f



PLMX Advertisement Number 3

While searching for something else, I had the surprise to find a "new" adve=
rtisement for PLMX, the multi-CPU PL/M compiler discussed in 2009.

So, in case another Old Timer would still be interested, please find it bel=
ow.

Yours Sincerely,
Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France


PLMXadv3.WS4
------------

- "PLMX: A PL/M to Fit All Micros"
  "The Intelligent machines Journal", Issue 20, 21 January 1980, p.10

https://books.google.fr/books?id=3DLz4EAAAAMBAJ&pg=3DPA10#v=3Donepage&q&f=
=3Dfalse

(Retyped by Emmanuel ROCHE.)

PLMX, billed as a universal high-level language for microprocessors, has  b=
een=20
introduced  by  Systems Consultants, Inc. ("SCI"), of San  Diego,  Californ=
ia.=20
PLMX  can be used with all 8- or 16-bit microprocessors known today,  and  =
its=20
modular structure will enable it to generate code for any such  microproces=
sor=20
yet  to be developed, the company says. PLMX is designed primarily for use =
 in=20
microcomputer  product  development systems and in real-time  process  cont=
rol=20
applications.

According  to  Dr. Jack Ingber, manager of product development for  SCI,  P=
LMX=20
takes  PL/M to its logical conclusion. PL/M, originally derived from PL/I, =
 is=20
used only on Intel 8080- and 8086-based systems. Other versions, such as  P=
L/Z=20
for  the Zilog Z-80 and PL/65 for the 6502, are used only with those  speci=
fic=20
microprocessors.

PLMX syntax is identical to that of PL/M, which means that the entire  libr=
ary=20
of  existing  PL/M programs can be compiled under PLMX. It  also  means  th=
at,=20
through the PLMX compiler, PL/M programs may be used on microprocessors  ot=
her=20
than the Intel 8080.

PLMX  is  said to be usable on any 8- or 16-bit microprocessor,  but  it  c=
an,=20
according to SCI, also be adapted to interface with practically any  operat=
ing=20
system.  Currently (January 1980), the PLMX compiler can run under TEKDOS  =
and=20
CP/M  operating systems. TEKDOS is the operating system for  Tektronix'  80=
02A=20
Universal  Microprocessor Development System, and CP/M is an operating  sys=
tem=20
that  can  support  just  about any Intel  8080-based  system  in  use  tod=
ay,=20
including  many  hobbyist and small industrial systems.  Interfaces  to  ot=
her=20
operating systems will be available in 1980.

In  addition,  PLMX is a true compiler, not an interpretive compiler  such =
 as=20
BASIC  or  Pascal in some of their current (1980)  implementations.  Since =
 an=20
interpreter must be resident in ROM for execution of programs, an interpret=
ive=20
compiler requires a considerable amount of memory space, thus restricting  =
its=20
usefulness in developing ROM-based products.

As seen in the illustration, the structure of PLMX allows for one interface=
 to=20
the operating system and another to the particular microprocessor, neither =
 of=20
which requires any modification to the main body of PLMX itself (i.e., to  =
the=20
compiler).  The interfaces to the different operating systems or to  differ=
ent=20
microprocessors  are modularized and, therefore, easily interchangeable.  T=
his=20
means  that  Input/Output routines or alternate code  generators  are  read=
ily=20
accomplished.

Included  in the PLMX package are run-time routines and  high-level  execut=
ive=20
procedures  that allow for a simple interface to the operating  system.  Th=
ese=20
routines  and  procedures give the user access to all system  peripherals  =
and=20
disk files.

PLMX source code compiles first to an intermediate code that is transparent=
 to=20
the  user.   This  intermediate code is then converted  by  the  modular  c=
ode=20
generator into assembly language code for the particular microprocessor.  C=
ode=20
generators  for  the  Intel  8080-8085, Zilog  Z-80,  and  Motorola  6800  =
are=20
available  now,  with code generators for the TI-9900 and RCA-1802  to  app=
ear=20
early  in  1980, SCI says. Zilog Z-8000, Motorola 68000 and  Intel  8086  c=
ode=20
generators will follow later in 1980.

Full access to the many functions of the particular microprocessor is provi=
ded=20
by  PLMX.   Based  variable and pointers allow  for  manipulation  of  memo=
ry,=20
including  bit-by-bit manipulation, which is especially important  in  proc=
ess=20
control.

PLMX,  like PL/M, is a modular, block-structured language.  Large  programm=
ing=20
projects can be broken down into smaller modules, with each module programm=
ed,=20
debugged,  and tested independently. Modules can then be linked together.  =
The=20
maximum  module  size, which is roughly proportional to the number  of  sou=
rce=20
code  lines,  is  limited by the amount of program  memory  available  to  =
the=20
compiler. A system with 64K of program memory can compile modules in excess=
 of=20
500 lines of source code.

The  PLMX compiler, priced at $1000, is housed on an 8-inch diskette, but  =
may=20
also  be  placed  on hard disk. The user invokes the  compiler  to  start  =
the=20
process;  the final code is space optimized, making the language suitable  =
for=20
ROM-based  programs. PLMX keeps the ROM and RAM areas separate.  In  additi=
on,=20
the  programmer has access to the code at any point after the compilation  =
for=20
modification, manipulation, etc., SCI says.

Contact: Systems Consultants, Inc., 4015 Hancock Street, San Diego, CA  921=
10;=20
(714) 222-6381.


EOF
=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A=1A
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Mr
11/3/2016 8:30:29 PM
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Dne =C4=8Dtvrtek 3. listopadu 2016 21:30:30 UTC+1 Mr. Emmanuel Roche, Franc=
e napsal(a):
> While searching for something else, I had the surprise to find a "new" ad=
vertisement for PLMX, the multi-CPU PL/M compiler discussed in 2009.
>=20
> So, in case another Old Timer would still be interested, please find it b=
elow.
>=20
> Yours Sincerely,
> Mr. Emmanuel Roche, France
>=20
>=20
> PLMXadv3.WS4
> ------------
>=20
> - "PLMX: A PL/M to Fit All Micros"
>   "The Intelligent machines Journal", Issue 20, 21 January 1980, p.10
>=20
> https://books.google.fr/books?id=3DLz4EAAAAMBAJ&pg=3DPA10#v=3Donepage&q&f=
=3Dfalse
>=20
> (Retyped by Emmanuel ROCHE.)
>=20
> PLMX, billed as a universal high-level language for microprocessors, has =
 been=20
> introduced  by  Systems Consultants, Inc. ("SCI"), of San  Diego,  Califo=
rnia.=20
> PLMX  can be used with all 8- or 16-bit microprocessors known today,  and=
  its=20
> modular structure will enable it to generate code for any such  microproc=
essor=20
> yet  to be developed, the company says. PLMX is designed primarily for us=
e  in=20
> microcomputer  product  development systems and in real-time  process  co=
ntrol=20
> applications.
>=20
> According  to  Dr. Jack Ingber, manager of product development for  SCI, =
 PLMX=20
> takes  PL/M to its logical conclusion. PL/M, originally derived from PL/I=
,  is=20
> used only on Intel 8080- and 8086-based systems. Other versions, such as =
 PL/Z=20
> for  the Zilog Z-80 and PL/65 for the 6502, are used only with those  spe=
cific=20
> microprocessors.
>=20
> PLMX syntax is identical to that of PL/M, which means that the entire  li=
brary=20
> of  existing  PL/M programs can be compiled under PLMX. It  also  means  =
that,=20
> through the PLMX compiler, PL/M programs may be used on microprocessors  =
other=20
> than the Intel 8080.
>=20
> PLMX  is  said to be usable on any 8- or 16-bit microprocessor,  but  it =
 can,=20
> according to SCI, also be adapted to interface with practically any  oper=
ating=20
> system.  Currently (January 1980), the PLMX compiler can run under TEKDOS=
  and=20
> CP/M  operating systems. TEKDOS is the operating system for  Tektronix'  =
8002A=20
> Universal  Microprocessor Development System, and CP/M is an operating  s=
ystem=20
> that  can  support  just  about any Intel  8080-based  system  in  use  t=
oday,=20
> including  many  hobbyist and small industrial systems.  Interfaces  to  =
other=20
> operating systems will be available in 1980.
>=20
> In  addition,  PLMX is a true compiler, not an interpretive compiler  suc=
h  as=20
> BASIC  or  Pascal in some of their current (1980)  implementations.  Sinc=
e  an=20
> interpreter must be resident in ROM for execution of programs, an interpr=
etive=20
> compiler requires a considerable amount of memory space, thus restricting=
  its=20
> usefulness in developing ROM-based products.
>=20
> As seen in the illustration, the structure of PLMX allows for one interfa=
ce to=20
> the operating system and another to the particular microprocessor, neithe=
r  of=20
> which requires any modification to the main body of PLMX itself (i.e., to=
  the=20
> compiler).  The interfaces to the different operating systems or to  diff=
erent=20
> microprocessors  are modularized and, therefore, easily interchangeable. =
 This=20
> means  that  Input/Output routines or alternate code  generators  are  re=
adily=20
> accomplished.
>=20
> Included  in the PLMX package are run-time routines and  high-level  exec=
utive=20
> procedures  that allow for a simple interface to the operating  system.  =
These=20
> routines  and  procedures give the user access to all system  peripherals=
  and=20
> disk files.
>=20
> PLMX source code compiles first to an intermediate code that is transpare=
nt to=20
> the  user.   This  intermediate code is then converted  by  the  modular =
 code=20
> generator into assembly language code for the particular microprocessor. =
 Code=20
> generators  for  the  Intel  8080-8085, Zilog  Z-80,  and  Motorola  6800=
  are=20
> available  now,  with code generators for the TI-9900 and RCA-1802  to  a=
ppear=20
> early  in  1980, SCI says. Zilog Z-8000, Motorola 68000 and  Intel  8086 =
 code=20
> generators will follow later in 1980.
>=20
> Full access to the many functions of the particular microprocessor is pro=
vided=20
> by  PLMX.   Based  variable and pointers allow  for  manipulation  of  me=
mory,=20
> including  bit-by-bit manipulation, which is especially important  in  pr=
ocess=20
> control.
>=20
> PLMX,  like PL/M, is a modular, block-structured language.  Large  progra=
mming=20
> projects can be broken down into smaller modules, with each module progra=
mmed,=20
> debugged,  and tested independently. Modules can then be linked together.=
  The=20
> maximum  module  size, which is roughly proportional to the number  of  s=
ource=20
> code  lines,  is  limited by the amount of program  memory  available  to=
  the=20
> compiler. A system with 64K of program memory can compile modules in exce=
ss of=20
> 500 lines of source code.
>=20
> The  PLMX compiler, priced at $1000, is housed on an 8-inch diskette, but=
  may=20
> also  be  placed  on hard disk. The user invokes the  compiler  to  start=
  the=20
> process;  the final code is space optimized, making the language suitable=
  for=20
> ROM-based  programs. PLMX keeps the ROM and RAM areas separate.  In  addi=
tion,=20
> the  programmer has access to the code at any point after the compilation=
  for=20
> modification, manipulation, etc., SCI says.
>=20
> Contact: Systems Consultants, Inc., 4015 Hancock Street, San Diego, CA  9=
2110;=20
> (714) 222-6381.
>=20
>=20
> EOF

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strilka
11/4/2016 6:29:42 PM
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