f



[News] Mac OS X Dumped For GNU/Linux Because It's Better (Not Just Libre)

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Moving from Mac to Ubuntu: Why I’m switching

,----[ Quote ]
| Why I’m leaving Mac
| 
|    1. Crap file management.The Finder doesn’t work for me. No location bar 
|    and no tree strucure side panel makes it difficult to navigate folders and 
|    move files around the way I want to.  
|    2. Insufficient panels & customization. In Ubuntu I can have as many 
|    panels I want, can put all kinds of stuff on them, and can arrange them 
|    however I want. In OSX You just have the dock, and you can really only put 
|    applications or files on them, and you can’t even put in a separator to 
|    keep them organized.    
|    3. Various other annoyances. Such as:
|           * program menus are glued to the top of the screen on one monitor 
|           only, which detaches them from the window. This is especailly 
|           annoying when the program you’re using is on the second monitor.  
|           * the date/time doesn’t open to a navigable calendar. I often use 
|           this to check dates in the past or future. 
|           * you can’t see hidden files unless you run a command from the 
|           terminal to turn them on. Thus, hidden files are either always on 
|           or always off.  
`----

http://meganmcdermott.com/2008/08/29/moving-mac-ubuntu-switching/

Why Switch to Linux?

,----[ Quote ]
| In an interesting post on Lifehacker, the editors ask the readers "Why did 
| you switch to Linux?" The question drew quite a lot of interesting responses, 
| including some very offbeat reasons for why people made the switch. If you're 
| under the impression that people switch solely for rebellious or "fight the 
| man" reasons, here are some of the more interesting responses and trends that 
| they point to.     
`----

http://ostatic.com/172141-blog/why-switch-to-linux


Related:

Switching From OS X to Ubuntu: 10 Things I Miss

,----[ Quote ]
| Overall, I have to say that I’m very happy with using Ubuntu. These are just 
| a few little things that really bug me about my Dell Ubuntu notebook. With a 
| little patients, I’m sure most of these issues will be solved. There are also 
| a lot of things I love about Ubuntu that I miss when I use OS X, maybe I’ll 
| share those in my next post.    
`----

http://www.starryhope.com/linux/2007/switching-from-os-x-to-ubuntu-ten-things-i-miss/
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0
newsgroups3 (79677)
8/31/2008 1:05:58 AM
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On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 01:05:58 +0000, Roy Schestowitz wrote:


> Moving from Mac to Ubuntu: Why I�m switching
> 
> ,----[ Quote ]
>| Why I�m leaving Mac
>| 
>|    1. Crap file management.The Finder doesn�t work for me. No location bar 
>|    and no tree strucure side panel makes it difficult to navigate folders and 
>|    move files around the way I want to.  
>|    2. Insufficient panels & customization. In Ubuntu I can have as many 
>|    panels I want, can put all kinds of stuff on them, and can arrange them 
>|    however I want. In OSX You just have the dock, and you can really only put 
>|    applications or files on them, and you can�t even put in a separator to 
>|    keep them organized.    
>|    3. Various other annoyances. Such as:
>|           * program menus are glued to the top of the screen on one monitor 
>|           only, which detaches them from the window. This is especailly 
>|           annoying when the program you�re using is on the second monitor.  
>|           * the date/time doesn�t open to a navigable calendar. I often use 
>|           this to check dates in the past or future. 
>|           * you can�t see hidden files unless you run a command from the 
>|           terminal to turn them on. Thus, hidden files are either always on 
>|           or always off.  
> `----
> 
> http://meganmcdermott.com/2008/08/29/moving-mac-ubuntu-switching/

Wonderful, some idiots blog...
Great source you have there Roy Schestowitz.

 
> Why Switch to Linux?

Good question.
Evidently 99 percent of the people have not done it.
Maybe you better investigate, Roy Schestowitz.

-- 
Moshe Goldfarb
Collector of soaps from around the globe.
Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
0
brick_n_straw (4058)
8/31/2008 12:25:33 AM
In article <wfm1ehm4a873.lc7tvefo2i3o$.dlg@40tude.net>,
 "Moshe Goldfarb." <brick_n_straw@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 01:05:58 +0000, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
> 
> 
> > Moving from Mac to Ubuntu: Why I�m switching
> > 
> > ,----[ Quote ]
> >| Why I�m leaving Mac
> >| 
> >|    1. Crap file management.The Finder doesn�t work for me. No location bar 
> >|    and no tree strucure side panel makes it difficult to navigate folders 
> >|    and 
> >|    move files around the way I want to.  

The Finder has three different ways to look at files: 

1. Each window is a view into one directory with each thing in the 
directory as its own icon. 

2. A window is a view into a folder with a list of everything in the 
directory. Folders have little triangles that you click on to reveal the 
contents of the folders. 

3. A window has columns; each column shows the contents of the item 
selected in the column to the left. 

I use them all; it depends on what I'm doing. I hate Windows' 
inconsistent file browser, and Red Hat Linux's file browser feels 
crunchy. 

The author is merely complaining that the Finder doesn't work the way he 
wants. (This is, of course okay. Extending the Windows-Macintosh Double 
Standard to Linux, it is perfectly okay to complain that Mac OS doesn't 
work the way you want to, but you cannot complain that Windows or Linux 
doesn't.) 

> >|    2. Insufficient panels & customization. In Ubuntu I can have as many 
> >|    panels I want, can put all kinds of stuff on them, and can arrange them 
> >|    however I want. In OSX You just have the dock, and you can really only 
> >|    put 
> >|    applications or files on them, and you can�t even put in a separator to 
> >|    keep them organized.    

One could probably find a custom finder replacement, but the author will 
never be happy with OS X. Linux application UIs are generally built with 
several principles in mind: 

1. They should be built by command-line gurus who don't understand why 
anyone would want to use a graphical UI. For example, the MySQL 
graphical database browser doesn't actually let you browse a database 
visually; it still requires you to hand-craft queries. 

2. The more knobs to frob, the better. All knobs must be instantly 
visible on the main window of the application. 

> >|    3. Various other annoyances. Such as:
> >|           * program menus are glued to the top of the screen on one 
> >|           monitor 
> >|           only, which detaches them from the window. This is especailly 
> >|           annoying when the program you�re using is on the second monitor. 

This is another aspect of complaining that the OS does not work the way 
I want it to, which is only valid against OS X. Becuase of the Double 
Standard, one is prohibited from making that complaint against Linux or 
Windows. Early Apple research resulted in Fitt's Law, which states that  
the time it takes to click on a UI widget depends somewhat on the 
distance from the mouse pointer to the widget and inversely on the size 
of the widget. The bigger the widget, the less time it takes. When the 
menu is stuck to the ceiling like that, each item in the menu is 
effectively 68 miles tall, which enables you to just slam the mouse 
pointer up there very quickly. 

My complaint against menus attached to windows is that it's often hard 
to tell which of several visible menus is the one I actually want. if I 
click the wrong one I've activated some other window. 


> >|           * the date/time doesn�t open to a navigable calendar. I often 
> >|           use 
> >|           this to check dates in the past or future. 

That's a cool feature request. Submit it to Apple! 

On OS X I can configure the clock/calendar to be a clock and calendar, 
and licking on it always gives me the complete current date and time. On 
Windows I have to move the mouse over there, and if the OS feels like 
it, it will tell me the date. On red Hat Linux ... there isn't one. 

> >|           * you can�t see hidden files unless you run a command from the 
> >|           terminal to turn them on. Thus, hidden files are either always 
> >|           on 
> >|           or always off.  

You could WTFCY and make an Applescript or BASH shell command which will 
do that. 

