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Need 13 postscript base fonts

Hello,

   I often come in contact with documents that reference the 13 postscript base fonts. The problem is that the authors of the documents fail to embed the fonts. Can anyone be so kind as to share them?

                           Thank you,

                                        Chris


In original PostScript, there are 13 base fonts:

    Courier (Regular, Oblique, Bold, Bold Oblique)
    Helvetica (Regular, Oblique, Bold, Bold Oblique)
    Times (Roman, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic)
    Symbol


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0
crossjudas
12/8/2016 7:36:50 PM
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On 12/08/2016 07:36 PM, crossjudas wrote:
> Hello,
> 
> I often come in contact with documents that reference the 13 
> postscript base fonts.

These are the "Adobe 35" fonts of PS Level 2, which includes the
original 13 from PS Level 1 (no-one uses Level 1 nowadays AFAIK):

Avant Garde
Bookman
Courier
Helvetica
Helvetica Narrow
New Century Schoolbook
Palatino
Times
Symbol
Zapf Chancery
Zapf Dingbats

All in four variants (Roman, Bold, Italic, Bold Italic) except for the
last three, which are singletons; that's (8×4)+3=35 fonts.

> The problem is that the authors of the documents fail to embed the
> fonts.

That's because practically all printers, drivers, and applications
already have the fonts embedded in the firmware.

It's not that authors "fail" to embed the fonts: they don't need to and
should NOT embed them — because the software and hardware already have a
copy.

It's technically possible to embed them, but usually difficult because
it's unnecessary duplication, and discouraged by the software. Not
really fair to blame the authors for something they didn't do and
wouldn't know how to, in most cases.

If you can explain what you want to do, perhaps we can help.

> Can anyone be so kind as to share them?

They can be found in many places, but they are Type 1 fonts, so
you need *both* the AFM and PFB files for each one. They are not single
files like .ttf or .otf fonts: you need .pfb *and* .afm files.

There are thousands of clones, ripoffs, and genuine redrawings of these
fonts going under various names. A lot depends on how accurate you need
them to be (ie the same metrics), how well you want them hinted, and
whether you want them with all modern additions — that is, all Unicode
Latin-alphabet diacriticals, plus things like the Euro sign €, which are
omitted in lower-quality copies (and, of course, in the originals, which
were first done this way for PS printers in the mid-1980s).

They are a part of the Ghostscript package,
https://ghostscript.com/download/gsdnld.html (pick the AGPL license for
personal use, but read it first).

They are also contained in the standard TeX Live distribution from
http://tug.org/texlive/ in TDS directories /texmf-dist/fonts/afm and
/texmf-dist/fonts/type1 (in the urw and adobe subdirectories — copies
were supplied by URW except for Courier, which was supplied by Adobe, no
idea why).

But if you don't have a copy of TeX Live installed, email me privately
and I'll zip them up (fractional distribution is usually unwise but an
exception is made for personal use).

If you need them for commercial purposes, you may be better off buying
them from Adobe's suppliers at
http://www.adobe.com/products/type/fonts-by-adobe.html if you have
customers who don't understand licensing.

///Peter


0
Peter
12/14/2016 12:00:49 AM
Reply: