f



FAQ 1.12 What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? #16

This is an excerpt from the latest version perlfaq1.pod, which
comes with the standard Perl distribution. These postings aim to 
reduce the number of repeated questions as well as allow the community
to review and update the answers. The latest version of the complete
perlfaq is at http://faq.perl.org .

--------------------------------------------------------------------

1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"?

    One bit. Oh, you weren't talking ASCII? :-) Larry now uses "Perl" to
    signify the language proper and "perl" the implementation of it, i.e.
    the current interpreter. Hence Tom's quip that "Nothing but perl can
    parse Perl."

    Before the first edition of *Programming perl*, people commonly referred
    to the language as "perl", and its name appeared that way in the title
    because it referred to the interpreter. In the book, Randal Schwartz
    capitalised the language's name to make it stand out better when
    typeset. This convention was adopted by the community, and the second
    edition became *Programming Perl*, using the capitalized version of the
    name to refer to the language.

    You may or may not choose to follow this usage. For example, parallelism
    means "awk and perl" and "Python and Perl" look good, while "awk and
    Perl" and "Python and perl" do not. But never write "PERL", because perl
    is not an acronym, apocryphal folklore and post-facto expansions
    notwithstanding.



--------------------------------------------------------------------

The perlfaq-workers, a group of volunteers, maintain the perlfaq. They
are not necessarily experts in every domain where Perl might show up,
so please include as much information as possible and relevant in any
corrections. The perlfaq-workers also don't have access to every
operating system or platform, so please include relevant details for
corrections to examples that do not work on particular platforms.
Working code is greatly appreciated.

If you'd like to help maintain the perlfaq, see the details in 
perlfaq.pod.
0
brian125 (4408)
4/22/2008 1:03:05 PM
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>>>>> "PS" == PerlFAQ Server <brian@stonehenge.com> writes:

  PS> 1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"?

  PS>     You may or may not choose to follow this usage. For example,
  PS>     parallelism means "awk and perl" and "Python and Perl" look
  PS>     good, while "awk and Perl" and "Python and perl" do not. But
  PS>     never write "PERL", because perl is not an acronym, apocryphal
  PS>     folklore and post-facto expansions notwithstanding.

what good timing! the appropriate official FAQ entry about not writing
PERL shows up soon after the never dying thread on that stupid subject.

and notice how none of the PERL usage flamers are back helping with the
usual questions and problems posted here. the regulars are doing their
jobs as usual. just like i said many times before, you help here, you
can have a say here. otherwise your comments on anything are highly
downgraded.

uri

-- 
Uri Guttman  ------  uri@stemsystems.com  --------  http://www.sysarch.com --
-----  Perl Code Review , Architecture, Development, Training, Support ------
--------- Free Perl Training --- http://perlhunter.com/college.html ---------
---------  Gourmet Hot Cocoa Mix  ----  http://bestfriendscocoa.com ---------
0
Uri
4/22/2008 6:46:36 PM
Uri Guttman wrote:
>>>>>> "PS" == PerlFAQ Server <brian@stonehenge.com> writes:
>
>> 1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"?
>
>>     You may or may not choose to follow this usage. For example,
>>     parallelism means "awk and perl" and "Python and Perl" look
>>     good, while "awk and Perl" and "Python and perl" do not. But
>>     never write "PERL", because perl is not an acronym, apocryphal
>>     folklore and post-facto expansions notwithstanding.
>
> what good timing! the appropriate official FAQ entry about not writing
> PERL shows up soon after the never dying thread on that stupid
> subject.

That was thread was over with and yet here you are bringing up the 
subject? Isn't that exactly what you told myself and others NOT to do?

> and notice how none of the PERL usage flamers are back helping with
> the usual questions and problems posted here.

I'm not above helping. It's a question of how much time one can devote. 
Either way that was never the issue and certainally not a requirement to 
comment as you tried to put it. (I actually work as a helper on other 
lists fwiw.)

Lastly, I would put forth that the language in this FAQ be less 
ambiguous.

Perhaps, isntead of,
   But never write "PERL", because perl is not an acronym,
   apocryphal folklore and post-facto expansions notwithstanding.
,
it could be something like,
   "PERL" is not an acronym per-se, but a backcronym, as defined
   in the Perl man page.

-- 
G.Etly 


0
Gordon
4/25/2008 10:42:35 PM
>>>>> "GE" == Gordon Etly <get@bentsys.com> writes:

  GE> Uri Guttman wrote:
  >>>>>>> "PS" == PerlFAQ Server <brian@stonehenge.com> writes:
  >> 
  >>> 1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"?
  >> 
  >>> You may or may not choose to follow this usage. For example,
  >>> parallelism means "awk and perl" and "Python and Perl" look
  >>> good, while "awk and Perl" and "Python and perl" do not. But
  >>> never write "PERL", because perl is not an acronym, apocryphal
  >>> folklore and post-facto expansions notwithstanding.
  >> 
  >> what good timing! the appropriate official FAQ entry about not writing
  >> PERL shows up soon after the never dying thread on that stupid
  >> subject.

  GE> That was thread was over with and yet here you are bringing up the 
  GE> subject? Isn't that exactly what you told myself and others NOT to do?

  >> and notice how none of the PERL usage flamers are back helping with
  >> the usual questions and problems posted here.

  GE> I'm not above helping. It's a question of how much time one can devote. 
  GE> Either way that was never the issue and certainally not a requirement to 
  GE> comment as you tried to put it. (I actually work as a helper on other 
  GE> lists fwiw.)

two posts today and not one with perl help. good ratio.

  GE> Lastly, I would put forth that the language in this FAQ be less 
  GE> ambiguous.

  GE> Perhaps, isntead of,
  GE>    But never write "PERL", because perl is not an acronym,
  GE>    apocryphal folklore and post-facto expansions notwithstanding.
  GE> ,
  GE> it could be something like,
  GE>    "PERL" is not an acronym per-se, but a backcronym, as defined
  GE>    in the Perl man page.

and you couldn't say that during the entire flame war about PERL?

uri

-- 
Uri Guttman  ------  uri@stemsystems.com  --------  http://www.sysarch.com --
-----  Perl Code Review , Architecture, Development, Training, Support ------
--------- Free Perl Training --- http://perlhunter.com/college.html ---------
---------  Gourmet Hot Cocoa Mix  ----  http://bestfriendscocoa.com ---------
0
Uri
4/26/2008 3:21:12 AM
Uri Guttman wrote:
>>>>>> "GE" == Gordon Etly <get@bentsys.com> writes:
>
>> Uri Guttman wrote:
>  >>>>>>> "PS" == PerlFAQ Server <brian@stonehenge.com> writes:

....
>> Lastly, I would put forth that the language in this FAQ be less
>> ambiguous.
>
>> Perhaps, isntead of,
>>    But never write "PERL", because perl is not an acronym,
>>    apocryphal folklore and post-facto expansions notwithstanding.
>> ,
>> it could be something like,
>>    "PERL" is not an acronym per-se, but a backcronym, as defined
>>    in the Perl man page.
>
> and you couldn't say that during the entire flame war about PERL?

That is actually a combination of what I said and what others responded 
with. The key parts are, 1, that there is a connection between the 
expansion and "PERL", and that 2, "PERL" shouldn't be wrong to use if 
you mean it as a short for that expansion.

This is nothing really different than what I've said all along. If you 
and others weren't on your hell bent crusade at the time maybe you would 
of grasped that then as you seem to have finally done so now, and so I 
thank you for finally showing some civility.

-- 
G.Etly 


0
Gordon
4/26/2008 6:42:28 AM
Reply:

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This is an excerpt from the latest version perlfaq1.pod, which comes with the standard Perl distribution. These postings aim to reduce the number of repeated questions as well as allow the community to review and update the answers. The latest version of the complete perlfaq is at http://faq.perl.org . -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? One bit. Oh, you weren't talking ASCII? :-) Larry now uses "Perl" to signify the language proper and "perl" the implementation of it, i.e. the current interpreter. Hence Tom's quip that "Nothing but perl can parse Perl." Before the first edition of *Programming perl*, people commonly referred to the language as "perl", and its name appeared that way in the title because it referred to the interpreter. In the book, Randal Schwartz capitalised the language's name to make it stand out better when typeset. This convention was adopted by the community, and the second edition became *Programming Perl*, using the capitalized version of the name to refer to the language. You may or may not choose to follow this usage. For example, parallelism means "awk and perl" and "Python and Perl" look good, while "awk and Perl" and "Python and perl" do not. But never write "PERL", because pe...

FAQ 1.12 What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? #23
This is an excerpt from the latest version perlfaq1.pod, which comes with the standard Perl distribution. These postings aim to reduce the number of repeated questions as well as allow the community to review and update the answers. The latest version of the complete perlfaq is at http://faq.perl.org . -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? One bit. Oh, you weren't talking ASCII? :-) Larry now uses "Perl" to signify the language proper and "perl" the implementation of it, i.e. the current interpreter. Hence Tom's quip that "Nothing but perl can parse Perl." Before the first edition of *Programming perl*, people commonly referred to the language as "perl", and its name appeared that way in the title because it referred to the interpreter. In the book, Randal Schwartz capitalised the language's name to make it stand out better when typeset. This convention was adopted by the community, and the second edition became *Programming Perl*, using the capitalized version of the name to refer to the language. You may or may not choose to follow this usage. For example, parallelism means "awk and perl" and "Python and Perl" look good, while "awk and Perl" and "Python and perl" do not. But never write "PERL", because pe...

FAQ 1.12 What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? #3 553808
This is an excerpt from the latest version perlfaq1.pod, which comes with the standard Perl distribution. These postings aim to reduce the number of repeated questions as well as allow the community to review and update the answers. The latest version of the complete perlfaq is at http://faq.perl.org . -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? One bit. Oh, you weren't talking ASCII? :-) Larry now uses "Perl" to signify the language proper and "perl" the ...

FAQ 1.12 What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? #2 298657
This is an excerpt from the latest version perlfaq1.pod, which comes with the standard Perl distribution. These postings aim to reduce the number of repeated questions as well as allow the community to review and update the answers. The latest version of the complete perlfaq is at http://faq.perl.org . -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1.12: What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"? One bit. Oh, you weren't talking ASCII? :-) Larry now uses "Perl" to signify the language proper and "perl...

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