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3D PDF and 3d PostScript

Having just returned from witnessing student projects in 3D printing at my
university and hearing about their use of 3D PDF, I searched the web for 3d
PostScript, finding, among other tidbits, this little Bill Casselman gem:

<http://www.math.ubc.ca/~cass/graphics/manual/code/ps3d.inc>.

New to me, so I ask here: an experiences with that among c.L.PS readers?

Cheers, and thanks, -- tlvp
-- 
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP.
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tlvp
5/9/2014 3:33:40 AM
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On Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:33:40 PM UTC-5, tlvp wrote:
> Having just returned from witnessing student projects in 3D printing at my
> university and hearing about their use of 3D PDF, I searched the web for 3d
> PostScript, finding, among other tidbits, this little Bill Casselman gem:
> 
> <http://www.math.ubc.ca/~cass/graphics/manual/code/ps3d.inc>.
> 
> New to me, so I ask here: an experiences with that among c.L.PS readers?
> 

I've looked at it, and it is fairly comprehensive and
efficiently maintains inverse transformations at each
stage to avoid recalculating.

I ended up not using it and writing my own for the
Steinmetz solid code, mostly because I don't understand
homogenous coordinates. And all the 4x4 matrices just
freaked me out.

You should read his book before trying to use it. As he
explains how to use it and most of the mathematical
pieces that it's built from. First edition is super 
cheap on amazon.
0
luser
5/9/2014 6:38:13 AM
On Thu, 8 May 2014 23:38:13 -0700 (PDT), luser- -droog wrote:

> On Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:33:40 PM UTC-5, tlvp wrote:
>> Having just returned from witnessing student projects in 3D printing at my
>> university and hearing about their use of 3D PDF, I searched the web for 3d
>> PostScript, finding, among other tidbits, this little Bill Casselman gem:
>> 
>> <http://www.math.ubc.ca/~cass/graphics/manual/code/ps3d.inc>.
>> 
>> New to me, so I ask here: an experiences with that among c.L.PS readers?
>> 
> 
> I've looked at it, and it is fairly comprehensive and
> efficiently maintains inverse transformations at each
> stage to avoid recalculating.
> 
> I ended up not using it and writing my own for the
> Steinmetz solid code, mostly because I don't understand
> homogenous coordinates. And all the 4x4 matrices just
> freaked me out.
> 
> You should read his book before trying to use it. As he
> explains how to use it and most of the mathematical
> pieces that it's built from. First edition is super 
> cheap on amazon.

A question in this context: does Adobe's Distiller turn 3d PostScript into
3D PDF ? Or is there any 3d-ish ps2pdf tool? Cheers, -- tlvp
-- 
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP.
0
tlvp
5/10/2014 4:43:00 AM
On Friday, May 9, 2014 11:43:00 PM UTC-5, tlvp wrote:
> On Thu, 8 May 2014 23:38:13 -0700 (PDT), luser- -droog wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> > On Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:33:40 PM UTC-5, tlvp wrote:
> 
> >> Having just returned from witnessing student projects in 3D printing at my
> >> university and hearing about their use of 3D PDF, I searched the web for 3d
> >> PostScript, finding, among other tidbits, this little Bill Casselman gem:
> >> 
> >> <http://www.math.ubc.ca/~cass/graphics/manual/code/ps3d.inc>.
> >> 
> >> New to me, so I ask here: an experiences with that among c.L.PS readers?
> >> 
> > 
> > I've looked at it, and it is fairly comprehensive and
> > efficiently maintains inverse transformations at each
> > stage to avoid recalculating.
> > 
> > I ended up not using it and writing my own for the
> > Steinmetz solid code, mostly because I don't understand
> > homogenous coordinates. And all the 4x4 matrices just
> > freaked me out.
> > 
> > You should read his book before trying to use it. As he
> > explains how to use it and most of the mathematical
> > pieces that it's built from. First edition is super 
> > cheap on amazon.

The chapters are also available up a few directories from 
the above link.
 
> A question in this context: does Adobe's Distiller turn 3d PostScript into
> 3D PDF ? 

Google led me to this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_3D
Which describes a "u3d" compressed file format that can be embedded 
in pdf and rendered with Acrobat Reader. But Casselman's 3D package
is a wholly independent effort, and its postscript output converts
directly into native pdf primitives. A unix analogy would be that
Casselman's ps3d.inc is very much a *user-land* tool, whereas
..u3d support has been patched-in to the Acrobat kernel.

> Or is there any 3d-ish ps2pdf tool? Cheers, -- tlvp

ps2pdf will work fine with ps3d.inc. You'll also need perl, of couse,
but who doesn't?! And ghostscript, of course. And a text editor.
It may also require other include files from the site. I recall not
finding links on the main manual page to some of the files mentioned,
but some simple editing of the URL should fetch whatever you may need.

The .u3d, being a compressed binary format, I'm sure requires more
specialized tools. For this I defer again to Wikipedia.

And, of course, for a simpler implementation of *some* of the capabilities
of Casselman's code, there is my own code, which was written with 
Casselman's manual on one knee and a linear algebra book on the other.
http://code.google.com/p/xpost/downloads/detail?name=3d5c.ps
http://code.google.com/p/xpost/downloads/detail?name=mat.ps

0
luser
5/10/2014 6:02:22 AM
On Fri, 9 May 2014 23:02:22 -0700 (PDT), luser- -droog wrote, ending with:

> And, of course, for a simpler implementation of *some* of the capabilities
> of Casselman's code, there is my own code, which was written with 
> Casselman's manual on one knee and a linear algebra book on the other.
> http://code.google.com/p/xpost/downloads/detail?name=3d5c.ps
> http://code.google.com/p/xpost/downloads/detail?name=mat.ps

Oh, thanks for those URLs, I don't think I was aware of them last time we'd
chatted about the max{(x^2 + y^2), (x^2 + z^2), (y^2 + z^2)} = 1 surface.

Cheers, -- tlvp
-- 
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP.
0
tlvp
5/11/2014 1:01:01 AM
On Friday, May 9, 2014 7:33:40 AM UTC+4, tlvp wrote:
> Having just returned from witnessing student projects in 3D printing at m=
y=20
> university and hearing about their use of 3D PDF

BTW, how is 3D PDF related to 3D printing?

From the technical point of view, 3D in PDF has nothing in common with Post=
Script or PDF itself.
Adobe just purchased a 3D viewer for an existing format (U3D) and extended =
PDF to embed U3D into PDF, later purchased a viewer for another format (PRC=
) with the development team, going to benefit from selling tools to convert=
 from other 3D formats to 3D PDF and finally scaled down its 3D effort almo=
st to nothing and sold the PRC team to TechSoft 3D.

There are free and open source tools to produce 3D PDF, and several commerc=
ial products are available as demo versions.
0
master
5/18/2014 11:54:46 AM
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