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On Lisp: the 6 keystones of Lisp

Trying to get a handle on CLOS, I grabbed my Kinkos copy of "On Lisp"
and jumped far ahead to the CLOS chapter.  In section 25.1, there is a
footnote (which in the .pdf version is for page 349) which reads:

"Efforts to sum up Lisp in a single phrase are probably doomed to
failure, because the power of Lisp arises from the combination of at
least five or six features."

OK, I can think of

1 extensibility

2 garbage collection

3 functions as a type

4 ...  oh-oh out of newbie guesses




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spambait292 (571)
4/27/2005 11:33:04 AM
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GP lisper schrieb:
> Trying to get a handle on CLOS, I grabbed my Kinkos copy of "On Lisp"
> and jumped far ahead to the CLOS chapter.  In section 25.1, there is a
> footnote (which in the .pdf version is for page 349) which reads:
> 
> "Efforts to sum up Lisp in a single phrase are probably doomed to
> failure, because the power of Lisp arises from the combination of at
> least five or six features."
> 
> OK, I can think of
> 
> 1 extensibility
> 
> 2 garbage collection
> 
> 3 functions as a type

I would add: equality between code and data.
Another good thing is that you always have the full language available. 
I could write a program that creates some data at runtime which is then 
seen as code and gets compiled while the program is running.


Andr´┐Ż
--
0
4/27/2005 11:47:07 AM
On Wed, 27 Apr 2005 04:33:04 -0700, GP lisper <spambait@CloudDancer.com> wrote:

> Trying to get a handle on CLOS, I grabbed my Kinkos copy of "On
> Lisp" and jumped far ahead to the CLOS chapter.  In section 25.1,
> there is a footnote (which in the .pdf version is for page 349)
> which reads:
>
> "Efforts to sum up Lisp in a single phrase are probably doomed to
> failure, because the power of Lisp arises from the combination of at
> least five or six features."
>
> OK, I can think of
>
> 1 extensibility
>
> 2 garbage collection
>
> 3 functions as a type
>
> 4 ...  oh-oh out of newbie guesses

Graham himself has in the meantime made that nine instead of six:

  <http://www.paulgraham.com/diff.html>

Cheers,
Edi.

-- 

Lisp is not dead, it just smells funny.

Real email: (replace (subseq "spamtrap@agharta.de" 5) "edi")
0
spamtrap837 (1403)
4/27/2005 11:56:43 AM
GP lisper wrote:
> Trying to get a handle on CLOS, I grabbed my Kinkos copy of "On Lisp"
> and jumped far ahead to the CLOS chapter.  In section 25.1, there
> is a footnote (which in the .pdf version is for page 349) which
> reads:
>
> "Efforts to sum up Lisp in a single phrase are probably doomed to
> failure, because the power of Lisp arises from the combination of
> at least five or six features."
>
> OK, I can think of
>
> 1 extensibility
>
> 2 garbage collection
>
> 3 functions as a type
>
> 4 ...  oh-oh out of newbie guesses

More ideas...
- different scopes/extents
- you can interact with lisp at different times (read/compile/etc)
- compiler macros
- optional type declarations
- well-thought out primitive types like featureful arrays
- system utilities like apropos

I vaguely recall Ant=F3nio Menezes Leit=E3o mentioned unusual uses for
compiler macros.
http://lisp.tech.coop/Paper#leitao

Maybe here?
http://www.gia.ist.utl.pt/~aml/Links/readable-efficient.ps

0
tayss_temp2 (762)
4/27/2005 12:20:03 PM
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