f



Hardware hard in Linux?

OK, here's the scenario. Dual boot box consisting of a P4P-800-E DLX,
Nvidia video card, printer, scanner, bells, whistles, and it's something
I'm proud of.

The Linux side is running Slack 10.2 with a custom 2.6.16 kernel and gware
Gnome for the desktop.

Mrs. Phist decided to buy me a wireless keyboard and mouse since my old
ones are almost five years old and I've beaten them all to hell. She's
not the most tech savvy person in the world and just went to Best Buy
and got a Microsoft keyboard/mouse combo for about $40 CAN. Not a bad
deal, but I'm going from PS2 wired keyboard and 5 button mouse to
wireless usb only keyboard and mouse combo made by Microsoft. I figured
I was in for some trials setting the thing up on the linux side, I was
wrong.

First boot with the new key/mouse, lilo of course didn't respond, so my
only choice was linux. On boot, they just worked when the login screen
was presented. I logged in and the multimedia buttons Just Worked! I had
programmed them in Gnome with my last keyboard and maybe three of them
had to be reset for everything to work. Volume control, track
selections, browser and e-mail, the whole chew.

On rebooting the keyboard worked with lilo as well, so I booted to
Windows. The keyboard and mouse started responding after a minute or
two, but to get the multimedia buttons working I had to slap the CD in,
install 30 meg of software, reboot, and then everything worked.

Where is all the "Hardware support in Linux sucks" stuff coming from
nowadays?! I would have agreed five years ago, but now? Gimme a break.
Hardware support in Linux is easier, more advanced, more streamlined
than the Windows equivalent even using Microsoft hardware. I really like
the feel of the buttons and the quiet keys. My last keyboard practically
echoed in comparison.

Maybe MS should concentrate on their peripheral sales, it'll be good to
have when folks find out what they're missing.

-- 
Look DEEP into the OPENINGS!!  Do you see any ELVES or EDSELS ... or a
HIGHBALL?? ...
0
jason3015 (1054)
4/30/2006 2:53:28 AM
comp.os.linux.advocacy 124139 articles. 3 followers. Post Follow

15 Replies
623 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 7

__/ [ Handover Phist ] on Sunday 30 April 2006 03:53 \__

> OK, here's the scenario. Dual boot box consisting of a P4P-800-E DLX,
> Nvidia video card, printer, scanner, bells, whistles, and it's something
> I'm proud of.
> 
> The Linux side is running Slack 10.2 with a custom 2.6.16 kernel and gware
> Gnome for the desktop.
> 
> Mrs. Phist decided to buy me a wireless keyboard and mouse since my old
> ones are almost five years old and I've beaten them all to hell. She's
> not the most tech savvy person in the world and just went to Best Buy
> and got a Microsoft keyboard/mouse combo for about $40 CAN. Not a bad
> deal, but I'm going from PS2 wired keyboard and 5 button mouse to
> wireless usb only keyboard and mouse combo made by Microsoft. I figured
> I was in for some trials setting the thing up on the linux side, I was
> wrong.
> 
> First boot with the new key/mouse, lilo of course didn't respond, so my
> only choice was linux. On boot, they just worked when the login screen
> was presented. I logged in and the multimedia buttons Just Worked! I had
> programmed them in Gnome with my last keyboard and maybe three of them
> had to be reset for everything to work. Volume control, track
> selections, browser and e-mail, the whole chew.
> 
> On rebooting the keyboard worked with lilo as well, so I booted to
> Windows. The keyboard and mouse started responding after a minute or
> two, but to get the multimedia buttons working I had to slap the CD in,
> install 30 meg of software, reboot, and then everything worked.
> 
> Where is all the "Hardware support in Linux sucks" stuff coming from
> nowadays?! I would have agreed five years ago, but now? Gimme a break.
> Hardware support in Linux is easier, more advanced, more streamlined
> than the Windows equivalent even using Microsoft hardware. I really like
> the feel of the buttons and the quiet keys. My last keyboard practically
> echoed in comparison.
> 
> Maybe MS should concentrate on their peripheral sales, it'll be good to
> have when folks find out what they're missing.

5 years in the past, as you mentioned, I had people install Linux /for/ me,
simply because I was not familiar enough with the steps involved. The
academic departments did all the needed work. I never even tried, so noone
should make any clumsy inferences. I imagine that hardware compatibility was
lacking at the time, which became a stereotype that perpetuated
unjustifiably.

In all my past setups (Ubuntu 4, Ubuntu 5, SuSE 9.3, Mandrake 9.2), no
problems came up. Hardware worked 'out of the box' with one sole exception
which was the need to change video settings _in BIOS_ (I imagine other
platform would have required the same adjustment). So, as suggested in your
post, there are no longer reasons to nag. Even laptops which are "designed
for Windows XP" appear to work fully 'out of the box', with Linux. People
are just scared to have a go at the setup, due to stereotypes.

Best wishes,

Roy

-- 
Roy S. Schestowitz
http://Schestowitz.com  |    SuSE Linux     �     PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
  4:20am  up 2 days 11:25,  12 users,  load average: 0.37, 0.48, 0.71
      http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project
0
newsgroups3 (79677)
4/30/2006 3:35:46 AM
On 2006-04-30, Handover Phist <jason@jason.websterscafe.com> posted something concerning:
> OK, here's the scenario. Dual boot box consisting of a P4P-800-E DLX,
> Nvidia video card, printer, scanner, bells, whistles, and it's something
> I'm proud of.
>
> The Linux side is running Slack 10.2 with a custom 2.6.16 kernel and gware
> Gnome for the desktop.
>
> Mrs. Phist decided to buy me a wireless keyboard and mouse since my old
> ones are almost five years old and I've beaten them all to hell. She's
> not the most tech savvy person in the world and just went to Best Buy
> and got a Microsoft keyboard/mouse combo for about $40 CAN. Not a bad
> deal, but I'm going from PS2 wired keyboard and 5 button mouse to
> wireless usb only keyboard and mouse combo made by Microsoft. I figured
> I was in for some trials setting the thing up on the linux side, I was
> wrong.
>
> First boot with the new key/mouse, lilo of course didn't respond, so my
> only choice was linux. On boot, they just worked when the login screen
> was presented. I logged in and the multimedia buttons Just Worked! I had
> programmed them in Gnome with my last keyboard and maybe three of them
> had to be reset for everything to work. Volume control, track
> selections, browser and e-mail, the whole chew.

You might have problems here when/if you power down. In most of the
machines I've used, if it didn't work at boot, there was some sort of a
legacy USB setting in the BIOS that was turned off.

I leave it turned on. I only run linux and the timeout is often short
(though I've been known to set it up to a minute). But I never know
when I might need to run memtest or something.

> On rebooting the keyboard worked with lilo as well, so I booted to
> Windows. The keyboard and mouse started responding after a minute or
> two, but to get the multimedia buttons working I had to slap the CD in,
> install 30 meg of software, reboot, and then everything worked.
>
> Where is all the "Hardware support in Linux sucks" stuff coming from
> nowadays?! I would have agreed five years ago, but now? Gimme a break.
> Hardware support in Linux is easier, more advanced, more streamlined
> than the Windows equivalent even using Microsoft hardware. I really like
> the feel of the buttons and the quiet keys. My last keyboard practically
> echoed in comparison.

It's all made up. It's based on old wives' tales and the like. Some
people still believe the earth is flat, too.

> Maybe MS should concentrate on their peripheral sales, it'll be good to
> have when folks find out what they're missing.

I have a cheap MicroInnovations wireless KB (I don't use the mouse, I
use a trackball). Everythiing works, including the MM keys, the email
key, the internet keys, etc (I had to set their functions up the way I
wanted them, which I'd no doubt do if I put it on an M$-based machine
anyway). I used to have a Kensington wireless mouse & keyboard on
another machine (still only used trackballs), Everything worked. I have
a Kensington wireless mouse for the work laptop and a Targus wireless
mouse for the home laptop. They both work Every sound card (save one),
every wired NIC (save one), every printer (save some Lexmarks). every
mouse, every keyboard, every scanner (save one), every drive (internal
and external), every video card, every SCSI card, every everything
(save those mentioned and a couple of other oddballs) have worked with
little or no effort.

-- 
It ain't what they call you, it's what you answer to.
  -- W.C. Fields
0
sinister656 (2009)
4/30/2006 4:57:20 AM
Handover Phist wrote:

> OK, here's the scenario. Dual boot box consisting of a P4P-800-E DLX,
> Nvidia video card, printer, scanner, bells, whistles, and it's something
> I'm proud of.
> 
> The Linux side is running Slack 10.2 with a custom 2.6.16 kernel and gware
> Gnome for the desktop.
> 
> Mrs. Phist decided to buy me a wireless keyboard and mouse since my old
> ones are almost five years old and I've beaten them all to hell. She's
> not the most tech savvy person in the world and just went to Best Buy
> and got a Microsoft keyboard/mouse combo for about $40 CAN. Not a bad
> deal, but I'm going from PS2 wired keyboard and 5 button mouse to
> wireless usb only keyboard and mouse combo made by Microsoft. I figured
> I was in for some trials setting the thing up on the linux side, I was
> wrong.
> 
> First boot with the new key/mouse, lilo of course didn't respond, so my
> only choice was linux. On boot, they just worked when the login screen
> was presented. I logged in and the multimedia buttons Just Worked! I had
> programmed them in Gnome with my last keyboard and maybe three of them
> had to be reset for everything to work. Volume control, track
> selections, browser and e-mail, the whole chew.
> 
> On rebooting the keyboard worked with lilo as well, so I booted to
> Windows. The keyboard and mouse started responding after a minute or
> two, but to get the multimedia buttons working I had to slap the CD in,
> install 30 meg of software, reboot, and then everything worked.
> 
> Where is all the "Hardware support in Linux sucks" stuff coming from
> nowadays?! I would have agreed five years ago, but now? Gimme a break.
> Hardware support in Linux is easier, more advanced, more streamlined
> than the Windows equivalent even using Microsoft hardware. I really like
> the feel of the buttons and the quiet keys. My last keyboard practically
> echoed in comparison.
>

I've had issues with my monitor which is nothing special. EliveCD would not
start X, but when I tried OLive, well it just blew me away, no problems and
the applications seem to start really quickly.

Debian was also a pain with my monitor, and wouldn't put it into standby
mode when I walked away from it. Didn't have USB hotplug either, because it
came with an older version of the Kernel. Kubuntu I am pleased to say <big
smile> had no such problems. With really good help, friendly forums it's
been a winner for me so far :-)

Moral of the story seems to be: If at first you don't succeed, try, try, try
again.
 
> Maybe MS should concentrate on their peripheral sales, it'll be good to
> have when folks find out what they're missing.
> 

I've heard people say that before. That does seem to be something they are
quite good at. Must confess I have never bothered to program any of those
extra buttons on my MS Keyboard.

-- 
Regards,

M
0
4/30/2006 8:27:04 AM
Handover Phist once pondered into the vast depths of his mind and came up
with this to say:

> Maybe MS should concentrate on their peripheral sales, it'll be good to
> have when folks find out what they're missing.

Honestly, I love Microsoft's peripherals. They're top notch. However, I've
had great difficulty getting Microsoft mice to work with Linux in the past,
so I don't bother. I do use their keyboards and have no problems.

I just hate the Microsoft software side of things. It's nothing personal - I
just found a better product.

-- 
This post has been brought to you by PCLinuxOS and Knode, part of the KDE
family of products.

Registered Linux User #378193
0
rsmith002 (59)
4/30/2006 2:15:34 PM
> 
> Maybe MS should concentrate on their peripheral sales, it'll be good to
> have when folks find out what they're missing.

