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WD 1001 mfm controller firmware sought

Hi,
title says it all - the WD 1001 in my machine is hard to get at, and I 
have no direct match for the PROMs in my programming device to read them.
If anyone's dumped the firmware of their WD 1001 MFM controller, I'd 
love to get a copy for inclusion into the MAME emulation project.

Thanks
Robert

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rfka01
9/1/2016 2:23:15 AM
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On 8/31/16 7:23 PM, rfka01 wrote:
> Hi,
> title says it all - the WD 1001 in my machine is hard to get at, and I have no direct match for the PROMs in my
> programming device to read them.

which version, 8" or 5"?

is this in a Kaypro?


0
Al
9/1/2016 1:01:01 AM
Am 01.09.2016 um 04:36 schrieb Al Kossow:
> On 8/31/16 7:23 PM, rfka01 wrote:
>> Hi,
>> title says it all - the WD 1001 in my machine is hard to get at, and I h=
ave no direct match for the PROMs in my
>> programming device to read them.
>
> which version, 8" or 5"?
>
> is this in a Kaypro?
>
>
Hi Al, the 1001 drives a 10MB 5.25" HD in my NCR DMV.

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rfka01
9/1/2016 6:12:03 AM
Am 01.09.2016 um 08:12 schrieb rfka01:
Got the critter out - it's a WD 1001-05 Rev. A12 to be precise.

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rfka01
9/1/2016 8:39:47 PM
PLAN A:
======
If you're confident doing circuit board technical work and if your WD 1001 proms are socketed, then its not very hard to remove them and hack together an Arduino breadboard circuit to read the prom contents into your PC.

You need to get the prom part number, find the datasheet online, then get the chip pinout. Check for power pins that require voltages not available on your Arduino. If they're only used for programming the prom, you only need to set those pins for normal read mode.

The you write a "script" to load latch high and low address pins, activate the chip enable and read data signal per the datasheet timing and then read each byte in turn thought a buffer chip, back into your Arduino. With each byte you can dump it on the PC monitor, or if you really feel comfortable coding in C, just wiki the .hex format and write your program to dump hex format lines of 16 or 32 bytes per that format.

You might find lots of messages in Arduino discussion groups on how to do that.

Plan B:
=====
If you've not done anything like that before, find a friend or in-law to do it. Buy them a case of beer and get all your proms read at once.

Jay_in_Dallas
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0
9/13/2016 12:41:16 AM
The controller is well documented and the drives are getting very hard to find.

I am surprised no one has taken a pic micro controller, an SD socket and the public domain fat c code and made an emulator.

This basic controller is used by so many machines and in a weekend or two could be replaced by a microcontroller and flash drive(s) with M$ file system support so the drives are disk images on an SD card.

FYI the controller uses a simple 8 bit parallel interface.


Randy
0
randy482
9/13/2016 1:07:39 AM
rfka01 wrote:
> ...If anyone's dumped the firmware of their WD 1001
> MFM controller, I'd love to get a copy for inclusion into
> the MAME emulation project...

Re: WD-100x Series of HDD Controllers:
===============================
I've got a WD-100x controller that came in my Tandy 4000. I think its a WD-1002 but I'll check my inventory spreadsheet before I dig it out of storage. When I bought the system, I immediately replaced the WD-100x with a SCSI controller and drive for higher capacity.

NOTE:

Some of the WD-100x series used the SMC/Signetics 8x300 micro. It was a 16 bit, fast bit-banger, identified by its over-sized ceramic chip. I doubt that code would be much use for you as it basically had about 8 primary opcodes but was great for bit-banging in live datastreams at least until datastreams got too fast...

Some of the WD-100x series are probably 8051/8031 based.

I have a set of WD HDD controller chips form 1983, some marked "PROTOTYPE," of which two of the set appeared to be nothing but 8051s. The WD part numbers were  {WD1015, WD1014, WD1010} if I recall correctly.

I have never seen those chips on a WD-100x controller board, but I haven't seen that many and I lost interest in looking for them about  40 years ago.

Jay_in_Dallas
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0
9/13/2016 2:18:54 AM
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