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python QT or python-GTK

** All the posts found in google are old.  I'm assuming new improvements have been made to both IDEs. **

Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm a newbie.

1. Which one of them requires fewer lines to accomplish the same thing?
from what I understand QT it's just like Borland J-Builder. Meaning, you want a button, you draw it, then you double-click on it, a window opens up and you type events and behavior.
And with GTK, you just type everything.

2. Which one is cross platform? (Linux, MacOS, Windows,etc).

3. Which one has more widgets?

4. Which one is the easiest to pick up?  I tried perl-QT and oh boy that mother is cryptic.

5. Which one has a bigger support community?

6. or if you think both pythonQT and PythonGTK are junk please suggest the one you like/use? I work on a Linux platform with Python 2.4.

Thanks guys, I appreciate  your help.


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j23212 (2)
3/18/2007 9:55:47 PM
comp.lang.python 77058 articles. 6 followers. Post Follow

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On Sunday 18 March 2007 9:55 pm, Jon Van DeVries wrote:
> ** All the posts found in google are old.  I'm assuming new improvements
> have been made to both IDEs. **
>
> Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm a newbie.
>
> 1. Which one of them requires fewer lines to accomplish the same thing?
> from what I understand QT it's just like Borland J-Builder. Meaning, you
> want a button, you draw it, then you double-click on it, a window opens up
> and you type events and behavior. And with GTK, you just type everything.
>
> 2. Which one is cross platform? (Linux, MacOS, Windows,etc).
>
> 3. Which one has more widgets?
>
> 4. Which one is the easiest to pick up?  I tried perl-QT and oh boy that
> mother is cryptic.
>
> 5. Which one has a bigger support community?
>
> 6. or if you think both pythonQT and PythonGTK are junk please suggest the
> one you like/use? I work on a Linux platform with Python 2.4.

A good start would be to appreciate that both PyQt and PyGTK are GUI toolkits. 
Neither are IDEs.

Phil
0
phil8896 (156)
3/18/2007 10:07:41 PM
Il Sun, 18 Mar 2007 11:55:47 -1000, Jon Van DeVries ha scritto:

> Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm a newbie.

Please understand then, that both QT and GTK+ are graphic toolkits. An IDE
is a totally different thing.

Also, please understand that Qt3 and Qt4 exist, and they're quite different
beasts. Qt4 is fairly new.

Qt is GPL or commercial, while GTK+ is LGPL. That means: if you want to use
QT, you must either distribute your app under the GPL, or buy the
commercial license, while you don't have this limit in GTK+.

Both are cross-platform, but you should check for their actual visual
performance wherever they should be employed. Also, GTK+ seems to still
need an X server on macosx (don't know about QT)

Both have IDEs to create GUIs; take a look at Glade or Gazpacho for GTK+.

Also, remember GTK+ is a community project while QT is a fully commercial
project.



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0
3/19/2007 12:17:39 AM
On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 11:55:47 -1000, "Jon Van DeVries"
<j23212@hotmail.com> declaimed the following in comp.lang.python:

> ** All the posts found in google are old.  I'm assuming new improvements have been made to both IDEs. **
> 
> Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm a newbie.
> 
> 1. Which one of them requires fewer lines to accomplish the same thing?
> from what I understand QT it's just like Borland J-Builder. Meaning, you want a button, you draw it, then you double-click on it, a window opens up and you type events and behavior.
> And with GTK, you just type everything.
>
	For the most part, none of the GUI TOOLKITS (not IDEs) includes a
drag&drop GUI BUILDER. Toolkits are libraries defining an API (in the
case of Python to an underlying toolkit... wxPython is the Python
front-end to wxWidgets). For all the toolkits, the basic operation is
"just type everything" -- an intermediate mode is where one manipulates
a configuration file that gets loaded at run-time, and which one
registers handlers against (my largest GUI application was 15 years ago,
emulating a Ramtek graphics engine using DECWindows -- it had
multi-thousand lines of config file in xt; the config file was nearly as
long as the C code that used it).

	For a GUI builder... consider http://wxglade.sourceforge.net/ (or,
if you can find it, the mentioned SPE, which attempts to be an IDE that
makes wxGlade available)

	IDE does not imply GUI builder... Some people consider VI (vim,
gvim, etc.) and EMACS to be IDEs. The basic requirements to qualify as
an IDE are an editor capable of maintaining multiple open files, capable
of invoking a build/run operation, and capable of debug runs...
PythonWin, SciTE, and IDLE are IDEs. None have GUI builder.

 
> 2. Which one is cross platform? (Linux, MacOS, Windows,etc).

	One what? GUI toolkit (GTK, Qt, wx, TK?...) Obviously MFC is /not/.

	GUI builder? Well, if written in pure Python it should run where
ever Python and the associated toolkit are available.

> 
> 3. Which one has more widgets?
>
	This is a question of GUI toolkit -- and even that isn't quite
limited... TK (via Tkinter in Python) has at least two extension
packages that add "widgets" that weren't native (PMW, and Tix).
 
> 4. Which one is the easiest to pick up?  I tried perl-QT and oh boy that mother is cryptic.
>
	Qt or Perl? <G>

> 
> 6. or if you think both pythonQT and PythonGTK are junk please suggest the one you like/use? I work on a Linux platform with Python 2.4.
>
	Not enough experience here... I do know I never liked applications
targeted to the "Gnome" look, preferring KDE... So... which toolkit did
those desktops favor?

	wxWidgets, as I recall, is supposed to attempt to look "native" on
each OS.

	Oh, and there is a book available (wxPython in Action) for wxPython
-- and it is the toolkit used by Dabo (an application builder).

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0
wlfraed (4596)
3/19/2007 12:18:42 AM
Dennis Lee Bieber a �crit :
> 	Not enough experience here... I do know I never liked applications
> targeted to the "Gnome" look, preferring KDE... So... which toolkit did
> those desktops favor?
> 
> 	wxWidgets, as I recall, is supposed to attempt to look "native" on
> each OS.

Well, wxWidgets targets the Gnome look ( it means it uses GTK on Linux ) 
and not the KDE look so I guess you wouldn't like wxWidgets either :)
0
3/20/2007 2:05:03 PM
On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 15:05:03 +0100, Christophe <chris.cavalaria@free.fr>
declaimed the following in comp.lang.python:

> 
> Well, wxWidgets targets the Gnome look ( it means it uses GTK on Linux ) 
> and not the KDE look so I guess you wouldn't like wxWidgets either :)

	OTOH, my machine with a Linux install gets booted about twice a year
(an old Mandrake 8.2, dualed with W98se -- the only reason the machine
is still around is that I can't find a WinXP driver for my ancient Nomad
Jukebox; and I keep the latter because it had /line-out/ jacks perfect
for amplified computer speaker usage, not just earphone jack). From what
I've seen, wxWidgets looks fine on XP <G>
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	Wulfraed	Dennis Lee Bieber		KD6MOG
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com		wulfraed@bestiaria.com
		HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/
	(Bestiaria Support Staff:		web-asst@bestiaria.com)
		HTTP://www.bestiaria.com/
0
wlfraed (4596)
3/20/2007 6:05:55 PM
Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:

> On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 11:55:47 -1000, "Jon Van DeVries"
> <j23212@hotmail.com> declaimed the following in comp.lang.python:
> 
>> ** All the posts found in google are old.  I'm assuming new improvements
>> have been made to both IDEs. **
>> 
>> Please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm a newbie.
>> 
>> 1. Which one of them requires fewer lines to accomplish the same thing?
>> from what I understand QT it's just like Borland J-Builder. Meaning, you
>> want a button, you draw it, then you double-click on it, a window opens
>> up and you type events and behavior. And with GTK, you just type
>> everything.
>>
> For the most part, none of the GUI TOOLKITS (not IDEs) includes a
> drag&drop GUI BUILDER. Toolkits are libraries defining an API (in the
> case of Python to an underlying toolkit... wxPython is the Python
> front-end to wxWidgets). For all the toolkits, the basic operation is
> "just type everything" -- an intermediate mode is where one manipulates
> a configuration file that gets loaded at run-time, and which one
> registers handlers against (my largest GUI application was 15 years ago,
> emulating a Ramtek graphics engine using DECWindows -- it had
> multi-thousand lines of config file in xt; the config file was nearly as
> long as the C code that used it).

I'm not sure if you're referring to something else, or aren't aware of Qt
Designer.  You can design your GUI's in the designer, run py-uic (comes
with PyQt) and you have python code for your GUI.  You then load that up,
and do your custom slot connections at run time.  You can also take the XML
files generated by Qt Designer and load and render them at runtime too.

j

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joshua638 (65)
3/21/2007 7:28:06 PM
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