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New systems?

I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I need to look for something used?
0
Isaac
5/27/2016 4:02:04 AM
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On 27/05/2016 2:02 PM, Isaac MacFarlane wrote:
> I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would
> like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I
> need to look for something used?
>

The Microbee was an Australian made Z80 based computer made back in the 
80's.  The company still exists and about to launch a new kit that is 
backward compatible but made with more modern parts.  Check it out fully at
http://www.microbeetechnology.com.au/classic-plus-kit-computer.htm

Alan
0
Alan
5/27/2016 4:31:30 AM
I have been participating to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup for the last 16 year=
s. I simply cannot remember ever reading a message about the Z-system durin=
g those last 16 years. As far as I know, the Z-system is dead. By the way, =
why are you posting this message in the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup? If the Z-sys=
tem was still alive, it would have its own Newsgroup...

As for "new systems" (meaning: able to run CP/M), yes they are still being =
made. In my humble opinion, the best one available currently is the P112, a=
nd a dozen of them are for sale, right now.

To finish: if you like this curiosity, why not set up a Web site about it?

I had the idea of making a Google search for "Z-system". The first 3 pages =
of results are about IBM...

Yours Sincerely,
Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France

0
Mr
5/27/2016 6:38:44 AM
Isaac MacFarlane <spideyfan1972@gmail.com> wrote:
> I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would 
> like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I 
> need to look for something used?

Are you talking about ZSDOS, ZCPR, and such?  The P112 will run that 
very well.  You can get a kit from http://661.org/p112 or eBay at 
http://www.ebay.com/itm/P112-single-board-computer-kit-/331708982947.  
It comes with floppy images of ZSDOS already set up and ready to go.


-- 
David Griffith
davidmylastname@acm.org   <--- Put my last name where it belongs
0
davidmylastname
5/27/2016 9:24:57 AM
On Friday, May 27, 2016 at 8:38:44 AM UTC+2, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:

> I have been participating to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup for the last
> 16 years. I simply cannot remember ever reading a message about the
> Z-system during those last 16 years. As far as I know, the Z-system
> is dead. By the way, why are you posting this message in the comp.os.cpm
> Newsgroup? If the Z-system was still alive, it would have its own
> Newsgroup...
> 
> As for "new systems" (meaning: able to run CP/M), yes they are still
> being made. In my humble opinion, the best one available currently is
> the P112, and a dozen of them are for sale, right now.

Had a brief look at the P112 web site and it says this:

This P112 board project is very different from the one Dave Brooks
offered. The board itself is the same, but that's about all that stayed
the same. The "native" operating system is now ZSDOS, an enhanced
replacement for CP/M 2.2. The old DOS+ boot disk can still be used, but
is discouraged. UZI-180, a Unix clone for the Z180 processor is available
in a version specifically customized for the P112.

Using a Z system as the native OS? 
0
Udo
5/27/2016 11:27:09 AM
On 05/27/2016 02:38 AM, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
> I have been participating to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup for the last 16
> years. I simply cannot remember ever reading a message about the Z-system
> during those last 16 years. As far as I know, the Z-system is dead. By the
> way, why are you posting this message in the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup? If the
> Z-system was still alive, it would have its own Newsgroup...

Because you haven't read a Usenet posting on Z-system, it never existed? My 
friend, the world did not start when you first began following comp.os.cpm.

Z-System was an entire ecosystem for 8-bit Z80 (and to some degree, 8080) 
systems.  It consisted of replacements for the BDOS and CCP (there were a 
variety) along with a comprehensive definition of system extensions to handle 
input and output redirection, terminal capabilities and many other things.

It certainly has fallen out of the spotlight, but there are those of us who 
find vanilla CP/M intolerable after getting used to the advantages of the Z 
environment.

During the early years it required a lot of manual configuration and assembly, 
but after Jay Sage produced 'nzcom' it became trivial to install on literally 
any CP/M system.  Nzcom, and all other major components, have been available 
on a free-as-in-beer basis for about 15 years.

You might actually be impressed if you tried it.  Among other things you would 
gain:

- Direct access to all user areas on all disks, e.g. 'copy a0:foo.com b3:', 
'dir c15:', etc.

- Command line history recall and editing

- Automated relog of changed diskettes (no more 'BDOS ERROR...' if you forget 
to Ctrl-C after change).

- File datestamping (modify, create date), with all the capabilities implied 
(think: 'make' to rebuild stale dependencies)

- Support for system time services

- A standardized method for defining terminal control codes.  Utilities and 
apps that make use of direct cursor positioning, inverse, etc. "just work" 
without the need for specific installation.

- Support for very large volumes and file sizes

And much, much more.  This comes with only a slight space penalty and you get 
to decide the balance between memory use and feature set.

0
Steven
5/27/2016 12:10:32 PM
Am 27.05.2016 um 14:10 schrieb Steven Hirsch:

> During the early years it required a lot of manual configuration and
> assembly, but after Jay Sage produced 'nzcom' it became trivial to
> install on literally any CP/M system.  Nzcom, and all other major
> components, have been available on a free-as-in-beer basis for about 15
> years.

Tody it must be craft-beer;-)

Without NZCOM and Z3PLUS my CP/M System won't run so smart as it does. 
It's a must have for me.
Dokumentation aboz NZCOM and Z3PLUS ist around the net.

Even thanks to Jay Sage and Helmut Jungkunz without both I didn't know 
about it here in germany..

http://www.classiccmp.org/cpmarchives/cpm/Miscellany/ZCPRZSys/NZCOM%20&%20Z3PLUS/Z-System%20Corner%20-%20TCJ42.htm

and here:

http://www.kiblerelectronics.com/tcj/archive/archive.shtml

Greetings

fritz


0
fritz
5/27/2016 3:34:32 PM
I can vouch for the P112, built one of my own in 2014.  Fun stuff!  You
can fit one into a old SCSI 3.5" drive enclosure with two 3.5" floppies
an IDE hard drive and a CF adapter using much less space than any S100
chassis.  I have mine hooked to a VT510 for a somewhat classic feel.
I'm thinking of swapping one floppy or the IDE hard drive for an IDE
CD-ROM drive.
0
cruff
5/27/2016 10:45:19 PM
On Friday, May 27, 2016 at 5:45:20 PM UTC-5, Craig Ruff wrote:
> I can vouch for the P112, built one of my own in 2014.  Fun stuff!  You
> can fit one into a old SCSI 3.5" drive enclosure with two 3.5" floppies
> an IDE hard drive and a CF adapter using much less space than any S100
> chassis.  I have mine hooked to a VT510 for a somewhat classic feel.
> I'm thinking of swapping one floppy or the IDE hard drive for an IDE
> CD-ROM drive.

Would you be able to give more details on this setup? This sounds like just the form factor that I want. I do think I would want to get a gide interface and a hard drive. Is there a limit on hard drive size?
0
Isaac
5/28/2016 2:03:51 AM
On Friday, May 27, 2016 at 10:34:36 AM UTC-5, fritz chwolka wrote:
> 
> Without NZCOM and Z3PLUS my CP/M System won't run so smart as it does. 
> It's a must have for me.
> Dokumentation aboz NZCOM and Z3PLUS ist around the net.
> 
Is there really no documentation for NZCOM floating around the net?  I think I have it on paper if it's needed.
0
jdhaddoxster
5/28/2016 2:44:10 AM
On Friday, May 27, 2016 at 2:38:44 PM UTC+8, Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France wrote:
> I have been participating to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup
> for the last 16 years. I simply cannot remember ever 
> reading a message about the Z-system during those last 
> 16 years. As far as I know, the Z-system is dead.

Hmm, now that's odd. A quick search of this newsgroup for "nzcom" turns up several recent mentions, including from this thread six months ago in which one Emmanuel Roche was also declaring "Z-stuff is dead".

