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Converting a FastCat5e network cable into a crossover cable

I tried posting this question in some other newsgroups but haven't gotten a
response, so  maybe someone here can help me.

I ran a 10Base2 home network (2 computers) for several years but recently
bought new network adapters and decided to switch over to 10BaseT at that
time.  A friend told me I could wire the PC's together directly thereby
avoiding the need for a hub. However, he neglected to tell me I would need
to use crossover cable, so I bought FastCat5e networking cable.   I couldn't
understand why my network wasn't working until I read this (or another)
newsgroup a few days ago and discovered I needed to use a crossover cable if
I wasn't using a hub.    Aggghhh!   Ok, no big deal except that now I'm a
little strapped for cash and won't be able to afford a hub and more
networking cable for a couple of weeks, and I'm really needing/wanting to
get this network running before then.

Here's my question:  Can I convert a FastCat5e network cable into a
crossover cable by removing then rewiring/replacing the RJ45 connector at
one end of the cable?

Thanks for any advice anyone can offer.

Sherri J.




0
Sherri
8/3/2003 9:28:22 PM
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> Here's my question:  Can I convert a FastCat5e network cable into a
> crossover cable by removing then rewiring/replacing the RJ45 connector 
> at
> one end of the cable?

You can, I often make crossover cables by cutting the end of a bulk 
purchased patch cable and fitting a reverse wired plug myself. Its cheaper 
to do it that way, than to buy a reel of cable\plugs and make my own. 

However your chances of wiring the new plug revered (or the normal way) 
without a crimp tool are slim. 

And if you have to buy the crimp tool to do it, its likely going to cost 
more than buying a swap over lead ready made. Or to forget the crossover 
and buy a $30 hub. 

Stuart.
0
Stuartr
8/3/2003 10:14:00 PM
Sherri & Garry January wrote:

> Here's my question:  Can I convert a FastCat5e network cable into a
> crossover cable by removing then rewiring/replacing the RJ45 connector at
> one end of the cable?

I haven't tried it, but if you lack a keystone jack and crimping tools, 
I guess it would be easiest to cut into the cable itself and cross the 
wires.  You would need soldering tools, some lengths of wire for 
jumpering, and some electrical tape.  I don't know the finer 
implications regarding impedances, echoes, transmission quality, etc.

You can find crossover cables on ebay and elsewhere for under $2 each, 
but the  shipping charges may be inhibitive.

0
Matt
8/5/2003 9:37:51 AM
On Tue, 05 Aug 2003 04:37:51 -0500, Matt <matt@themattfella.com>
wrote:

>Sherri & Garry January wrote:
>
>> Here's my question:  Can I convert a FastCat5e network cable into a
>> crossover cable by removing then rewiring/replacing the RJ45 connector at
>> one end of the cable?
>
>I haven't tried it, but if you lack a keystone jack and crimping tools, 
>I guess it would be easiest to cut into the cable itself and cross the 
>wires.  You would need soldering tools, some lengths of wire for 
>jumpering, and some electrical tape.  I don't know the finer 
>implications regarding impedances, echoes, transmission quality, etc.


Very ugly solution, bound to cause problems later.

>You can find crossover cables on ebay and elsewhere for under $2 each, 
>but the  shipping charges may be inhibitive.

Or duck into a local computer shop and see if they'll swap or
reterminate an existing cable.

-Chris

0
chris
8/7/2003 2:59:33 AM
It is not recommended to crimp patch cords in a field, straight through or
cross-over. Cords are considered the weakest link in any cabling system, and
with prices for this stuff these days, making one yourself does not make any
sense.

If you still want to make one yourself, here is the page that describes pin
layout:
http://www.cabling-design.com/references/pinouts/10-100base_t_crossover.shtml

-- 
Dmitri Abaimov
http://www.cabling-design.com
Residential Cabling Guide and other useful online resources for premises
wiring users and professionals
http://www.cabling-design.com/resources/documents/residential.html
Residential Cabling Guide 2003

"Sherri & Garry January" <slj@centurytel.net> wrote in message
news:f1fXa.3696$Jk5.3071140@feed2.centurytel.net...
> I tried posting this question in some other newsgroups but haven't gotten
a
> response, so  maybe someone here can help me.
>
> I ran a 10Base2 home network (2 computers) for several years but recently
> bought new network adapters and decided to switch over to 10BaseT at that
> time.  A friend told me I could wire the PC's together directly thereby
> avoiding the need for a hub. However, he neglected to tell me I would need
> to use crossover cable, so I bought FastCat5e networking cable.   I
couldn't
> understand why my network wasn't working until I read this (or another)
> newsgroup a few days ago and discovered I needed to use a crossover cable
if
> I wasn't using a hub.    Aggghhh!   Ok, no big deal except that now I'm a
> little strapped for cash and won't be able to afford a hub and more
> networking cable for a couple of weeks, and I'm really needing/wanting to
> get this network running before then.
>
> Here's my question:  Can I convert a FastCat5e network cable into a
> crossover cable by removing then rewiring/replacing the RJ45 connector at
> one end of the cable?
>
> Thanks for any advice anyone can offer.
>
> Sherri J.
>
>
>
>


0
D
8/7/2003 11:04:28 PM
Try Maplin. They will sell you a "converter" which is like a
tiny cable adapter which reverses the wire sequence at one
end, thus effectively making your straight cable a crossover
cable.

"Sherri & Garry January" <slj@centurytel.net> wrote in
message news:f1fXa.3696$Jk5.3071140@feed2.centurytel.net...
| I tried posting this question in some other newsgroups but
haven't gotten a
| response, so  maybe someone here can help me.
|
| I ran a 10Base2 home network (2 computers) for several
years but recently
| bought new network adapters and decided to switch over to
10BaseT at that
| time.  A friend told me I could wire the PC's together
directly thereby
| avoiding the need for a hub. However, he neglected to tell
me I would need
| to use crossover cable, so I bought FastCat5e networking
cable.   I couldn't
| understand why my network wasn't working until I read this
(or another)
| newsgroup a few days ago and discovered I needed to use a
crossover cable if
| I wasn't using a hub.    Aggghhh!   Ok, no big deal except
that now I'm a
| little strapped for cash and won't be able to afford a hub
and more
| networking cable for a couple of weeks, and I'm really
needing/wanting to
| get this network running before then.
|
| Here's my question:  Can I convert a FastCat5e network
cable into a
| crossover cable by removing then rewiring/replacing the
RJ45 connector at
| one end of the cable?
|
| Thanks for any advice anyone can offer.
|
| Sherri J.
|
|
|
|


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0
Bob
8/14/2003 7:39:36 PM
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