f



Is Linux right for me?

Is Linux right for me? I am looking into buying some form of old,
beaten-up PC for a couple of bucks, and were wondering if there would
be any point too installing Linux. I probably will (attempt) to
anyway, simply because it looks cool and I can impress my friends and
relatives by having knowledge of something. I've looked at the
Slackware site and the installation process doesn't seem to trying.

I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.

A few questions:

1) Is there really any point to running Linux-- really. I know,
Microsoft is Evil and Bill Gates is the Devil Incarnate and so forth,
but will I really gain any advantage from running Linux? What are the
advantages of this OS, giving that I am only doing the things
mentioned in the list above?

2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
while.

3) It seems that standard Linux distributions come with fairly
comprehensive resources and that with Slackware at least I can
download all the information I need to begin with onto less that a
dozen floppies. Is it really this easy? A few floppies really is a
small amount, or am I just underestimating the elegance of this OS? Do
I need any "additional" utilities to really achieve anything?

Thanks in advance.
0
11/4/2003 1:08:03 PM
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At earth time Tue, 04 Nov 2003 05:08:03 -0800, the following transmission
was received from the entity known as Joe W.:

> Is Linux right for me? I am looking into buying some form of old,
> beaten-up PC for a couple of bucks, and were wondering if there would
> be any point too installing Linux. I probably will (attempt) to
> anyway, simply because it looks cool and I can impress my friends and
> relatives by having knowledge of something. I've looked at the
> Slackware site and the installation process doesn't seem to trying.
> 
> I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
> so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
> I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
> playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.
> 
> A few questions:
> 
> 1) Is there really any point to running Linux-- really. I know,
> Microsoft is Evil and Bill Gates is the Devil Incarnate and so forth,
> but will I really gain any advantage from running Linux? What are the
> advantages of this OS, giving that I am only doing the things
> mentioned in the list above?

Linux can do the things you're talking about, though you'd have to play
games written for it, or try to run windows games using the windows
emulator, wine, which works often but not always. There is an office
package called OpenOffice which does most of the things people actually
need out of MS Office, and a good range of programming languages are
supported.

Apart from this, some advantages are:

- security and stability.
- good for building custom systems to do things that are a bit unusual or
aren't supported by mainstream apps.
- a proper command line with built in scripting language, which you should
appreciate if you're at all into programming.
- the various layers of the system (kernel, system libraries, GUI, desktop
manager etc.) are built to be modular and independent from each other so
you can pick and choose how much of the system you want to run and which
programs to use for which bit.
- easy to manage a monitorless system over a network connection if you
want to build a server, firewall or router.

> 2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
> need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
> only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
> I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
> while.

You can run X-Windows itself quite happily on a pentium 166 with maybe
16-24M of memory; however some of the X applications like Mozilla, or the
KDE desktop environment need a bit more than that. I was running a system
about six months ago which was a pentium 233 with 24M memory, using a
lightweight window manager. KDE was too slow, but I could still run
individual KDE or Gnome apps without too many problems.

If you want to escape from GUIs, any linux system will let you switch off
the whole GUI layer and work from a text mode virtual console. (With
hot-key switching between different consoles). You can also switch to the
console while you're running X-windows, or get a command line window
within x-windows with xterm or similar.

> 3) It seems that standard Linux distributions come with fairly
> comprehensive resources and that with Slackware at least I can
> download all the information I need to begin with onto less that a
> dozen floppies. Is it really this easy? A few floppies really is a
> small amount, or am I just underestimating the elegance of this OS? Do
> I need any "additional" utilities to really achieve anything?

This depends a lot on what you want to do. I think there are linux distros
which install a dedicated system just for running a router/firewall from a
single floppy, but if you want to do more than just play around with the
basic system tools and maybe learn to use the C compiler, you will
probably need more than 'a dozen floppies'. Most of the programs you need
day to day are going to be on the first CD of the CD sets that each distro
releases. The programs on my machine come to around 3G, but I have a lot
of extra stuff installed so you don't need as much as that.

If your machine has the disk space and a CD rom drive (you can switch
this from another machine to do the install), and you can find someone who
has a fast connection, I reckon you'd be better downloading at least the
first CD from one of the main distros and installing from that.

andy.


-- 
remove 'n-u-l-l' to email me. html mail or attachments will go in the spam
bin unless notified with [html] or [attachment] in the subject line. 
0
news37 (285)
11/4/2003 1:58:21 PM
Joe W. wrote:
> Is Linux right for me? I am looking into buying some form of old,
> beaten-up PC for a couple of bucks, and were wondering if there would
> be any point too installing Linux. I probably will (attempt) to
> anyway, simply because it looks cool and I can impress my friends and
> relatives by having knowledge of something. I've looked at the
> Slackware site and the installation process doesn't seem to trying.
> 
> I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
> so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
> I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
> playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.
> 
> A few questions:
> 
> 1) Is there really any point to running Linux-- really. I know,
> Microsoft is Evil and Bill Gates is the Devil Incarnate and so forth,
> but will I really gain any advantage from running Linux? What are the
> advantages of this OS, giving that I am only doing the things
> mentioned in the list above?
> 
> 2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
> need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
> only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
> I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
> while.
> 
> 3) It seems that standard Linux distributions come with fairly
> comprehensive resources and that with Slackware at least I can
> download all the information I need to begin with onto less that a
> dozen floppies. Is it really this easy? A few floppies really is a
> small amount, or am I just underestimating the elegance of this OS? Do
> I need any "additional" utilities to really achieve anything?
> 
> Thanks in advance.

The best and cheapest way to find out is:

http://www.knoppix.org/

Don't let the "closed" message fool you, it is merely a protest against 
software patents. Just click on the "KNOPPIX" link in the English text.

If stuff is unclear after reading, come back and ask. I'm sure that 
inbetween all the troll attacks and flamefests there will be the 
occasional informative reply.

-- 
the Entity Formerly Known As Jazz

You know, I almost put a .sig down here.

0
itsfortytwo (300)
11/4/2003 7:18:26 PM
mysterious_aardvark@hotmail.com (Joe W.) writes:

> Is Linux right for me? I am looking into buying some form of old,
> beaten-up PC for a couple of bucks, and were wondering if there would
> be any point too installing Linux. I probably will (attempt) to
> anyway, simply because it looks cool and I can impress my friends and
> relatives by having knowledge of something. I've looked at the
> Slackware site and the installation process doesn't seem to trying.
>
> I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
> so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
> I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
> playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.
>
> A few questions:
>
> 1) Is there really any point to running Linux-- really. I know,
> Microsoft is Evil and Bill Gates is the Devil Incarnate and so forth,
> but will I really gain any advantage from running Linux? What are the
> advantages of this OS, giving that I am only doing the things
> mentioned in the list above?

Depends.  Do you *like* the way Windows does things?  Do you like an
operating system that hides information from its users to make things
"easier"[1]?  Would you like the opportunity (sometimes forced,
admittedly) to learn how your computer does what it does and how to
tweak it?

If you answer the first two "yes" and the third "no", then by all
means you'll gain something with Linux.  Also, if you just like trying
something new, go with Linux.

> 2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
> need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
> only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
> I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
> while.

You want it, even if you don't use it all the time.  Some applications
really need graphical output.  Anyway, unless you're hard up for
computer resources, there's not much reason not to install it.  (If
you *are* hard up for resources, then don't install it.)

As far as what's necessary for decent X: I'd say 128M memory is
plenty.  You can get by with less, especially if you don't intend to
run 47 applications simultaneously.  I'm sure some folks here have
a much smaller memory.

You can choose your window manager, which dramatically changes how
much resources X uses.  So if you're tired of bloated GUIs, you can go
with a very simple window manager (say, twm) and use very little
memory.

> 3) It seems that standard Linux distributions come with fairly
> comprehensive resources and that with Slackware at least I can
> download all the information I need to begin with onto less that a
> dozen floppies. Is it really this easy? A few floppies really is a
> small amount, or am I just underestimating the elegance of this OS? Do
> I need any "additional" utilities to really achieve anything?

A standard Slackware installation now comes on two CDs.  The two dozen
floppies are probably the bare minimum to boot it up and get on the
network, at which point you can download the rest.  Of course, you
don't *need* to install everything on the two Slackware CDs (really
one and a half).  That includes games, TeX typesetting software, a
million and two compilers, a web server, etc.

Where did you see the dozen floppies reference?  Is it on the
Slackware site?

If you like tweaking and you prefer editing simple text files over
using a GUI for your configurations, then I think Slackware is a good
choice.  However, it's really almost the only distro I know, so I'm
terribly biased.

Footnotes: 
[1]  This is my subjective opinion from the few experiences I have
with Windows.  If you don't think it's an accurate description, answer
"yes" here.

-- 
Jesse F. Hughes
"That's what's annoying about Usenet as some loser will state a case,
get their ass kicked, but STILL keep coming back as if nothing
happened."  -- James Harris explains his strategy.
0
jesseh (19)
11/4/2003 9:11:49 PM
Oh Joe W., why did you say this?

> Is Linux right for me? I am looking into buying some form of old,
> beaten-up PC for a couple of bucks, and were wondering if there would
> be any point too installing Linux.

When I got into Linux, that was my plan too... run Linux in text mode on
cheap hardware. Soon I discovered that Linux was so good it *deserves* the
best hardware.

For instance, I am sitting here typing this on my laptop. The
newsreader, Pan, is running on the desktop and X is forwarding it all
across my wireless network.

How cool is that?


-- 
Ian
Allium Alert #1:
   Chewing gum whilst peeling onions stops your eyes from running.

0
IanPegel (405)
11/4/2003 9:12:47 PM
mysterious_aardvark@hotmail.com (Joe W.) wrote in message news:<61ad442e.0311040508.3a731106@posting.google.com>...
> Is Linux right for me? I am looking into buying some form of old,
> beaten-up PC for a couple of bucks, and were wondering if there would
> be any point too installing Linux. I probably will (attempt) to
> anyway, simply because it looks cool and I can impress my friends and
> relatives by having knowledge of something. I've looked at the
> Slackware site and the installation process doesn't seem to trying.

Linux'll run on a 386SX or better, with agt least 2 megs of RAM. If
you're wanting to run X, the minimum RAM goes up to 4 megs.

I was able to run a 20-player Netrek server (with maximum players
present), X, a word-processor, a print server, an FTP server, a web
server, 7 MUSHes, a mail server, a network router and 5 mailing lists,
on a 486DX-20 with 16 megs of RAM and a 40 meg hard disk. The machine
was still very usable, with no significant slow-down.

Oh, not -quite- that old! :)

Linux'll out-perform Windows on identical hardware, for everything
you've said.
If you're familiar with DOS, then you're familiar with 90% of the
commands you are likely to use in practice. If not, there are GUI
tools for just about anything and everything, these days.

> I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
> so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
> I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
> playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.

Word Processing: The clear favourite here, for your requirements,
would be Open Office, because that can import/export Word documents,
making it extremely suitable for school assignments where you have to
hand things in on disk or CD, or where you're given assignments in
digital form.

Pascal: GPC is a PASCAL compiler for Linux. It bolts right on to GCC,
the Gnu compiler collection, which includes C, C++, Objective C and
Fortran 77.

Roguelikes: Most'll compile out of the box on Linux. I can't think of
any - even the very old games of this kind (eg: Omega - my favourite)
- that won't compile just fine. The worst possible case scenario is
that you find a game that requires tweaking the makefile. This is
usually quite painless, and even if you were to run into problems,
most Linux geeks would be able to tell you step-for-step how to fix
them.

> A few questions:
> 
> 1) Is there really any point to running Linux-- really. I know,
> Microsoft is Evil and Bill Gates is the Devil Incarnate and so forth,
> but will I really gain any advantage from running Linux? What are the
> advantages of this OS, giving that I am only doing the things
> mentioned in the list above?

First, Linux doesn't require as much hardware as Windows. As a result,
things will work faster and more reliably. (Running out of memory is
the number one cause of Windows crashes. Running out of space in the
process table is the number two cause.)

Second, because of the first reason, if something goes wrong with the
hardware (and student housing is usually hard on computers!) it's
cheaper to fix.

Third, Linux will take a lot more abuse than Windows. You can
power-down in the middle of doing something, and the machine will
(usually) survive just fine. If you have it set up to use a
journalling filesystem (XFS, JFS or ReiserFS), you have chkdsk times
of around 1-5 seconds, with very low risk of losing anything.

Fourth, Linux can act as a gateway onto the Internet for other
computers. As a result, if there are a number of people who need the
Internet, you can jointly get an Internet connection, hook it up
through the Linux box, and tell Linux to split the connection between
everyone else in the house.

> 2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
> need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
> only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
> I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
> while.

You need VGA or better, and at least 4 megs of RAM. The more RAM and
the better the graphics card, the better the result, but it'll work on
real bare-bones stuff.

You don't need X. You can do absolutely everything by the
command-line. In fact, I generally do exactly that, only using X for
LinCity, Freeciv, XPilot and Netrek.

(Well, almost everything. I'd hate to do word-processing on the
command-line, although with TeX, that IS possible.)

> 3) It seems that standard Linux distributions come with fairly
> comprehensive resources and that with Slackware at least I can
> download all the information I need to begin with onto less that a
> dozen floppies. Is it really this easy? A few floppies really is a
> small amount, or am I just underestimating the elegance of this OS? Do
> I need any "additional" utilities to really achieve anything?

A dozen floppies is about right, for a reasonable install. Most of the
critical parts of Linux'll actually fit on two disks. The rest is for
all the additional utilities.

A typical floppy distro will look something like this:

One boot disk
One "root" disk (this has the absolute essential parts of the OS)
Three or four disks for the compilers and development tools
One disk for the BSD games (I'd call this essential! :)
Four disks for the basic utilities and applications

Personally, for word-processing, I'd recommend X and Open Office. I
would not suggest any newcomer to Linux just diving into TeX. It's
very powerful, and if you're used to HTML programming, you'll pick up
the tag system quickly. But WYSIWYG it isn't. Sometimes that's great,
but for rattling off assignments, you would be better off with a
word-processor.

X probably takes about 4 disks, and Open Office will probably squeeze
onto another three.

So, for a complete, very usable system, you're looking at 18 floppies
maximum.

If the distro is put together well, they can probably cut down on that
total. I'm just using typical numbers, here.

One of the reasons it's so small is that there aren't any
flight-simulators in the spreadsheet. Ok, seriously, because Linux is
designed to be a bolt-together system, you usually only have the parts
you absolutely need. With Windows, you get the works, whether you need
any of the extras or not. Very little is actually optional.

Hey, that's got its good points. Some things are very rapid to
configure under Windows, as a result, and PnP support is a whole lot
better. The price you pay for that is having all the overhead there.
With Linux, serious changes can require a bit more effort, but you can
take full advantage of what resources the machine has to offer. You're
not burning up clock-cycles or RAM on things you're not using.

> Thanks in advance.

Pick the distro that best meets your needs, and I think you'll find
that it's well worth your time and effort.

There are plenty of update services out there which will update not
only the basic bits and pieces of the OS, but allow you to
update/install a multitude of applications and utilities. From what
you've said, I don't think you'll need these, but it's worth knowing
that they do exist.

As I've mentioned before, you will probably benefit from using a
journalling filesystem, so make sure that the distro either allows you
to set that up when you install, or provides tools to convert to one.
I'd call this quasi-essential - not everyone does this, and it won't
kill you if you don't, but it's a really strong recommendation,
especially if you think it likely you'll need to power the machine on
or off unexpectedly. (eg: running late for a class, thunderstorms,
remembering an assignment 10 mins before it's due, or other headaches
of that kind)
0
imipak (12)
11/4/2003 9:34:29 PM
imipak@yahoo.com (Jonathan Day) wrote in message news:<ae9c8308.0311041334.fea9c7f@posting.google.com>...
> mysterious_aardvark@hotmail.com (Joe W.) wrote in message news:<61ad442e.0311040508.3a731106@posting.google.com>...
> > Is Linux right for me? I am looking into buying some form of old,
> > beaten-up PC for a couple of bucks, and were wondering if there would
> > be any point too installing Linux. I probably will (attempt) to
> > anyway, simply because it looks cool and I can impress my friends and
> > relatives by having knowledge of something. I've looked at the
> > Slackware site and the installation process doesn't seem to trying.
> 
> Linux'll run on a 386SX or better, with agt least 2 megs of RAM. If
> you're wanting to run X, the minimum RAM goes up to 4 megs.
> 
> Linux'll out-perform Windows on identical hardware, for everything
> you've said.
> If you're familiar with DOS, then you're familiar with 90% of the
> commands you are likely to use in practice. If not, there are GUI
> tools for just about anything and everything, these days.

Sounds great... though I think the GUI tools are out of the question
with the price of (even ancient) hardware around here. But I'm not
averse to learning a few cool and impressive-looking commands.

> > I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
> > so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
> > I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
> > playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.
> 
> Word Processing: The clear favourite here, for your requirements,
> would be Open Office, because that can import/export Word documents,
> making it extremely suitable for school assignments where you have to
> hand things in on disk or CD, or where you're given assignments in
> digital form.

What about this EMacs thing I've been hearing a lot about? Or vi?
They're text-processing, I know, but I've heard that they can do a
lot... like indent C code and check spelling. Could you, say, write an
essay easily enough with such software?

> Pascal: GPC is a PASCAL compiler for Linux. It bolts right on to GCC,
> the Gnu compiler collection, which includes C, C++, Objective C and
> Fortran 77.

Actually, one of my reasons for wanting to move to Linux is to learn
C/C++. I don't want to have a Pascal compiler at all, or I might fall
back on old habits.

> Roguelikes: Most'll compile out of the box on Linux. I can't think of
> any - even the very old games of this kind (eg: Omega - my favourite)
> - that won't compile just fine. The worst possible case scenario is
> that you find a game that requires tweaking the makefile. This is
> usually quite painless, and even if you were to run into problems,
> most Linux geeks would be able to tell you step-for-step how to fix
> them.

Sounds peachy.

[snip "do I need Linux" question 1].

> > 2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
> > need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
> > only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
> > I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
> > while.
> 
> You need VGA or better, and at least 4 megs of RAM. The more RAM and
> the better the graphics card, the better the result, but it'll work on
> real bare-bones stuff.

I don't think I'll be getting much better that the 386 minimum
previously mentioned... so X seems to be a bad decision for me. But
the outlook doesn't look that bleak without it.

> You don't need X. You can do absolutely everything by the
> command-line. In fact, I generally do exactly that, only using X for
> LinCity, Freeciv, XPilot and Netrek.
> 
> (Well, almost everything. I'd hate to do word-processing on the
> command-line, although with TeX, that IS possible.)

As I asked before, is text processing workable for me?

[snip info on amount of disks needed]

Sounds good. I was worrying a bit, with a few people saying I need
high-speed internet connections, etc. I'll just leave my 33k dial-up
on one night...

[snip]

> As I've mentioned before, you will probably benefit from using a
> journalling filesystem, so make sure that the distro either allows you
> to set that up when you install, or provides tools to convert to one.
> I'd call this quasi-essential - not everyone does this, and it won't
> kill you if you don't, but it's a really strong recommendation,
> especially if you think it likely you'll need to power the machine on
> or off unexpectedly. (eg: running late for a class, thunderstorms,
> remembering an assignment 10 mins before it's due, or other headaches
> of that kind)

Sounds like a plan, what with the... rather precarious power (and
assignment-doing) system out here.
0
11/6/2003 7:09:39 AM
Joe W. wrote:

> What about this EMacs thing I've been hearing a lot about? Or vi?
> They're text-processing, I know, but I've heard that they can do a
> lot... like indent C code and check spelling. Could you, say, write an
> essay easily enough with such software?
> 

Of course. They are text editors. There are lots of tutorial sites out there
for them. Hell, try them both and see which one you like. I personally like
vim but but I don't want to start another vi vs vim vs emacs vs xemacs war.


>> Pascal: GPC is a PASCAL compiler for Linux. It bolts right on to GCC,
>> the Gnu compiler collection, which includes C, C++, Objective C and
>> Fortran 77.
> 
> Actually, one of my reasons for wanting to move to Linux is to learn
> C/C++. I don't want to have a Pascal compiler at all, or I might fall
> back on old habits.
> 

Then don't install GPC. OTOH, if you do install it nothing says you have to
use it (but it is there if you find you do need it) and it couldn't hurt.

>> > 2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
>> > need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
>> > only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
>> > I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
>> > while.
>> 
>> You need VGA or better, and at least 4 megs of RAM. The more RAM and
>> the better the graphics card, the better the result, but it'll work on
>> real bare-bones stuff.
> 

www.xfree86.org have a look and see.

> I don't think I'll be getting much better that the 386 minimum
> previously mentioned... so X seems to be a bad decision for me. But
> the outlook doesn't look that bleak without it.
> 
>> You don't need X. You can do absolutely everything by the
>> command-line. In fact, I generally do exactly that, only using X for
>> LinCity, Freeciv, XPilot and Netrek.
>> 
>> (Well, almost everything. I'd hate to do word-processing on the
>> command-line, although with TeX, that IS possible.)
> 
> As I asked before, is text processing workable for me?
> 

That depends on you. It works for me.

B.
-- 
Registered Linux user number 243680.
http://www.mandrakeuser.org/
Where the fun begins!
How to ask questions in Linux newsgroups:
http://tuxedo.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
0
Brian
11/6/2003 10:28:08 AM
In  <61ad442e.0311052309.2542bc1@posting.google.com>, Joe W. wrote:

> imipak@yahoo.com (Jonathan Day) wrote in message news:<ae9c8308.0311041334.fea9c7f@posting.google.com>...

>> Word Processing: The clear favourite here, for your requirements,
>> would be Open Office, because that can import/export Word documents,
>> making it extremely suitable for school assignments where you have to
>> hand things in on disk or CD, or where you're given assignments in
>> digital form.
> 
> What about this EMacs thing I've been hearing a lot about? Or vi?
> They're text-processing, I know, but I've heard that they can do a
> lot... like indent C code and check spelling. Could you, say, write an
> essay easily enough with such software?

You might want to look at LaTeX.  It wouldn't surprise me to
find that emacs has a LaTeX front-end mode.  LaTeX would let
you do killer presentation without the GUI baggage.

-- 
| "Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a |
| completely unintentional side effect. " -- Linus Torvalds      |
+--------------- D. C. Sessions <dcs@lumbercartel.com> ----------+
0
dcs (70)
11/6/2003 11:58:30 AM
"D. C. Sessions" <dcs@lumbercartel.com> writes:

> In  <61ad442e.0311052309.2542bc1@posting.google.com>, Joe W. wrote:
>
>> imipak@yahoo.com (Jonathan Day) wrote in message news:<ae9c8308.0311041334.fea9c7f@posting.google.com>...
>
>>> Word Processing: The clear favourite here, for your requirements,
>>> would be Open Office, because that can import/export Word documents,
>>> making it extremely suitable for school assignments where you have to
>>> hand things in on disk or CD, or where you're given assignments in
>>> digital form.
>> 
>> What about this EMacs thing I've been hearing a lot about? Or vi?
>> They're text-processing, I know, but I've heard that they can do a
>> lot... like indent C code and check spelling. Could you, say, write an
>> essay easily enough with such software?
>
> You might want to look at LaTeX.  It wouldn't surprise me to
> find that emacs has a LaTeX front-end mode.  LaTeX would let
> you do killer presentation without the GUI baggage.

If by "front-end" you mean a major mode devoted to LaTeX, then you are
of course correct.  I think there's a couple of LaTeX modes, but the
best one is auctex, which is absolutely wonderful, especially with
reftex.

If I understand correctly, auctex is maintained by David Kastrup, an
occasional poster in this newsgroup (or is he a regular?  I see him in
sci.math, too, and can't recall how often I see him here).

-- 
"Sure, [my Usenet presence is] like Shaq playing against you in your
backyard, but that has its perks, as I find ways to have my fun *and*
I can send messages to certain people in the United States Government
without concern that the rest of you understand them." -- James Harris
0
jesseh (19)
11/6/2003 3:14:44 PM
mysterious_aardvark@hotmail.com (Joe W.) wrote in message 
> Sounds great... though I think the GUI tools are out of the question
> with the price of (even ancient) hardware around here. But I'm not
> averse to learning a few cool and impressive-looking commands.

Let's see... There are some -very- impressive-looking commands and
text console
systems.

Linuxconf is a fairly popular tool, out there. It'll manage most of
the common system functions, centrally. It's a pain only in that it
manages it's own configuration files, so if you use it for, say, BIND
then you really need to do everything for BIND through Linuxconf.

For networking, you only need to look at iptables and tc to see that
you have some -serious- power at your fingertips. (eg: It would be
perfectly possible to set up a firewall, a NAT service, and then split
the bandwidth and allocate priorities to different traffic types, such
as e-mail.)

You can convert between text, Postscript and PDF formats, with a
single command.