--nathanael
0
Nathanael
5/28/2016 4:52:38 AM
Umm, that would be THIS thread:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/comp.os.cpm/ft83HZSirtM
0
Nathanael
5/28/2016 4:54:08 AM
In article <d7229e91-d2af-497f-a8d2-139e54d3b079@googlegroups.com>,
Isaac MacFarlane  <spideyfan1972@gmail.com> wrote:
> Would you be able to give more details on this setup? This sounds like
> just the form factor that I want. I do think I would want to get a gide
> interface and a hard drive. Is there a limit on hard drive size?

P112
P112-GIDE
        Maxtor 86480D6 6GB IDE HDD
                partitions: 5x 32MB

        IDE CF adapter using the SMI controller IC
        128 MB CF card partitions:
                4x 8 MB and 1x 32 MB
        (I bought these along with the P112-GID from
        Terry Gulczynski <terryg@stack180.com>.)

2x FDD 3.5" Teac FD-235HF

The enclosure is some no-name SCSI external drive enclosure that will
hold 4x 5.25" half height drives.  It has a small HP PC power supply in
it and an extra ball bearing fan.  18 cm W x 41 cm L x 24 cm H

The P112 and GIDE cards are mounted on an aluminum drive adapter plate I
happened to have from something else.  It has been bent to fit over the
metal rods that run from the front to the rear of the drive enclosure.
This places the cards in the rear of the enclosure above the power
supply.  The enclosure has enough room to mount the P112's battery
holder in the 90 degree position so that the GIDE board can be installed
above the P112.  I've mounted a push button reset switch on the front,
and the two serial port connectors are mounted on the back.

The Maxtor HDD is the loudest part of the whole thing!  I'd forgotten
how noisy older drives can be.

Both David and Terry were very helpful answering some questions I had
while building the boards and getting things running.
0
cruff
5/28/2016 2:56:54 PM
On 05/28/2016 10:56 AM, Craig Ruff wrote:

>
> P112
> P112-GIDE
>          Maxtor 86480D6 6GB IDE HDD
>                  partitions: 5x 32MB
>
>          IDE CF adapter using the SMI controller IC
>          128 MB CF card partitions:
>                  4x 8 MB and 1x 32 MB
>          (I bought these along with the P112-GID from
>          Terry Gulczynski <terryg@stack180.com>.)
>
> 2x FDD 3.5" Teac FD-235HF
>
> The enclosure is some no-name SCSI external drive enclosure that will
> hold 4x 5.25" half height drives.  It has a small HP PC power supply in
> it and an extra ball bearing fan.  18 cm W x 41 cm L x 24 cm H
>
> The P112 and GIDE cards are mounted on an aluminum drive adapter plate I
> happened to have from something else.  It has been bent to fit over the
> metal rods that run from the front to the rear of the drive enclosure.
> This places the cards in the rear of the enclosure above the power
> supply.  The enclosure has enough room to mount the P112's battery
> holder in the 90 degree position so that the GIDE board can be installed
> above the P112.  I've mounted a push button reset switch on the front,
> and the two serial port connectors are mounted on the back.
>
> The Maxtor HDD is the loudest part of the whole thing!  I'd forgotten
> how noisy older drives can be.

I bought an older (and somewhat smaller) SCSI external enclosure from David 
and did something similar.  My unit has a 3.5" HD drive and CD-ROM reader on 
the front.  For hard drive emulation, I squeezed a little IDE/CF-card adapter 
into the lower rear where it's accessible through one of the old 50-pin 
Centronics connector openings.  There's a 34-pin ribbon header on the rear for 
additional floppy drives and 9-pin D connector for console.

> Both David and Terry were very helpful answering some questions I had
> while building the boards and getting things running.

Absolutely.  Above and beyond the call of duty in both their cases.  I ran 
into a bunch of very odd issues with OS configuration and floppy drive 
handling earlier this year.  Terry was incredibly patient and helpful in 
working me through them

I highly recommend this approach for a "new" CP/M / Z-system compatible machine.

0
Steven
5/28/2016 4:58:11 PM
Hope I'm not hijacking this thread too much.

I have been wanting a P112 for some time now. Being a software guy, however, I would pay to have it assembled for me. But then I have to justify (well, OK, rationalize) the expense.

So, could someone discuss why they would choose a P112 over, say, a Raspberry Pi running Linux/YAZE?

--Nathanael
0
Nathanael
5/29/2016 1:47:22 AM
On 05/28/2016 09:47 PM, Nathanael wrote:

> I have been wanting a P112 for some time now. Being a software guy,
> however, I would pay to have it assembled for me. But then I have to
> justify (well, OK, rationalize) the expense.

Terry G. (Stack180) will assemble P112 kits for a fee.

> So, could someone discuss why they would choose a P112 over, say, a
> Raspberry Pi running Linux/YAZE?

Some possibilities:

- They want the authentic vintage experience

- They want access to legacy floppy and/or hard disk media

- Just because...  :-)

Personally, it's all three.


0
Steven
5/29/2016 1:01:39 PM
On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 6:01:40 AM UTC-7, Steven Hirsch wrote:
[...]
> - They want access to legacy floppy and/or hard disk media
[...]

I'd like to here more about this. Anyone have any personal experience interfacing 8" floppy disk drives to the P112? Is it possible?

This could make a pretty slick dev machine particularly with a CF card for bringing up and restoring old, of the day, equipment.

0
Jeff
5/29/2016 2:53:19 PM
On 05/29/2016 10:53 AM, Jeff Albrecht wrote:
> On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 6:01:40 AM UTC-7, Steven Hirsch wrote: [...]
>> - They want access to legacy floppy and/or hard disk media

> I'd like to here more about this. Anyone have any personal experience
> interfacing 8" floppy disk drives to the P112? Is it possible?

If you generate the proper disk definition and get the wiring correct, it 
should work fine.  Since I use ImageDisk on an old 486 DOS machine for media 
archiving and generation there's no pressing need here.

> This could make a pretty slick dev machine particularly with a CF card for
> bringing up and restoring old, of the day, equipment.

Yes, although it won't be format-agnostic in the sense that IMD is.
0
Steven
5/29/2016 2:57:43 PM
On 05/26/2016 11:02 PM, Isaac MacFarlane wrote:
> I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I need to look for something used?
>

This is one of those questions that makes me re-think my approach to all 
of this.  This post makes perfect sense for this newsgroup - yet there 
is something in me that has a problem with it. Personally, I would never 
consider using new hardware to run an old OS.  Like removing the 
steering wheel in a Ferrari -all that power but you can't control it. 
But if you HAVE to tinker and no vintage machines are available - it's 
pretty much the only approach available.  I've always used old OS's as a 
'means to an end' to run my old hardware.  And when I want to tinker 
with an OS on new hardware, I always have Linux.  I know of CP/M 
emulators that run under existing hardware/OS's. I've used them to code 
& debug software that's destined for a vintage system to save wear & 
tear on the old metal.  But is there a Zsystem emulator out there?  That 
would make tinkering much more accessible to everyone by eliminated the 
need to run it in 'native mode'.  Just a thought.
0
John
5/29/2016 4:33:24 PM
On 05/29/2016 12:33 PM, John Garza wrote:
> On 05/26/2016 11:02 PM, Isaac MacFarlane wrote:
>> I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would like
>> something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I need to look
>> for something used?
>>
>
> This is one of those questions that makes me re-think my approach to all of
> this.  This post makes perfect sense for this newsgroup - yet there is
> something in me that has a problem with it. Personally, I would never consider
> using new hardware to run an old OS.  Like removing the steering wheel in a
> Ferrari -all that power but you can't control it. But if you HAVE to tinker
> and no vintage machines are available - it's pretty much the only approach
> available.  I've always used old OS's as a 'means to an end' to run my old
> hardware.  And when I want to tinker with an OS on new hardware, I always have
> Linux.  I know of CP/M emulators that run under existing hardware/OS's. I've
> used them to code & debug software that's destined for a vintage system to
> save wear & tear on the old metal.  But is there a Zsystem emulator out
> there?  That would make tinkering much more accessible to everyone by
> eliminated the need to run it in 'native mode'.  Just a thought.