> > http://meganmcdermott.com/2008/08/29/moving-mac-ubuntu-switching/
> 
> Wonderful, some idiots blog...
> Great source you have there Roy Schestowitz.
> 
>  
> > Why Switch to Linux?
> 
> Good question.
> Evidently 99 percent of the people have not done it.
> Maybe you better investigate, Roy Schestowitz.

Linux is good for servers and embedded systems. It's too crunchy for a 
desktop system. I particularly despise its second-rate terminal 
application. OS X's is very good, with direct keyboard support for copy 
and paste and nice integration with the Finder. For instance, if I need 
to know the complete path to some file, I can just type ls and then drag 
the icon for the file to the terminal. It then pastes the path onto the 
command line for me. Under Linux, every application has its own 
standards for how to implement copy and paste. On some, I MUST use a 
menu; on others I can use the misplaced control key. 

The Gnome desktop is extremely well documented for developers, but not 
for users. For instance, I once searched all up and down the web to find 
instructions on how the damn menu is configured and how to add things to 
it. I had installed some cool applications onto Linux, and I wanted to 
have them in the menu ... but nothing would tell me how to do that. I 
can add things to the top menu. And forget being able to create my own 
icons for things. 

I've used Linux, Windows, and OS X. I prefer OS X. Someone else 
switching back to Linux will not convince me to.

-- 
Timberwoof <me at timberwoof dot com> 
http://www.timberwoof.com
People who can't spell get kicked out of Hogwarts. 
0
8/31/2008 1:03:17 AM
On Sat, 30 Aug 2008 18:03:17 -0700, Timberwoof wrote:

> In article <wfm1ehm4a873.lc7tvefo2i3o$.dlg@40tude.net>,
>  "Moshe Goldfarb." <brick_n_straw@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 01:05:58 +0000, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
>> 
>> 
>>> Moving from Mac to Ubuntu: Why I�m switching
>>> 
>>> ,----[ Quote ]
>>>| Why I�m leaving Mac
>>>| 
>>>|    1. Crap file management.The Finder doesn�t work for me. No location bar 
>>>|    and no tree strucure side panel makes it difficult to navigate folders 
>>>|    and 
>>>|    move files around the way I want to.  
> 
> The Finder has three different ways to look at files: 
> 
> 1. Each window is a view into one directory with each thing in the 
> directory as its own icon. 
> 
> 2. A window is a view into a folder with a list of everything in the 
> directory. Folders have little triangles that you click on to reveal the 
> contents of the folders. 
> 
> 3. A window has columns; each column shows the contents of the item 
> selected in the column to the left. 
> 
> I use them all; it depends on what I'm doing. I hate Windows' 
> inconsistent file browser, and Red Hat Linux's file browser feels 
> crunchy. 
> 
> The author is merely complaining that the Finder doesn't work the way he 
> wants. (This is, of course okay. Extending the Windows-Macintosh Double 
> Standard to Linux, it is perfectly okay to complain that Mac OS doesn't 
> work the way you want to, but you cannot complain that Windows or Linux 
> doesn't.) 
> 
>>>|    2. Insufficient panels & customization. In Ubuntu I can have as many 
>>>|    panels I want, can put all kinds of stuff on them, and can arrange them 
>>>|    however I want. In OSX You just have the dock, and you can really only 
>>>|    put 
>>>|    applications or files on them, and you can�t even put in a separator to 
>>>|    keep them organized.    
> 
> One could probably find a custom finder replacement, but the author will 
> never be happy with OS X. Linux application UIs are generally built with 
> several principles in mind: 
> 
> 1. They should be built by command-line gurus who don't understand why 
> anyone would want to use a graphical UI. For example, the MySQL 
> graphical database browser doesn't actually let you browse a database 
> visually; it still requires you to hand-craft queries. 
> 
> 2. The more knobs to frob, the better. All knobs must be instantly 
> visible on the main window of the application. 
> 
>>>|    3. Various other annoyances. Such as:
>>>|           * program menus are glued to the top of the screen on one 
>>>|           monitor 
>>>|           only, which detaches them from the window. This is especailly 
>>>|           annoying when the program you�re using is on the second monitor. 
> 
> This is another aspect of complaining that the OS does not work the way 
> I want it to, which is only valid against OS X. Becuase of the Double 
> Standard, one is prohibited from making that complaint against Linux or 
> Windows. Early Apple research resulted in Fitt's Law, which states that  
> the time it takes to click on a UI widget depends somewhat on the 
> distance from the mouse pointer to the widget and inversely on the size 
> of the widget. The bigger the widget, the less time it takes. When the 
> menu is stuck to the ceiling like that, each item in the menu is 
> effectively 68 miles tall, which enables you to just slam the mouse 
> pointer up there very quickly. 
> 
> My complaint against menus attached to windows is that it's often hard 
> to tell which of several visible menus is the one I actually want. if I 
> click the wrong one I've activated some other window. 
> 
> 
>>>|           * the date/time doesn�t open to a navigable calendar. I often 
>>>|           use 
>>>|           this to check dates in the past or future. 
> 
> That's a cool feature request. Submit it to Apple! 
> 
> On OS X I can configure the clock/calendar to be a clock and calendar, 
> and licking on it always gives me the complete current date and time. On 
> Windows I have to move the mouse over there, and if the OS feels like 
> it, it will tell me the date. On red Hat Linux ... there isn't one. 
> 
>>>|           * you can�t see hidden files unless you run a command from the 
>>>|           terminal to turn them on. Thus, hidden files are either always 
>>>|           on 
>>>|           or always off.  
> 
> You could WTFCY and make an Applescript or BASH shell command which will 
> do that. 
> 
>>> http://meganmcdermott.com/2008/08/29/moving-mac-ubuntu-switching/
>> 
>> Wonderful, some idiots blog...
>> Great source you have there Roy Schestowitz.
>> 
>>  
>>> Why Switch to Linux?
>> 
>> Good question.
>> Evidently 99 percent of the people have not done it.
>> Maybe you better investigate, Roy Schestowitz.
> 
> Linux is good for servers and embedded systems. It's too crunchy for a 
> desktop system. I particularly despise its second-rate terminal 
> application. OS X's is very good, with direct keyboard support for copy 
> and paste and nice integration with the Finder. For instance, if I need 
> to know the complete path to some file, I can just type ls and then drag 
> the icon for the file to the terminal. It then pastes the path onto the 
> command line for me. Under Linux, every application has its own 
> standards for how to implement copy and paste. On some, I MUST use a 
> menu; on others I can use the misplaced control key. 
> 
> The Gnome desktop is extremely well documented for developers, but not 
> for users. For instance, I once searched all up and down the web to find 
> instructions on how the damn menu is configured and how to add things to 
> it. I had installed some cool applications onto Linux, and I wanted to 
> have them in the menu ... but nothing would tell me how to do that. I 
> can add things to the top menu. And forget being able to create my own 
> icons for things. 
> 
> I've used Linux, Windows, and OS X. I prefer OS X. Someone else 
> switching back to Linux will not convince me to.

I'm a Windows user but IMHO OSX is THE DeFacto standard for a desktop...
Well thought out, easy to use and intuitive....

Just like most things Apple makes...

I had an iPod clone (Creative, and a big mistake) for a while and recently
bought an iPod...

I never even cracked the manual because it just seems to know what I want
to do with it.
Very weird.
I suspect I am quite the norm and Apple did their research and thus the
device is intuitive.

Extrapolating  to Linux, Linux is not intuitive.
Linux is a joke when it comes to average Joe.

What Linux does WRONG as far as interfacing with the user could fill and
encyclopedia but suffice to say, they obviously did not do any user
studies.

But then again what can one expect for free?


-- 
Moshe Goldfarb
Collector of soaps from around the globe.
Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
0
brick_n_straw (4058)
8/31/2008 1:10:38 AM
In article <wfm1ehm4a873.lc7tvefo2i3o$.dlg@40tude.net>,
 "Moshe Goldfarb." <brick_n_straw@gmail.com> wrote:

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-7"

Hmmm....first Tatoo Vampire, and now you!?  This outbreak of posting in 
the Greek character set is spreading!

-- 
--Tim Smith
0
reply_in_group (13194)
8/31/2008 4:35:45 AM
On Sat, 30 Aug 2008 21:35:45 -0700, Tim Smith wrote:

> In article <wfm1ehm4a873.lc7tvefo2i3o$.dlg@40tude.net>,
>  "Moshe Goldfarb." <brick_n_straw@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-7"
> 
> Hmmm....first Tatoo Vampire, and now you!?  This outbreak of posting in 
> the Greek character set is spreading!

I dunno.
I'm not doing anything different?


-- 
Moshe Goldfarb
Collector of soaps from around the globe.
Please visit The Hall of Linux Idiots:
http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
0
brick_n_straw (4058)
8/31/2008 3:35:31 PM
On 2008-08-31, Timberwoof <timberwoof.spam@inferNOnoSPAMsoft.com> wrote:
> In article <wfm1ehm4a873.lc7tvefo2i3o$.dlg@40tude.net>,
>  "Moshe Goldfarb." <brick_n_straw@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 01:05:58 +0000, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> > Moving from Mac to Ubuntu: Why I�m switching
>> > 
>> > ,----[ Quote ]
>> >| Why I�m leaving Mac
>> >| 
>> >|    1. Crap file management.The Finder doesn�t work for me. No location bar 
>> >|    and no tree strucure side panel makes it difficult to navigate folders 
>> >|    and 
>> >|    move files around the way I want to.  
>
> The Finder has three different ways to look at files: 
>
> 1. Each window is a view into one directory with each thing in the 
> directory as its own icon. 
>
> 2. A window is a view into a folder with a list of everything in the 
> directory. Folders have little triangles that you click on to reveal the 
> contents of the folders. 
>
> 3. A window has columns; each column shows the contents of the item 
> selected in the column to the left. 
>
> I use them all; it depends on what I'm doing. I hate Windows' 
> inconsistent file browser, and Red Hat Linux's file browser feels 
> crunchy. 
>
> The author is merely complaining that the Finder doesn't work the way he 
> wants. (This is, of course okay. Extending the Windows-Macintosh Double 
> Standard to Linux, it is perfectly okay to complain that Mac OS doesn't 
> work the way you want to, but you cannot complain that Windows or Linux 
> doesn't.) 

    No. There is quite a difference, A HUGE difference, between saying that
something is not to your tastes versus saying that it is "inherently wrong"
for not doing things your way or what you view to be the "one true way".

    Linux (and to a much lesser degree Windows) is much more tolerant and
accomodating of other approaches to the same problem.

>
>> >|    2. Insufficient panels & customization. In Ubuntu I can have as many 
>> >|    panels I want, can put all kinds of stuff on them, and can arrange them 
>> >|    however I want. In OSX You just have the dock, and you can really only 
>> >|    put 
>> >|    applications or files on them, and you can�t even put in a separator to 
>> >|    keep them organized.    
>
> One could probably find a custom finder replacement, but the author will 

    One could also probably find a colony of rhesus monkeys in your pants.

> never be happy with OS X. Linux application UIs are generally built with 
> several principles in mind: 
>
> 1. They should be built by command-line gurus who don't understand why 
> anyone would want to use a graphical UI. For example, the MySQL 
> graphical database browser doesn't actually let you browse a database 
> visually; it still requires you to hand-craft queries. 

     Funny that. I had no problem doing this.

>
> 2. The more knobs to frob, the better. All knobs must be instantly 
> visible on the main window of the application. 

     Sounds like confusing visual noise.

>
>> >|    3. Various other annoyances. Such as:
>> >|           * program menus are glued to the top of the screen on one 
>> >|           monitor 
>> >|           only, which detaches them from the window. This is especailly 
>> >|           annoying when the program you�re using is on the second monitor. 
>
> This is another aspect of complaining that the OS does not work the way 
> I want it to, which is only valid against OS X. Becuase of the Double 
> Standard, one is prohibited from making that complaint against Linux or 
> Windows. Early Apple research resulted in Fitt's Law, which states that  

    Nope. Complain often enough and loud enough and someone might implement
a workalike. Infact, for any complaint you have about Linux for which you
think Linux doesn't have one Linux probably already does.

> the time it takes to click on a UI widget depends somewhat on the 
> distance from the mouse pointer to the widget and inversely on the size 
> of the widget. The bigger the widget, the less time it takes. When the 
> menu is stuck to the ceiling like that, each item in the menu is 
> effectively 68 miles tall, which enables you to just slam the mouse 
> pointer up there very quickly. 
>
> My complaint against menus attached to windows is that it's often hard 
> to tell which of several visible menus is the one I actually want. if I 
> click the wrong one I've activated some other window. 
>
>
>> >|           * the date/time doesn�t open to a navigable calendar. I often 
>> >|           use 
>> >|           this to check dates in the past or future. 
>
> That's a cool feature request. Submit it to Apple! 
>
> On OS X I can configure the clock/calendar to be a clock and calendar, 
> and licking on it always gives me the complete current date and time. On 
> Windows I have to move the mouse over there, and if the OS feels like 
> it, it will tell me the date. On red Hat Linux ... there isn't one. 
>
>> >|           * you can�t see hidden files unless you run a command from the 
>> >|           terminal to turn them on. Thus, hidden files are either always 
>> >|           on 
>> >|           or always off.  
>
> You could WTFCY and make an Applescript or BASH shell command which will 
> do that. 

    This is EXTRAORDINARILY LAME. In an OS like MacOS, this really is a 
completely intolerably user hostile situation. No Apple Cheerleader with
an ounce of shame should make up excuses for it or suggest such a crude
manual hack.

>
>> > http://meganmcdermott.com/2008/08/29/moving-mac-ubuntu-switching/
>> 
>> Wonderful, some idiots blog...
>> Great source you have there Roy Schestowitz.
>> 
>>  
>> > Why Switch to Linux?
>> 
>> Good question.
>> Evidently 99 percent of the people have not done it.
>> Maybe you better investigate, Roy Schestowitz.
>
> Linux is good for servers and embedded systems. It's too crunchy for a 
> desktop system. I particularly despise its second-rate terminal 

      Well, at least I don't have to send someone to the termainal if
they want their hidden files visible. That's even worse than Windows.

> application. OS X's is very good, with direct keyboard support for copy 
> and paste and nice integration with the Finder. For instance, if I need 
> to know the complete path to some file, I can just type ls and then drag 
> the icon for the file to the terminal. It then pastes the path onto the 
> command line for me. Under Linux, every application has its own 
> standards for how to implement copy and paste. On some, I MUST use a 
> menu; on others I can use the misplaced control key. 

    Ah... no.

    There is infact an X standard for cut & paste that many of us have
been using with Linux and Unixen before it quite possibly since before
you started computing and possibly even before you were born.

>
> The Gnome desktop is extremely well documented for developers, but not 
> for users. For instance, I once searched all up and down the web to find 
> instructions on how the damn menu is configured and how to add things to 
> it. I had installed some cool applications onto Linux, and I wanted to 

    You mean you missed that little icon on the bottom "Add/Remove"?

> have them in the menu ... but nothing would tell me how to do that. I 
> can add things to the top menu. And forget being able to create my own 
> icons for things. 

     That's pretty trivial too.

>
> I've used Linux, Windows, and OS X. I prefer OS X. Someone else 
> switching back to Linux will not convince me to.
>


-- 
	OpenDoc is moot when Apple is your one stop iShop.      |||
				                               / | \   

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jedi (14754)
9/2/2008 12:44:48 AM
Reply: