f



python-dev Summary for 2005-01-16 through 2005-01-31

=====================
Summary Announcements
=====================

-----------------------------------------
School sure likes to destroy my free time
-----------------------------------------

A month late, that much closer to having this hectic quarter being over.  Sorry 
for being so delinquent with this summary but school has kept me busy and 
obviously the Real World has to take precedence over volunteer work.  Now if I 
could only get paid for doing this... =)

And if you hate the summaries being late, you could do it yourself.  This is 
not meant to be a flippant comment!  I am always willing to hand over 
development of the summaries to anyone who is willing to do a comparable job. 
If you are interested feel free to email me.  I have now made this a permanent 
offer in the header in case someone comes along later and decides they want to 
do this.


----------------------
RSS feed now available
----------------------

Thanks entirely to one of my predecessors, A.M. Kuchling, the python-dev 
Summaries are available as an `RSS feed`_.  The feed contains the titles of 
every summary and so will be updated with the newest summaries as soon as they 
are posted online.  A full text feed will eventually be available.


----------
New format
----------

I have done a thorough restructuring of the boilerplate and the Summary 
Announcements section for the Summaries.  The purpose of this is to make 
finding information in the boilerplate much easier.  It also keeps consistency 
by sectioning off everything as in the Summary section.

The other reason is for the ``contents`` directive in reST_.  This will provide 
a more thorough table of contents for the web version of the summary at the 
very top of the summaries.  This will allow people to jump directly to the 
section of the Summary they care about the most.  Obviously this perk only 
exists in the HTML version.

Lastly, the typical boilerplate for each Summary has now been moved to the 
bottom.  This was at the request of a regular reader who I would like to keep 
happy.  =)  It also seems reasonable since once you have read through it once 
chances are you are not going to read it again so might as well move it out of 
the way.

Then again I could be totally wrong about all of this and manage to alienate 
every person who reads the summaries regularly.  =)




=======
Summary
=======

---------------------
Python 2.3.5 released
---------------------

Consider how late this summary is I bet you already knew Python 2.3.5 was 
already out the door.  =)

With Python 2.4 out in the world this means there is a very high probability 
2.3.6 will never exist and this marks the end of the 2.3 branch.

Contributing threads:
   - `2.3.5 delayed til next week 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051140.html>`__
   - `2.3 BRANCH FREEZE imminent! 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051277.html>`__
   - `RELEASED Python 2.3.5, release candidate 1 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051304.html>`__


------------------------------------------------------
Making magic type conversion methods act like __str__
------------------------------------------------------

Walter Dörwald discovered that when you subclass 'unicode' and call unicode() 
on an instance of the subclass it will not call the implementation of 
__unicode__ of the subclass but instead will call unicode.__unicode__ .  When 
in the same scenario with strings, though, str() calls the subclass' __str__ 
method.  Turns out 'int' and 'float' act like 'unicode' while 'complex' acts 
like 'str'.

So who is right?  Docs say 'str' is wrong, but this is mainly an artifact of 
pre-2.2 inability to subclass types.  Turns out 'str' is acting properly. 
`Patch #1109424`_ implements the proper semantics and will eventually go in for 
2.5 (won't touch 2.4 since it is a semantic change).

... _Patch #1109424: http://www.python.org/sf/1109424

Contributing threads:
   - `__str__ vs. __unicode__ 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051175.html>`__


---------------------------------------------
Speeding up function calls to C API functions
---------------------------------------------

Neal Norwitz posted the patch found at http://www.python.org/sf/1107887 to help 
with function calls to C code.  The idea is to expand the family of values used 
in PyMethodDef.ml_flags for argument types to include specifying the number of 
minimum and maximum number of arguments.  This can provide a speedup by 
allowing the eval loop to unpack everything in the C stack and skip packing 
arguments in a tuple.

But not everyone was sure it was worth the extra need to specify all of this 
for functions.  Regardless of that and any other objections this would be more 
of a Python 3000 thing.

Which also led to a quick shift in topic to how Python 3.0 will be developed. 
Guido said it would be piece-meal.  Read 
http://joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000069.html for why.

Contributing threads:
   - `Speed up function calls 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051251.html>`__
   - `Moving towards Python 3.0 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051355.html>`__


------------------------------------------------------------
How to handle memory allocation with the presence of threads
------------------------------------------------------------

Evan Jones has been working on a patch to allow the garbage collector to free 
up memory of small objects.  This led him to ask questions in terms of memory 
usage in the face of threading at the C level.  While the GIL usually needs to 
be held for any operation that touches Python code, he was not sure if this 
held for the memory API.

