f



NAME! and NAME@ versus !NAME and @NAME

Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:

  save value of (to stack)          @name
  restore value of                  !name
  store into                        name!
  fetch from                        name@

I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
when to use name@ or name!.

My research so far: The Standard use the latter a lot: C!, 2! R@, F!,
DEFER@, etc.  But the former seems to be rare.  I found !CSP and !BITS
in some traditional Forths.  Machine Forth use A!/A@ to access the
contents of the A register, and !A/@A to access memory.

Any insights?
0
Lars
2/11/2016 9:01:25 AM
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On Thursday, 11 February 2016 09:16:58 UTC, Lars Brinkhoff  wrote:
> Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:
> 
>   save value of (to stack)          @name
>   restore value of                  !name
>   store into                        name!
>   fetch from                        name@
> 
> I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
> when to use name@ or name!.
> 
> My research so far: The Standard use the latter a lot: C!, 2! R@, F!,
> DEFER@, etc.  But the former seems to be rare.  I found !CSP and !BITS
> in some traditional Forths.  Machine Forth use A!/A@ to access the
> contents of the A register, and !A/@A to access memory.
> 
> Any insights?

I have used the following conventions:

to the stack: @thing ("fetch thing" - from thing to the stack)
from the stack: !thing ("store thing" - from the stack to thing)

But, equally, you could use:

thing> ("fetch thing" - from thing to the stack)
>thing ("store thing" - from the stack to thing)

I've used both, and don't really have a preference.

You pay's your money and makes your choice ;-)
0
Mark
2/11/2016 9:56:50 AM
On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 10:01:25 +0100
Lars Brinkhoff <lars.spam@nocrew.org> wrote:

> Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:
>=20
>   save value of (to stack)          @name
>   restore value of                  !name
>   store into                        name!
>   fetch from                        name@
>=20
> I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
> when to use name@ or name!.
>=20
> My research so far: The Standard use the latter a lot: C!, 2! R@, F!,
> DEFER@, etc.  But the former seems to be rare.  I found !CSP and !BITS
> in some traditional Forths.  Machine Forth use A!/A@ to access the
> contents of the A register, and !A/@A to access memory.
>=20
> Any insights?


Leo Brodie's "Thinking Forth" pg 287

Meaning            Form    Example
....
save value of      @name   @CURSOR
restore value of   !name   !CURSOR
store into         name!   SECONDS!
fetch from         name@   INDEX@
....

=46rom that, my guess is that if the source
is the data stack and destination is a variable,
then the @ and ! come after and vice-versa.
I.e., @name and !name are expected to be paired
operations and so are name! and name@.

a) variable -> data stack -> variable
b) data stack -> variable -> data stack

Of course, as you can see they are equivalent.
It's just a matter of the the expected source.


Rod Pemberton

0
Rod
2/11/2016 10:02:07 AM
Den torsdag 11 februari 2016 kl. 10:16:58 UTC+1 skrev Lars Brinkhoff:
> Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:
> 
>   save value of (to stack)          @name
>   restore value of                  !name
>   store into                        name!
>   fetch from                        name@
> 
> I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
> when to use name@ or name!.
> 
> My research so far: The Standard use the latter a lot: C!, 2! R@, F!,
> DEFER@, etc.  But the former seems to be rare.  I found !CSP and !BITS
> in some traditional Forths.  Machine Forth use A!/A@ to access the
> contents of the A register, and !A/@A to access memory.
> 
> Any insights?

Can there be a standard about this? There are som many different kind of words that might fit in to use ! and @. In the embryo of ZET,

https://github.com/Lehs/ZET

my Forth based, Gap inspired, mini environment for computational mathematics, I use @ as a prefix to words that acts on addresses, in the sense "fetch and act", i.e:

@split \ ad -- 

that splits the list at the top of a stack allocated at ad, into "tail" and "head" on that stack. While the word

xst@ \ -- n

read the value (without pop the stack) of the xst-stack. I also have a word

stack@ \ ad -- n

where

: xst@ xst stack@ ;

which maybe should be named @stack@ if I was consequent. But being consequent is difficult and could become an obstacle for the programmer. Inconsequence, on the other side, is an obstacle for others to read the code.

For me it's a problem having too much lateral thinking beside. If I would create something very special, I might reform the names as a finishing touch.
0
lehs
2/11/2016 10:40:00 AM
Lars Brinkhoff <lars.spam@nocrew.org> writes:
>Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:
>
>  save value of (to stack)          @name
>  restore value of                  !name
>  store into                        name!
>  fetch from                        name@
>
>I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
>when to use name@ or name!.
>
>My research so far: The Standard use the latter a lot: C!, 2! R@, F!,
>DEFER@, etc.  But the former seems to be rare.  I found !CSP and !BITS
>in some traditional Forths.  Machine Forth use A!/A@ to access the
>contents of the A register, and !A/@A to access memory.
>
>Any insights?

The guide you cite above is at odds with the practice in the standard
and elsewhere.  The practice I have experienced is to use the type as
prefix (c@ d@ f@), and to use postfixes for variants; e.g., if you
want to have an unaligned load, you might have @u d@u f@u.

- anton
-- 
M. Anton Ertl  http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/home.html
comp.lang.forth FAQs: http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/forth/faq/toc.html
     New standard: http://www.forth200x.org/forth200x.html
   EuroForth 2015: http://www.rigwit.co.uk/EuroForth2015/
0
anton
2/11/2016 10:51:59 AM
Mark Wills wrote:
> Lars Brinkhoff wrote:
>>   save value of (to stack)          @name
>>   restore value of                  !name
>>   store into                        name!
>>   fetch from                        name@
>> 
>> I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
>> when to use name@ or name!.
>
> I have used the following conventions:
>
> to the stack: @thing ("fetch thing" - from thing to the stack)
> from the stack: !thing ("store thing" - from the stack to thing)

So what's your take on name! and name@?

Maybe the convention is <DATA-TYPE>!/@, and !/@<ENTITY>?

(In which case one might argue that R@ should have been named @R
instead.)

> But, equally, you could use:
>
> thing> ("fetch thing" - from thing to the stack)
> >thing ("store thing" - from the stack to thing)

Right, like R> and >R.
0
Lars
2/11/2016 11:04:26 AM
lehs wrote:
> Can there be a standard about this?

May be not.  It's not very important, but I was curious because
obviously Leo Brodie cared enough to put it in words and print it in a
book.

> I use @ as a prefix to words that acts on addresses, in the sense
> "fetch and act", i.e:
>
> @split \ ad -- 
>
> that splits the list at the top of a stack allocated at ad, into
> "tail" and "head" on that stack. While the word
>
> xst@ \ -- n
>
> read the value (without pop the stack) of the xst-stack.

I'm not sure (or I wouldn't have started this thread), but isn't this
the exact opposite of Leo Brodie's conventions?
0
Lars
2/11/2016 11:10:51 AM
Anton Ertl writes:
> The guide you cite above is at odds with the practice in the standard
> and elsewhere.  The practice I have experienced is to use the type as
> prefix (c@ d@ f@), and to use postfixes for variants; e.g., if you
> want to have an unaligned load, you might have @u d@u f@u.

I'm may well be out of date, because I guess it's more than 30 years
old.  Maybe it originated at Forth Inc during the 70ies?

Regarding your experience, what do you think about !/@NAME?  (Seen in the
wild: !/@BITS and !/@CSP.)
0
Lars
2/11/2016 11:33:49 AM
Den torsdag 11 februari 2016 kl. 12:10:53 UTC+1 skrev Lars Brinkhoff:
> lehs wrote:
> > Can there be a standard about this?
>=20
> May be not.  It's not very important, but I was curious because
> obviously Leo Brodie cared enough to put it in words and print it in a
> book.
>=20
> > I use @ as a prefix to words that acts on addresses, in the sense
> > "fetch and act", i.e:
> >
> > @split \ ad --=20
> >
> > that splits the list at the top of a stack allocated at ad, into
> > "tail" and "head" on that stack. While the word
> >
> > xst@ \ -- n
> >
> > read the value (without pop the stack) of the xst-stack.
>=20
> I'm not sure (or I wouldn't have started this thread), but isn't this
> the exact opposite of Leo Brodie's conventions?

I don't know either and I haven't red the book. Obviously standards are obs=
tacles that oppresses creativity and I guess that's why I stopped read Fort=
h books after a while. And I don't understand Brodie here. What's the diffe=
rence between "save value of (to stack)" and "fetch from" (to stack?
0
lehs
2/11/2016 11:37:25 AM
Op Thu, 11 Feb 2016 12:33:49 +0100 schreef Lars Brinkhoff:

> Anton Ertl writes:
>> The guide you cite above is at odds with the practice in the standard
>> and elsewhere.  The practice I have experienced is to use the type as
>> prefix (c@ d@ f@), and to use postfixes for variants; e.g., if you
>> want to have an unaligned load, you might have @u d@u f@u.
> 
> I'm may well be out of date, because I guess it's more than 30 years
> old.  Maybe it originated at Forth Inc during the 70ies?

Forth Inc. did not even exist then. I've read somewhere B@ and B!
for C@ and C!
D@ and D! are mostly written as 2@ and 2!

> 
> Regarding your experience, what do you think about !/@NAME?  (Seen in the
> wild: !/@BITS and !/@CSP.)

Store and fetch in one name? What do they do?

!CSP has no arguments and no results, so it's quite different from
those above. It does not match with @CSP (unknown) but with ?CSP.
Also neither arguments or results.

groet Coos
0
Coos
2/11/2016 12:01:51 PM
Lehs wrote:
> Obviously standards are obstacles that oppresses creativity

Sure, by all means use your own conventions!

> And I don't understand Brodie here. What's the difference between
> "save value of (to stack)" and "fetch from" (to stack?

Right!  That's exactly what I don't understand.

But I think your point about "operating on an address" may be the
answer.

TYPE@ ( addr -- xi ) \ Fetch xi from TYPE at addr.
TYPE! ( xi addr -- ) \ Store xi into TYPE at addr.

@ENTITY ( -- xi ) \ Fetch xi from ENTITY.
!ENTITY ( xi -- ) \ Store xi into ENTITY.

If this isn't what Brodie meant, maybe it ought to be. ;-)
0
Lars
2/11/2016 12:04:59 PM
Coos Haak skrev:
> Lars Brinkhoff schreef:
>> Maybe it originated at Forth Inc during the 70ies?
> Forth Inc. did not even exist then.

It was formed 1973 according to the intertubes.

>> Regarding your experience, what do you think about !/@NAME?
> Store and fetch in one name? What do they do?

I dunno, that's kinda what the thread is about.  Access a named thing?

> !CSP has no arguments and no results, so it's quite different from
> those above. It does not match with @CSP (unknown) but with ?CSP.

Point taken on ?CSP.

I think !CSP could be read as "store something into CSP".  (Which is
what is does, yay!)  In this case "something" isn't from the stack.
I.e. the stack effext is ( xi -- ) with i=0.

But it's not a strong argument.
0
Lars
2/11/2016 12:11:22 PM
Lars Brinkhoff <lars.spam@nocrew.org> writes:
>Anton Ertl writes:
>> The guide you cite above is at odds with the practice in the standard
>> and elsewhere.  The practice I have experienced is to use the type as
>> prefix (c@ d@ f@), and to use postfixes for variants; e.g., if you
>> want to have an unaligned load, you might have @u d@u f@u.
>
>I'm may well be out of date, because I guess it's more than 30 years
>old.  Maybe it originated at Forth Inc during the 70ies?
>
>Regarding your experience, what do you think about !/@NAME?  (Seen in the
>wild: !/@BITS and !/@CSP.)

!CSP in fig-Forth stores the stack depth in the user variable CSP.
There is no @CSP, only ?CSP which checks the depth against the old
depth.

