$bh.
> http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96533/memory.htm#33797
>
> Table scans aren't necessarily bad.  If you really do need most of the
> table, for example.  Poke about in asktom.oracle.com for more info.
> You could make things worse going from full table scans to thrashing
> your buffers.
>
> jg
> --
> @home.com is bogus.
> http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/nation/20061101-1133-paypal-halloween-explosion.html
> 


0
jonathan5683 (1392)
11/2/2006 8:03:34 AM
"joel garry" <joel-garry@home.com> wrote in message 
news:1162417597.219001.165100@e64g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>
> Ben wrote:
>> 9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L
>>
>> I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
>> table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
>> is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
>> the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
>> getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
>> of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
>> I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
>> solve my problem though...
>>
>> I hope that wasn't too confusing.
>
> It reads the blocks to the buffer, but puts them on the least recently
> used end of the LRU list, so they get aged out first.
> http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96524/c08memor.htm#8550
>
> You do run into aging each other's blocks out when you do lots of
> indexed reads.  That's when it helps to use another buffer pool.
>
> You can look at what segments are in the buffer with v$bh.
> http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96533/memory.htm#33797
>
> Table scans aren't necessarily bad.  If you really do need most of the
> table, for example.  Poke about in asktom.oracle.com for more info.
> You could make things worse going from full table scans to thrashing
> your buffers.
>
> jg
> --
> @home.com is bogus.
> http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/nation/20061101-1133-paypal-halloween-explosion.html
> 


0
jonathan5683 (1392)
11/2/2006 8:06:20 AM
"joel garry" <joel-garry@home.com> wrote in message 
news:1162417597.219001.165100@e64g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>
> You can look at what segments are in the buffer with v$bh.
> http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96533/memory.htm#33797
>
>

That's a bad piece of SQL - it's inefficient and gives the
wrong results. I've seen several "experts" present without
attribution - I didn't realised they'd just copied it from the
manuals

SELECT o.object_name, COUNT(1) number_of_blocks
FROM DBA_OBJECTS o, V$BH bh
 WHERE o.object_id  = bh.objd
   AND o.owner     != 'SYS'
 GROUP BY o.object_name
 ORDER BY count(1);

I've stuck a couple of comments about it on my blog at:
    http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/but-its-in-the-manual/


PS Sorry about the spurious empty messages that
preceded this one.  New laptop - the keys are in
the wrong places ;)

-- 
Regards

Jonathan Lewis
http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com

Author: Cost Based Oracle: Fundamentals
http://www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk/cbo_book/ind_book.html

The Co-operative Oracle Users' FAQ
http://www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk/faq/ind_faq.html


0
jonathan5683 (1392)
11/2/2006 9:39:36 AM
"Jonathan Lewis" <jonathan@jlcomp.demon.co.uk> wrote in message 
news:Hbadncvzx99NIdTYRVnyiw@bt.com...
>
> "joel garry" <joel-garry@home.com> wrote in message 
> news:1162417597.219001.165100@e64g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>>
>> You can look at what segments are in the buffer with v$bh.
>> http://download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96533/memory.htm#33797
>>
>>
>
> That's a bad piece of SQL - it's inefficient and gives the
> wrong results. I've seen several "experts" present without
> attribution - I didn't realised they'd just copied it from the
> manuals
>


Pausing for thought - I suppose it's always possible
that the person writing the manual copied it from one
of the "experts". I wonder when it first appeared in
the manuals.


-- 
Regards

Jonathan Lewis
http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com

Author: Cost Based Oracle: Fundamentals
http://www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk/cbo_book/ind_book.html

The Co-operative Oracle Users' FAQ
http://www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk/faq/ind_faq.html



0
jonathan5683 (1392)
11/2/2006 10:19:30 AM
hpuxrac wrote:
> Ben wrote:
> > 9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L
> >
> > I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
> > table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
> > is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
> > the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
> > getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
> > of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
> > I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
> > solve my problem though...
> >
> > I hope that wasn't too confusing.
>
> As other responders have noted, full table scans do get dumped into the
> buffer cache but will tend to get flushed back out immediately
> depending on how many blocks are read in the full scans and how big the
> buffer cache is.
>
> If you set a 10046 trace and set it to level 12 you will get wait
> information that includes exactly what blocks are being read.
>
> Some long running batch process do better with full scans, it all
> depends.
>
> Cary Millsap has a good book optimizing oracle performance that might
> be of use.

Thanks for the replies, I have read several chapters of Cary Millsap's
book and have learned a great deal from it. I just skimmed the chapters
that he gets into great depth on quantative analysis and queing
analysis (those made my head hurt).
I did a 10046 trace level 8, which led me to the file reads.  Level 12
pulls the bind info, doesn't it? I can't remember.
I may have been a little misleading in my question when I mentioned
sequential reads and full table scans. There are a few sessions that
were performing table scans and a few sessions that were performing
index range scans. It looks as though there were about 5 sessions that
keep fighting for disk reads on about four datafiles.
The sql that is causing full scans is poorly written and I think that
if it was optimized this would relieve some of our headache.

