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Person of interest

They screened the final episode of POI (at least for the current 
series...) here last night.

The series is about 2 "Artifical Super Intelligences" (ASI) which are 
battling for world domination.

The "good one" is called "the machine", the "bad one" is called "Samaritan".

The guy who programmed "The machine" (character Harold Finch) has to get 
a deadly virus called ICE 9 into Samaritan, realizing that in killing it 
he will also kill his own creation.

He uploads the virus OK, but Samaritan then requires an 8 letter verbal 
password before it will execute the files...

I can tell you I was stunned when he said it... :-)

Pete.
-- 
I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...
0
pete
12/20/2016 1:53:54 AM
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pete dashwood <dashwood@enternet.co.nz> wrote:
<snip>
> 
> The guy who programmed "The machine" (character Harold Finch) has to get 
> a deadly virus called ICE 9 into Samaritan, realizing that in killing it 
> he will also kill his own creation.
> 
> He uploads the virus OK, but Samaritan then requires an 8 letter verbal 
> password before it will execute the files...
> 
> I can tell you I was stunned when he said it... :-)

I saw it a while ago but forgot it, I think I can guess
it based upon this group :)

Anyway a very good series, been watching the reruns as time
permits, if I see the episode will pay more attention to
the PW.

> 
> Pete.

John
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John
12/20/2016 2:52:13 AM
On 12/19/16 8:53 PM, pete dashwood wrote:
> They screened the final episode of POI (at least for the current
> series...) here last night.
>
> The series is about 2 "Artifical Super Intelligences" (ASI) which are
> battling for world domination.
>
> The "good one" is called "the machine", the "bad one" is called
> "Samaritan".
>
> The guy who programmed "The machine" (character Harold Finch) has to get
> a deadly virus called ICE 9 into Samaritan, realizing that in killing it
> he will also kill his own creation.
>
> He uploads the virus OK, but Samaritan then requires an 8 letter verbal
> password before it will execute the files...
>
> I can tell you I was stunned when he said it... :-)
>
> Pete.

C'mon Pete. Don't keep those of us who have never seen
the show or are likely to waste the time in front of the
"boob tube" to watch it in suspense.  What was it?

bill

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Bill
12/20/2016 5:14:32 PM
Search-engineing reveals: http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/55877/what-is-the-significance-of-the-password

It's one of those "you had to be there when Pete heard it, like, actually there, inside his body" to be anything even remotely approaching "mildly interested".
0
Bill
12/20/2016 5:37:59 PM
On 12/20/16 12:37 PM, Bill Woodger wrote:
> Search-engineing reveals: http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/55877/what-is-the-significance-of-the-password
>
> It's one of those "you had to be there when Pete heard it, like, actually there, inside his body" to be anything even remotely approaching "mildly interested".
>

Thanks.  I read what they had to say.  And, I can honestly
say, it did not spark even the slightest interest in ever
bothering to watch the show.  And if your curious about
my opinion of TV.  I just dumped DISH as I certainly don't
think there is anything there worth the $150 a month it was
costing.  Guess my mis-spent youth that predated TV has
resurfaced. I work in my computer lab with NDR1 on the
Internet radio and am perfectly happy with that.

bill

0
Bill
12/20/2016 8:10:59 PM
On 21/12/2016 6:37 a.m., Bill Woodger wrote:
> Search-engineing reveals: http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/55877/what-is-the-significance-of-the-password
>
> It's one of those "you had to be there when Pete heard it, like, actually there, inside his body" to be anything even remotely approaching "mildly interested".
>
:-)

Probably...

However, many millions of people follow and enjoy the show and it came 
completely unexpectedly, out of left field.

I have no idea why the writers chose that password.

(What are the odds?)

Maybe there are some old-time ex-COBOL programmers on the staff and they 
thought it would be a good chance to wind me up... I dunno.

It succeeded.

Pete.

