f



route 0.0.0.0 twice

Hi,

I some doubts question regarding a Cisco config.

In the config I can see the following two lines:

ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.1
ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.2

I know that these addresses are active in two interfaces. We had a 2Mbit
connection that was upgraded to 4 Mbit. Our ISP told us to add the routes
and that with those two routes we would be able to use the two links as one.
Is this true with Cisco's CEF?

My question is:
 1. what's the route selected by the packets?


Thanks,

NC


0
Nuno
7/22/2003 8:16:07 AM
comp.dcom.sys.cisco 25313 articles. 0 followers. Post Follow

3 Replies
1161 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 31

Nuno Cristelo wrote:
> Hi,
> 
> I some doubts question regarding a Cisco config.
> 
> In the config I can see the following two lines:
> 
> ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.1
> ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.2
> 
> I know that these addresses are active in two interfaces. We had a 2Mbit
> connection that was upgraded to 4 Mbit. Our ISP told us to add the routes
> and that with those two routes we would be able to use the two links as one.
> Is this true with Cisco's CEF?
> 
> My question is:
>  1. what's the route selected by the packets?

Do a "show IP route" and see what the metrics assigned to
the two default-routes come out as. If they are defaulting
to identical values, then in the absence of any other
instructions, it should load-balance outbound packets
across the two interfaces.

[note I say "should", as there is always the possibility
that the routing-metrics are actually being defined by
a dynamic routing-protocol as well as the above route-
statements, in which case you need to see what the
actual metrics are once the static and dynamic routes
are aggregated].

0
PJML
7/22/2003 9:32:06 AM
Note that in order to have an effective load-balancing, you *must* disable
"route-cache" and "ip route-cache" on both interfaces!

-- 

"PJML" <pjml@nerc.ac.uk.loopback> a �crit dans le message de
news:3f1d0497$1@news.nwl.ac.uk...
> Nuno Cristelo wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > I some doubts question regarding a Cisco config.
> >
> > In the config I can see the following two lines:
> >
> > ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.1
> > ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.2
> >
> > I know that these addresses are active in two interfaces. We had a 2Mbit
> > connection that was upgraded to 4 Mbit. Our ISP told us to add the
routes
> > and that with those two routes we would be able to use the two links as
one.
> > Is this true with Cisco's CEF?
> >
> > My question is:
> >  1. what's the route selected by the packets?
>
> Do a "show IP route" and see what the metrics assigned to
> the two default-routes come out as. If they are defaulting
> to identical values, then in the absence of any other
> instructions, it should load-balance outbound packets
> across the two interfaces.
>
> [note I say "should", as there is always the possibility
> that the routing-metrics are actually being defined by
> a dynamic routing-protocol as well as the above route-
> statements, in which case you need to see what the
> actual metrics are once the static and dynamic routes
> are aggregated].
>


0
SkyFoxXP
7/22/2003 3:19:02 PM
In article <bfjkkk$14lb$1@news5.isdnet.net>, nospamplease@altern.org 
says...
> Note that in order to have an effective load-balancing, you *must* disable
> "route-cache" and "ip route-cache" on both interfaces!

Unless you use CEF per-packet load balancing.

-- 

hsb

"Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding"  Calvin
***************  USE ROT13 TO SEE MY EMAIL ADDRESS  ****************
********************************************************************
Due to the volume of email that I receive, I may not not be able to
reply to emails sent to my account.  Please post a followup instead.
********************************************************************
0
Hansang
7/22/2003 8:11:56 PM
Reply: