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[Telecom] Cell phone text message spam

I received a spam text message on my cell phone.  (I did not open it).
I called the carrier who said they'd waive the message fee.  But do
they do anything to trace such messages back and put a stop to them?
They didn't seem to care.

They offered to put a block on receiving text messages.  As it
happens, I don't do any texting at all, but I'm not sure I want to
deny myself a feature in case I would want or need to use it in the
future.

Are unsolicited text messages to a cell phone illegal?  Isn't that
like sales calls to a cellphone which are illegal?

Could anyone who is knowledgeable explain spam texting rules ?
Thanks!

0
hancock4
1/2/2008 3:54:24 AM
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hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:

> I received a spam text message on my cell phone.  (I did not open it).
> I called the carrier who said they'd waive the message fee.  But do
> they do anything to trace such messages back and put a stop to them?
> They didn't seem to care.
> 
> They offered to put a block on receiving text messages.  As it
> happens, I don't do any texting at all, but I'm not sure I want to
> deny myself a feature in case I would want or need to use it in the
> future.
> 
> Are unsolicited text messages to a cell phone illegal?  Isn't that
> like sales calls to a cellphone which are illegal?
> 
> Could anyone who is knowledgeable explain spam texting rules ?
> Thanks!
> 

It's the new Spam of 2008.  My wife and I have already blocked our cell 
phones.  We are old-fashioned folks; we just make and receive voice 
calls with voice mail for backup.

0
Sam
1/2/2008 2:21:12 PM
Sam Spade <sam@coldmail.com> wrote:

> It's the new Spam of 2008.


This is a good argument foir 'caller pays', such as we have here in
Europe.

Until / unless we get swamped with junk-texts, they won't be any more
troublesome to delete than the occasional junk-email that gets through
the spam filters.

cheers,

Henry

0
henry999
1/3/2008 3:43:05 PM
On Thu, 3 Jan 2008, Henry posted:
> This is a good argument foir 'caller pays', such as we have here in
> Europe.

I get more spam on my European cell phone service than on my US or 
Canadian services.

Since many (not all) North American customers pay for incoming SMS, SMS 
spam is illegal (this doesn't include your own carrier spamming you with a 
"free SMS") here.

Unlike European carriers, North American carriers have STRONG motivation 
to be aggressive in stopping SMS spam.  Some European carriers (e.g., 
Vodafone) are active in anti-spam efforts, but they have a bit of a 
conflict of interest because they are getting paid by the spammers to 
deliver the spam.

North American consumers are not all shy about calling their carrier and 
turning off SMS entirely, or at least getting the charge for the spam 
taken off their bill.  The cost to the carrier to deal with these requests 
greatly outweighs any profit from delivering the spam (not to mention the 
loss of revenue when the customer disables SMS).

The other side of the coin is that free email/SMS gateways (and services 
to give you free weather, news, etc. alerts) are still the rule in North 
America.  This presents a challenge to the carriers, as delivery of free 
alerts look a lot like a spam run ("it's pink, but it's ham instead of 
spam").  The carriers have long ago blocked bulk email from entities not 
known to be be free alert carriers.

On Verizon, and perhaps other carriers, it is possible to change your 
email address at the gateway from your phone number to something else. 
This prevents getting hit by spam runs that send to random phone numbers.

-- Mark --

http://panda.com/mrc
Democracy is two wolves and a sheep deciding what to eat for lunch.
Liberty is a well-armed sheep contesting the vote.

0
Mark
1/4/2008 1:54:12 AM
In article <1ia57xl.hw2idazc2ymnN%henry999@eircom.net>, henry999
@eircom.net says...
> Sam Spade <sam@coldmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > It's the new Spam of 2008.
> 
> 
> This is a good argument foir 'caller pays', such as we have here in
> Europe.
> 
> Until / unless we get swamped with junk-texts, they won't be any more
> troublesome to delete than the occasional junk-email that gets through
> the spam filters.
> 
> cheers,
> 
> Henry
> 
> 

Oh it's coming. I'd love to see caller pays in the U.S. That would make 
it worth having a cell phone because it would cut down on the bull#$%^
calls.  