Tim Peters clarified all of this by pointing out the documentation in the C API 
manual about the GIL.  In a nutshell the memory API is not exempt from needing 
to hold the GIL, so hold it.

It was also pointed out there was a bunch of code to allow people to mix usage 
of PyMem_* functions with PyObject_* functions.  That was purely done for 
backwards-compatibility back in the day.  Mixing these two APIs for memory is 
very bad.  Don't do it!

Contributing threads:
   - `Improving the Python Memory Allocator 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051255.html>`__
   - `Python Interpreter Thread Safety? 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051335.html>`__


--------------------------
Slicing iterators rejected
--------------------------

Nick Coghlan proposed allowing iterators to be sliced liked other sequence 
types.  That way something like ``enumerate("ABCD")[1:]`` would work.

But Guido rejected it.  With itertools.islice existence it does not provide new 
functionality.  Plus "Iterators are for single sequential access" according to 
Guido, and thus should not be confused with sequences.

Contributing threads:
   - `Allowing slicing of iterators 
<http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-dev/2005-January/051257.html>`__


===============
Skipped Threads
===============

- redux: fractional seconds in strptime
- how to test behavior wrt an extension type?
- Strange segfault in Python threads and linux kernel 2.6
- Unix line endings required for PyRun* breaking embedded Python
- Zen of Python
- PyCon: The Spam Continues ;-)
- Patch review: [ 1094542 ] add Bunch type to collections module



========
Epilogue
========

------------
Introduction
------------

This is a summary of traffic on the `python-dev mailing list`_ from
January 16, 2005 through January 31, 2005.
It is intended to inform the wider Python community of on-going
developments on the list on a semi-monthly basis.  An archive_ of
previous summaries is available online.

An `RSS feed`_ of the titles of the summaries is available.
You can also watch comp.lang.python or comp.lang.python.announce for
new summaries (or through their email gateways of python-list or
python-announce, respectively, as found at http://mail.python.org).

This is the fifty-seventh summary written by Brett Cannon (grad schools are 
actually crazy enough to accept me  =).

To contact me, please send email to brett at python.org.  Do *not*
post to comp.lang.python if you wish to reach me.

The `Python Software Foundation`_ is the non-profit organization that
holds the intellectual property for Python.  It also tries to advance
the development and use of Python.  If you find the python-dev Summary
helpful please consider making a donation.  You can make a donation at
http://python.org/psf/donations.html .  Every penny helps so even a
small donation with a credit card, check, or by PayPal helps.

If you are looking for a way to expand your knowledge of Python's
development and inner-workings, consider writing the python-dev
Summaries yourself!  I am willing to hand over the reins to someone
who is willing to do a comparable or better job of writing the
Summaries.  If you are interested, please email me at
brett at python.org.


--------------------
Commenting on Topics
--------------------

To comment on anything mentioned here, just post to
`comp.lang.python`_ (or email python-list@python.org which is a
gateway to the newsgroup) with a subject line mentioning what you are
discussing.  All python-dev members are interested in seeing ideas
discussed by the community, so don't hesitate to take a stance on
something.  And if all of this really interests you then get involved
and join `python-dev`_!


-------------------------
How to Read the Summaries
-------------------------

The in-development version of the documentation for Python can be
found at http://www.python.org/dev/doc/devel/ and should be used when
looking up any documentation for new code; otherwise use the current
documentation as found at http://docs.python.org/ .  PEPs (Python
Enhancement Proposals) are located at http://www.python.org/peps/ .
To view files in the Python CVS online, go to
http://cvs.sourceforge.net/cgi-bin/viewcvs.cgi/python/ .  Reported
bugs and suggested patches can be found at the SourceForge_ project
page.

Please note that this summary is written using reStructuredText_.
Any unfamiliar punctuation is probably markup for reST_ (otherwise it
is probably regular expression syntax or a typo =); you can safely
ignore it.  I do suggest learning reST, though; it's simple and is
accepted for `PEP markup`_ and can be turned into many different
formats like HTML and LaTeX.  Unfortunately, even though reST is
standardized, the wonders of programs that like to reformat text do
not allow me to guarantee you will be able to run the text version of
this summary through Docutils_ as-is unless it is from the
`original text file`_.

... _python-dev: http://www.python.org/dev/
... _SourceForge: http://sourceforge.net/tracker/?group_id=5470
... _python-dev mailing list: http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-dev
... _comp.lang.python: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=comp.lang.python
... _PEP Markup: http://www.python.org/peps/pep-0012.html

... _Docutils: http://docutils.sf.net/
... _reST:
... _reStructuredText: http://docutils.sf.net/rst.html
... _PSF:
... _Python Software Foundation: http://python.org/psf/

... _last summary: http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-01-01_2005-01-15.html
... _original text file: http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-01-16_2005-01-31.ht
... _archive: http://www.python.org/dev/summary/
... _RSS feed: http://www.python.org/dev/summary/channews.rdf

0
bac1 (39)
3/1/2005 3:18:20 AM
comp.lang.python 77058 articles. 6 followers. Post Follow

7 Replies
445 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 32

Brett Cannon:
>Lastly, the typical boilerplate for each Summary has now been moved to
the
>bottom.  This was at the request of a regular reader who I would like
to keep
>happy.  =)  It also seems reasonable since once you have read through
it once
>chances are you are not going to read it again so might as well move
it out of
>the way.

+1 for this idea. The summary looks much better now :)
Keep the good work going,

                          Michele Simionato

0
3/1/2005 4:02:59 AM
Michele Simionato wrote [on c.l.py]:
> Brett Cannon:
[... python-dev summary ... boilerplate change ...]
> 
> +1 for this idea. The summary looks much better now :)
> Keep the good work going,
> 
Sorry, but i have to disagree. I hope you won't take this reply 
personally, Michele, since it's directed to all c.l.py readers, as well 
as (particularly) at Python users who [unlike you] are mostly take and 
rather less give. Although this is inherently the nature of open source, 
in certain cases this can be taken too far.

I have a long history of doing things, and an equally long history 
giving up doing them. This stems from a personal belief that organic 
growth (IMHO the healthiest type) will only be engendered by variety.

I was the Chairman of the Sun UK User Group once.

When I was elected I said I would serve for two years, and when I 
resigned after two years many people said to me "Steve, please 
reconsider your decision". I observed, perhaps somewhat cynically, that 
most of the people who said this were motivated by the wish to avoid the 
pain of locating and electing a new chairman.

Guess what ... when I refused to reconsider they found a new chairman, 
who was at least as good as me (I thought he was better), and life 
carried on. If you were to ask a member of the Sun UK User Group now the 
name of their second chairman I'd be very surprised if they had any idea 
who the hell Steve Holden was. (Historical note: the first chairman was 
Chris Brown, and nobody will remember him either).

Now, the reason for this specific rant is this: I can tell a cry for 
help when I see one. Brett has done a magnificent job of providing 
python-dev summaries since Andrew decided he'd had enough, and he is to 
be congratulated for it. I managed to offload another bunch of work on 
him (moderation of various troublesome PyCon mailing lists), but at 
least I was able to recompense him by letting him into PyCon for nothing.

I can say this because I am confident that nobody will even think of 
suggesting that Brett's contribution to the Python community doesn't 
entitle him to a free place at PyCon. I suspect most readers of this 
list would feel the same about Guido (I certainly hope so, because he 
too is a free-loader this year :-). I would actually like a free place 
at PyCon to represent recognition of significant contributions to the 
Python community, but there is a conflict here with another of my goals 
(raising funds for the PSF).

But frankly, I think it's time someone else stood up and said "Brett, 
you've done a magnificent job. Hesitant though I am about replacing you, 
I would like to volunteer for the task, because only when you are free 
from the burden of writing the python-dev summaries will we see what 
else you are capable of". Since I am at best an intermittent reader of 
python-dev I can say this without fear of having to stand up myself.

Oops, I'm rambling. I guess what I'm trying to say boils down to "Ask 
not what the Python community can do for you ...", and anyone who can't 
provide the remainder of the analogy is too young to consider themselves 
a victim of this post, and can claim a free ticket until they are old 
enough ti understand what history is.

I like to think that although I don't make frequent checkins to the code 
base I do *something* to engender the Python community spirit (though I 
don't consider my own interpretation of that spirit to uniquely define 
it), and I'm damned sure Brett has done his share.

It would be great if just a *few* more people who are currently 
consuming the fruits of our labors would stop sitting on the sidelines 
shouting "great job!" and roll their sleeves up.

I hope I'll be able to put these remarks in a corporate context for 
PyCon - which astute readers will have noticed will be my last PyCon as 
chairman. I am happy to say that Andrew Kuchling has finally admitted 
his lust for power and confirmed that he is prepared to act as chairman 
for 2006, and I wish him well. More later

one-more-thing-given-up-ly y'rs  - steve
0
steve73 (4801)
3/1/2005 11:14:59 AM
Brett,
<...snip...>
> ----------
> New format
> ----------
> 
> I have done a thorough restructuring of the boilerplate and the Summary 
> Announcements section for the Summaries.  The purpose of this is to make 
> finding information in the boilerplate much easier.  It also keeps 
> consistency by sectioning off everything as in the Summary section.
> 
> The other reason is for the ``contents`` directive in reST_.  This will 
> provide a more thorough table of contents for the web version of the 
> summary at the very top of the summaries.  This will allow people to 
> jump directly to the section of the Summary they care about the most.  
> Obviously this perk only exists in the HTML version.
> 
> Lastly, the typical boilerplate for each Summary has now been moved to 
> the bottom.  This was at the request of a regular reader who I would 
> like to keep happy.  =)  It also seems reasonable since once you have 
> read through it once chances are you are not going to read it again so 
> might as well move it out of the way.
> 
> Then again I could be totally wrong about all of this and manage to 
> alienate every person who reads the summaries regularly.  =)
> 
<...snip...>

as always I do appreciate your summaries. This new format, with the 
boilerplate at the end certainly is an improvement. However, I always 
use your news announcement as a trigger to read the version at 
<http://www.python.org/dev/summary/<dates>.html>. I used to do this by 
clicking on the "archive" link at the beginning of your message and then 
clicking on the latest summary. For my type of reading I would strongly 
prefer to have the link to the actual version at the top of the message, 
rather than at the end.

I hope you keep summarizing as long as no other volunteer takes over.

thanks, Gerrit


-- 
Gaudi systems architecting:
<http://www.extra.research.philips.com/natlab/sysarch/>

0
3/1/2005 12:22:12 PM
Steve Holden wrote:
> Now, the reason for this specific rant is this: I can tell a cry for 
> help when I see one. Brett has done a magnificent job of providing 
> python-dev summaries since Andrew decided he'd had enough, and he is to 
> be congratulated for it. I managed to offload another bunch of work on 
> him (moderation of various troublesome PyCon mailing lists), but at 
> least I was able to recompense him by letting him into PyCon for nothing.

The more I participate, the more I can relate to Eric Raymond's notion
of a "gift society". Volunteers give their contributions to the
community just because they want to, and they may get recognition in
return. But because these are gifts, you can just stop giving them away
at any time, and nobody should feel bad about doing so. The community
only is only entitled to the contributor saying so - finding somebody
else to step in is indeed optional.

I don't actually know whether Brett would prefer to hand over the
python-dev summaries to somebody else, but if he wants to, he could
just *stop* publishing them, with nobody taking over, and my
appreciation of this contribution would not change at all. Continuing
it until a new volunteer steps forward is, as I said, truly optional.

I still recall when Tim Peters reappeared in the net (even though
I haven't been around long enough to remember him disappear), and
I know I didn't understand all the cheering and praising (I do
now, of course). So their isn't anything wrong with taking a
vacation from a project for some time, not even if the vacation
takes a few years :-)

Enough ranting.

Regards,
Martin
0
ISO
3/1/2005 11:18:53 PM
Steve Holden wrote:
> Michele Simionato wrote [on c.l.py]:
> 
>> Brett Cannon:
> 
> [... python-dev summary ... boilerplate change ...]
> 
>>
>> +1 for this idea. The summary looks much better now :)
>> Keep the good work going,
>>
> Sorry, but i have to disagree. I hope you won't take this reply 
> personally, Michele, since it's directed to all c.l.py readers, as well 
> as (particularly) at Python users who [unlike you] are mostly take and 
> rather less give. Although this is inherently the nature of open source, 
> in certain cases this can be taken too far.
> 
[SNIP]
> Now, the reason for this specific rant is this: I can tell a cry for 
> help when I see one. Brett has done a magnificent job of providing 
> python-dev summaries since Andrew decided he'd had enough, and he is to 
> be congratulated for it. I managed to offload another bunch of work on 
> him (moderation of various troublesome PyCon mailing lists), but at 
> least I was able to recompense him by letting him into PyCon for nothing.
> 
[SNIP]
> But frankly, I think it's time someone else stood up and said "Brett, 
> you've done a magnificent job. Hesitant though I am about replacing you, 
> I would like to volunteer for the task, because only when you are free 
> from the burden of writing the python-dev summaries will we see what 
> else you are capable of". Since I am at best an intermittent reader of 
> python-dev I can say this without fear of having to stand up myself.
> 
[SNIP]

[I am going to use this to reply to both Steve and Martin]

As Steve mentioned above, he can spot a cry for help when he sees one.  I think 
the problem is that I am a total sucker when it comes to the Python community 
and python-dev.

Anyone who has been on the python-dev list for as long as I have been a 
participant has most likely seen my almost yearly "thank you" emails I send the 
list (which there will probably be another one of once I choose where I am 
going to pursue my doctorate; I have acceptances but I am still waiting to here 
back from 9 more schools).  Usually it is just me gushing to python-dev, 
thanking the list for how Python has gotten me where I am today.  And that 
statement is completely sincere; python-dev has sculpted me into the programmer 
that I am (does this mean I can blame python-dev for my own buggy code?  =). 
And for that I will be eternally grateful to all of the wonderful people I have 
gotten to work with and know on this list.

It has also made me want to help people to get involved on python-dev in hopes 
others would benefit from python-dev the same way I have.  Granted, python-dev 
tends not to attract people like I was when I started getting involved (a 
philosophy degree and 4 CS courses does not equal a good programmer by default 
  =), but I have always hoped that through my efforts some other people could 
come to enjoy hacking on Python, learn some things, and advance the language.

But I think the big problem is that the Summaries have become a "gift" in the 
truest sense of the word.  I lost all personal benefit from the Summaries over 
a year ago.  Initially I learned a ton from all of the reading I was doing and 
the research required to understand what the heck people were talking about. 
But I have graduated from "The School of Hard Knocks".  At this point I do the 
Summaries entirely altruistically, giving back what I can to the community in a 
way that I know benefits many people which happens to have zero benefit to me now.

The Summaries consume what little free time I do have for Python which is 
unfortunate.  I have always hoped I would get to the point in my programming 
abilities that I would be a larger asset to python-dev as a programmer than as 
a writer.  I would like to think I have reached that point finally after my 
over two and a half years on the list (I can't believe I first posted to the 
list on June 17, 2002!).

So, to make sure I don't squander what time I do have for Python waiting for a 
possible replacement that might never come, I have decided that I am going to 
stop doing the python-dev Summaries after PyCon; the Summary covering the last 
half of March 2005 will be it for me.  Hopefully I will be more valuable as an 
active participant on python-dev again instead of as a passive listener who 
just happens to chime in on occasion and squash a simple bug when I am 
procrastinating from doing my homework.

This has been a long time coming and I needed a swift kick in the ass to 
finally get me to stop.  I thank you, Steve, for giving me that kick like the 
English gentleman you are.  =)

-Brett
0
bac1 (39)
3/2/2005 3:52:06 AM
Gerrit Muller wrote:
>
> as always I do appreciate your summaries. This new format, with the
> boilerplate at the end certainly is an improvement. However, I always

> use your news announcement as a trigger to read the version at
> <http://www.python.org/dev/summary/<dates>.html>. I used to do this
by
> clicking on the "archive" link at the beginning of your message and
then
> clicking on the latest summary. For my type of reading I would
strongly
> prefer to have the link to the actual version at the top of the
message,
> rather than at the end.
>

I bet you are not the only one.  I have now added a link just below the
TOC that points directly to the HTML version of the current Summary.

> I hope you keep summarizing as long as no other volunteer takes over.
>

That will be true if someone picks it up between now and end of March.
I just sent a reply to Steve's email announcing my retirement from the
python-dev Summaries after I send off the March 16 - 31 Summary.  Time
to stop and try to be more helpful in a (personally more enjoyable)
coding capacity on python-dev.

-Brett

0
3/2/2005 4:01:06 AM
Martin v. L�wis wrote:
> Steve Holden wrote:
> 
> The more I participate, the more I can relate to Eric Raymond's notion
> of a "gift society". Volunteers give their contributions to the
> community just because they want to, and they may get recognition in
> return. But because these are gifts, you can just stop giving them away
> at any time, and nobody should feel bad about doing so. The community
> only is only entitled to the contributor saying so - finding somebody
> else to step in is indeed optional.

I write a few open source projects myself, and I get virtually no 
feedback or patches on anything. Only complaints if there are bugs :-)

But on the other hand I use a lot of other peoples code without commenting.

I guess that is the way it must work. You take leadership in a small 
area, and you keep it as long as you care to.

So while it might not feel as a "brotherhood of shared effort" in the 
single sub-project, it might very well be on a higher level.


-- 

hilsen/regards Max M, Denmark

http://www.mxm.dk/
IT's Mad Science
0
maxm (304)
3/2/2005 2:59:27 PM
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[Note: yes, this is *September*! All my (Tony's) bad, Steve has been =20= chugging away at the summaries like he should have. Extra apologies =20 for this one - it was approved by python-dev a while back, and I =20 didn't realise that I hadn't done the python-list post.] python-dev Summary for 2005-09-01 through 2005-09-15 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ... contents:: [The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-09-01_2005-09-15.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3...

python-dev Summary for 2005-07-16 through 2005-07-31
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-07-16_2005-07-31.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D ------------------------------------------------- PyPy Sprint in Heidelberg 22nd - 29th August 2005 ------------------------------------------------- Heidelberg University in Germany will host a PyPy_ sprint from 22nd = August to 29th August. The sprint will push towards the 0.7 release of PyPy_ = which hopes to reach Python 2.4.1 compliancy and to have full, direct, = ...

python-dev Summary for 2005-12-16 through 2005-12-31
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-12-16_2005-12-31.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D ---------------------------- QOTF: Quote of the Fortnight ---------------------------- Python-dev is in love with Python, though sometimes too much, Fredrik Lundh contends: ...in reality, some things are carefully thought out and craftily implemented, some things are engineering tradeoffs made at a certain time, and some things are just accidents -- but python-dev will happily defe...

python-dev Summary for 2005-02-01 through 2005-02-14
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-02-01_2005-02-14.html] ===================== Summary Announcements ===================== -------------------------- Giving myself a gold watch -------------------------- As some of you may have already heard or read, I am retiring from writing the python-dev Summaries after sending out the March 16 - 31 summary. It has been a long time coming and it required a kick in the ass (graciously supplied by Steve Holden) to finally make me let go of doing this and let someone else take over. The joy of ...

python-dev Summary for 2005-12-01 through 2005-12-15
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-12-01_2005-12-15.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D ----------------------------------------------------- Reminder: plain text documentation fixes are accepted ----------------------------------------------------- Want to help out with the Python documentation? Don't know LaTeX? No problem! Plain text or ReST fixes are also welcome. You won't be able to produce a diff file like with a normal patch, but comments that explain how t...

python-dev Summary for 2005-08-01 through 2005-08-15
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-08-01_2005-08-15.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D ---------------------------- QOTF: Quote of the Fortnight ---------------------------- Some wise words from Donovan Baarda in the PEP 347 discussions: It is true that some well designed/developed software becomes = reliable very quickly. However, it still takes heavy use over time to prove that. Contributing thread: - `PEP: Migrating the Python CVS to Subversion <http://mail.p...

python-dev Summary for 2005-07-16 through 2005-07-31
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-07-16_2005-07-31.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D ------------------------------------------------- PyPy Sprint in Heidelberg 22nd - 29th August 2005 ------------------------------------------------- Heidelberg University in Germany will host a PyPy_ sprint from 22nd = August to 29th August. The sprint will push towards the 0.7 release of PyPy_ = which hopes to reach Python 2.4.1 compliancy and to have full, direct, = translation into ...

python-dev summary for 2005-07-01 to 2005-07-15
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-07-01_2005-07-15.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D ------------------------------ QOTF (Quotes of the Fortnight) ------------------------------ Marc-Andre Lemburg provides perhaps the best summary to date of `how strings and Unicode should be used`_ in Python: To untie this Gordian Knot, we should use strings and Unicode like they are supposed to be used (in the context of text data): * strings are fine for text data that is encod...

python-dev Summary for 2005-03-01 through 2005-03-15
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-03-01_2005-03-15.html] ===================== Summary Announcements ===================== ----------------------------- Second to last summary for me ----------------------------- Just a reminder, after this Summary there is only one more left for me to write. After that Tim Lesher, Tony Meyer, and Steven Bethard will be taking over. ----------------- See you at PyCon! ----------------- PyCon_ is practically upon us! If you are going to be there, great! Please feel free to say hello if you run int...

python-dev Summary for 2005-05-01 through 2005-05-15
[The HTML version of this Summary is available at http://www.python.org/dev/summary/2005-05-01_2005-05-15.html] =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D Summary Announcements =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D ---------------------------------------------- PEP 340 Episode 2: Revenge of the With (Block) ---------------------------------------------- This fornight's Python-Dev was dominated again by another nearly 400 messages on the topic of anonymous block statements. The discussion was a little more focused than the last thanks mainly...

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