Z-System (NZCOM, actually) installs just fine on most emulators.  I use it 
with Z80pack on my Linux machine.  The file datestamp and time services 
required me to write a clock driver, but it was simple to do.

I have an application written in Turbo-Modula2 + Z80 assembler that takes a 
while to build on real hardware.  After setting up the build environment in 
Z80pack I type 'make' and it's done in less than 10 seconds.

0
Steven
5/29/2016 10:26:32 PM
On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 9:01:40 PM UTC+8, Steven Hirsch wrote:

> - They want the authentic vintage experience
> - They want access to legacy floppy and/or hard disk media
> - Just because...  :-)
> 
> Personally, it's all three.

Thanks. I don't have any legacy media (or hardware to read them on) lying around, but I could go with your first and third.

On the other hand, I've got a couple of shiftless Pi's lying around looking for something to do ...

The purchasing options on the P112 page are a tad unclear: I will want the "mostly complete kit" @$180 (outside the US). But there's the final option: Terry for Assembly $160. Does that bring the total to US$340?

--nathanael
0
Nathanael
5/30/2016 4:44:40 AM
On Saturday, May 28, 2016 at 4:44:11 AM UTC+2, jdhadd...@gmail.com wrote:

> Is there really no documentation for NZCOM floating around the net?
> I think I have it on paper if it's needed.

Documentation PDF is included in the NZCOM package for z80pack.
If needed I can make it available as separate file.
0
Udo
5/30/2016 9:16:34 AM
On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 6:33:26 PM UTC+2, John Garza wrote:

> I know of CP/M 
> emulators that run under existing hardware/OS's. I've used them to code 
> & debug software that's destined for a vintage system to save wear & 
> tear on the old metal.  But is there a Zsystem emulator out there?  That 
> would make tinkering much more accessible to everyone by eliminated the 
> need to run it in 'native mode'.  Just a thought.

For z80pack I build a pretty much complete NZCOM Z system, should be
good for getting started.
0
Udo
5/30/2016 9:23:00 AM
Nathanael <cjeculver@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sunday, May 29, 2016 at 9:01:40 PM UTC+8, Steven Hirsch wrote:

>> - They want the authentic vintage experience
>> - They want access to legacy floppy and/or hard disk media
>> - Just because...  :-)
>> 
>> Personally, it's all three.

> Thanks. I don't have any legacy media (or hardware to read them on) 
> lying around, but I could go with your first and third.

> On the other hand, I've got a couple of shiftless Pi's lying around 
> looking for something to do ...

> The purchasing options on the P112 page are a tad unclear: I will want 
> the "mostly complete kit" @$180 (outside the US). But there's the 
> final option: Terry for Assembly $160. Does that bring the total to 
> US$340?

No.  You just pay $160.  The "Terry for Assembly" option just means that 
I ship the kit to Terry instead of you.  When you do this, you need to 
contact Terry seperately and pay him for his services.  Then he'll tell 
me it's okay for me to ship the kit to him.  Now, you're outside the US, 
but I'm still shipping to Terry, who is inside the US.  He'll be the one 
who prepares an international shipment to you.

When I set up that Paypal button, I wanted to have a seperate drop-down 
to ask how you want it shipped, but that doesn't seem possible.  I 
updated the button to hopefully clear things up.


-- 
David Griffith
davidmylastname@acm.org   <--- Put my last name where it belongs
0
davidmylastname
5/30/2016 9:48:11 AM
  To: Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France
Mr. wrote:
> From Newsgroup: comp.os.cpm
> 
> I have been participating to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup for the last 16 years. I simply cannot remember ever reading a message about the Z-system during those last 16 years. As far as I know, the Z-system is dead. By the way, why are you posting this message in the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup? If the Z-system was still alive, it would have its own Newsgroup...

Don't be dick.

g.


-- 
Proud owner of F-15C 80-0007
http://www.f15sim.com - The only one of its kind.
http://www.diy-cockpits.org/coll - Go Collimated or Go Home.
Some people collect things for a hobby.  Geeks collect hobbies.