0
T
1/4/2008 1:55:18 AM
>> It's the new Spam of 2008.

Junk textx have been around for a while; there's case law suggesting that 
they're illegal under the TCPA.

>
> This is a good argument foir 'caller pays', such as we have here in
> Europe.
>
> Until / unless we get swamped with junk-texts

What rock have you been living under?  The only reason you're not swamped 
with junk texts is that European mobile carriers filter like crazy against 
bulk text sources.  There's zillions of ways to sneak SMS into the system 
without paying retail prices.

0
John
1/4/2008 10:16:53 PM
Mark Crispin wrote:
> On Thu, 3 Jan 2008, Henry posted:
>> This is a good argument foir 'caller pays', such as we have here in
>> Europe.
> 
> I get more spam on my European cell phone service than on my US or 
> Canadian services.
> 
> Since many (not all) North American customers pay for incoming SMS, SMS 
> spam is illegal (this doesn't include your own carrier spamming you with 
> a "free SMS") here.
> 
> Unlike European carriers, North American carriers have STRONG motivation 
> to be aggressive in stopping SMS spam.  Some European carriers (e.g., 
> Vodafone) are active in anti-spam efforts, but they have a bit of a 
> conflict of interest because they are getting paid by the spammers to 
> deliver the spam.
> 
> North American consumers are not all shy about calling their carrier and 
> turning off SMS entirely, or at least getting the charge for the spam 
> taken off their bill.  The cost to the carrier to deal with these 
> requests greatly outweighs any profit from delivering the spam (not to 
> mention the loss of revenue when the customer disables SMS).
> 
> The other side of the coin is that free email/SMS gateways (and services 
> to give you free weather, news, etc. alerts) are still the rule in North 
> America.  This presents a challenge to the carriers, as delivery of free 
> alerts look a lot like a spam run ("it's pink, but it's ham instead of 
> spam").  The carriers have long ago blocked bulk email from entities not 
> known to be be free alert carriers.
> 
> On Verizon, and perhaps other carriers, it is possible to change your 
> email address at the gateway from your phone number to something else. 
> This prevents getting hit by spam runs that send to random phone numbers.
> 
> -- Mark --
> 
> http://panda.com/mrc
> Democracy is two wolves and a sheep deciding what to eat for lunch.
> Liberty is a well-armed sheep contesting the vote.
> 
I get very little spam on my phone, Srint allows you to set your user 
name on each phone that then becomes the same on your e-mail address.  I 
change min a while back because a friend of mine put my e-mail address 
on his long e-mail jokes he would send out, I have unlimited data on my 
plan so it does not matter to me.

-- 
The Only Good Spammer is a Dead one!! Have you hunted one down today? 
(c) 2007  I Kill Spammers, Inc. A Rot In Hell Co.

0
Steven
1/4/2008 10:17:43 PM
T wrote:
> Oh it's coming. 

More like its already come and gone...at least in the U.S.

Almost twenty years ago, a study showed 70% of U.S.callers
would not place a call to a cellphone if they had to pay.

AT&T tried to float the idea twenty years ago. The fact that
you don't see it now shows its not going to happen.

Likewise with the Metro Mobile CTS project in Phoenix in 1986
with a one percent higher churn rate that normal cellular users.



0
DTC
1/4/2008 10:18:37 PM
On Jan 4, 5:17=A0pm, Steven Lichter <diespamm...@ikillspammers.com>
wrote:

> change min a while back because a friend of mine put my e-mail address
> on his long e-mail jokes he would send out ...

I do not allow my email correspondants to use my address for any group
mailing purposes.  I don't want my mailbox cluttered up with stupid
jokes, videos, political propaganda, etc.  I think it helps keep away
spam.

0
hancock4
1/5/2008 6:37:13 PM
> More like its already come and gone...at least in the U.S.

Americans expect free local calls.  If you think you are so important that 
people will pay to call your mobile phone, you're wrong.  (If you 
disagree, get yourself a 900 number.)

As has been noted many, many, many times here before, since North American 
mobile subscribers care about the costs of all of their calls rather than 
just outbound calls, North American mobile carriers compete on actual 
price and the mobile calls in the US and Canada cost about half what they 
cost other places.

Regards,
John Levine, johnl@iecc.com, Primary Perpetrator of "The Internet for Dummies",
Information Superhighwayman wanna-be, http://www.johnlevine.com, ex-Mayor
"More Wiener schnitzel, please", said Tom, revealingly.

0
John
1/5/2008 6:58:06 PM
DTC wrote:
> T wrote:
>> Oh it's coming. 
> 
> More like its already come and gone...at least in the U.S.
> 
> Almost twenty years ago, a study showed 70% of U.S.callers
> would not place a call to a cellphone if they had to pay.
> 
> AT&T tried to float the idea twenty years ago. The fact that
> you don't see it now shows its not going to happen.
> 
> Likewise with the Metro Mobile CTS project in Phoenix in 1986
> with a one percent higher churn rate that normal cellular users.
> 
> 
> 
In some cases the caller does pay for the call.  I had a phone that had 
an out of area number so anyone that called it had to pay at least the 
Toll Charges.

-- 
The Only Good Spammer is a Dead one!! Have you hunted one down today? 
(c) 2007  I Kill Spammers, Inc. A Rot In Hell Co.

0
Steven
1/5/2008 6:59:19 PM
John L <johnl@iecc.com> wrote:

> The only reason you're not swamped 
> with junk texts is that European mobile carriers filter like crazy against
> bulk text sources.

Well, it's working then, isn't it?

cheers,

Henry

0
henry999
1/5/2008 6:59:46 PM
Steven Lichter wrote:
> In some cases the caller does pay for the call.  I had a phone that had 
> an out of area number so anyone that called it had to pay at least the 
> Toll Charges.

Well..true, everyone knows that a long distance call is extra. but
that's really not along the same line of thought of CPP.

0
DTC
1/6/2008 1:57:48 AM
DTC wrote:
> Steven Lichter wrote:
>> In some cases the caller does pay for the call.  I had a phone that 
>> had an out of area number so anyone that called it had to pay at least 
>> the Toll Charges.
> 
> Well..true, everyone knows that a long distance call is extra.

Eh?  What century are you from?  A LOT of us have unlimited LD and 
unlimited Local. Some call it "VoIP."


> but
> that's really not along the same line of thought of CPP.
> 

0
Rick
1/6/2008 6:20:36 AM
Rick Merrill wrote:
> DTC wrote:
>> Steven Lichter wrote:
>>> In some cases the caller does pay for the call.  I had a phone that 
>>> had an out of area number so anyone that called it had to pay at 
>>> least the Toll Charges.
>>
>> Well..true, everyone knows that a long distance call is extra.
> 
> Eh?  What century are you from?  A LOT of us have unlimited LD and 
> unlimited Local. Some call it "VoIP."

Well, that was meant in the sense that you know its a billable LD call

On the other hand, I don't think consumer grade VoIP is that reliable
in the sense of consistent call quality compared to a hard wired call.

And to be honest..with the unlimited long distance plans that telcos
are offering now for prices less than a paid subscription service
(better QOS than free services), I can't see commercial VoIP providers
successfully competing in the intra and inter state market. They might
fair better with international calling, but THEN you have the problems
with state owned telcos that block competitive VoIP.
10 ISPs and countries known to have blocked VoIP:
http://tinyurl.com/2ms7d8

0
DTC
1/6/2008 8:09:20 PM
DTC wrote:
> Rick Merrill wrote:
>> DTC wrote:
>>> Steven Lichter wrote:
>>>> In some cases the caller does pay for the call.  I had a phone that 
>>>> had an out of area number so anyone that called it had to pay at 
>>>> least the Toll Charges.
>>>
>>> Well..true, everyone knows that a long distance call is extra.
>>
>> Eh?  What century are you from?  A LOT of us have unlimited LD and 
>> unlimited Local. Some call it "VoIP."
> 
> Well, that was meant in the sense that you know its a billable LD call
> 
> On the other hand, I don't think consumer grade VoIP is that reliable
> in the sense of consistent call quality compared to a hard wired call.
> 
> And to be honest..with the unlimited long distance plans that telcos
> are offering now for prices less than a paid subscription service
> (better QOS than free services), I can't see commercial VoIP providers
> successfully competing in the intra and inter state market. They might
> fair better with international calling, but THEN you have the problems
> with state owned telcos that block competitive VoIP.
> 10 ISPs and countries known to have blocked VoIP:
> http://tinyurl.com/2ms7d8
> 

Well, there is really no difference of "grade" between business and 
consumer Once the packets get on the internet.

Yes, everything has startup problems, but clarity and reliability are as 
good as they could be. (VoIP depends on cable; phone units need UPS)

Best feature is that phone messages are kept on the suppliers computer, 
not on my answering machine.

QoS is normally governed by the Telephone Adapter.

0
Rick
1/7/2008 11:27:56 PM
Reply:

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[FTC press release] In eight different complaints filed in courts around the United States, the FTC charged 29 defendants with collectively sending more than 180 million unwanted text messages to consumers, many of whom had to pay for receiving the texts. The messages promised consumers free gifts or prizes, including gift cards worth $1,000 to major retailers such as Best Buy, Walmart and Target. Consumers who clicked on the links in the messages found themselves caught in a confusing and elaborate process that required them to provide sensitive personal information, apply for credit or pay to subscribe to services to get the supposedly "free" cards. ====== http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2013/03/textmessages.shtm - A question for our SMS mavens. Per the NY Times article [a]: "Spam waves have become much more frequent since phone companies began offering unlimited text-messaging plans. Now, spammers buy hundreds of SIM cards, the chips that make cellphones work, allowing them to send a flood of messages and then abandon the phone numbers." [a] https://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/08/business/government-takes-legal-action-over-phone-spam.html - I'm wondering about that for a couple of reasons. First is that you'd (the spammer, that is) still have to type in each msg into the phone. That kind of limits it to a hundred or so per hour. - Now that's a big number, but it ain't a BIG number. Are the...

Texting (and cell phone usage) while driving movie: the consequences [Telecom]
I wish there was a way to force all the [motorists] who use cell phones and/or text while driving to view this [Public Service Announcement]: <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ttNgZDZruI> [4 minutes 12 seconds] Yes, it's brutal, and so are vehicular collisions and deaths caused by distracted drivers. ***** Moderator's Note ***** Although the results may differ in the U.K. or in other countries, ISTR that in the U.S., experience has shown that horrifying video images don't have the intended result. I'll defer to other readers to confirm or deny. In any case, please remember that the video was not a documentary of actual events: it is a work of fiction, and was professionally produced as a Public Service Announcement. It was intended to frighten young drivers with the hope of reducing traffic accidents, and it should be viewed in that light. Bill Horne On 8/26/2009 4:59 PM, Thad Floryan wrote: > I wish there was a way to force all the [motorists] who use cell > phones and/or text while driving to view this [Public Service > Announcement]: Bill (the moderator): thank you for 2 things. Cleaning up my original words and reducing them to "[motorists]", and clarifying what PSA means. I had no idea what was meant by PSA upon seeing it in Silicon Valley's "Road Show Report" today at URL: <http://www.mercurynews.com/mrroadshow/> > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ttNgZDZruI&...

funny telecom cartoon (telecom) [telecom]
For a bit of telecom humor, see: http://www.gocomics.com/offthemark/2014/02/18 -- Rich Greenberg Sarasota, FL, USA richgr atsign panix.com + 1 941 378 2097 Eastern time. N6LRT I speak for myself & my dogs only. VM'er since CP-67 Canines: Val,Red,Shasta,Zero,Casey & Cinnar (At the bridge) Owner:Chinook-L Canines: Red & Max (Siberians) Retired at the beach Asst Owner:Sibernet-L ...

Penalty for driving while texting in Long Island-a disabled cell phone [telecom]
Penalty for driving while texting in Long Island-a disabled cell phone New York prosecutor says driving while texting is as dangerous as drunk driving. by David Kravets Sept 9 2014 Ars Technica Motorists popped for texting-while-driving violations in Long Island could be mandated to temporarily disable their mobile phones the next time they take to the road. That's according to Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice, who says she is moving to mandate that either hardware be installed or apps be activated that disable the mobile phone while behind the wheel. The di...

news report on cell phone spam
A local TV news report discussed the problem of spam texts and phone calls to cell phones, where the callee often has to pay for them. Many people interviewed resented the intrusion of such calls and texts and their cost. The news report said "it's hard for [users] to stop this on cell phones". (I don't know if that's true) They quoted the carriers as saying they will credit customers for such calls upon request. (Not mentioned was how difficult it sometimes can be to reach a carrier's customer service to get such a credit.) For myself, after receiving and billed for several unsolicited spam messages I had my carrier turn off texting, a feature I don't use. I can't help but wonder if the carriers and telephone network administrators could do more to stop spam and illegal solicitation calls. (It's also illegal to call a nursing home resident, but sales people would call my mother.) [public replies, please] On Oct 4, 6:18 pm, HAncock4 <withh...@invalid.telecom-digest.org> wrote: > The news report said "it's hard for [users] to stop this on cell > phones". (I don't know if that's true) They quoted the carriers as > saying they will credit customers for such calls upon request. For my part, I just keep a zero balance on a Virgin Mobile phone, and when my "minute pack" runs out, I add just enough money to buy another one. No money, no text messages. Bil...

Re: [telecom] When Texting Is Wrong [Telecom]
In a message dated 7/18/2009 9:44:10 AM Central Daylight Time, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes: > My feeling is that automation must make things better for the customer > than they were before. The usual result nowadays is that it is done to make things better for the company, not the customer. -- Wes Leatherock wesrock@aol.com wleathus@yahoo.com ...

Death of the text? Mobile phone users turn to free instant messaging as electronic communication of choice [telecom]
Mobile text messaging could become extinct within a generation as millions of young people turn to other forms of electronic communication. Teenagers are increasingly using instant messaging from mobile phones and social networking sites such as Facebook. Experts predict the amount of texts sent in the UK will drop by 20 per cent in the next two years. It comes as teenagers and students are increasingly using BlackBerrys instead of iPhones and other smartphones because the device has a free BBM messenger. Read more here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1380388/Death-text-Mobile-phone-users-turn-free-instant-messaging-electronic-communication-choice.html Submitters note: Blackberry? Really? On Mon, 25 Apr 2011 10:18:12 -0500, John Mayson wrote: > Mobile text messaging could become extinct within a generation as > millions of young people turn to other forms of electronic > communication. ........... > It comes as teenagers and students are increasingly using BlackBerrys > instead of iPhones and other smartphones because the device has a free > BBM messenger. > > > Read more here: > http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1380388/Death-text-Mobile-phone-users-turn-free-instant-messaging-electronic-communication-choice.html > > Submitters note: Blackberry? Really? Exactly, and if you are going to rely on any Smartphone there is also this free (almost instant) messaging s...

[telecom] Need some guidance on telecom easements [Telecom]
> ***** Moderator's Note ***** > > IANAL, and you need a good one, experienced in both easements and > tower leases. Don't go to the local guy: this is an area where new > precedents are being set almost daily, as cell towers and cellular > infrastructure pop up at every streetcorner. You need a firm that > does this all the time. > > You can start by getting some facts by yourself: > > 1. What frequencies will the transmitter(s) operator on? > 2. What company will hold the FCC license? > 3. What are the authorized emission types? > 4. Would the easement allow them to add more transmitters in the future? > 5. Does the easement allow them to heighten the pole or substitute a > tower? > 6. Does the easement allow them to erect new buildings? > > The specific answer are important, but the meta-message is critical: > if you get evasiveness and double-talk, techno-babble, or bureacratic > buck-passing, STOP the process and call in the cavalry. Tell your > attorney to put safeguards into the lease that prevent the > communications carrier from putting a wireless central office on top > of that pole. > > Most importantly, don't let them rush you: if ANYONE threatens to move > the equipment and get a lease elsewhere, tell them "Go ahead!". The > fact that your land was sought-after as a tower site means it's fit > for use as a cellular (or o...

Re: The Telecom Digest (1 messages) [TELECOM]
> Per T: >>> It's not going to happen. Most phone services allow call-block now. And >>> on my phone I use Blacklist for Android - MetroPCS wants to charge me a >>> buck a month for phone block. A $2 app does it forever and I don't need >>> to pay MetroPCS for the privilege. >> But don't Call-Block services depend on a blacklist? If so, who >> maintains the blacklist? >> >> What data does the Android app work from? Does it just block >> anything where the calling number is not in your phonebook? > No, you can tell the Blacklist application what numbers to block. I > quite like it as when you want to add it'll go into the phone call log > and let you choose a number. > There is a similar program for Blackberry, I use iBlocker Pro on mine. It will reject calls (either dump straight to voicemail or auto-answer and hang up on the call) and reply to texts from blocked numbers too with your own "custom" message. ...

[telecom] Manual and Magneto Phone Systems [Telecom]
On Friday, August 15, 2008 8:40 AM "Anthony Bellanga" <anthonybellanga@gonetoearth.com> wrote: > Regarding Lisa Hancock's inquiry about manual and magneto systems: > > Just because a system used *MAGNETO RINGING* does NOT necessarily > mean that all phones had *LOCAL BATTERY* for *TALKING*. > > And just because a system had *COMMON BATTERY* for powering *TALKING* > does NOT necessarily mean that all phones had centralized ringing > machines! > > Power for ringing is (usually) Alternating Current; > power for the talk circuit is Direct current. The classifications of central offices in those days were "magneto," which was understood to mean magneto signalling, local talk battery, and "common battery," which was understood to mean common talk and supervisory battery and machine ringing. This was the usual teleco usage as applied to central offices. The central office had machine ringing whether it was magneto or common battery*. A very significant part of common battery operation is the supevision that was inherent. Local batteries would have been incompatible with the supervisory functions. The same battery was used for both talk and supervision. But there indeed might be some magneto lines in a common battery exchange. That was particularly true in earlier days when rural magneto lines (usually one conductor and ground) were served from a comm...

Re: The Telecom Digest (16 messages) [telecom]
Sat, 25 Sep 2010 23:23:21 -0400 Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com> noted the article: <<Smartphones encourage mobile user churn Owners of high end handsets are the least loyal, bad news for AT&T CAROLINE GABRIEL Published: 22 September, 2010 High end smartphones not only bring operators' networks crashing down with their high rates of data consumption, but they breed fickle consumers who will worsen churn levels, especially as users get more hostile to two-year contract lock-ins. The downside of the smartphone boom is highlighted in a survey by Nokia Siemens, which found that users of high end handsets are the least likely to stay with their carrier.>> Further on into the article it states: <<Before smartphones, the main driver of customer loyalty was network coverage and signal strength. Now the device is the main factor for customers choosing a carrier, and applications and services play a major role in keeping them loyal, both to the device and the network.>> In my opinion anyone who switches their carrier simply for a device no matter how "wow" the device is a little not too smart. Many people have stated many times that AT&T's network is inferior to Verizon's but I know plenty of people who now have regular non jailbroken iPhones who I assume are on the AT&T network and have abandoned their previous network. If you have a device that can't perform because the netwo...

John's Phone | The World's Simplest Cell Phone [telecom]
Yep, it has no display and the Address Book is a pad and paper! http://www.johnsphones.com/ Now that's retro! -- Regards, David. David Clayton Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Knowledge is a measure of how many answers you have, intelligence is a measure of how many questions you have. On Sat, Mar 26, 2011 at 6:56 PM, David Clayton <dcstar@myrealbox.com> wrote: > Yep, it has no display and the Address Book is a pad and paper! > > http://www.johnsphones.com/ > > Now that's retro! Does anyone else besides me strangely want one? I'm ...

Phone calls or text [telecom]
David Mitchell's Soapbox: Phone calls - video http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/video/2011/may/26/david-mitchell-soap-box-phone-calls-video?CMP=twt_gu (Alternative short form for the above link) http://goo.gl/2Ffrm On Sun, 2011-11-20 at 09:03 -0800, Joseph Singer wrote: > David Mitchell's Soapbox: Phone calls - video > > http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/video/2011/may/26/david-mitchell-soap -box-phone-calls-video?CMP=twt_gu > > (Alternative short form for the above link) > http://goo.gl/2Ffrm Oh, finally, someone on utube that I agree with. I'm going to start putting my own videos out there. Bill (Remove QRM from email address to write to me directly) ...

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