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OT: Book Recomendation

The DNA Restart by Sharon Moalem

Tailor your diet to your DNA.  No expensive DNA testing required.  Chewing a 
cracker can tell you how many carbohydrate are best for you.  Use a cotton 
swab to extract some ear wax and learn how much alcohol is best for you. 
Which foods are good for your DNA and which are not..  What is the best oil 
to use.  What is the best way to prepare your food.

He does not just make general recommendations but gives specifics and give 
his reasons.  A bonos is better tasting food. 


0
Charles
12/22/2016 4:03:44 AM
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On 22/12/2016 5:03 p.m., Charles Hottel wrote:
> The DNA Restart by Sharon Moalem
>
> Tailor your diet to your DNA.  No expensive DNA testing required.  Chewing a
> cracker can tell you how many carbohydrate are best for you.  Use a cotton
> swab to extract some ear wax and learn how much alcohol is best for you.
> Which foods are good for your DNA and which are not..  What is the best oil
> to use.  What is the best way to prepare your food.
>
> He does not just make general recommendations but gives specifics and give
> his reasons.  A bonos is better tasting food.
>
>
Hi Charlie,

good to see you're still here... :-)

I saw a possibly similar volume based on eating foods that were based on 
your blood type.

A friend of mine reckoned it was right on the money but I never tried it 
myself.

I'm a pretty keen cook and I enjoy a wide range of foods, prepared in 
different ways. I don't eat rubbish or snack between meals and I keep a 
balance between fats, carbohydrates, and protein, with particular care 
on fat, sugar, and salt.

My weight is stable (and 9 kilos less than it was 5 years ago...) and I 
feel pretty healthy. (I swim a kilometre at least twice a week, and 
three times if I can find the time.)

So I don't think tying my diet to what is actually "good" for my DNA is 
going to work for me. Not to say it won't work for other people.

I have reached a time in my life when I'd rather enjoy it than worry 
about it... :-)

Pete.
-- 
I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...
0
pete
12/22/2016 5:46:46 AM
"pete dashwood" <dashwood@enternet.co.nz> wrote in message 
news:ec17maFba15U1@mid.individual.net...
> On 22/12/2016 5:03 p.m., Charles Hottel wrote:
>> The DNA Restart by Sharon Moalem
>>
>> Tailor your diet to your DNA.  No expensive DNA testing required. 
>> Chewing a
>> cracker can tell you how many carbohydrate are best for you.  Use a 
>> cotton
>> swab to extract some ear wax and learn how much alcohol is best for you.
>> Which foods are good for your DNA and which are not..  What is the best 
>> oil
>> to use.  What is the best way to prepare your food.
>>
>> He does not just make general recommendations but gives specifics and 
>> give
>> his reasons.  A bonos is better tasting food.
>>
>>
> Hi Charlie,
>
> good to see you're still here... :-)
>
> I saw a possibly similar volume based on eating foods that were based on 
> your blood type.
>
> A friend of mine reckoned it was right on the money but I never tried it 
> myself.
>
> I'm a pretty keen cook and I enjoy a wide range of foods, prepared in 
> different ways. I don't eat rubbish or snack between meals and I keep a 
> balance between fats, carbohydrates, and protein, with particular care on 
> fat, sugar, and salt.
>
> My weight is stable (and 9 kilos less than it was 5 years ago...) and I 
> feel pretty healthy. (I swim a kilometre at least twice a week, and three 
> times if I can find the time.)
>
> So I don't think tying my diet to what is actually "good" for my DNA is 
> going to work for me. Not to say it won't work for other people.
>
> I have reached a time in my life when I'd rather enjoy it than worry about 
> it... :-)
>
> Pete.
> -- 
> I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...

We are not all as lucky as you.  I struggle with my weight and with hunger 
when I try to cut back,   Based on this book I cut out artificial sweetners 
and I feel much better, and can eat more normally.   I found lots of 
interesting facts in this book.  Raw kale can be bad for you.  Apple juice 
is often made from rotting apples and can be bad for you.  Celery has a 
chemical that can be bad for some people. Parsnips have a chemical that is 
bad for you, etc. I used to think organic food was a waste of money, but he 
explains that plants grown under conditions of greater stress produce more 
phytonutrients to protect themselves, and this makes them better for us. 
The amount of phytonutrients in food can vary greatly, so it is best to eat 
a wide variety and not just a lot of the same thing.

I believe this book explains why different people react differently to 
different foods, and why so many experiments regarding food often result in 
contradictory results.  I also found the many genes and chemical pathways 
that are discussed to be very interesting.  The author has a couple of other 
books that look interesting to me. 


0
Charles
12/22/2016 10:13:17 PM
On 23/12/2016 11:13 a.m., Charles Hottel wrote:
> "pete dashwood" <dashwood@enternet.co.nz> wrote in message
> news:ec17maFba15U1@mid.individual.net...
>> On 22/12/2016 5:03 p.m., Charles Hottel wrote:
>>> The DNA Restart by Sharon Moalem
>>>
>>> Tailor your diet to your DNA.  No expensive DNA testing required.
>>> Chewing a
>>> cracker can tell you how many carbohydrate are best for you.  Use a
>>> cotton
>>> swab to extract some ear wax and learn how much alcohol is best for you.
>>> Which foods are good for your DNA and which are not..  What is the best
>>> oil
>>> to use.  What is the best way to prepare your food.
>>>
>>> He does not just make general recommendations but gives specifics and
>>> give
>>> his reasons.  A bonos is better tasting food.
>>>
>>>
>> Hi Charlie,
>>
>> good to see you're still here... :-)
>>
>> I saw a possibly similar volume based on eating foods that were based on
>> your blood type.
>>
>> A friend of mine reckoned it was right on the money but I never tried it
>> myself.
>>
>> I'm a pretty keen cook and I enjoy a wide range of foods, prepared in
>> different ways. I don't eat rubbish or snack between meals and I keep a
>> balance between fats, carbohydrates, and protein, with particular care on
>> fat, sugar, and salt.
>>
>> My weight is stable (and 9 kilos less than it was 5 years ago...) and I
>> feel pretty healthy. (I swim a kilometre at least twice a week, and three
>> times if I can find the time.)
>>
>> So I don't think tying my diet to what is actually "good" for my DNA is
>> going to work for me. Not to say it won't work for other people.
>>
>> I have reached a time in my life when I'd rather enjoy it than worry about
>> it... :-)
>>
>> Pete.
>> --
>> I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...
>
> We are not all as lucky as you.  I struggle with my weight and with hunger
> when I try to cut back,

You are not alone. I have friends who have exactly the same problem. And 
suggesting easy answers has become a billion dollar industry.

At this time of year we are surrounded by sticky treats and a tendency 
to pig out on the foods we love. I'm not suggesting it has to be an 
austere Xmas, but I believe we do need to balance what we eat and make 
sure we EARN the Xmas pudding by exercise.... :-)

There are so many fad diets and cleansers and de-tox and pills to help 
us when, really, it comes down to discipline and common sense.

There is one thing I would recommend (and I do it myself): Eat raw fruit 
and blend it with a Ninja or similar so you get the fibre as well as the 
nutrition. I start the day with a blend of fresh apple, kiwi fruit, 
avocado, grapes, frozen berries (strawberry, raspberry, blueberries, 
etc.), flax seed, and the juice of a fresh coconut. Not only is it 
delicious, but it stops me being hungry until well into the afternoon. 
(I generally don't get up before 9:30; I'm not a morning person. I also 
like to work at night when it is quiet so I don't usually go to bed 
before 2:00 am. My friends know not to call me before 10:00 am because 
it will go to voice... The point I'm trying to make here is that 
everybody is different and we all need to find what suits us. There is 
no right or wrong pattern, but the demands of going to work and making a 
living force us into routines that we are not really comfortable with. 
Sleep is important of course, and I find I operate well on 6 or 7 hours 
a night. If I get less - (occasionally I will obsessively code through 
the night and suddenly become aware that daylight is trying to get 
through the curtains and birds are singing) I have to make up for it by 
sleeping until I wake up at the weekend... Sometimes it will be 10 hours 
or so.

I eat fish at least twice a week (I especially like salmon and know a 
number of ways to prepare it that are all delicious...) and red meat 
(steaks, chops etc.) needs to have some of the fat trimmed off it. I 
have become used to low fat meats like venison (absolutely delicious and 
versatile), and goat (also delicious and available from Halal 
butcheries). It is the barbeque season here and that is one of my 
favourite ways to cook... again, the temptation to over-indulge has to 
be resisted. Be moderate and diverse.

I like to steam vegetables like caulifower and broccoli and I use 
chicken stock with a splash of wine in it and herbs. It infuses a better 
flavour and they cook faster than boiling... they need to be al dente; 
few culinary things worse than vegetables that taste like soggy 
cardboard. I NEVER peel potates or pumpkin, etc. (The nutrition is under 
the skin and gets discarded if you peel them.)

I don't usually Ninja vegetables but I was interested in your comment 
about raw kale (which is often presented as being the super nutritious 
answer to all our dietary problems).  The apple juice from rotten apples 
has no relevance for me because I would NEVER buy processed apple juice 
(or any other juice) in the first place UNLESS I was absolutely sure it 
was just juice and nothing else. I realize it is easy when you live in 
paradise (I can pick oranges and mandarins by reaching out of my kitchen 
window :-)) but even those of us who live in apartments and urban areas 
can exercise discretion in what we eat and drink... read the labels at 
the supermarket, watch for fat, salt, and sugar. If you can't get 
something that hasn't been adulterated, drink water - the non-flavour 
grows on you :-)

I have cut down on alcohol but I still have wine with dinner (usually, 
not inevitably) and I managed to get coffee consumption down from 14 
cups a day to around 4 (that was REALLY hard for me...). If I join the 
boys for a beer, it is two beers...very aware about driving, especially 
as we get older, when we need to take even more care.