I've heard the comment before that 'the best thing MS makes is their mice
<mouses?>'.
0
ray65 (5421)
4/30/2006 2:15:36 PM
On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 04:35:46 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:

<snip>
 
> Even laptops which are "designed
> for Windows XP" appear to work fully 'out of the box', with Linux. People
> are just scared to have a go at the setup, due to stereotypes.

Some laptops do work OOTB, but not all, or at least, not perfectly. My old
Compaq Presario does, though for a while it had problems with Mandrake and
Fedora (down to that particular version of Xorg, I think). My mother's new
Dell works with SimplyMEPIS, including wifi. But my Toshiba doesn't like
Mandriva at all, and though other distros will install, only SUSE and
MEPIS will recognise the ethernet hardware properly (that said, it *is* a
somewhat uncommon NIC and Toshiba is not the most Linux-compatible of
manufacturers).

Everything else, bar 3D graphics, does work well out of the box with SUSE
on the Tosh, though. The real downer is its poor battery life. Otherwise,
it's really not a bad laptop, but if I have to replace it in the future,
I'll go for different manufacturer.

-- 
Kier
0
vallon (8614)
4/30/2006 4:59:11 PM
__/ [ Kier ] on Sunday 30 April 2006 17:59 \__

> On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 04:35:46 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
> 
> <snip>
>  
>> Even laptops which are "designed
>> for Windows XP" appear to work fully 'out of the box', with Linux. People
>> are just scared to have a go at the setup, due to stereotypes.
> 
> Some laptops do work OOTB, but not all, or at least, not perfectly. My old
> Compaq Presario does, though for a while it had problems with Mandrake and
> Fedora (down to that particular version of Xorg, I think). My mother's new
> Dell works with SimplyMEPIS, including wifi. But my Toshiba doesn't like
> Mandriva at all, and though other distros will install, only SUSE and
> MEPIS will recognise the ethernet hardware properly (that said, it *is* a
> somewhat uncommon NIC and Toshiba is not the most Linux-compatible of
> manufacturers).
> 
> Everything else, bar 3D graphics, does work well out of the box with SUSE
> on the Tosh, though. The real downer is its poor battery life. Otherwise,
> it's really not a bad laptop, but if I have to replace it in the future,
> I'll go for different manufacturer.
 
Hi Kier,

In that case, _in the future_, put the horses before the carriage** and pick
a laptop which you know will work with your favourite distribution. A quick
Web search, as well as the extensive documentation about particular laptop
models and Linux distributions, will make this trivial. Distributions tend
to be hardware-backward-compatible (I came across some exceptions involving
the suSE 9.3->10.x migration), so it's a rather safe bet.

The Dell models appear to be fairly Linux-friendly. Whether they confirm the
arrival of their Linux laptop at France, we are yet to find out. There has
been no official announcement, yet. Only the Inquirer had a blurb, which
seems rather reliable.

Best wishes,

Roy

**Have you ever purchased a ticket to a metal concert and had regrets when
you found out that no classical music was contained therein?

-- 
Roy S. Schestowitz
http://Schestowitz.com  |    SuSE Linux     �     PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
  7:35pm  up 3 days  2:32,  13 users,  load average: 0.68, 0.71, 0.64
      http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project
0
newsgroups3 (79677)
4/30/2006 6:44:43 PM
On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 19:44:43 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:

> __/ [ Kier ] on Sunday 30 April 2006 17:59 \__
> 
>> On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 04:35:46 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
>> 
>> <snip>
>>  
>>> Even laptops which are "designed
>>> for Windows XP" appear to work fully 'out of the box', with Linux. People
>>> are just scared to have a go at the setup, due to stereotypes.
>> 
>> Some laptops do work OOTB, but not all, or at least, not perfectly. My old
>> Compaq Presario does, though for a while it had problems with Mandrake and
>> Fedora (down to that particular version of Xorg, I think). My mother's new
>> Dell works with SimplyMEPIS, including wifi. But my Toshiba doesn't like
>> Mandriva at all, and though other distros will install, only SUSE and
>> MEPIS will recognise the ethernet hardware properly (that said, it *is* a
>> somewhat uncommon NIC and Toshiba is not the most Linux-compatible of
>> manufacturers).
>> 
>> Everything else, bar 3D graphics, does work well out of the box with SUSE
>> on the Tosh, though. The real downer is its poor battery life. Otherwise,
>> it's really not a bad laptop, but if I have to replace it in the future,
>> I'll go for different manufacturer.
>  
> Hi Kier,
> 
> In that case, _in the future_, put the horses before the carriage** and pick
> a laptop which you know will work with your favourite distribution. A quick
> Web search, as well as the extensive documentation about particular laptop
> models and Linux distributions, will make this trivial. Distributions tend
> to be hardware-backward-compatible (I came across some exceptions involving
> the suSE 9.3->10.x migration), so it's a rather safe bet.

Call it an impulse buy. Well, nearly. 

> 
> The Dell models appear to be fairly Linux-friendly. Whether they confirm the
> arrival of their Linux laptop at France, we are yet to find out. There has
> been no official announcement, yet. Only the Inquirer had a blurb, which
> seems rather reliable.

I'd probably buy a Dell, next time. They're good value.

> 
> Best wishes,
> 
> Roy
> 
> **Have you ever purchased a ticket to a metal concert and had regrets when
> you found out that no classical music was contained therein?

Can't say I have :-)

-- 
Kier

0
vallon (8614)
4/30/2006 7:05:04 PM
Kier wrote:
> On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 19:44:43 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
>
> > __/ [ Kier ] on Sunday 30 April 2006 17:59 \__
> >
> >> On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 04:35:46 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:
> >>
> >> <snip>
> >>
> >>> Even laptops which are "designed
> >>> for Windows XP" appear to work fully 'out of the box', with Linux. People
> >>> are just scared to have a go at the setup, due to stereotypes.
> >>
> >> Some laptops do work OOTB, but not all, or at least, not perfectly. My old
> >> Compaq Presario does, though for a while it had problems with Mandrake and
> >> Fedora (down to that particular version of Xorg, I think). My mother's new
> >> Dell works with SimplyMEPIS, including wifi. But my Toshiba doesn't like
> >> Mandriva at all, and though other distros will install, only SUSE and
> >> MEPIS will recognise the ethernet hardware properly (that said, it *is* a
> >> somewhat uncommon NIC and Toshiba is not the most Linux-compatible of
> >> manufacturers).
> >>
> >> Everything else, bar 3D graphics, does work well out of the box with SUSE
> >> on the Tosh, though. The real downer is its poor battery life. Otherwise,
> >> it's really not a bad laptop, but if I have to replace it in the future,
> >> I'll go for different manufacturer.
> >
> > Hi Kier,
> >
> > In that case, _in the future_, put the horses before the carriage** and pick
> > a laptop which you know will work with your favourite distribution. A quick
> > Web search, as well as the extensive documentation about particular laptop
> > models and Linux distributions, will make this trivial. Distributions tend
> > to be hardware-backward-compatible (I came across some exceptions involving
> > the suSE 9.3->10.x migration), so it's a rather safe bet.
>
> Call it an impulse buy. Well, nearly.
>
> >
> > The Dell models appear to be fairly Linux-friendly. Whether they confirm the
> > arrival of their Linux laptop at France, we are yet to find out. There has
> > been no official announcement, yet. Only the Inquirer had a blurb, which
> > seems rather reliable.
>
> I'd probably buy a Dell, next time. They're good value.

I have a few Dell laptops and a Toshiba as well. Overall SuSE works
fine on the Dell except for the following. 1) Built-in wireless. It
wasn't supported out of the box by SuSE but I was able to find and
download an RPM to get it to work. There's a project at SourceForge
that I tried to compile but I gave up on it and found the re-built RPM.
Took the easy way out.

So wireless is now working fine and the only remaining annoyance (#2)
is the "glide-point" pad that's used as the mouse. It basically works
but it's just not very smooth. The mouse seems to jerk around the
screen more than it should. There's one driver (I think it's the ALPS)
that works well for smoothness and the ability to easily move the
cursor except that it generates lots of "phantom clicks" as the cursor
passes over buttons and links. The other driver (I'm on a different
machine at the moment so I don't know the name) doesn't generate the
phantom clicks but the cursor movement is jerky.

The weird thing is that all the hard-stuff work in SuSE. The DVD
burner, the display, the power management, basically everything. But a
seemingly simple thing like the "mouse device" (glide pad) is slightly
dorked.

0
lqualig (4343)
5/1/2006 12:37:10 AM
ray wrote:
>> Maybe MS should concentrate on their peripheral sales, it'll be good to
>> have when folks find out what they're missing.
> 
> I've heard the comment before that 'the best thing MS makes is their mice
> <mouses?>'.

While that may be true, their mice still suck.

-- 
"There is nothing I understand." - Shit
0
theletterk3 (2489)
5/1/2006 4:49:36 AM
On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 17:37:10 -0700, Larry Qualig wrote:

> 
> Kier wrote:

<snip>

>>
>> I'd probably buy a Dell, next time. They're good value.
> 
> I have a few Dell laptops and a Toshiba as well. Overall SuSE works
> fine on the Dell except for the following. 1) Built-in wireless. It
> wasn't supported out of the box by SuSE but I was able to find and
> download an RPM to get it to work. There's a project at SourceForge
> that I tried to compile but I gave up on it and found the re-built RPM.
> Took the easy way out.

Nothing wrong in that :-) My brother had to do something similar with his
laptop, I believe, to get the wifi working. Separate cards may be annoying
in some ways, but if you get one that's a dud with Linux, at elast you can
try another

> 
> So wireless is now working fine and the only remaining annoyance (#2)
> is the "glide-point" pad that's used as the mouse. It basically works
> but it's just not very smooth. The mouse seems to jerk around the
> screen more than it should. There's one driver (I think it's the ALPS)
> that works well for smoothness and the ability to easily move the
> cursor except that it generates lots of "phantom clicks" as the cursor
> passes over buttons and links. The other driver (I'm on a different
> machine at the moment so I don't know the name) doesn't generate the
> phantom clicks but the cursor movement is jerky.
> 
> The weird thing is that all the hard-stuff work in SuSE. The DVD
> burner, the display, the power management, basically everything. But a
> seemingly simple thing like the "mouse device" (glide pad) is slightly
> dorked.

That does seem rather odd, doesn't it. Possibly touchpads are a bit less
standard than other types of kit on a laptop.

I've got a built-in card reader on mine which has never shown signs of
working in SUSE; I don't know if it's even possible to get it to work. But
that at least doesn't afeect the day-to-day working of the machine, it's
just an extra it would be nice to have.

-- 
Kier

0
vallon (8614)
5/1/2006 9:39:26 AM
__/ [ Kier ] on Monday 01 May 2006 10:39 \__

> On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 17:37:10 -0700, Larry Qualig wrote:
> 
>> 
>> Kier wrote:
> 
> <snip>
> 
>>>
>>> I'd probably buy a Dell, next time. They're good value.
>> 
>> I have a few Dell laptops and a Toshiba as well. Overall SuSE works
>> fine on the Dell except for the following. 1) Built-in wireless. It
>> wasn't supported out of the box by SuSE but I was able to find and
>> download an RPM to get it to work. There's a project at SourceForge
>> that I tried to compile but I gave up on it and found the re-built RPM.
>> Took the easy way out.
> 
> Nothing wrong in that :-) My brother had to do something similar with his
> laptop, I believe, to get the wifi working. Separate cards may be annoying
> in some ways, but if you get one that's a dud with Linux, at elast you can
> try another


See the following article, which was published last night:

        http://www.linuxdevices.com/news/NS1977847793.html
                        [ Linux gains enhanced WiFi stack ]


This will ultimately make, once distributed and propagated to the latest from
each vendor, manual installation of Wi-Fi a thing of the past. From what I
have been told time and time again, distributions are not the cause for
incompatibilities with hardware. It is usually the kernel and its 'glue'
with the remainder (various packages).