0
balvey (229)
11/2/2006 12:58:05 PM
On Thu, 02 Nov 2006 09:39:36 +0000, Jonathan Lewis wrote:

> 
> I've stuck a couple of comments about it on my blog at:
>     http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/but-its-in-the-manual/

Jonathan, in the referenced page, I found the following passage:

"Efficiency

A couple of standard guidelines for writing SQL - eliminate early,
aggregate before extending.  So let’s apply them here."


I am very interested in some kind of formal guiding principles for writing
SQL. Do you have any books, articles or web pages you could recommend?

-- 
http://www.mladen-gogala.com

0
11/3/2006 3:41:27 AM
"Mladen Gogala" <mgogala.spam-me-not@verizon.net> wrote in message 
news:pan.2006.11.03.03.41.28.793996@verizon.net...
> On Thu, 02 Nov 2006 09:39:36 +0000, Jonathan Lewis wrote:
>
>>
>> I've stuck a couple of comments about it on my blog at:
>>     http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/but-its-in-the-manual/
>
> Jonathan, in the referenced page, I found the following passage:
>
> "Efficiency
>
> A couple of standard guidelines for writing SQL - eliminate early,
> aggregate before extending.  So let's apply them here."
>
>
> I am very interested in some kind of formal guiding principles for 
> writing
> SQL. Do you have any books, articles or web pages you could recommend?
>
> -- 
> http://www.mladen-gogala.com
> 


0
jonathan5683 (1392)
11/3/2006 7:34:45 AM
"Mladen Gogala" <mgogala.spam-me-not@verizon.net> wrote in message 
news:pan.2006.11.03.03.41.28.793996@verizon.net...
> On Thu, 02 Nov 2006 09:39:36 +0000, Jonathan Lewis wrote:
>
>>
>> I've stuck a couple of comments about it on my blog at:
>>     http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/but-its-in-the-manual/
>
> Jonathan, in the referenced page, I found the following passage:
>
> "Efficiency
>
> A couple of standard guidelines for writing SQL - eliminate early,
> aggregate before extending.  So let's apply them here."
>
>
> I am very interested in some kind of formal guiding principles for 
> writing
> SQL. Do you have any books, articles or web pages you could recommend?
>
> -- 
> http://www.mladen-gogala.com
>

The only work that I happen to know of is the Dan Tow
book on SQL Tuning.  The Guy Harrison book is the
classic of course, but more aimed at the details of specific
Oracle operators.

I don't agree with some of Dan Tow's "philosophical"
points, and there is a strong bias towards OLTP rather
than heavy duty DSS, but it does have a sound generic
strategy for analysing the SQL.

Alternatively, I have a one-day course on writing optimal
SQL which gets its first airing on 20th Nov in the London


-- 
Regards

Jonathan Lewis
http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com

Author: Cost Based Oracle: Fundamentals
http://www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk/cbo_book/ind_book.html

The Co-operative Oracle Users' FAQ
http://www.jlcomp.demon.co.uk/faq/ind_faq.html


0
jonathan5683 (1392)
11/3/2006 7:39:36 AM
"Mladen Gogala" <mgogala.spam-me-not@verizon.net> a �crit dans le message de news: pan.2006.11.03.03.41.28.793996@verizon.net...
| On Thu, 02 Nov 2006 09:39:36 +0000, Jonathan Lewis wrote:
|
| >
| > I've stuck a couple of comments about it on my blog at:
| >     http://jonathanlewis.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/but-its-in-the-manual/
|
| Jonathan, in the referenced page, I found the following passage:
|
| "Efficiency
|
| A couple of standard guidelines for writing SQL - eliminate early,
| aggregate before extending.  So let's apply them here."
|
|
| I am very interested in some kind of formal guiding principles for writing
| SQL. Do you have any books, articles or web pages you could recommend?
|
| -- 
| http://www.mladen-gogala.com
|

Have a look at "The Art of SQL" by St�phane Faroult.
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/artofsql/index.html
http://www.amazon.com/Art-SQL-Stephane-Faroult/dp/0596008945/sr=8-2/qid=1162540432/ref=sr_1_2/102-2411167-9090532?ie=UTF8&s=books

Regards
Michel Cadot


0
Michel
11/3/2006 8:00:48 AM
On 1 Nov 2006 13:28:20 -0800, "Ben" <balvey@comcast.net> wrote:

>9.2.0.5 Ent Ed AIX5L
>
>I've got a few long running processes that are all performing full
>table scans and they are waiting on db file % reads. When a file read
>is performed, is it reading the blocks into the buffer and then on to
>the user or does it just dump them straight out to the user?  What I'm
>getting at is, Could these table scans be aging each other's blocks out
>of the buffer and thus causing more file reads?
>I guess if I could do away with the table scans in general that would
>solve my problem though... 
>
>I hope that wasn't too confusing.
>
If, as the subject of your post suggest, you only see sequential reads
and not scattered reads (or not a lot of it), you're not doing full
table scans, your doing index range scans and table lookups from
rowid's found in indexes.

Regards, 
Jaap.
0
11/3/2006 10:12:20 PM
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