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I have also heard that F# is gaining ground because VB.Net programmers can change their source code a bit/byte/module at a time, with 1/3 less the VB code.

I have also heard that F# is gaining ground because VB.Net programmers
can change their source code a bit/byte/module at a time, with 1/3
less the VB code.

Is that true?
--
Regards,
Casey
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3/19/2009 1:45:16 AM
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On Wed, 18 Mar 2009 18:45:16 -0700, Casey Hawthorne
<caseyhHAMMER_TIME@istar.ca> wrote:

>I have also heard that F# is gaining ground because VB.Net programmers
>can change their source code a bit/byte/module at a time, with 1/3
>less the VB code.
>
>Is that true?

It's not very likely.  VB and F# are so far apart semantically that I
doubt many VB programmers would/could make the switch.

I don't see where F# is making significant inroads into general use
.... I certainly don't see many (or any) listing for F# jobs on most of
the boards.  The upward delta in total job listings appears high by
percentage, but the absolute numbers are very low.

George
0
gneuner2 (761)
3/19/2009 7:26:52 PM
Casey Hawthorne wrote:
> I have also heard that F# is gaining ground because VB.Net programmers
> can change their source code a bit/byte/module at a time, with 1/3
> less the VB code.
> 
> Is that true?

Possibly.

When people register their interest in our F#.NET Journal:

  http://www.ffconsultancy.com/products/fsharp_journal/register.html

we ask them to list the languages they currently use. Of 122 respondents, 66
said C# but only 12 said VB.NET.

So I think far more people are migrating from C# to F# rather than from
VB.NET to F#.

-- 
Dr Jon D Harrop, Flying Frog Consultancy Ltd.
http://www.ffconsultancy.com/?u
0
jon (3344)
3/20/2009 3:21:19 AM
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