-- 
I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...
0
pete
12/20/2016 10:43:02 PM
On 21/12/2016 9:10 a.m., Bill Gunshannon wrote:
> On 12/20/16 12:37 PM, Bill Woodger wrote:
>> Search-engineing reveals:
>> http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/55877/what-is-the-significance-of-the-password
>>
>>
>> It's one of those "you had to be there when Pete heard it, like,
>> actually there, inside his body" to be anything even remotely
>> approaching "mildly interested".
>>
>
> Thanks.  I read what they had to say.  And, I can honestly
> say, it did not spark even the slightest interest in ever
> bothering to watch the show.  And if your curious about
> my opinion of TV.  I just dumped DISH as I certainly don't
> think there is anything there worth the $150 a month it was
> costing.  Guess my mis-spent youth that predated TV has
> resurfaced. I work in my computer lab with NDR1 on the
> Internet radio and am perfectly happy with that.
>
> bill
>

I agree with you Bill.

In general I don't watch TV very much at all, but I am a sucker for 
shows about computer technology and POI is one of the best.

These days I like quiz shows (they have just started running Jeopardy 
here)... the English quiz show "The Chase" is brilliant and I record 
then watch that when I have some time or need to relax.

Not sure if it is the same but I seem to recall NDR as being 
Nord-Deutsche Rundfunk... I still stream WDR2 (West-Duetsche Rundfunk) 
occassionally so that I don't lose all of the Germ I was once fluent in.

News comes from Al Jazeera, CNN, and local channels, plus a local online 
service that covers things around Tauranga.

I remember when I first visited the USA (1977) and stayed in a motel in 
Sherman Oaks where there were around 100 TV channels. (Back in NZ we had 
3...) I commented to the manager that the Licence Fee must be huge for 
so many channels. He asked me what a TV Licence Fee was and I explained 
we had to pay a fee to receive radio and TV transmissions (since 
abolished). He looked at me with incredulity...
"You mean to say you have to pay money to watch that shit?!"

I think he was right.

Pete.

-- 
I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...
0
pete
12/20/2016 10:55:34 PM
The reason is explained in the link. 

Best I could come up with relevant to the list was ANSCOBOL, so I was disappointed by the answer.

I think it is a long stretch from "computer" and "dashwood" to "hey, that could be me", but then may surname's only got seven letters, so I'd have missed out on the build-up, "is it me, is it me?", excitement culminating in the "YES!!!" on revelation.

On Tuesday, December 20, 2016 at 11:43:08 PM UTC+1, pete dashwood wrote:
> On 21/12/2016 6:37 a.m., Bill Woodger wrote:
> > Search-engineing reveals: http://movies.stackexchange.com/questions/55877/what-is-the-significance-of-the-password
> >
> > It's one of those "you had to be there when Pete heard it, like, actually there, inside his body" to be anything even remotely approaching "mildly interested".
> >
> :-)
> 
> Probably...
> 
> However, many millions of people follow and enjoy the show and it came 
> completely unexpectedly, out of left field.
> 
> I have no idea why the writers chose that password.
> 
> (What are the odds?)
> 
> Maybe there are some old-time ex-COBOL programmers on the staff and they 
> thought it would be a good chance to wind me up... I dunno.
> 
> It succeeded.
> 
> Pete.
> 
> -- 
> I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...

0
Bill
12/20/2016 11:29:10 PM
On 21/12/2016 12:29 p.m., Bill Woodger wrote:
> The reason is explained in the link.
>
> Best I could come up with relevant to the list was ANSCOBOL, so I was disappointed by the answer.
>
> I think it is a long stretch from "computer" and "dashwood" to "hey, that could be me", but then may surname's only got seven letters, so I'd have missed out on the build-up, "is it me, is it me?", excitement culminating in the "YES!!!" on revelation.

(I wasn't serious that it was aimed at me; I don't think the universe 
works quite like that.)

Part of the shock for me was that there was no build up. There was no 
hint that the password would be a name. I was expecting something deep 
and mysterious out of quantum physics or cybernetics... I had noted the 
volume of Sense and Sensibility earlier and am familiar with the story 
but that was part of the "romance" side of the show; I watch it for the 
"computer" part (and watching Shaw, Groves, and Reese kick arse... :-))

Then, as a writer, I have to ask myself: "Why THAT Book?" The people who 
write the show chose Austen's book about the Dashwoods when they could 
have chosen any book...

I really hope thousands of people don't start using that password... :-)

Pete.

<snipped>

-- 
I used to write COBOL; now I can do anything...
0
pete
12/21/2016 12:54:31 PM
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