Want to edit or extract bits from a text file? sed, cut, seq, sort, 

> > > I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
> > > so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
> > > I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
> > > playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.
> > 
> > Word Processing: The clear favourite here, for your requirements,
> > would be Open Office, because that can import/export Word documents,
> > making it extremely suitable for school assignments where you have to
> > hand things in on disk or CD, or where you're given assignments in
> > digital form.
> 
> What about this EMacs thing I've been hearing a lot about? Or vi?
> They're text-processing, I know, but I've heard that they can do a
> lot... like indent C code and check spelling. Could you, say, write an
> essay easily enough with such software?
> 
> > Pascal: GPC is a PASCAL compiler for Linux. It bolts right on to GCC,
> > the Gnu compiler collection, which includes C, C++, Objective C and
> > Fortran 77.
> 
> Actually, one of my reasons for wanting to move to Linux is to learn
> C/C++. I don't want to have a Pascal compiler at all, or I might fall
> back on old habits.
> 
> > Roguelikes: Most'll compile out of the box on Linux. I can't think of
> > any - even the very old games of this kind (eg: Omega - my favourite)
> > - that won't compile just fine. The worst possible case scenario is
> > that you find a game that requires tweaking the makefile. This is
> > usually quite painless, and even if you were to run into problems,
> > most Linux geeks would be able to tell you step-for-step how to fix
> > them.
> 
> Sounds peachy.
> 
> [snip "do I need Linux" question 1].
> 
> > > 2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
> > > need to run? I have noticed that quite a few Linux games run on "X"
> > > only (apart from ASCII roguelikes, so I feel OK in that respect...) Do
> > > I really want it? I mean, it really would be nice to escape GUIs for a
> > > while.
> > 
> > You need VGA or better, and at least 4 megs of RAM. The more RAM and
> > the better the graphics card, the better the result, but it'll work on
> > real bare-bones stuff.
> 
> I don't think I'll be getting much better that the 386 minimum
> previously mentioned... so X seems to be a bad decision for me. But
> the outlook doesn't look that bleak without it.
> 
> > You don't need X. You can do absolutely everything by the
> > command-line. In fact, I generally do exactly that, only using X for
> > LinCity, Freeciv, XPilot and Netrek.
> > 
> > (Well, almost everything. I'd hate to do word-processing on the
> > command-line, although with TeX, that IS possible.)
> 
> As I asked before, is text processing workable for me?
> 
> [snip info on amount of disks needed]
> 
> Sounds good. I was worrying a bit, with a few people saying I need
> high-speed internet connections, etc. I'll just leave my 33k dial-up
> on one night...
> 
> [snip]
> 
> > As I've mentioned before, you will probably benefit from using a
> > journalling filesystem, so make sure that the distro either allows you
> > to set that up when you install, or provides tools to convert to one.
> > I'd call this quasi-essential - not everyone does this, and it won't
> > kill you if you don't, but it's a really strong recommendation,
> > especially if you think it likely you'll need to power the machine on
> > or off unexpectedly. (eg: running late for a class, thunderstorms,
> > remembering an assignment 10 mins before it's due, or other headaches
> > of that kind)
> 
> Sounds like a plan, what with the... rather precarious power (and
> assignment-doing) system out here.
0
imipak (12)
11/6/2003 3:59:31 PM
mysterious_aardvark@hotmail.com (Joe W.) wrote in message news:<61ad442e.0311052309.2542bc1@posting.google.com>...
> Sounds great... though I think the GUI tools are out of the question
> with the price of (even ancient) hardware around here. But I'm not
> averse to learning a few cool and impressive-looking commands.

Argh. My browser cut me off! Anyway, the point is, you've got lots of
text editing tools. You'll also have the Perl scripting language, and
that's often used for processing text streams.

You'll have text-based cd-burning tools, text-based cd players,
text-based e-mail, tewxt-based web browsers...

For managing projects, you'll get RCS and CVS - two very nice revision
control systems, where you can keep multiple versions of projects and
recall any of them.

> What about this EMacs thing I've been hearing a lot about? Or vi?
> They're text-processing, I know, but I've heard that they can do a
> lot... like indent C code and check spelling. Could you, say, write an
> essay easily enough with such software?

EMACS is often referred to as an OS disguised as a text editor.
Seriously, it's amazingly powerful. You can (in theory) boot into
EMACS and drive everything through that. You can use it for a file
manager, for running applications, etc. It also has a very nice LISP
interpreter built in, with a sizable range of applets provided. Oh,
and it can edit documents. :) You can edit as many docs as you like at
once. As many of these can be on-screen (eg: by splitting the console)
as you like.

VI is also excellent. It's generally quicker than EMACS for text
editing, if you know the commands. (It uses a lot of escape sequences
to do things, rather than using menus and command lines. If you know
the mnemonics, it's great, but if - like me - your brain doesn't wrap
itself around those too well, then you may be better off with EMACS.)

There are plenty of wars between EMACS and VI users, but these often
forget that people are different and think different ways. If you
think the way EMACS "thinks", then EMACS will be better. If you think
the way VI "thinks", then VI will be better.

(The only "meaningful" EMACS vs VI war was a paintball contest at a
Linux convention.)

> Actually, one of my reasons for wanting to move to Linux is to learn
> C/C++. I don't want to have a Pascal compiler at all, or I might fall
> back on old habits.

As another poster mentioned, you don't need to install options you
don't want. But it never hurts to know that the options exist.

That's the big strength of Linux - you never need to download or
install the bits you don't want to use. But you -always- have the
option to include it later. There's no penalty for doing so (or not
doing so). Nothing is so integrated that you can't ignore or replace
it.

> I don't think I'll be getting much better that the 386 minimum
> previously mentioned... so X seems to be a bad decision for me. But
> the outlook doesn't look that bleak without it.

Personally, I've never bothered much with X, except when it's been
absolutely necessary. svgalib and framebuffers make it possible to
handle the majority of basic graphics needs without ever having to use
X.

> As I asked before, is text processing workable for me?

Yes. If you want basic text documents (no fonts, colors, etc) then
either EMACS or VI will meet your every need, with nothing further
required.

If you want something that looks every bit as good as a desktop
publishing suite, you're still OK - all you need is OpenDoc or LaTeX
and a bit of time to get familiar with the tags. These are used by
commercial publishers and academics to produce finished, high-quality
books, journal articles, etc. OpenDoc will also let you include
hypertext links as standard.

You can do all of this without ever having to touch a GUI. We are
talking serious power at your fingertips, with pure ASCII text.
Nothing more.

> [snip info on amount of disks needed]
> 
> Sounds good. I was worrying a bit, with a few people saying I need
> high-speed internet connections, etc. I'll just leave my 33k dial-up
> on one night...

If it takes a full night, at 33K, you're using a slow mirror site. :)
Seriously, for what you want to do, I'd be amazed if it took more than
3-4 hours to download the contents, copy (or rawrite, depending on
format) the disks, install Linux, and be booted up under the new OS.

A fairly comprehensive distribution may take 9 hours to download at
33K, but as most of the contents of a distribution is X stuff, it's
almost unimaginable that it would take that long.

> Sounds like a plan, what with the... rather precarious power (and
> assignment-doing) system out here.

There are a bunch of journalling filesystems out there, and they're
good at different things. Some distributions will use a particular
filing system, but there are tools for converting one filesystem to
another.

ReiserFS - This is believed to be the fastest all-round filesystem out
there. For raw speed, with reliability, this would be the one to go
with. It's not as fast as some filesystems, on specific tasks, but on
average it's the best. The main drawback is that it's fairly new,
compared to others, and so isn't as well tested.

XFS - SGI's commercial-grade filesystem. This is the fastest on reads,
but deletes are much slower than average. Writes are about average.
So, it's not great on development work, but it's brilliant if you're
going to be spending most of your time using existing software and
existing data. Because it's the code from IRIX, ported to Linux, it's
very well tested in general, but less so on Linux specifically. It can
be quirky, but it's still a very solid product.

JFS - IBM's commercial-grade filesystem. About average on absolutely
everything. But it is absolutely solid. I've yet to hear of anyone who
has had problems, and trust me when I say that there are plenty of
people who look hard for problems. This was ported from AIX, and (as
with XFS) is therefore very well tested in general. Despite being
probably the best (from the reliability standpoint), not many
distributions provide it.

Ext3 - This is Linux' Ext2 filesystem with journalling added. As such,
it's well-tested with Linux, there are the most Linux tools for
manipulating filesystem internals, and most distributions provide it
as standard. (Indeed, Red Hat offered it as the only journalling
system they'd let you pick from their installer.) Because it's layers
on layers, it's slower than the others and doesn't support some of the
very nice extensions SGI and IBM have put in to their filingsystems.
If this is the only journalling filesystem you can chose, though, it's
still a good choice compared to any non-journalling FS.

Reiser4 - This is ReiserFS with added caffeine. It's staggering, but
it's also highly experimental and only recommended for filesystem
developers and other freaks of nature. :) I don't know of any
distribution that provides it. However, remember the name because once
it becomes stable, it'll blow the socks off everything else out there.
0
imipak (12)
11/6/2003 4:49:33 PM
mysterious_aardvark@hotmail.com (Joe W.) wrote:

>I mostly use my computer for: Word processing (school assignments and
>so forth), rudimentary programming (Currently Pascal (because I can).
>I assume Linux will give me some motivation to learn C or C++), and
>playing roguelikes and some other (older) games.

>
>1) Is there really any point to running Linux-- really. I know,
>Microsoft is Evil and Bill Gates is the Devil Incarnate and so forth,
>but will I really gain any advantage from running Linux? What are the
>advantages of this OS, giving that I am only doing the things
>mentioned in the list above?

The ability to mess with all of the OS if you want to.  Totally
free compilers and programming tools ot mess iwht. 

>
>2) What kind of system does this "X Windows" (or whatever it's called)
>need to run? 

I had Linux running (to a certain extent) on a PII 266MHz with
256Mb of RAM.  Ir ran Ok with 128 as well.  


>3) It seems that standard Linux distributions come with fairly
>comprehensive resources and that with Slackware at least I can
>download all the information I need to begin with onto less that a
>dozen floppies. Is it really this easy? A few floppies really is a
>small amount, or am I just underestimating the elegance of this OS?

Make that a few CDs!  At least 3 if you get into installing
databases and compilers and source code.  If you go the Gentoo or
"install from online, you need a cable modem.  It's a lot of
code. 

As a newbie, buying a distro in a box with a manual would be a
good idea.  If you have no existing OS to defend, install is
easy. 

Tsu Dho Nimh

-- 
When businesses invoke the "protection of consumers," it's a lot like 
politicians invoking morality and children - grab your wallet and/or 
your kid and run for your life.
0
tsudhonimh (45)
11/7/2003 11:43:39 AM
Reply:

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Hi I've just just done some searches on Google for ROX linux, and ROX on other platforms. I've not managed to find anything. Is ROX available for OS X? Is ROX available for Acorn\Iyonix Arm linux? Did ROX Linux ever come to anything? I was a member of the mailing list a while ago, it started off interesting and then seemed to go off on a tangent then it all went quiet. It seemed like an excellent idea, a linux distro structured like RISC OS. It would have been an ideal compliment to a RISC OS system, same UI but different set of applications (probably not quite so consistent as we are used to though). It could also have been a life boat if RISC OS were ever to grind to a halt. Presumably some sorts of common apps (python perhaps) would have been possible and if RISCOSE or similar were to be developed too, the possibilities would be even greater. Do others consider it would have been desirable? -- Jess Iyonix contact http://jess.itworkshop-nexus.net Hotmail is my spam trap - don't email valid - mailto:nospam@jess.itworkshop-nexus.net In message <729a59544e.jess@itworkshop.invalid> Jess <phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote: > Hi > > I've just just done some searches on Google for ROX linux, and ROX on > other platforms. > These starting points might help. http://www.google.co.uk/search?sourceid=navclient&q=ROX filer desktop http://rox.sourceforge.net/phpwiki/ http://rox.sourceforg...

Linux Could NOT Have Invented Linux
The current view in Western technology is that Linus Torvalds invented Linux. Nothing could be further from the truth. The technical complexity and useability of Linux make it beyond the capability of what man could produce using the tools available in 1992. My theory is that Ancient Astronauts descended from the sky on 'Chariots of the Gods' and showed Linus *how* to write an Operating System. These alien visitors must have appeared as strange to the young Torvalds, and so he may have mistaken them for carpet vendors. -- w:04 On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 14:28:27 GMT, Erich Von Daniken <ancient@mysteries.nospam> wrote: >The current view in Western technology is that Linus Torvalds invented >Linux. I thought dumb fucking shithead posted from cox.net. TCS <The-Central-Scrutinizer@p.o.b.o.x.com> writes: > On Tue, 08 Jun 2004 14:28:27 GMT, Erich Von Daniken <ancient@mysteries.nospam> wrote: > >>The current view in Western technology is that Linus Torvalds invented >>Linux. > > I thought dumb fucking shithead posted from cox.net. Maybe you should read the post. Then consider whether it's parody or sarcasm. It wasn't the funniest post I've ever read, but it wasn't a dumb fucking shithead post either. -- "If you see math knowledge as a tool--as a hammer--with which you can attack other people then ... you defeat rational discourse." "I get to call my proof the Hammer. It'...

[News] Tips for Linux Advocacy (from Linux-hostile Site)
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 10 Things for Linux Desktop Evangelists to Ponder ,----[ Quote ] | Continuing the theme from #6, be willing to pay for Linux. Be willing to | discuss Linux as a product people buy. Be willing to say "not free" isn't | always a bad thing. | | I know Linux proscribes selling Linux, but there are many success stories | where Linux is the cornerstone of a profitable product (think TiVo). A nicely | constructed Linux Desktop is worth money, whether FOSS thinks so or not. `---- http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/10-Things-for-Linux-Desktop-Evangelists-to-Ponder-67559.html Linux, FOSS, and the Time-Honored Tradition of Charging More for Less ,----[ Quote ] | There is something fundamentally defective with a business that feels it | can't survive by giving customers a fair deal. Stick with FOSS. What you see | is what you get, warts, roses, everything, with no place to hide tricksy | dealings or dishonesty. `---- http://www.linuxtoday.com/infrastructure/2009071002535OPCY Recent: Why Use Linux? ,----[ Quote ] | 'I Would Pay for Linux' | | "I use Linux first and foremost because it's Unix, and I've been a big fan of | the Unix paradigm for 20+ years," Slashdot blogger yagu told | LinuxInsider. "With GNU software, Linux is better than industrial (HP, Sun, | et al.) Unix because it leverages the best extensions of familiar commands, | making them friendlier (color syntax...

[News] Linux, Linux, Linux at Acer (Phones and Tablets)
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Acer CEO whips out iPad rival ,----[ Quote ] | Acer has shown off an Android-based iPad | alternative. `---- http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2010/05/27/acer_shows_ipad_tablet/ Acer Gets Official with ‘Stream’ ,----[ Quote ] | Acer has created a new 3D user interface that | features animations and a 'peeling' gesture to | unlock the phone. The lock screen lets users | read information without having to open | applications and a History panel provides quick | access to often-used apps. `---- http://www.androidg...

Linux Brochure Project (LBP)--Linux Advocacy & Publicity
Your organization may be interested in the Linux Brochure Project hosted on SourceForge. This project was developed because the Victoria Linux User Group (VLUG) wanted to produce their brochure using open source tools rather than proprietary ones. We registered it at SourceForge so that any Linux LUG and other advocacy groups could use the software to produce their own brochure. This project has been written up by LWN (http://lwn.net/Articles/51938/). See below for project details. Barbara Irwin Publicity Coordinator, VLUG ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Linux Brochure Project (LBP) is GPLed data and software which is used to document key Linux information in a standard-size brochure (two sides of a single letter-sized or A4 sheet of paper that is Z-folded into the six mini-pages of the brochure). Four key features of this project make it an excellent advocacy and publicity tool for LUGS and Linux organizations: 1) the project data and software are GPLed; 2) all software tools used to build the LBP brochures are open source; 3) the brochure can be customized to fit individual requirements of LUGs and other Linux organizations; and 4) the software produces an attractive brochure. Currently there are two versions of the brochure -- a "Linus" version, which features famous quotes from Linus and a VLUG version, which has been adopted as the Victoria Linux Users Group official brochure...

[News] [Linux] Linux More Secure Than Mac OS X, Windows
How secure are Linux, Window and Mac OS? ,----[ Quote ] | Overall it looks like the Linux kernel turns out to be the most | secure system. Not only does it have virtually no security holes | that lead to system access, it's also very resilient to remote | attacks, two areas where both Windows and Mac OS X aren't doing | very well. `---- http://www.masuran.org/node/29 Lots of nice charts on the page. Good summary. Related: Linux hacks rare as hens' teeth, says survey ,----[ Quote ] | Adding more fuel to the Linux versus Windows fire, a US research firm | this week released a ...

[News] [Linux] More Speculations About a Google OS Based on GNU/Linux
Google admits that it is going after Microsoft Office... Is Windows next? ,----[ Quote ] | So that brings us to the obvious question: What about the operating | system? There have been rumors for years about a Google PC and/or | Google OS that was based on Linux and aimed at providing a simple, | intuitive desktop for the masses. Naturally, that Google PC would | primarily be an Internet terminal that features Google's online | applications. `---- http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=465 Still getting slapped for spyware (Dell) and news aggregators... Google stands firm behind News search site ,----[ Quote ] | All along, Google has defended News saying that it is protected by | the fair use principle -- because it only reproduces headlines, text | snippets and thumbnail images -- and that it provides great benefit | to media Web sites by sending them readers. `---- http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;535941450;fp;;fpid;;pf;1 ...

[News] Linux is Linux is Linux, Not 'Cheap Windows'
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Reimagining The Desktop ,----[ Quote ] | KDE 4.1 goes a long way to solving that dilemma. `---- http://www.northdavisroad.net/2008/08/reimagining-the-desktop/ Linux should remain Linux ,----[ Quote ] | I disagree that Linux should concentrate on running native Windows apps. This | is exactly the opposite of what the community should be doing. If you notice | more and more companies are working to make Linux their base rather than | Windows. This frees them of paying tax to MS and stops MS from beating their | products with tighter Windows...

[News] Another Company (6WIND) Raves About Linux, Linux, Linux...
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 6WIND Launches New Software Solution for Application Development upon Multi-Core Processor Architectures that Simplifies, Reduces Costs and Speeds Time to Market ,----[ Quote ] | 6WIND, the market’s only provider of a networking software solution to | simplify application development within multi-core processor based equipment, | today announced a new solution targeted at mid-range applications (2 to 4 | cores) to provide the highest L2/L3 performance for a pure Linux system. | Based on Fast Path architecture, the 6WINDGate™ EDS software enab...

ssh over php from w2k to linux hangs (linux to linux ok)
Hello, I am trying to make some bash-scripts, that are to be executed on remote linux-boxes available to some Windows users over a php-interface. To require no interaction from the part of the windows users, I installed cygwin, generated rsa-keys and copied the public key on the server. I also changed the user, running the apache service appropriately and I added cygwin/bin to this users path. So, executing "ssh user@server something" worked using the cygwin-bash or the windows CLI. However, if I execute a php-script containing a "system" or "proc_open" with this command, it never returns. The same php-script *does* work on linux! Any clues? Greetings Neven ...

[News] [Linux] Linux Foundation and MontaVista Organise Linux Conferences
Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit ,----[ Quote ] | The first Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit takes place mid | June, featuring the fourth Desktop Architects Meeting, an LSB | face to face meeting and various council meetings. `---- http://liquidat.wordpress.com/2007/06/02/linux-foundation-collaboration-summit/ MontaVista Vision 2007 Embedded Linux Developers Conference... ,----[ Quote ] | Hosted by MontaVista, and including platinum sponsors | Freescale Semiconductor, IBM, Intel, and Texas Instruments, | the Vision 2007 event is expected to bring the latest tips, | technique...

COLA is full of fanatic Linux Zealots. Look Elsewhere for Linux Advocacy.
I tried a little experiment and that was to post to COLA making certain to agree with the usual morons like Schestowitz, [Homer], Terry Porter and so forth. I was very careful to make certain that I did not set them off by posting controversial information. IOW I became a COLA "Stepford wife" for a week or so. It was extremely difficult to accomplish because the list of so called Linux "advocates", at least that is what they call themselves, is small in number but high on their own special form of bullshit. Then *ON PURPOSE* , that part is important for those who like to...

[News] [Linux] Man Chooses Linux Over Mac OS X, Windows
Which OS for Ruby on Rails development? ,----[ Quote ] | I've had experience using Linux servers (no GUIs), so I figured I | could always drop back to the command line if something broke and | I've had to once or twice during installations. But overall I have | been pleasantly surprised at how civil an experience it has been. `---- http://falkayn.blogspot.com/2007/05/which-os-for-ruby-on-rails-development.html ...

Are Linux Lusers Really Displaced Locksmiths? (Foley Belsaw School of Linux Advocacy)
Does Foley Belsaw have a school for Linux lusers like they do for Locksmith lusers? If not, they should! It could be a real money maker IMHO. On Thursday 22 September 2005 00:11 Lisa Cottmann wrote: > Does Foley Belsaw Nono Susan - I'm sure Foley doesn't cross post. Please stop, silly girl. Bill "Lisa Cottmann" <lisa_cottmann@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:1127344265.713851.255270@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com... > Does Foley Belsaw have a school for Linux lusers like they do for > Locksmith lusers? > > If not, they should! > > It coul...

[News] Linux Workshop Planned in Cambridge, VxWorks OS Lags Behind Linux
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Cambridge embedded systems event offers embedded Linux workshop ,----[ Quote ] | Embedded Linux TrainingFor the third year | running, the UK Embedded Masterclass will be | running a half-day workshop that offers an | "Introduction to Embedded Linux". `---- http://www.cambridgenetwork.co.uk/news/article/default.aspx?objid=66121 Intel Updates Wind River VxWorks OS ,----[ Quote ] | "VxWorks and Wind River Linux are | complementary offers, allowing Wind River to | serve customers who need Linux or VxWorks," | Brown said. "These can be used separately, and | there certainly are vertical sub-markets | better suited by one or the other. In | addition, we can offer them together as a | single solution." `---- http://www.internetnews.com/infra/article.php/3856946/Intel+Updates+Wind+River+VxWorks+OS.htm Related: Cambridge company says Microsoft lease is unfair ,----[ Quote ] | InterSystems Corp. CEO Phillip Ragon has called One Memorial Drive home for | the past 20 years. | | But the longtime Cambridge resident and MIT graduate said the building’s | landlord, the Blackstone Group, has a plan in the works to potentially brand | the 17-story office tower as “the Microsoft building” by endorsing large | Microsoft signs to be placed on three exterior sides and leasing out the top | three floors to the out-of-town competitor. | | “A big Microsoft sign across the top might imply that Cambridge i...

[News] [Linux] Linux Gets Prettier, Mac OS X Plays Catch-up
H-K Suite [EN] ,----[ Quote ] | Suite H-K is an union of skins, themes, icons, scripts and | configuration files which got the purpose to create an elegant, | linear Desktop. Differently from meny other dark themes, I tried | to avoid reading problems in most commons programs. Here are some | screenshot from version 0.1. `---- http://embracesblog.mine.nu/?page_id=5 Apple's latest catchup: [Apple's 'Beryl/XGL'] ,----[ Quote ] | With Mac OS X, you can multitask like never before. You can run | several applications at once and have multiple windows open at the | same time very easily. But when it comes to trying to find | something specific, sorting through all of those open applications | and windows can become time consuming and frustrating at best. `---- http://www.yousoftware.com/desktops/desktops.php ...

Web resources about - Is Linux right for me? - comp.os.linux.advocacy

Linux - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the operating system. For the kernel, see Linux kernel . For other uses, see Linux (disambiguation) . and video game consoles ...

Linux - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the operating system. For the kernel, see Linux kernel . For other uses, see Linux (disambiguation) . The development of ...

Linux - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the operating system. For the kernel, see Linux kernel . For other uses, see Linux (disambiguation) . and video game consoles ...

Linux - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the operating system. For the kernel, see Linux kernel . For GNU package based on Linux kernel, see GNU Linux-libre . For ...

More developers now use OS X than Linux, says ‘most comprehensive survey ever conducted’
Stack Overflow reports that more developers now use OS X than Linux as their primary OS, and that if the trend continues, fewer than half of ...

Google kills Chrome app launcher for Microsoft Windows, Apple OS X, and Linux
During the Windows 8 era, I was very worried about that operating system the UI and design choices were troubling. Luckily, as a longtime Linux ...

Pre-order the first Ubuntu Linux tablet
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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8 Enters Beta
Although it's no longer the leading edge of Red Hat's product portfolio, RHEL 6 is still getting new features.

Mac extends its lead over Linux among software developers, chipping away at Windows
A new survey of more than 55,000 coders shows Mac OS X distancing itself from Linux in a ranking of the most popular desktop operating systems ...

Google's Scrapping Chrome's App Launcher on Windows, Mac and Linux
Like opening Chrome apps using Google’s dedicated launcher? Tough: As of July, it will be entirely scrapped on Windows, Mac and Linux. Read ...

Resources last updated: 3/29/2016 4:20:16 PM