In addition to the above I take Krill, garlic and anti-oxidants daily 
and if I feel a cold or flu coming on, large doses of vitamin C and home 
made fresh chicken soup... I haven't had a cold (or any other kind of 
ailment) for over 10 years, and the last serious illness I had was 58 
years ago. (I nearly died and it changed my whole outlook on life...)

So, all of the above is just one man's view and it is a highly 
controversial subject. It works for me; YMMV...

It ISN'T easy but a lot of it is about breaking bad habit patterns laid 
down over years.


    Based on this book I cut out artificial sweetners
> and I feel much better, and can eat more normally.

Yes, these are evil and toxic. I used to take sugar in coffee and tea 
(given the amount of these I used to drink daily, it is no wonder I 
become overweight)... then as enlightenment slowly dawned I realized I 
had to do something about the sugar. I decided to move to using honey 
(Hey! it's natural isn't it?)... and as I didn't lose any weight, I 
suddenly realized that the sugars in honey are pretty much the same as 
the sucrose we buy in the shop... Had to bite the bullet and stop 
spooning honey (or sugar) into the coffee. Hard for about a week. Then I 
realized that the coffee actually tasted better, and today, I can't 
drink coffee with sugar in it. I was tempted during this time by 
artificial sweeteners like Sweet n Low but I didn't like the after taste 
so stopped. Later, as the truth about these sweeteners emerged,  I was 
very glad I did.

Sometimes, changing your mind about something can help you deal with it.

(Who wants the sugar?  Who controls what you want?...)

I found lots of
> interesting facts in this book.  Raw kale can be bad for you.  Apple juice
> is often made from rotting apples and can be bad for you.  Celery has a
> chemical that can be bad for some people. Parsnips have a chemical that is
> bad for you, etc.

Human Beings are complex and diverse creatures so I'm sure that's true. 
I read somewhere that celery can help with arthritis. (I take Krill for 
that and, so far, I have only the occasional twinge; I don't want to 
lose my guitar so I play regularly and I think that might help too.)

  I used to think organic food was a waste of money, but he
> explains that plants grown under conditions of greater stress produce more
> phytonutrients to protect themselves, and this makes them better for us.

If you needed convincing, you only need to taste fresh fruit and 
vegetables out of the garden, as opposed to the supermarket. I had a 
friend from Germany staying here and she commented on how different the 
tomatoes, radishes and even the potatoes tasted, compared to what she 
would get back home. (These were bought from a local supermarket here). 
Then my neighbour gave us some tomatoes from her garden and it was quite 
noticeable how much more flavoursome they were. I am a crap gardener so 
I gave up on it; but this year there will be black grapes all along the 
fence with my neighbour (deliberately planted so we can share them) and 
this is the first (possibly, only) time that something I actually 
planted myself has grown. Fortunately, my fruit trees produce abundantly 
and all they ever get from me is an encouraging word and thanks... :-)
> The amount of phytonutrients in food can vary greatly, so it is best to eat
> a wide variety and not just a lot of the same thing.

Absolutely!

>
> I believe this book explains why different people react differently to
> different foods, and why so many experiments regarding food often result in
> contradictory results.  I also found the many genes and chemical pathways
> that are discussed to be very interesting.  The author has a couple of other
> books that look interesting to me.
>

Having found something that is working for you, Charlie, I'd say: "Stick 
to it..."

Good Luck!

Pete.
-- 
I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...
0
pete
12/23/2016 12:42:08 AM
It seems like you are doing things right for you and right according to the 
book.

Be careful grilling with too high a temperature as it can create so nasty 
chemicals.

Califlower should be cooked but I think steaming would qualify.

Sugar wise, honey is similar to sucrose, but honey is better because it 
contains many phytochemicals.  This is because the bees visit a wide variety 
of different flowers.  The honey should be dark, unfiltered and unheated. 
You were right to limit it.  The book allows 2 teaspoons of honey per day.

I just finished another section of the book about umami or deliciousness. 
He discusses how you can make your food more delicious.  He gleaned most of 
this information from top chefs all over the world.  He included a table of 
ingredients that you can use to make food more delicious.  This leads to 
more saiety from eating less food and also cooking with less fat.  There is 
a tomato chewing experiment to help readers experience umami.

The next section of the book is about drinking oolong tea.

<snip>

Merry Christmas, Happy holidays and Happy New Year to all! 


0
Charles
12/24/2016 5:09:59 AM
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