- anton
-- 
M. Anton Ertl  http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/home.html
comp.lang.forth FAQs: http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/forth/faq/toc.html
     New standard: http://www.forth200x.org/forth200x.html
   EuroForth 2015: http://www.rigwit.co.uk/EuroForth2015/
0
anton
2/11/2016 12:15:12 PM
Anton wrote:
> > Regarding your experience, what do you think about !/@NAME?  (Seen
> > in the wild: !/@BITS and !/@CSP.)
>
> !CSP in fig-Forth stores the stack depth in the user variable CSP.
> There is no @CSP, only ?CSP which checks the depth against the old
> depth.

Yes, I understand.  Do you have any thoughts about Brodie's style guide
regarding !NAME and @NAME?
0
Lars
2/11/2016 12:35:01 PM
On Thu, 11 Feb 2016 10:01:25 +0100, Lars Brinkhoff
<lars.spam@nocrew.org> wrote:

>Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:
>
>  save value of (to stack)          @name
>  restore value of                  !name
>  store into                        name!
>  fetch from                        name@
>
>I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
>when to use name@ or name!.

The last memory access wordset proposal for Forth-200x contains the 
following item 2. It's a convention, but the people around the table
can live with it. Treat <size> below as meaning <what>. 

What is before the @ or ! tells you what the data item is, the prefix
BE or LE can tell you how the item is used/stored/fetched, and what
comes after@ or ! tells you which address space or channel is being
used.

2. The names follow the notation:

        [<order> -] <size> <action> [<address-space>]

    where:

        order:   BE for big endian
                 LE for little endian
        size:    B for 8-bit byte
                 W for 16-bit word
                 L for 32-bit long-word
                 X for 64-bit extended-word
        action:  !, @ or , with the usual meaning

   Systems with multiple address spaces, e.g. Harvard architectures
   and cross compilers often require an address-space indicator:

        address space:
                 C code space
                 R register space
                 T target address space in cross compiler
                 D Debug link

   The default byte order (<order>) is the native byte order for
   the implementation unless otherwise indicated.  The default
   address-space (<address-space>) is the data space.

Stephen

-- 
Stephen Pelc, stephenXXX@mpeforth.com
MicroProcessor Engineering Ltd - More Real, Less Time
133 Hill Lane, Southampton SO15 5AF, England
tel: +44 (0)23 8063 1441, fax: +44 (0)23 8033 9691
web: http://www.mpeforth.com - free VFX Forth downloads
0
stephen
2/11/2016 12:35:17 PM
On Thursday, 11 February 2016 12:35:05 UTC, Lars Brinkhoff  wrote:
> Anton wrote:
> > > Regarding your experience, what do you think about !/@NAME?  (Seen
> > > in the wild: !/@BITS and !/@CSP.)
> >
> > !CSP in fig-Forth stores the stack depth in the user variable CSP.
> > There is no @CSP, only ?CSP which checks the depth against the old
> > depth.
> 
> Yes, I understand.  Do you have any thoughts about Brodie's style guide
> regarding !NAME and @NAME?

On reflection, I think I prefer the >thing and thing> approach. It
seems less ambiguous.
0
Mark
2/11/2016 1:06:01 PM
On Thursday, February 11, 2016 at 8:06:02 AM UTC-5, Mark Wills wrote:
> 
> On reflection, I think I prefer the >thing and thing> approach. It
> seems less ambiguous.

The is my preference as well.
0
Chris
2/11/2016 1:18:39 PM
anton@mips.complang.tuwien.ac.at (Anton Ertl) writes:

>Lars Brinkhoff <lars.spam@nocrew.org> writes:
>>Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:
>>
>>  save value of (to stack)          @name
>>  restore value of                  !name
>>  store into                        name!
>>  fetch from                        name@
>>
>>I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
>>when to use name@ or name!.
>>
>>My research so far: The Standard use the latter a lot: C!, 2! R@, F!,
>>DEFER@, etc.  But the former seems to be rare.  I found !CSP and !BITS
>>in some traditional Forths.  Machine Forth use A!/A@ to access the
>>contents of the A register, and !A/@A to access memory.
>>
>>Any insights?

>The guide you cite above is at odds with the practice in the standard
>and elsewhere.  The practice I have experienced is to use the type as
>prefix (c@ d@ f@), and to use postfixes for variants; e.g., if you
>want to have an unaligned load, you might have @u d@u f@u.

Then there is the use of !<x> where <x> is some datastructure
to denote initialisation.

    100 BAG key-notes

    key-notes !BAG          \ Make bag empty.

I'm so thoroughly familiar with this, that I know no better than
that it is is existing practice.

>- anton
-- 
Albert van der Horst, UTRECHT,THE NETHERLANDS
Economic growth -- being exponential -- ultimately falters.
albert@spe&ar&c.xs4all.nl &=n http://home.hccnet.nl/a.w.m.van.der.horst

0
Albert
2/11/2016 1:27:07 PM
Coos Haak <chforth@hccnet.nl> writes:

>Op Thu, 11 Feb 2016 12:33:49 +0100 schreef Lars Brinkhoff:

>> Anton Ertl writes:
>>> The guide you cite above is at odds with the practice in the standard
>>> and elsewhere.  The practice I have experienced is to use the type as
>>> prefix (c@ d@ f@), and to use postfixes for variants; e.g., if you
>>> want to have an unaligned load, you might have @u d@u f@u.
>>
>> I'm may well be out of date, because I guess it's more than 30 years
>> old.  Maybe it originated at Forth Inc during the 70ies?

>Forth Inc. did not even exist then. I've read somewhere B@ and B!
>for C@ and C!
>D@ and D! are mostly written as 2@ and 2!

>>
>> Regarding your experience, what do you think about !/@NAME?  (Seen in the
>> wild: !/@BITS and !/@CSP.)

>Store and fetch in one name? What do they do?

>!CSP has no arguments and no results, so it's quite different from
>those above. It does not match with @CSP (unknown) but with ?CSP.
>Also neither arguments or results.

That usage is consistent with what I mentionned in my other post:
    !CSP : initialise the stack checking mechanism (with the current
            value of the stack pointer)

>groet Coos
-- 
Albert van der Horst, UTRECHT,THE NETHERLANDS
Economic growth -- being exponential -- ultimately falters.
albert@spe&ar&c.xs4all.nl &=n http://home.hccnet.nl/a.w.m.van.der.horst

0
Albert
2/11/2016 1:30:15 PM
Lars Brinkhoff wrote:
> Leo Brodie's Forth style guide says:
>
>   save value of (to stack)          @name
>   restore value of                  !name
>   store into                        name!
>   fetch from                        name@
>
> I don't understand when it's appropriate to use @name or !name, and
> when to use name@ or name!.

Based on usage I've seen

name@  ( -- x )   name!  ( x -- )  are simply shorthand versions of
name @  and  name  !  respectively where  name  is an existing variable.

!name ( -- )  is synonymous with  /name  i.e. it resets variable  name
to its default value.

I don't recall seeing  @name  used so I won't speculate what it does.
Elizabeth would probably know.



0
HAA
2/12/2016 5:58:38 AM
HAA wrote:
> ...
> !name ( -- )  is synonymous with  /name  i.e. it resets variable  name
> to its default value.

Looking at Brodie's list I see the above is at odds with his so beware.

Given his examples  @name  !name  usage is likely to be:

!cursor ( -- )    save the current console cursor position (presumably
                        in a 2variable called CURSOR)

@cursor ( -- )  restore the console cursor position previously saved by
                        !cursor



0
HAA
2/12/2016 6:41:41 AM
HAA wrote:
> !name ( -- ) is synonymous with /name i.e. it resets variable name to
> its default value.

Curious, I've usually seen /NAME used as "(bytes) per NAME", i.e. "size
of NAME".

For resetting something, I've seen "0NAME", i.e. "zero/clear the state
of NAME".
0
Lars
2/12/2016 7:13:12 AM
HAA wrote:
> Looking at Brodie's list I see the above is at odds with his so beware.

Aren't every Forther slightly at odds with everyone else? ;-)
0
Lars
2/12/2016 7:56:04 AM
Lars Brinkhoff wrote:
> HAA wrote:
> > !name ( -- ) is synonymous with /name i.e. it resets variable name to
> > its default value.
>
> Curious, I've usually seen /NAME used as "(bytes) per NAME", i.e. "size
> of NAME".
>
> For resetting something, I've seen "0NAME", i.e. "zero/clear the state
> of NAME".

A reduced list appears in Forth Programmers Handbook (included with
SwiftForth demo).  There  /name  is listed as meaning either division,
initialize, or "per".




0
HAA
2/12/2016 2:36:50 PM
Op Sat, 13 Feb 2016 01:36:50 +1100 schreef HAA:

> Lars Brinkhoff wrote:
>> HAA wrote:
>>> !name ( -- ) is synonymous with /name i.e. it resets variable name to
>>> its default value.
>>
>> Curious, I've usually seen /NAME used as "(bytes) per NAME", i.e. "size
>> of NAME".
>>
>> For resetting something, I've seen "0NAME", i.e. "zero/clear the state
>> of NAME".
> 
> A reduced list appears in Forth Programmers Handbook (included with
> SwiftForth demo).  There  /name  is listed as meaning either division,
> initialize, or "per".

I use / in names for division and "per" a lot. I haven't encountered
initializing though.
Another common one but diffrerent is /STRING

groet Coos
0
Coos
2/12/2016 9:46:41 PM
Mark Wills wrote:
> ...
> I have used the following conventions:
>
> to the stack: @thing ("fetch thing" - from thing to the stack)
> from the stack: !thing ("store thing" - from the stack to thing)
> ...

That appears to be it.  Checking SwiftForth I found:

    @DATE ( -- n )
    !DATE ( n -- )

    @TIME ( -- ud )
    !TIME ( ud -- )

These fetch/store values to the system.



0
HAA
2/13/2016 10:28:08 PM
On Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 3:29:15 PM UTC-7, HAA wrote:
> Mark Wills wrote:
> > ...
> > I have used the following conventions:
> >
> > to the stack: @thing ("fetch thing" - from thing to the stack)
> > from the stack: !thing ("store thing" - from the stack to thing)
> > ...
> 
> That appears to be it.  Checking SwiftForth I found:
> 
>     @DATE ( -- n )
>     !DATE ( n -- )
> 
>     @TIME ( -- ud )
>     !TIME ( ud -- )
> 
> These fetch/store values to the system.

This naming convention was obsolete in the 1980s. It comes from very early 1970s Forth implementations written at a time when naming conventions hadn't yet been settled.

You should always have xxx@ and xxx! that do the same as xxx @ and xxx ! --- Forth is postfix, after all.
0
hughaguilar96
2/14/2016 5:45:37 AM
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Hi, I am working on Message Center through this user can send massage to their classmats. one exception occurred when user clicks on "TO" to select the recipient name. Proper Excpetion is: "Error Message nested Exception is: Javax.naming.name not found Exception:[Java:comp/env/mme010] not bound in naming service." Plz share your view, how can i rectify this problem. Thanks & Regards Harman Harman wrote: > Hi, > > I am working on Message Center through this user can send massage to > their classmats. one exception occurred when user clicks on "TO&q...

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I try to use "new.new.classobj (name, baseclass, dict)" and have no clue what the "dict" of the current name space is. I can name dicts of imported modules, because their name exists in the current name space. If, for instance, I import a module "service" then that module's name space would be "service.__dict__". But if I import * from service, then I incorporate that name space into the current one and I cannot name it, because the current module's name is not part of the module's own name space. "dir (service)" is e...

save name name
Dear all, I came across code, and have seen this: save me me save EXCHCD EXCHCD save SIC SIC save PRC PRC I wonder why the variable name occurs twice, does anybody know why that is? Many thanks in advance! Chris On 4/21/2015 2:28 AM, Christoph Meier wrote: > Dear all, > I came across code, and have seen this: > > save me me > save EXCHCD EXCHCD > save SIC SIC > save PRC PRC > > I wonder why the variable name occurs twice, does anybody know why that is? > > Many thanks in advance! > > Chris > one name is the variable n...

Break into first name, middle name, last name
I am trying to break this name in first name, middle name, last name. Mark shipton chris a chia d brookford sim e petal I am trying to use scan function. first = scan(name,1,' '); last name = scan(name, -1, ' '); what function should i use to get those middle name as 2 of name contains middle intials and 2 of them are blank. I guess if there are three words then there is Middle name/initial. Otherwise you could compare scan(,1) to scan(,-2) and if equal assume NMI. data _null_; input name &$20.; name = propcase(name); n = countW(name); length first middle ...

naming column names
Hi, I am learning Ms Sql and I found that a lot of the tables I am finding ( in different tutorials ) are using special names for their column names such like au_username, au_salery ... Is the any naming convention for column names, or just at all is there any reason for naming the table columns in specific way. Thanks in advance. Hi You can use http://vyaskn.tripod.com/object_naming.htm Although I am not a fan of extending column names to include (part of a) table name as it should be redundant if the tables are always referenced with the tables alias in the code. It is important to ...

What is the Name of #? How did # Get its Name?
Julian Macassey wrote to the Digest fifteen years ago and asked about the ' # ' key on telephones. There were several messages on it at the time, then about nine years ago, in 1995 we had a more or less definitive answer. For those of you who have wondered about this key which is located directly below the 9 on telephone keypads, here are the answers we printed at the time, as per our archives. Subject: Octothorpe source Date: 19 Nov 88 15:25:08 PST (Sat) From: ucla-an!bongo!julian@ee.UCLA.EDU (julian macassey) I am looking for an authoritative reference for the ...

Name server names
This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_25C771_01CA4E51.51B47960 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01CA4E72.D8B7D568" ------_=_NextPart_001_01CA4E72.D8B7D568 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Curious - We have name servers in our primary domain so those are the FQDN names we put at Registrar and at network provider. =20 Is there any reason we can't also have separate external IPs and names pointing t...

Admin Process: File name: NAMES.NSF; Name:
As Administrator I recently change my name. Now every time the AdminP start I get this. 2005-02-09 04:59:03 Admin Process: File name: NAMES.NSF; Name: << MY OLD NAME>> : User name not found in Name and Address Book What have I missed ? Where to look TIA. "McDuff" <Mc@Duff.is> wrote: >As Administrator I recently change my name. > >Now every time the AdminP start I get this. > >2005-02-09 04:59:03 Admin Process: File name: NAMES.NSF; Name: << MY OLD >NAME>> : User name not found in Name and Address Book > ...

adding a variable name to a hash to name is part of the variable name
I have a perl script that I wrote the loops through a list of servers in a file and I want to create a hash with the server name in it. I want each server to have its own hash. for example $myserver = thor; hash name $server_$myserver_name{$some_key} want to get this hash name $server_thor_name{$some_key} How do I get the $myserver name to be interpolated to thor in that line? I tried this and it failed. $server_${myserver}_name{$some_key} -Bobby Bobby Chamness wrote: > I have a perl script that I wrote the loops through a list of servers > in a file and I want to create a hash...

Illegal characters in database names, table names, user names...
I'm developing a simple proof-of-concept Web application, more as a personal programming exercise than anything else, that presents the user with a login form where they can type in a database name, username, and password. I then present them with a text field to type in SQL queries, and hand back a nicely-formatted HTML table with the result of their queries. Basically, just a programming exercise to get my feet wet with the Web application framework I'm using (a Python-based framework called Quixote). As I was writing the database-connection code, I got to thinking about s...

scope of $name in: (my $name = 123) && something-involving-$name;
I find it strange in the examlpe below 1 open(my $fh, my $name="</no/such/file") || 2 warn "Error name=$name\n"; 3 print "name=$name"; that $name is not in the scope, at line 2 (in the warn() arg). The assignment to $name in line 1 definitely already happened. So how come $name is not known at line 2 ? Is this a feature or a bug ? What is the explanation ? Does perl, like, wait for the semicolon to add $name to the hashtable or variables ? This is counterintuitive to me ... (comparing to C foo() { int x=1, y=x; } ) Thanks Y...

Web resources about - NAME! and NAME@ versus !NAME and @NAME - comp.lang.forth

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