ScarletDME - The red hot Data Management Environment
A Multi-Value database for the masses, not the classes.
http://scarlet.deltasoft.com - Get it _today_!
--- Synchronet 3.16c-Win32 NewsLink 1.103
The Retro Archive - telnet://bbs.retroarchive.org
0
Gene
6/2/2016 3:26:25 PM
Steven Hirsch wrote:
> ...
> And much, much more.  This comes with only a slight space penalty and you get
> to decide the balance between memory use and feature set.

Z-system certainly had its fans.  'The Computer Journal' often had articles and
announcements.  It got a bit confusing with the updates, options, manual/auto
installs etc.  As cute as it was, some argued they'd rather use the memory for
programs.  Then there was the commercial side of it and the sometimes public
acrimony between developers.  One thing Z-System failed to anticipate was
that folks would eventually run CP/M on systems with effective CPU speeds
greater than 255 MHz.  255 was the highest value you could plug into the
Termcap!



0
Ed
6/8/2016 1:01:01 AM
Alan Laughton wrote:
> On 27/05/2016 2:02 PM, Isaac MacFarlane wrote:
> > I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would
> > like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I
> > need to look for something used?
> >
>
> The Microbee was an Australian made Z80 based computer made back in the
> 80's.  The company still exists and about to launch a new kit that is
> backward compatible but made with more modern parts.  Check it out fully at
> http://www.microbeetechnology.com.au/classic-plus-kit-computer.htm
>
> Alan

I didn't think anyone still made mechanical switch keyboards :)



0
Ed
6/8/2016 12:28:33 PM
On Wed, 8 Jun 2016, Ed wrote:

> Alan Laughton wrote:
>> On 27/05/2016 2:02 PM, Isaac MacFarlane wrote:
>>> I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would
>>> like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I
>>> need to look for something used?
>>>
>>
>> The Microbee was an Australian made Z80 based computer made back in the
>> 80's.  The company still exists and about to launch a new kit that is
>> backward compatible but made with more modern parts.  Check it out fully at
>> http://www.microbeetechnology.com.au/classic-plus-kit-computer.htm
>>
>> Alan
>
> I didn't think anyone still made mechanical switch keyboards :)

Unicomp does, don't they?

-uso.
0
Steve
6/8/2016 12:32:26 PM
Unicomp definitely does--I picked up a model M clone about a year ago. It f=
eels and types amazingly (buckling spring vs everything else), but the plas=
tics seems ever so slightly more brittle than the original model M.

In addition to this, there are other manufacturers making mechanical keyswi=
tches keyboards. The other mech keyboard I use is a Razor BlackWidow keyboa=
rd (using Cherry blue switches). It feels very good, almost like a vintage =
Alps keyboard (but not quite so).

Hope that helps with your keyboard dilemma!


-Billy
0
wmunroe78
6/8/2016 2:17:58 PM
On Wednesday, June 8, 2016 at 5:32:28 AM UTC-7, Steve Nickolas wrote:
> On Wed, 8 Jun 2016, Ed wrote:
> 
> > Alan Laughton wrote:
> >> On 27/05/2016 2:02 PM, Isaac MacFarlane wrote:
> >>> I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would
> >>> like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I
> >>> need to look for something used?
> >>>
> >>
> >> The Microbee was an Australian made Z80 based computer made back in the
> >> 80's.  The company still exists and about to launch a new kit that is
> >> backward compatible but made with more modern parts.  Check it out fully at
> >> http://www.microbeetechnology.com.au/classic-plus-kit-computer.htm
> >>
> >> Alan
> >
> > I didn't think anyone still made mechanical switch keyboards :)
> 
> Unicomp does, don't they?
> 
> -uso.
0
wmunroe78
6/8/2016 2:18:24 PM
On 06/08/2016 14:07, Ed wrote:
> acrimony between developers.  One thing Z-System failed to anticipate was
> that folks would eventually run CP/M on systems with effective CPU speeds
> greater than 255 MHz.  255 was the highest value you could plug into the
> Termcap!

Now, why would one want to plug *CPU* *speed* into the termcap?
That's ... different

-- 
Torfinn Ingolfsen,
Norway
0
Torfinn
6/8/2016 8:51:52 PM
Ed <invalid@nospam.com> wrote:
> Alan Laughton wrote:
>> On 27/05/2016 2:02 PM, Isaac MacFarlane wrote:
>> > I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would
>> > like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I
>> > need to look for something used?
>>
>> The Microbee was an Australian made Z80 based computer made back in the
>> 80's.  The company still exists and about to launch a new kit that is
>> backward compatible but made with more modern parts.  Check it out fully at
>> http://www.microbeetechnology.com.au/classic-plus-kit-computer.htm

> I didn't think anyone still made mechanical switch keyboards :)

http://www.wasdkeyboards.com/ makes good ones with Cherry switches.  I 
plan to get one of their keyboards sometime when I overhaul my desktop 
machine.  They're pricey, but worth it.


-- 
David Griffith
davidmylastname@acm.org   <--- Put my last name where it belongs
0
davidmylastname
6/9/2016 8:25:13 AM
On Friday, 27 May 2016 05:02:05 UTC+1, Isaac MacFarlane  wrote:
> I was wondering if there are any new systems still available. I would like something small that can run Zsystem. Does this exist or do I need to look for something used?

You may give a try to FPGA based systems like this http://searle.hostei.com/grant/Multicomp/ , runs CP/M 2.2 
0
Chris
6/9/2016 8:52:45 AM
Torfinn Ingolfsen wrote:
> On 06/08/2016 14:07, Ed wrote:
> > acrimony between developers.  One thing Z-System failed to anticipate was
> > that folks would eventually run CP/M on systems with effective CPU speeds
> > greater than 255 MHz.  255 was the highest value you could plug into the
> > Termcap!
>
> Now, why would one want to plug *CPU* *speed* into the termcap?
> That's ... different

Not so strange.  Many terminals required time to do certain functions
e.g. clear the screen.  As there was no hand-shaking programs had
to wait a specified time before sending new data to the terminal; and
for this they needed to know the CPU speed.



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Ed
6/9/2016 11:17:48 AM
I'd like to look at getting z-system running on a coleco Adam - it runs 2.2 . Where do I start?

Bill h 
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William
6/10/2016 11:32:14 PM
On 06/10/2016 07:32 PM, William Hicks wrote:

> I'd like to look at getting z-system running on a coleco Adam - it runs 2.2
> . Where do I start?

Download nzcom and dive in!

0
Steven
6/13/2016 12:38:37 AM
> Z-system certainly had its fans.

I thought Circuit Cellar's SB180 run Z/CPR3.
Or is that a different flavor of system?
0
jeffj
7/5/2016 12:24:03 PM
On 07/05/2016 08:24 AM, Jeff Jonas wrote:
>> Z-system certainly had its fans.
>
> I thought Circuit Cellar's SB180 run Z/CPR3.
> Or is that a different flavor of system?

ZCPR3 was the heart and soul of Z-System, which also included a new BDOS 
replacement.


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Steven
7/5/2016 8:27:43 PM
I have a Unicomp model M clone (and a real IBM model M too) and it is an ac=
curate clone (correct keyswitches and layout).  Also, they offer many acces=
sories and a version of the model M with a thumb mouse numb (like the Lenov=
o laptops, little red nub between G,H,B)


On Wednesday, June 8, 2016 at 10:18:01 AM UTC-4, wmun...@gmail.com wrote:
> Unicomp definitely does--I picked up a model M clone about a year ago. It=
 feels and types amazingly (buckling spring vs everything else), but the pl=
astics seems ever so slightly more brittle than the original model M.
>=20
> In addition to this, there are other manufacturers making mechanical keys=
witches keyboards. The other mech keyboard I use is a Razor BlackWidow keyb=
oard (using Cherry blue switches). It feels very good, almost like a vintag=
e Alps keyboard (but not quite so).
>=20
> Hope that helps with your keyboard dilemma!
>=20
>=20
> -Billy

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D
7/7/2016 1:45:32 AM
Jeff Jonas wrote:
> ...I thought Circuit Cellar's SB180 run Z/CPR3.
> Or is that a different flavor of system?...

I have an SB-180. (SB180-R4 bought 12/02/1987)

The SB-180 manual just refers to the OS as "Z-System."
It also has ZCPR3 replacing the Console Command Processor module (CCP).

The included ZRDOS Programmer's Guide is subtitled:
"Echelon Z-System Disk Operating System."

The manual defines it:
"ZRDOS is a Z80 coded CP/M 2.2 compatible Disk Operating System. Use of Z80 code allows addition of many new features..."

Jay_in_Dallas
--
0
9/13/2016 1:36:06 AM
On Thursday, June 2, 2016 at 11:46:30 AM UTC-4, Gene Buckle wrote:
> To: Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France
> Mr. wrote:
> > From Newsgroup: comp.os.cpm
> >=20
> > I have been participating to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup for the last 16 =
years. I simply cannot remember ever reading a message about the Z-system d=
uring those last 16 years. As far as I know, the Z-system is dead. By the w=
ay, why are you posting this message in the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup? If the Z=
-system was still alive, it would have its own Newsgroup...
>=20
> Don't be dick.
>=20
> g.

Roche has an excellent command of the syntax of English but he doesn't seem=
 to grasp the nuances of phrasing that convey just as much meaning as the w=
ords themselves. He doesn't realize how he sounds to native English speaker=
s. Either that or he's just a dick. :)

Tom L
0
Tom
9/21/2016 2:57:18 PM
On Thu, 26 May 2016 23:38:44 -0700 (PDT), "Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France"
<roche182@laposte.net> wrote:

>I have been participating to the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup for the last 16 years. I simply cannot remember ever reading a message about the Z-system during those last 16 years. As far as I know, the Z-system is dead. By the way, why are you posting this message in the comp.os.cpm Newsgroup? If the Z-system was still alive, it would have its own Newsgroup...

From Wikipedia (perhaps you've heard of it?)

''ZCPR (the Z80 Command Processor Replacement) was introduced on
February 2, 1982 as a drop-in replacement for the standard Digital
Research console command processor (CCP) and was initially written by
a group of computer hobbyists who called themselves "The CCP Group".
They were Frank Wancho, Keith Petersen (the archivist behind Simtel at
the time), Ron Fowler, Charlie Strom, Bob Mathias, and Richard Conn.
Richard was, in fact, the driving force in this group (all of whom
maintained contact through email).

ZCPR1 was released on a disk put out by SIG/M (Special Interest
Group/Microcomputers), a part of the Amateur Computer Club of New
Jersey.

ZCPR2 was released on February 14, 1983. It was released as a set of
ten disks from SIG/M. ZCPR2 was upgraded to 2.3, and also was released
in 8080 code, permitting the use of ZCPR2 on 8080 and 8085 systems.

ZCPR3 was released on Bastille Day, July 14, 1984, as a set of nine
disks from SIG/M. The code for ZCPR3 could also be compiled (with
reduced features) for the 8080 and would run on systems that did not
have the requisite Z80 microprocessor.

In January 1987, Richard Conn stopped developing ZCPR, and Echelon
asked Jay Sage (who already had a privately enhanced ZCPR 3.1) to
continue work on it. Thus, ZCPR 3.3 was developed and released. ZCPR33
no longer supported the 8080 series of microprocessors, and added the
most features of any upgrade in the ZCPR line.

Features of ZCPR as of version 3 included:

    shells
    aliases
    I/O redirection
    flow control
    named directories
    search paths
    custom menus
    passwords
    on line help

ZCPR3.3 also included a full complement of utilities with considerably
extended capabilities. While enthusiastically supported by the CP/M
user base of the time, ZCPR alone was insufficient to slow the demise
of CP/M.''


enough said.

Bill
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Bill
9/21/2016 8:37:20 PM
Reply: