f



Re: [Telecom] Cell phone text message spam

Thu, 03 Jan 2008 18:07:11 -0800 Steven Lichter wrote:

<<I get very little spam on my phone, Srint allows you to set your user

name on each phone that then becomes the same on your e-mail address.
  I 
change min a while back because a friend of mine put my e-mail address 
on his long e-mail jokes he would send out, I have unlimited data on my
plan so it does not matter to me.>>

This does nothing for text message spam that is phone number to phone
number.

We're happy that you wish to subscribe to an unlimited data, but most
of us do not bother with it nor do we wish to subscribe to such plans
since we want our phones for using as phones and occasional text
messages.  


      ____________________________________________________________________________________
Looking for last minute shopping deals?  
Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.  http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping

0
Mr
1/6/2008 6:20:11 AM
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Mr Joseph Singer wrote:
> Thu, 03 Jan 2008 18:07:11 -0800 Steven Lichter wrote:
> 
> <<I get very little spam on my phone, Srint allows you to set your user
> 
> name on each phone that then becomes the same on your e-mail address.
>   I 
> change min a while back because a friend of mine put my e-mail address 
> on his long e-mail jokes he would send out, I have unlimited data on my
> plan so it does not matter to me.>>
> 
> This does nothing for text message spam that is phone number to phone
> number.
> 
> We're happy that you wish to subscribe to an unlimited data, but most
> of us do not bother with it nor do we wish to subscribe to such plans
> since we want our phones for using as phones and occasional text
> messages.  
> 
> 
>       ____________________________________________________________________________________
> Looking for last minute shopping deals?  
> Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.  http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
> 
Mine is set to that type of plan since I'm on the road most of the time 
and use the phone attached to my computer to connect to work when I 
can't get any other way to get on the net.

-- 
The Only Good Spammer is a Dead one!! Have you hunted one down today? 
(c) 2007  I Kill Spammers, Inc. A Rot In Hell Co.

0
Steven
1/6/2008 3:59:15 PM
Reply:

Similar Artilces:

Re: [telecom] Re: TELECOM Re: Analog cell phone equipment
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[Telecom] Cell phone text message spam
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Re: [telecom] Cell-phone generation increasingly disconnected [Telecom]
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Cell phone texting spam--article [telecom]
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Re: [telecom] Cell-phone generation increasingly disconnected [Telecom] #2
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Re: [telecom] Texting May Be Taking a Toll [Telecom]
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Re: [telecom] Texting May Be Taking a Toll [Telecom] #2
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[TELECOM] Re: TELECOM Re: Wireless and 911.
-------------------------------1188482645 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit In a message dated 29 Aug 2007 14:50:20 -0700, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes: > So I assume all land line phones now support 911. Some places took a > while to go over to it. It's challenging because phoneco exchange > boundaries often don't match public service boundaries. Further, > local fire/police/resuce each may have their own service boundaries. > (In my town the police is very local but the fire is regiona...

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Telecom Re: Analog Cell Phones
This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C7FEC6.0963DEB2 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable The alarm industry still makes use of AMPS cell phone systems for connectivity from their client's premises. In March 2006 an Alarm Industry Communications Committee petitioned the FCC to extend the AMPS "sunset" date by two years to February 2010. They asserted that there were more than a million analog alarm radios and they say that there just isn't enough time to change all of them out by February 2008. Never mind that they have already had several years to change their equipment. One of my "mottos" is: Lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part. =20 The last I heard the FCC is sticking with 18 February 2008. Do any Digest readers have more recent information? I would like to know, since my class session on cell phones is coming up soon. =20 Regards. =20 Charles G. Gray Senior Lecturer, Telecommunications Oklahoma State University - Tulsa (918) 594-8433 =20 =20 =20 ------_=_NextPart_001_01C7FEC6.0963DEB2 Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable <html xmlns:v=3D"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" = xmlns:o=3D"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" = xmlns:w=3D"urn:schemas-microso...

Re: [telecom] Cell phones and towers
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Re: [telecom] size a major consideration in mobile phone sets [Telecom]
In a message dated 4/29/2009 4:43:39 PM Central Daylight Time, bonomi@host122.r-bonomi.com writes: > I know from personal experience with an old analog "bag phone" (a > Motorola), mag-mount whip on the middle of the vehicle roof gave me > a _lot_ more range than the rubber-duckie on the back of the brick. > e.g. I had service out in the "middle of nowhere" in th Rockies, > some 17+ miles off the nearest paved road, in BLM wastelands. I once used an analog Nokia phone on the road from Limon to Caslet Rock (a two-lane cutoff) through pretty rugged country in a heavy rainstorm and got through OK. No external antenna. The bill showed the service was from Burlington, Colorado, (just past the Kansas state line) a lot more than 17 miles. Wes Leatherock wesrock@aol.com wleathus@yahoo.com ...

[telecom] Re: Analog cell phone equipment
20 Sep 2007 11:51:42 -0700 hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote: <<*Battery life in my new digital phone doesn't seem so good. In one cycle, I had the phone only when I made calls on it. I made three 20 minute calls and that exhausted the battery (total 60 minutes of talk time). I thought a modern battery would do better. It seems that other people get more usage out of their phones, plus they leave them on 24/7. Perhaps I should complain to Verizon? It's hard to judge battery life since normally standby time is mixed in.>> That's the nature of CDMA which is what Verizon and Sprint use. CDMA is very "tower" intensive and is constantly communicating with the system to see if there's any traffic for you. "TDMA" (IS-136) and GSM are not always trying to communicate with the tower so they are much better with battery life. I had three models that were similar only one was for CDMA, one for TDMA "IS-136" and one for GSM. The CDMA phone just on standby could only go for a day and a half before you'd get the low battery signal. The GSM and IS-136 units were good on standby for over a week. I leave my phone on for weeks recharging when necessary only every few days. ____________________________________________________________________________________ Be a better Globetrotter. Get better travel answers from someone who knows. Yahoo! Answers - Check it out. http://answers.yahoo.com/dir...

[telecom] cell phone query re: Cuba
There's a political/criminal case going on in Cuba right now where a US citizen, Alan Gross, is charged with some pretty scary (in regards to potential punishment) crimes against the State. Basically they're accusing him of working for an arm of the US gov't to encourage rebellion. Leaving aside all the politics there's a point I'm having trouble understanding. One claim is that he was distributing cell phones to the community there. Anyone know how that could possibly work? There's no way a handheld cell phone would reach any "Western" (as in US or carribean island) towers. And even if they were frequency and format compatable with whatever Cuba's using, they'd need to have accounts established with the carrier. Any ideas? Thanks _____________________________________________________ Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key dannyb@panix.com [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded] >One claim is that he was distributing cell phones to >the community there. > >Anyone know how that could possibly work? Cuba has normal GSM phone service, which (in theory) anyone can use who has enough hard currency to pay for it: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03/28/cuba_mobile_phones/ R's, John In article <Pine.NEB.4.64.1103100159260.18209@panix5.panix.com>, danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote: >There's a political/c...

Cell phones: more texting, less talking? [telecom]
On the commuter train on Saturday I noticed it was quieter than usual. Typically on a weekend many passengers, especially the younger ones, are yakking away on their cell phones making the train rather noisy. (That's why some railroads have introduced "quiet cars", though not on weekends). Anyway, I did notice a number of passengers 'thumbing away', that is, apparently sending and receiving text messages. I understand text message traffic has gone up, which the cell carriers love because texting uses less bandwidth capacity than a voice call does, but they charge more for it. One needs to pay extra to get unlimited texting. Otherwise, as many parents found out the hard way, texting is expensive. Has text message traffic overcame voice message traffic? Could someone expand on today's cell phone traffic mix? Thanks. [public replies, please] HAncock4 wrote: > Has text message traffic overcame voice message traffic? Could > someone expand on today's cell phone traffic mix? Thanks. A quick Google tells me that a GSM 'half-rate' codec requires 6.5 kbit/sec; a 140 character message is 1120 bits of payload and the average text length is probably much less than 140 characters so it would take several texts per second - which is how many texting users? - to equal the bandwidth consumption of a single voice call. So I'm betting that voice still accounts for the vast majority of the bits m...

Re: Cell Phone Clock Inaccuracy [Telecom]
Fri, 16 Jan 2009 13:29:28 -0600 Frank Stearns <franks.pacifier.com@pacifier.net> wrote: <<Summary: why doesn't a cell phone show the correct time of day?>> << And all this time I thought cell phones were networked-synched for their time-of-day displays. That ended on Christmas eve day, when I temporarily lost my phone, decided to get a replacement (another Samsung) and discovered that its clock was 4-6 minutes slow. The T-mobile store people assured me this "happened all the time" -- some clocks were on, others were off. "That doesn't make any sense," I said. They shrugged. My old phone was found and returned a few days later. I disliked the new phone for many reasons besides the slow clock, so I took it back, reactivated my old phone. And now it too was 4-6 minutes slow. I can travel to different areas and compare my phone to others' with the same carrier. They're on, I'm off. I can manually set the clock in the phone, but within a few moments it is updated back to the wrong time. I went back to the store, checked maybe 18 display phones. Three were running 4-6 minutes slow, two were more than five hours off, the others were accurate, far as I could tell. So now I'm trying to understand just how this is happening, assuming a network time sync signal, and moreover, how it ...

Re: cell-phone phishing? (UNCLASSIFIED)[Telecom]
This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C91804.55951946 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Classification: UNCLASSIFIED=20 Caveats: NONE =20 I assume it's not an actual debt of YOURS. I don't have a cell phone, but an answering service which picks up my listed telephone numbers got a few calls from what turned out to be a collection agency, and I found out the name they were looking for (my last name but a different first name) and had to call back and say there is no such person here. =20 Classification: UNCLASSIFIED=20 Caveats: NONE ------_=_NextPart_001_01C91804.55951946 Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD> <META HTTP-EQUIV=3D"Content-Type" CONTENT=3D"text/html; = charset=3Dus-ascii"> <META NAME=3D"Generator" CONTENT=3D"MS Exchange Server version = 6.5.7653.38"> <TITLE>Re: cell-phone phishing? (UNCLASSIFIED)</TITLE> </HEAD> <BODY> <!-- Converted from text/rtf format --> <P><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Arial">Classification:&nbsp;<U><B> = UNCLASSIFIED</B></U><B></B> </FONT> <BR><FONT SIZE=3D2 FACE=3D"Arial">Cav...

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Telecom Italia - Telecom Italia
Telecom Italia offers infrastructures, platforms and services for mobile and fixed phones, internet, ICT solutions and media content.

Telecompaper – Telecom news and research – News Home
tp:news tp:research tp:events Edition: International Nederlands Log in Register Products 0 Article Binder Telecompaper Loading... 0 Home Mobile ...

Telecompetitor - Providing insight, analysis, and commentary on the evolving telecom competitive landscape ...
U.S. wireless subscriber connections increased 7% between 2010 and 2011 , reaching 331.6 million, according to CTIA - The Wireless Industry Association. ...

Telecom Reseller
The News Source for UC, Cloud, Collaboration and Mobility

Telecoms Korea - Since 2004
Telecoms Korea Since 2004 Contact

Bienvenue sur le site du GER Télécom - GER Télécom
Depuis 1981, plus de 700 contrats ont prouvé notre savoir-faire et ont fait du GER Télécom l'une des grandes Junior-Entreprises françaises. Implantée ...

Resources last updated: 2/26/2016 8:39:02 AM