>> So wireless is now working fine and the only remaining annoyance (#2)
>> is the "glide-point" pad that's used as the mouse. It basically works
>> but it's just not very smooth. The mouse seems to jerk around the
>> screen more than it should. There's one driver (I think it's the ALPS)
>> that works well for smoothness and the ability to easily move the
>> cursor except that it generates lots of "phantom clicks" as the cursor
>> passes over buttons and links. The other driver (I'm on a different
>> machine at the moment so I don't know the name) doesn't generate the
>> phantom clicks but the cursor movement is jerky.
>> 
>> The weird thing is that all the hard-stuff work in SuSE. The DVD
>> burner, the display, the power management, basically everything. But a
>> seemingly simple thing like the "mouse device" (glide pad) is slightly
>> dorked.
> 
> That does seem rather odd, doesn't it. Possibly touchpads are a bit less
> standard than other types of kit on a laptop.
> 
> I've got a built-in card reader on mine which has never shown signs of
> working in SUSE; I don't know if it's even possible to get it to work. But
> that at least doesn't afeect the day-to-day working of the machine, it's
> just an extra it would be nice to have.


I have never come across built-in card readers (Flash/SD?), but why not make
use of the PCMCIA slot or USB-based card readers? These are the more
standard ways of getting things to work, as oppose to relying on a
model-specific slot that is probably integrated onto the motherboard or is
part of the architecture (much like the drift and emergence of on-board
modems, sound cards etc.). Perhaps it's too novel to be supported. Perhaps
it requires a manual setup, which could otherwise have been done at the
factory before computers were shipped.

Best wishes,

Roy

-- 
Roy S. Schestowitz      |    "Free the mind, the source will follow"
http://Schestowitz.com  |    SuSE Linux     �     PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
 10:50am  up 3 days 17:47,  12 users,  load average: 0.50, 0.68, 0.60
      http://iuron.com - Open Source knowledge engine project
0
newsgroups3 (79677)
5/1/2006 10:01:31 AM
On Mon, 01 May 2006 11:01:31 +0100, Roy Schestowitz wrote:

> __/ [ Kier ] on Monday 01 May 2006 10:39 \__
> 
>> On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 17:37:10 -0700, Larry Qualig wrote:
>> 
>>> 
>>> Kier wrote:
>> 
>> <snip>
>> 
>>>>
>>>> I'd probably buy a Dell, next time. They're good value.
>>> 
>>> I have a few Dell laptops and a Toshiba as well. Overall SuSE works
>>> fine on the Dell except for the following. 1) Built-in wireless. It
>>> wasn't supported out of the box by SuSE but I was able to find and
>>> download an RPM to get it to work. There's a project at SourceForge
>>> that I tried to compile but I gave up on it and found the re-built RPM.
>>> Took the easy way out.
>> 
>> Nothing wrong in that :-) My brother had to do something similar with his
>> laptop, I believe, to get the wifi working. Separate cards may be annoying
>> in some ways, but if you get one that's a dud with Linux, at elast you can
>> try another
> 
> 
> See the following article, which was published last night:
> 
>         http://www.linuxdevices.com/news/NS1977847793.html
>                         [ Linux gains enhanced WiFi stack ]

Yes, I just read that posta few minutes ago. It's a very good
development, one of the things which is definitely needed and helpful.
Another in the mounting stack of complaints the anti-Linuxers can no
longer use against us.

> 
> 
> This will ultimately make, once distributed and propagated to the latest from
> each vendor, manual installation of Wi-Fi a thing of the past. From what I
> have been told time and time again, distributions are not the cause for
> incompatibilities with hardware. It is usually the kernel and its 'glue'
> with the remainder (various packages).

It can't be an easy task, sorting all this out.

> 
> 
>>> So wireless is now working fine and the only remaining annoyance (#2)
>>> is the "glide-point" pad that's used as the mouse. It basically works
>>> but it's just not very smooth. The mouse seems to jerk around the
>>> screen more than it should. There's one driver (I think it's the ALPS)
>>> that works well for smoothness and the ability to easily move the
>>> cursor except that it generates lots of "phantom clicks" as the cursor
>>> passes over buttons and links. The other driver (I'm on a different
>>> machine at the moment so I don't know the name) doesn't generate the
>>> phantom clicks but the cursor movement is jerky.
>>> 
>>> The weird thing is that all the hard-stuff work in SuSE. The DVD
>>> burner, the display, the power management, basically everything. But a
>>> seemingly simple thing like the "mouse device" (glide pad) is slightly
>>> dorked.
>> 
>> That does seem rather odd, doesn't it. Possibly touchpads are a bit less
>> standard than other types of kit on a laptop.
>> 
>> I've got a built-in card reader on mine which has never shown signs of
>> working in SUSE; I don't know if it's even possible to get it to work. But
>> that at least doesn't afeect the day-to-day working of the machine, it's
>> just an extra it would be nice to have.
> 
> 
> I have never come across built-in card readers (Flash/SD?), but why not make
> use of the PCMCIA slot or USB-based card readers? These are the more
> standard ways of getting things to work, as oppose to relying on a
> model-specific slot that is probably integrated onto the motherboard or is
> part of the architecture (much like the drift and emergence of on-board
> modems, sound cards etc.). Perhaps it's too novel to be supported. Perhaps
> it requires a manual setup, which could otherwise have been done at the
> factory before computers were shipped.

It's the only built-in of that type I've ever come across, but it may 
become a more popular inclusion, so someone could get around to supporting
it sometime, hopefully. I've been meaning to buy a USB card reader, just
to save the batteries on my camera, but of course it's another thing to
have to carry around. A built-in reader that worked would be very useful,
and this particular one accepts several different types of card, like SD,
etc. Though external readers are pretty cheap, and do have the advantage
of being portable between machines, so there are pros and cons to both.

-- 
Kier


0
vallon (8614)
5/1/2006 10:40:49 AM
On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 02:53:28 +0000, Handover Phist wrote:

> Mrs. Phist decided to buy me a wireless keyboard and mouse since my old
> ones are almost five years old and I've beaten them all to hell. She's
> not the most tech savvy person in the world and just went to Best Buy
> and got a Microsoft keyboard/mouse combo for about $40 CAN. Not a bad
> deal, but I'm going from PS2 wired keyboard and 5 button mouse to
> wireless usb only keyboard and mouse combo made by Microsoft. I figured
> I was in for some trials setting the thing up on the linux side, I was
> wrong.
> 
> First boot with the new key/mouse, lilo of course didn't respond, so my
> only choice was linux. On boot, they just worked when the login screen
> was presented. I logged in and the multimedia buttons Just Worked! I had
> programmed them in Gnome with my last keyboard and maybe three of them
> had to be reset for everything to work. Volume control, track
> selections, browser and e-mail, the whole chew.


Pretty much the same experience just now with a M$ wireless mouse (I don't
like the company or much care for their software, but I have to admit that
they do have decent hardware).  Plug the USB key into my running laptop,
put in the battery and instantly working, scroll and all.  Didn't even
have to restart Xorg.  Seamless transition between the touchpad and
the mouse.  Nice.  

glewis@astrel:~$ lsusb
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 045e:00e1 Microsoft Corp. 


0
rapskat2 (2033)
5/2/2006 12:02:34 AM
After takin' a swig o' grog, rapskat belched out this bit o' wisdom:

> glewis@astrel:~$ lsusb
> Bus 001 Device 002: ID 045e:00e1 Microsoft Corp. 

You are illegally using Microsoft trademarks.

<grin>

-- 
Kreegah! Bundolo Microsoft bolgani!
0
linonut2 (5242)
5/2/2006 11:33:45 AM
Reply: