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Breathe new life into an older notebook with a few upgrades?

	Article titled "Punch Up Your Portable" in the Oct '04 edition
of Computer Shopper pages 142-144 (if you can find a newer article on
this topic I'd appreciate it), they talk about how to replace your
hard drive, ram, & CPU w/ step by step instructions.

	I thought for most laptops, you couldn't upgrade a processor.
Or is it you can, but it isn't really worth it?

===
     	"Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they make it easier to do don't need to be done."
               -- Andy Rooney
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0
Ablang
1/9/2006 3:22:30 AM
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"Ablang" <HilaryDuff111905@ablang-duff.com> wrote in message 
news:jnl3s1p7kjg4j7mbdm093iqqrjfpphnumh@4ax.com...
> Article titled "Punch Up Your Portable" in the Oct '04 edition
> of Computer Shopper pages 142-144 (if you can find a newer article on
> this topic I'd appreciate it), they talk about how to replace your
> hard drive, ram, & CPU w/ step by step instructions.
>
> I thought for most laptops, you couldn't upgrade a processor.
> Or is it you can, but it isn't really worth it?
>
> ===
>     "Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the 
> things they make it easier to do don't need to be done."
>               -- Andy Rooney
> _________________________________________
> Usenet Zone Free Binaries Usenet Server
> More than 140,000 groups
> Unlimited download
> http://www.usenetzone.com to open account

Upgrading laptops is usually not cost effective.  By the time you buy a new 
hard drive, more RAM and a CPU, you could be buying a new unit entirely.


0
Kevin
1/9/2006 4:56:29 AM
Sometimes you can replace the CPU.  Most of the modern laptops have 
socketed CPUs, but quite often the BIOS is locked down, for example I 
was unable to replace a Celeron with a P4 (same family, stepping, speed, 
etc.) in a Toshiba 1410/1415 even though the same machine was sold with 
a P4 as the 2410/2415.


Ablang wrote:

> 	Article titled "Punch Up Your Portable" in the Oct '04 edition
> of Computer Shopper pages 142-144 (if you can find a newer article on
> this topic I'd appreciate it), they talk about how to replace your
> hard drive, ram, & CPU w/ step by step instructions.
> 
> 	I thought for most laptops, you couldn't upgrade a processor.
> Or is it you can, but it isn't really worth it?
> 
> ===
>      	"Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they make it easier to do don't need to be done."
>                -- Andy Rooney
> _________________________________________
> Usenet Zone Free Binaries Usenet Server
> More than 140,000 groups
> Unlimited download
> http://www.usenetzone.com to open account
0
Barry
1/9/2006 10:34:03 AM
On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 10:34:03 GMT, Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com>
spewed:
>Sometimes you can replace the CPU.  Most of the modern laptops have 
>socketed CPUs, but quite often the BIOS is locked down, for example I 
>was unable to replace a Celeron with a P4 (same family, stepping, speed, 
>etc.) in a Toshiba 1410/1415 even though the same machine was sold with 
>a P4 as the 2410/2415.
>
Really?!
I too was under the impression that CPU's couldn't be upgraded, nor BIOS.
Many times RAM can't be either due to the BIOS or too few slots.
I have a very old Dell Latitude XPi P133 ST that I have been dying to
upgrade for years.  It's the only model ever made with an OPTICAL
trackball in the RIGHT.  There was a 166, but that's hardly worth finding.
Currently there is NO new laptop made with a trackball, or keyboard of any
kind for that matter with an optical or having it in the right place below
the spacebar.
If I could bump that thing's CPU up even just a little, or much more
importantly upgrade the RAM, it'd be great little typer to have.
Unfortunately, everything I've found out says the RAM is limited to 40MB
due to slots and BIOS.
If anybody knows of a 3rd party BIOS upgrade for the thing, I'd love to
hear about it!  Dell never made an upgrade to fix it, just put out the
166, then revamped the line without the trackball or nice keyboard key
travel.  Regress in the name of progress.  So nice of them :(

>
>Ablang wrote:
>
>> 	Article titled "Punch Up Your Portable" in the Oct '04 edition
>> of Computer Shopper pages 142-144 (if you can find a newer article on
>> this topic I'd appreciate it), they talk about how to replace your
>> hard drive, ram, & CPU w/ step by step instructions.
>> 
>> 	I thought for most laptops, you couldn't upgrade a processor.
>> Or is it you can, but it isn't really worth it?
>> 
>> ===
>>      	"Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they make it easier to do don't need to be done."
>>                -- Andy Rooney
>> _________________________________________
>> Usenet Zone Free Binaries Usenet Server
>> More than 140,000 groups
>> Unlimited download
>> http://www.usenetzone.com to open account

0
1/10/2006 8:58:13 PM
The BIOS can always be upgraded, which, however, does not mean that an 
upgrade is available.

Almost all current generation laptops have socketed CPUs and have for 
several years.  The laptop makers can keep the system kind of "open" to 
upgrades (within limits), or they can, through jumpers and the BIOS, 
"lock it down".

Ram can almost always be upgraded up to some maximum which is usually a 
function of the chipset, not the laptop.

Most of the Pentium I laptops had the CPU soldered to the motherboard 
("tab bonded") and cannot be upgraded, but from about the Pentium II 
onward, most laptops either use a replaceable CPU module or a socketed CPU.


see.my.sig.4.addr@nowhere.com.invalid wrote:

> On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 10:34:03 GMT, Barry Watzman <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com>
> spewed:
> 
>>Sometimes you can replace the CPU.  Most of the modern laptops have 
>>socketed CPUs, but quite often the BIOS is locked down, for example I 
>>was unable to replace a Celeron with a P4 (same family, stepping, speed, 
>>etc.) in a Toshiba 1410/1415 even though the same machine was sold with 
>>a P4 as the 2410/2415.
>>
> 
> Really?!
> I too was under the impression that CPU's couldn't be upgraded, nor BIOS.
> Many times RAM can't be either due to the BIOS or too few slots.
> I have a very old Dell Latitude XPi P133 ST that I have been dying to
> upgrade for years.  It's the only model ever made with an OPTICAL
> trackball in the RIGHT.  There was a 166, but that's hardly worth finding.
> Currently there is NO new laptop made with a trackball, or keyboard of any
> kind for that matter with an optical or having it in the right place below
> the spacebar.
> If I could bump that thing's CPU up even just a little, or much more
> importantly upgrade the RAM, it'd be great little typer to have.
> Unfortunately, everything I've found out says the RAM is limited to 40MB
> due to slots and BIOS.
> If anybody knows of a 3rd party BIOS upgrade for the thing, I'd love to
> hear about it!  Dell never made an upgrade to fix it, just put out the
> 166, then revamped the line without the trackball or nice keyboard key
> travel.  Regress in the name of progress.  So nice of them :(
> 
> 
>>Ablang wrote:
>>
>>
>>>	Article titled "Punch Up Your Portable" in the Oct '04 edition
>>>of Computer Shopper pages 142-144 (if you can find a newer article on
>>>this topic I'd appreciate it), they talk about how to replace your
>>>hard drive, ram, & CPU w/ step by step instructions.
>>>
>>>	I thought for most laptops, you couldn't upgrade a processor.
>>>Or is it you can, but it isn't really worth it?
>>>
>>>===
>>>     	"Computers make it easier to do a lot of things, but most of the things they make it easier to do don't need to be done."
>>>               -- Andy Rooney
>>>_________________________________________
>>>Usenet Zone Free Binaries Usenet Server
>>>More than 140,000 groups
>>>Unlimited download
>>>http://www.usenetzone.com to open account
> 
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
1/11/2006 12:54:51 AM
On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 00:54:51 GMT, Barry Watzman
<WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote:

>Most of the Pentium I laptops had the CPU soldered to the motherboard 
>("tab bonded") and cannot be upgraded, but from about the Pentium II 
>onward, most laptops either use a replaceable CPU module or a socketed CPU.

	Except! Most subnotebooks (as we recently discussed in another
thread) are surface mounted. The socketed CPUs stand a few mm taller
than a surface mount, and in this day of slim, small subnotebooks,
every millimeter counts. My IBM TransNote and the IBM X series are
soldered to the motherboard.
	It should also be noted that CPUs can be upgraded only within their
chip generation with compatible processors; you can't go from a
Pentium MMX to a Pentium 4. I mention this because the previous reply
mentioned having a Dell at 133Mhz with the fastest version of the
model running at 166Mhz. Odds are, that is the fastest that model will
go.
	epbrown
--
2003 BMW 325i Black/Black
2003 BMW Z4 Black/Black
0
three1983s (56)
1/11/2006 5:20:22 AM
On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 05:20:22 GMT, E Brown <three1983s@att.net> spewed:
>>Most of the Pentium I laptops had the CPU soldered to the motherboard 
>>("tab bonded") and cannot be upgraded, but from about the Pentium II 
>>onward, most laptops either use a replaceable CPU module or a socketed CPU.
>
>	Except! Most subnotebooks (as we recently discussed in another
>thread) are surface mounted. The socketed CPUs stand a few mm taller
>than a surface mount, and in this day of slim, small subnotebooks,
>every millimeter counts. My IBM TransNote and the IBM X series are
>soldered to the motherboard.
>	It should also be noted that CPUs can be upgraded only within their
>chip generation with compatible processors; you can't go from a
>Pentium MMX to a Pentium 4. I mention this because the previous reply
>mentioned having a Dell at 133Mhz with the fastest version of the
>model running at 166Mhz. Odds are, that is the fastest that model will
>go.
>	epbrown

Ya, I agree, probably SOL on the CPU upgrade.
What I'm really hoping for is a BIOS upgrade that'll allow more RAM,
unless it is soley a chipset issue, in which case I'm screwed on that too
:(
AFAIK, Dell did NOT ever make one.
I have never found one from any other source either.
BUT, that doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
So, who out there is my savior?  Bueller?  Bueller?  Anybody? :)

0
1/21/2006 12:06:24 PM
On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 04:06:24 -0800,
see.my.sig.4.addr@nowhere.com.invalid wrote:

>Ya, I agree, probably SOL on the CPU upgrade.
>What I'm really hoping for is a BIOS upgrade that'll allow more RAM,
>unless it is soley a chipset issue, in which case I'm screwed on that too
>:(

	It's a solely a chipset issue, but that's usually not the whole
story. Chipsets are usually limited to some factor of 64 (128, 256,
512...). Manufacturers always include some RAM on the motherboard and
that throws things off. In your case, you wrote that the limit is
40MB. Most likely, the real hardware limit is 64MB but you've got 8MB
on the board and you added 32MB. If there were nothing on the board,
you could add a 64MB chip to max out. If you could disable the onboard
RAM, you'd get access to your full capacity.
	There are tricks. I know someone that used a utility knife to cut
the RAM off the board to disable it and added his max to the slot. On
some Sony's the original RAM is in a slot on the bottom of the
motherboard - remove the board, flip it over, take out the old chip
and you've got a free slot. In my 701C, simply installing a 64MB chip
disables the onboard RAM so I can use the full 64MB capacity.
	epbrown 
--
2003 BMW 325i Black/Black
2003 BMW Z4 Black/Black
0
three1983s (56)
1/21/2006 7:04:18 PM
Reply: