f



Android 6

OK, I've temporarily abandoned all hope with my Timmy phone where the 
screen touch alignment is wrong, plus, like the Queen of England, I have 
a most terrible cold, so I'm extremely low-powered.

So, I got a cheapo Android 6 phone by "THL" at what I thought was a very 
keen price, but while it was in the post, saw an offer I couldn't refuse 
on a Medion Android 6 phone in a local supermarket. So, now there are 
two.

Both, of course, immediately asked if I want to use the SD card for 
storage or for internal memory. Googling brought up loads of 
contradictions, and scares about internal, so both phones are using the 
cards as storage for photo and video. Is there a definitive, clear guide 
to this decision anywhere?

The old Timmy was used mainly for vehicle diagnostics and similar and, 
for example, Torque would record trip data onto its SD card. I haven't 
yet found a way to do this in either Android 6 phone. Also, an app to 
move apps to the sd card says the card has to be formatted as internal 
memory, which Google seems to say makes the existing internal memory 
redundant (and bypassed?).

Both phones seem good and touch alignment is fine. The Medion is a bit 
weird in that the app icon screens go vertically and the back button is 
on the wrong side, but it seems to have come with a good "where am I?" 
app and Teamviewer to some get you going operation. It doesn't, however, 
have the developer options in "Settings" that I need.

I wonder if these can be installed?
-- 
Bill
0
Bill
12/22/2016 5:21:26 PM
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On 12/22/2016 09:21 AM, Bill wrote:
> OK, I've temporarily abandoned all hope with my Timmy phone where the
> screen touch alignment is wrong, plus, like the Queen of England, I have
> a most terrible cold, so I'm extremely low-powered.
>
> So, I got a cheapo Android 6 phone by "THL" at what I thought was a very
> keen price, but while it was in the post, saw an offer I couldn't refuse
> on a Medion Android 6 phone in a local supermarket. So, now there are
> two.
>
> Both, of course, immediately asked if I want to use the SD card for
> storage or for internal memory. Googling brought up loads of
> contradictions, and scares about internal, so both phones are using the
> cards as storage for photo and video. Is there a definitive, clear guide
> to this decision anywhere?

Probably not, but I chose to use the external card as an extension to 
the internal memory.  I'll never want to take it out to use for any 
other purpose (cards are cheap now) and I copy stuff to my computer via 
wifi/ftp.  I use clickfree (available only through 1 Mobile Market, not 
google play) to back whatever it regards as the whole thing up to 
dropbox and hope for the best.

> The old Timmy was used mainly for vehicle diagnostics and similar and,
> for example, Torque would record trip data onto its SD card. I haven't
> yet found a way to do this in either Android 6 phone. Also, an app to
> move apps to the sd card says the card has to be formatted as internal
> memory, which Google seems to say makes the existing internal memory
> redundant (and bypassed?).

No, it's still internal memory -- there's just a more direct connection 
to the external card.  I guess.  I got tired of the "not enough room" 
messages from google play with my previous phone, so chose to extend the 
internal memory.  Stupid people who insist on not allowing you to choose 
where to install stuff.

> Both phones seem good and touch alignment is fine. The Medion is a bit
> weird in that the app icon screens go vertically and the back button is
> on the wrong side, but it seems to have come with a good "where am I?"
> app and Teamviewer to some get you going operation. It doesn't, however,
> have the developer options in "Settings" that I need.
>
> I wonder if these can be installed?

You can get the developer options opened by doing something weird (tap 
something 9 times or something similar), at least on the two phones I've 
done it with.  Google will probably find instructions.


-- 
Cheers, Bev
    "The last thing you want is for somebody to commit suicide
     before executing them."
            -Gary Deland, former Utah director for corrections
0
The
12/22/2016 6:00:28 PM
Bill wrote:

[...]
> Both, of course, immediately asked if I want to use the SD card for 
> storage or for internal memory. Googling brought up loads of 
> contradictions, and scares about internal, so both phones are using the 
> cards as storage for photo and video. Is there a definitive, clear guide 
> to this decision anywhere?

If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
cards are prone to errors as more you write on them and they are also
sometimes way slower than the flash memory in the phone itself, this
*may* not be a good idea if you don't have high quality SD cards.

On the other hand - you also don't want to loos any data on "external"
SD cards and backups should be done then as well.

So in the end the answer is: if you intend to use the SD card in other
devices too - for example to copy files to it to be used on the phone
later etc. then stay with "external". Otherwise it may not really matter.



-- 
Arno Welzel
https://arnowelzel.de
https://de-rec-fahrrad.de
http://fahrradzukunft.de
0
Arno
12/22/2016 10:55:51 PM
In article <502c7829-0031-8959-8b94-88c12ed8f7dd@arnowelzel.de>, Arno
Welzel <usenet@arnowelzel.de> wrote:

> 
> If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
> backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
> cards are prone to errors as more you write on them

complete nonsense.

> and they are also
> sometimes way slower than the flash memory in the phone itself,

that part is likely true, but the difference probably won't make uch of
a difference because mobile devices are typically cpu-bound, not
i/o-bound.

> this
> *may* not be a good idea if you don't have high quality SD cards.

why would anyone buy a shit quality card? the good ones aren't that
much more.

> On the other hand - you also don't want to loos any data on "external"
> SD cards and backups should be done then as well.

backups should be done regardless.
0
nospam
12/23/2016 12:15:18 AM
In message <o3h497$eca$1@dont-email.me>, The Real Bev 
<bashley101@gmail.com> writes
>Probably not, but I chose to use the external card as an extension to 
>the internal memory.  I'll never want to take it out to use for any 
>other purpose (cards are cheap now) and I copy stuff to my computer via 
>wifi/ftp.  I use clickfree (available only through 1 Mobile Market, not 
>google play) to back whatever it regards as the whole thing up to 
>dropbox and hope for the best.

That seems very sensible, but I'm not sure it meets my needs (and 
prejudices).
I have a dashcam that has wifi, but at the moment only has software that 
works with android and ios. The sd card in the camera can be put into a 
PC and the files (video, gps,etc) transferred as they are straight mp4 
files. If I have understood it right, in an emergency, the dashcam will 
record a short clip to the phone either via a deceleration trigger or a 
button push. This clip and a jpg will thus be on the phone.
This worked on my old 4.4 phone, where I believe I'd got the clips etc 
on the SD card. Admittedly, I downloaded without taking the card out of 
the phone
If the sd card on the phone is encrypted and the phone crashes to the 
floor, I'm not sure anything could be recovered.

I think I've convinced myself that I want to keep the card unencrypted 
for data, ie mobile storage, but I'm having trouble in getting the data 
from apps to store on the sd card rather than the existing memory.

I may be wrong in all of this and if so plead illness. The camera 
records in fairly high definition, so uses 128G cards itself, and the 
small emergency clips are fairly large. Files on the old phone could 
easily reach many gigs. A trip halfway along the North Wales coast using 
the old phone into Torque recorder was 970megs.

As an aside, I do have a prejudice about SD cards and encryption as many 
years ago I imported a pioneering Aiwa portable mp3 audio recorder, and 
was horrified to discover that it used the secure feature in the then 
new Secure Data cards that meant the files could not be played back 
anywhere else. This locked the audio to the specific machine.  It made 
it completely useless for field recording and it's only recently that 
I've been forced into ever considering anything else that used SD cards.

Thanks for the useful reply.
-- 
Bill
0
Bill
12/23/2016 12:23:51 AM
In article <GF5$UjdX6GXYFwDO@end.of.the.universe>, Bill
<Billaboard@gmail.com> wrote:

> As an aside, I do have a prejudice about SD cards and encryption as many 
> years ago I imported a pioneering Aiwa portable mp3 audio recorder, and 
> was horrified to discover that it used the secure feature in the then 
> new Secure Data cards that meant the files could not be played back 
> anywhere else. This locked the audio to the specific machine.  It made 
> it completely useless for field recording and it's only recently that 
> I've been forced into ever considering anything else that used SD cards.

that is entirely the doing of the aiwa device. other products don't do
that.
0
nospam
12/23/2016 12:30:04 AM
Am 23.12.16 um 01:15 schrieb nospam:
> In article <502c7829-0031-8959-8b94-88c12ed8f7dd@arnowelzel.de>, Arno
> Welzel <usenet@arnowelzel.de> wrote:
>
>>
>> If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
>> backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
>> cards are prone to errors as more you write on them
>
> complete nonsense.

nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid>

you are absolutely right. If you want to be taken seriously come here 
with a valid e-mail-address and a name.

-- 
http://www.albasani.net/index.html.de
Ein freier und kostenloser Server fuer Usenet/NetNews (NNTP)
0
Joerg
12/23/2016 4:46:56 AM
In article <o3ia80$i81$1@news.albasani.net>, Joerg Lorenz
<hugybear@gmx.ch> wrote:

> >> If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
> >> backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
> >> cards are prone to errors as more you write on them
> >
> > complete nonsense.
> 
> nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid>
> 
> you are absolutely right. If you want to be taken seriously come here 
> with a valid e-mail-address and a name.

resorting to insults guarantees you won't be taken seriously at all.

what he wrote is absolute rubbish. if you have credible evidence to the
contrary, provide it. otherwise fuck off.
0
nospam
12/23/2016 5:15:24 AM
In message <221220161930042824%nospam@nospam.invalid>, nospam 
<nospam@nospam.invalid> writes
>In article <GF5$UjdX6GXYFwDO@end.of.the.universe>, Bill
><Billaboard@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> As an aside, I do have a prejudice about SD cards and encryption as many
>> years ago I imported a pioneering Aiwa portable mp3 audio recorder, and
>> was horrified to discover that it used the secure feature in the then
>> new Secure Data cards that meant the files could not be played back
>> anywhere else. This locked the audio to the specific machine.  It made
>> it completely useless for field recording and it's only recently that
>> I've been forced into ever considering anything else that used SD cards.
>
>that is entirely the doing of the aiwa device. other products don't do
>that.

Not now they don't, but the original push and concept behind SD cards 
was that they were DRM friendly and so were able to restrict user's 
access and options. At the time the other concept was that we all would 
have to pay Fraunhofer for a licence every time we encoded anything to 
mp3. I was there and actually tried to purchase a bunch of mp3 licences, 
but communication with the, I assumed, German or Swiss professor at 
Fraunhofer Institute in the office on his own, didn't go well.

Common sense and the public seem to have won with SD and, to an extent, 
mp3.

I just gave this as background about why I don't want some third party 
or machine encrypting my original data. I want to be the one who 
controls the data and access if I own (ie recorded ) it.

The question still remains - is it an "Android policy" that data 
generated by apps on the machine cannot be stored on an unencrypted sd 
card or is it just that I haven't found how to do it on Android 6?
-- 
Bill
0
Bill
12/23/2016 12:42:05 PM
On Fri, 23 Dec 2016 12:42:05 +0000, Bill wrote:

> ... question still remains - is it an "Android policy" that data 
> generated by apps on the machine cannot be stored on an unencrypted sd 
> card or is it just that I haven't found how to do it on Android 6?

Can't be "Android policy" flat-out, because the camera app on a Motorola
Droid of mine is perfectly happy to put the jpeg files it captures into a
folder (explicitly: /dcim/Camera/ )on the external microSDHC card I have
installed in the microSD slot on that handset.

(Among the Settings then available, once the Camera app is open, there is
Storage Location, which offers both Internal Phone Storage and SD Card.)

OTOH, there's NO guarantee that *every* app on *every* Android device will
surely *always* offer the same storage alternatives. 

HTH. Cheers, -- tlvp
-- 
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP.
0
tlvp
12/23/2016 4:58:06 PM
In message <221220161915189668%nospam@nospam.invalid>
          nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

>In article <502c7829-0031-8959-8b94-88c12ed8f7dd@arnowelzel.de>, Arno
>Welzel <usenet@arnowelzel.de> wrote:
>
>> 
>> If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
>> backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
>> cards are prone to errors as more you write on them
>
>complete nonsense.

Nonsense on your part.  It does happen, with some SD cards that
buyers believe to be perfectly respectable.  I've had it happen
with three Kingston cards.

>> this
>> *may* not be a good idea if you don't have high quality SD cards.
>
>why would anyone buy a shit quality card? the good ones aren't that
>much more.

The trouble /may/ be that there are fakes or substandard cards
out there, bought in good faith from an outlet that appears to
be respectable (my cards that I mentioned above were) - it would
not surprise me if respectable outlets are duped from time to
time and sell bad stuff in good faith.

The world is not as black and white as you make it out to be.

Dave
0
Dave
12/23/2016 5:11:04 PM
In article <efd310f355.DaveMeUK@my.inbox.com>, Dave Higton
<dave@davehigton.me.uk> wrote:

> >> If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
> >> backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
> >> cards are prone to errors as more you write on them
> >
> >complete nonsense.
> 
> Nonsense on your part.  It does happen, with some SD cards that
> buyers believe to be perfectly respectable.  I've had it happen
> with three Kingston cards.

there is no reason whatsoever why writing to an sd card or any other
type of flash memory will cause it to slow down over time. that's
absolute nonsense.

whatever you think might have been happening was due to some other
reason.

one possibility is that volumes formatted as fat tend to be slower with
a large number of files. perhaps that's what you're seeing. a simple
reformat fixes that.

> >> this
> >> *may* not be a good idea if you don't have high quality SD cards.
> >
> >why would anyone buy a shit quality card? the good ones aren't that
> >much more.
> 
> The trouble /may/ be that there are fakes or substandard cards
> out there, bought in good faith from an outlet that appears to
> be respectable (my cards that I mentioned above were) - it would
> not surprise me if respectable outlets are duped from time to
> time and sell bad stuff in good faith.

that isn't at all common and you know it, in the unlikely event it does
happen, the respectable outlet will take it back and give you a
legitimate one.

> The world is not as black and white as you make it out to be.

i never said it was.
0
nospam
12/23/2016 5:43:45 PM
In message <231220161243453968%nospam@nospam.invalid>
          nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

>In article <efd310f355.DaveMeUK@my.inbox.com>, Dave Higton
><dave@davehigton.me.uk> wrote:
>
>> >> If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
>> >> backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
>> >> cards are prone to errors as more you write on them
>> >
>> >complete nonsense.
>> 
>> Nonsense on your part.  It does happen, with some SD cards that
>> buyers believe to be perfectly respectable.  I've had it happen
>> with three Kingston cards.
>
>there is no reason whatsoever why writing to an sd card or any other
>type of flash memory will cause it to slow down over time. that's
>absolute nonsense.
>
>whatever you think might have been happening was due to some other
>reason.

Absolutely not - I was addressing the cards at sector level.

>one possibility is that volumes formatted as fat tend to be slower with
>a large number of files. perhaps that's what you're seeing. a simple
>reformat fixes that.

Impossible explanation, as you will see from the above.

Dave
0
Dave
12/23/2016 9:22:18 PM
Am 23.12.16 um 13:42 schrieb Bill:
> The question still remains - is it an "Android policy" that data
> generated by apps on the machine cannot be stored on an unencrypted sd
> card or is it just that I haven't found how to do it on Android 6?

That is not correct. You can easily store unencrypted fotos and music on 
a sd-card. I have done so on a Galaxy Tablet running on Android 6. Data 
stored on the internal memory was encrypted, data on the sd was not.

-- 
http://www.albasani.net/index.html.de
Ein freier und kostenloser Server fuer Usenet/NetNews (NNTP)
0
Joerg
12/24/2016 9:49:06 AM
In article <49d427f355.DaveMeUK@my.inbox.com>, Dave Higton
<dave@davehigton.me.uk> wrote:

> >> >> If you really want to get as much "internal" memory as possible and do
> >> >> backups regularly, then use the SD card as "internal". But since SD
> >> >> cards are prone to errors as more you write on them
> >> >
> >> >complete nonsense.
> >> 
> >> Nonsense on your part.  It does happen, with some SD cards that
> >> buyers believe to be perfectly respectable.  I've had it happen
> >> with three Kingston cards.
> >
> >there is no reason whatsoever why writing to an sd card or any other
> >type of flash memory will cause it to slow down over time. that's
> >absolute nonsense.
> >
> >whatever you think might have been happening was due to some other
> >reason.
> 
> Absolutely not - I was addressing the cards at sector level.

that's not a normal use case.

when using the card as intended, there is no slowdown. i have over ten
year old sd cards and they work just as well now as they did when they
were new.

> >one possibility is that volumes formatted as fat tend to be slower with
> >a large number of files. perhaps that's what you're seeing. a simple
> >reformat fixes that.
> 
> Impossible explanation, as you will see from the above.

i said it's one possibility, not the only possibility.
0
nospam
12/24/2016 7:29:50 PM
Reply: