f



Is Linux right for you?

Pretty good article on the subject ...

~~
How do you know if you are a potential candidate to become a Linux user? 
It's this simple: What's the first app you fire up after booting into 
your system? If you said 'browser', then you are a potential Linux user.

Gone are the days when the operating system used to be the primary 
component of your computing. Today, the browser has taken center stage 
and is the gateway to the highway of information.

Whether you are shopping from Amazon.com, connecting with friends through 
social networking, dealing with clients over email or VoIP, managing your 
time through calendars, collaborating with teams on Google Docs, 
listening to your favorite music or watching the latest blockbuster, you 
pretty much live inside a browser.

Building the case for Linux

Fortunately or unfortunately, most of our files have moved to the cloud 
and most of our applications have become services. Gone are the days when 
people listen to music on Windows Media Player; today we listen to 
Pandora and Spotify. Gone are the days when watch MPEG movies in WMP; now 
we stream them from Netflix and HBO Now.

You don't need Microsoft Office to work on documents, presentations or 
spreadsheets; Google Docs takes care of almost all of it. You don't need 
to save all of your files on the 'Desktop' or on the 'C' drive, which you 
struggle to save every time your Windows crashes; almost all of our data 
resides on Dropbox, Google Drive, etc.
....

But what if I still need applications?

Depending upon your needs and concerns for privacy you may not want to 
fully move to the cloud. No worries, Linux has you covered. There are 
open source alternatives for almost all proprietary software, some of 
which are actually better than their proprietary counterparts.

Amarok and Clementine are among the greatest music players and have more 
features than iTunes or WMP. VLC is the best video player there is, even 
better than Quicktime or WMP.

All major browsers, including Firefox, Chrome and Opera, are available 
for Linux; and there are many more.

If you are not content with Google Docs, you have LibreOffice. But that's 
not all. You also have Calligra, AbiWord and many more.

Want to work on images? There are neat online image editing tools like 
Pixler or Sumo Paint. If you are not satisfied with what these have to 
offer, there are GIMP and Krita. GIMP is a great image editing tool for 
the average PC user; Krita is one of the best tool for artists and 
designers.
....

Why Linux?

On a philosophical note, our tools should not control us; we should 
control our tools.

Would you eat food from a box not knowing what’s inside it? Even if it 
may have ingredients you are allergic to or that you just don’t want to 
consume? If your answer is yes, then this article is not for you.

If the answer is no, then why not apply the same logic to the digital 
world? Why use software whose ingredients are hidden and could be harmful 
to you?

In the proprietary world, the software or hardware maker takes control of 
your digital life; they dictate what you can or can’t do with ‘your’ 
computer. These proprietary components have backdoors that can be used to 
track and monitor you.

Would you be comfortable moving into a house that is bugged and has spy 
cameras installed everywhere to monitor your every move? I wouldn’t be 
comfortable living in such a house.

That’s where Linux and Open Source enter the scene. Since these are open 
source technologies and developed in public, you can clearly see what 
they do with your data, your communications.

Linux and Open Source gives you assurance that your PC is not betraying 
you and leaking your data to the Skynet. Rather, it actually helps you in 
further protecting your privacy.

The best thing about Linux is that it shares knowledge instead of 
restricting it. Instead of locking down information about ‘how the 
software works’ behind fortified walls, Linux and Open Source give us 
full access to that vast knowledge base.

And one more answer to the question "Why Linux?": It is cost efficient. 
It saves money not only for individuals but also for businesses.
....

My wife used to be a Mac user and I switched her to Ubuntu and then to 
Chrome OS. When she was on Mac, she would often call me to fix something, 
but since moving to Linux/Chrome OS her support requests all but went 
away.

I have migrated many users to Linux as well. The first thing I do is 
analyze their computer usage to see whether they can live with Linux or 
not, and then suggest the appropriate OS. This article pretty much sums 
up that exercise. And once they switch to Linux, they admit how 
magnificent it is.

If you don't want to deal with the uncertain future of Windows, don't 
want to worry about viruses, backdoors or compromised privacy, don’t want 
vendor lock-in, and don’t use any of the tools I mentioned above, I 
believe Linux is the right OS for you.

Give it a try. You won’t regret it.
~~
http://www.itworld.com/article/2922426/linux/is-linux-right-for-you.html


-- 
To WinDrones and iCultists obsessed with Linux. Get a life.
0
ronb
6/7/2015 4:43:33 PM
comp.os.linux.advocacy 124139 articles. 3 followers. Post Follow

9 Replies
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On 6/7/15, 9:43 AM, in article ml1sbl$8l4$1@dont-email.me, "ronb"
<ronb02NOSPAM@gmail.com> wrote:

> Pretty good article on the subject ...
> 
> ~~
> How do you know if you are a potential candidate to become a Linux user?
> It's this simple: What's the first app you fire up after booting into
> your system? If you said 'browser', then you are a potential Linux user.

Good point. For web surfing Linux does a pretty good job.

> Gone are the days when the operating system used to be the primary
> component of your computing. Today, the browser has taken center stage
> and is the gateway to the highway of information.

For many this is true. And if you use your computer this way Linux can be an
adequate solution. It is not really better than the alternatives (though
your risk of getting malware is lower than if you use Windows).

> Whether you are shopping from Amazon.com, connecting with friends through
> social networking, dealing with clients over email or VoIP, managing your
> time through calendars, collaborating with teams on Google Docs,
> listening to your favorite music or watching the latest blockbuster, you
> pretty much live inside a browser.
> 
> Building the case for Linux

Right: Linux is good if you use your computer largely as a web kiosk. Hard
to make the case if you use local programs.

> Fortunately or unfortunately, most of our files have moved to the cloud
> and most of our applications have become services. Gone are the days when
> people listen to music on Windows Media Player; today we listen to
> Pandora and Spotify. Gone are the days when watch MPEG movies in WMP; now
> we stream them from Netflix and HBO Now.

This might be true for some... but from what I have seen not many.

> You don't need Microsoft Office to work on documents, presentations or
> spreadsheets; Google Docs takes care of almost all of it.

If your needs are small, it can work well. Sure. And notice the article does
not try to pretend LibreOffice is comparable. Good.

> You don't need to save all of your files on the 'Desktop' or on the 'C' drive,
> which you struggle to save every time your Windows crashes; almost all of our
> data resides on Dropbox, Google Drive, etc.

Whose does? 

> ...
> 
> 
> But what if I still need applications?
> 
> Depending upon your needs and concerns for privacy you may not want to
> fully move to the cloud. No worries, Linux has you covered. There are
> open source alternatives for almost all proprietary software, some of
> which are actually better than their proprietary counterparts.

Now this is not true. Even in basic classes such as word processors Linux is
far behind.

> Amarok and Clementine are among the greatest music players and have more
> features than iTunes or WMP. VLC is the best video player there is, even
> better than Quicktime or WMP.

It does not say how... and VLC is available for Windows and OS X.

> All major browsers, including Firefox, Chrome and Opera, are available
> for Linux; and there are many more.

They are also available for the competition.

> If you are not content with Google Docs, you have LibreOffice. But that's
> not all. You also have Calligra, AbiWord and many more.

None of which compete well.

> Want to work on images? There are neat online image editing tools like
> Pixler or Sumo Paint. If you are not satisfied with what these have to
> offer, there are GIMP and Krita. GIMP is a great image editing tool for
> the average PC user; Krita is one of the best tool for artists and
> designers.

For their price they are great - but they are far behind the "big boys".

> ...
> 
> 
> Why Linux?
> 
> On a philosophical note, our tools should not control us; we should
> control our tools.

And this is where we get to the heart of the "reasoning". It is not about
productivity, efficiency, or error reduction: it is about a philosophy...
the following of a cult-leader.

> Would you eat food from a box not knowing what�s inside it? Even if it
> may have ingredients you are allergic to or that you just don�t want to
> consume? If your answer is yes, then this article is not for you.

Would you accept poor and false analogies? If so the author's reasoning is
for you!

> If the answer is no, then why not apply the same logic to the digital
> world? Why use software whose ingredients are hidden and could be harmful
> to you?
> 
> In the proprietary world, the software or hardware maker takes control of
> your digital life; they dictate what you can or can�t do with �your�
> computer. These proprietary components have backdoors that can be used to
> track and monitor you.

Having more choice and more control of your computing abilities is not
reduced choice. The author is spewing Stallman-style nonsense.

> Would you be comfortable moving into a house that is bugged and has spy
> cameras installed everywhere to monitor your every move? I wouldn�t be
> comfortable living in such a house.
> 
> That�s where Linux and Open Source enter the scene. Since these are open
> source technologies and developed in public, you can clearly see what
> they do with your data, your communications.

And they run on closes source hardware. Oops.

> Linux and Open Source gives you assurance that your PC is not betraying
> you and leaking your data to the Skynet. Rather, it actually helps you in
> further protecting your privacy.

Maybe. Maybe not. I am not tied to sending anything to Apple or MS, other
than letting them know I licenses the software I use correctly. They need
not know anything about my data.

> The best thing about Linux is that it shares knowledge instead of
> restricting it. Instead of locking down information about �how the
> software works� behind fortified walls, Linux and Open Source give us
> full access to that vast knowledge base.
> 
> And one more answer to the question "Why Linux?": It is cost efficient.
> It saves money not only for individuals but also for businesses.

This comes back to my reasons for Linux: the price and the philosophy.
Great. If those are more important to you than productivity, efficiency, and
error reduction then Linux is a great choice for you. I do not argue against
that.

> ...
> 
> 
> My wife used to be a Mac user and I switched her to Ubuntu and then to
> Chrome OS. When she was on Mac, she would often call me to fix something,
> but since moving to Linux/Chrome OS her support requests all but went
> away.

She learned not to trust you. Got it. :)
 
> I have migrated many users to Linux as well. The first thing I do is
> analyze their computer usage to see whether they can live with Linux or
> not, and then suggest the appropriate OS. This article pretty much sums
> up that exercise. And once they switch to Linux, they admit how
> magnificent it is.

Who does. And magnificent in what way? Would love to see some examples!
 
> If you don't want to deal with the uncertain future of Windows, don't
> want to worry about viruses, backdoors or compromised privacy, don�t want
> vendor lock-in, and don�t use any of the tools I mentioned above, I
> believe Linux is the right OS for you.
> 
> Give it a try. You won�t regret it.

But most do and switch back to Windows or OS X. Look at the claimed download
counts of distros vs. the miniscule usage.

> ~~
> http://www.itworld.com/article/2922426/linux/is-linux-right-for-you.html
> 
Thank you. I added a comment to the article as well. Will be interesting to
see the responses. 


-- 
* Mint MATE Trash, Panel, Menu:     <http://youtu.be/C0y74FIf7uE>
* Mint KDE bugs or Easter eggs?     <http://youtu.be/CU-whJQvtfA>
* Mint KDE working with folders:    <http://youtu.be/7C9nvniOoE0>
* Mint KDE creating files:          <http://youtu.be/N7-fZJaJUv8>
* Mint KDE help:                    <http://youtu.be/3ikizUd3sa8>
* Mint KDE general navigation:      <http://youtu.be/t9y14yZtQuI>
* Mavericks / Pages 5.1:            <http://youtu.be/D3BPWANQoIk>
* OS / Word Processor Comparison:   <http://youtu.be/w6Qcl-w7s5c>

0
Snit
6/7/2015 5:38:16 PM
On Sunday, June 7, 2015 at 12:44:50 PM UTC-4, ronb wrote:
> Pretty good article on the subject ...=20

Hah!  The article is too big and covers too much ground, while ignoring the=
 biggest problem of Linux: Too many options and way too many different dist=
ros.

Second, you cannot believe what most of the different distros say in print,=
 especially in regards to CPU processor requirements.

Most Linux distros are extremely lazy and totally indifferent as to wasting=
 the time of the public. Far too much of their printed info is grossly out =
of date and therefore nothing but one big Lie.

Linux's CPU processor classification system is a total joke and is universa=
lly WRONG and grossly out of date. In other words, the printed information =
is simply NOT correct.


> Fortunately or unfortunately, most of our files have moved to the cloud=
=20
> and most of our applications have become services. Gone are the days when=
=20
> people listen to music on Windows Media Player; today we listen to=20
> Pandora and Spotify. Gone are the days when watch MPEG movies in WMP; now=
=20
> we stream them from Netflix and HBO Now.

ONLY if you are a Pultz!


=20
> You don't need Microsoft Office to work on documents, presentations or=20
> spreadsheets; Google Docs takes care of almost all of it. You don't need=
=20
> to save all of your files on the 'Desktop' or on the 'C' drive, which you=
=20
> struggle to save every time your Windows crashes; almost all of our data=
=20
> resides on Dropbox, Google Drive, etc.

ALL programs work differently. Therefore some adjustment is required even i=
f the GUI is basically close to Microsoft Office 2003.  Linux offers an opt=
ion (IE, LibreOffice) that is historically connected to OpenOffice, which c=
onnection is all too often ignored.  Any connection to JAVA is definitely a=
 NEGATIVE.


> If you are not content with Google Docs, you have LibreOffice. But that's=
=20
> not all. You also have Calligra, AbiWord and many more.

AbiWord is great wordprocessor.

Only a Pultz would use Google Docs.

=20
> Want to work on images? There are neat online image editing tools like=20
> Pixler or Sumo Paint. If you are not satisfied with what these have to=20
> offer, there are GIMP and Krita. GIMP is a great image editing tool for=
=20
> the average PC user; Krita is one of the best tool for artists and=20
> designers.
> ...

GIMP is way to complex for the average user who just wants to do some basic=
 photo editing.  If the Linux developers had any brains at all, THEY would =
offer a simplified version of GIMP.

I will have to check Krita out, as Moi is NOT familiar with it.


> My wife used to be a Mac user and I switched her to Ubuntu and then to=20
> Chrome OS. When she was on Mac, she would often call me to fix something,=
=20
> but since moving to Linux/Chrome OS her support requests all but went=20
> away.


Chrome OS???  Do NOT make Moi barf!!!
0
John
6/7/2015 5:44:42 PM
On 6/7/2015 12:43 PM, ronb wrote:

> "...since moving to Linux/Chrome OS her support requests all but went
> away."

> http://www.itworld.com/article/2922426/linux/is-linux-right-for-you.html


Another "works for me" liar.

Meanwhile:

Mint:      http://forums.linuxmint.com/
Ubuntu:    http://ubuntuforums.org
Fedora:    http://fedoraforum.org/
Mageia:    https://forums.mageia.org/en/
Debian:    http://forums.debian.net/
openSUSE:  http://forums.opensuse.org/
Arch:      https://bbs.archlinux.org/
CentOS:    http://www.centos.org/modules/newbb/
Puppy:     http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/
PCLinuxOS: http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/
Ultimate:  http://forumubuntusoftware.info/
Lubuntu:   http://ubuntuforums.org/tags.php?tag=lubuntu
Pear:      http://pearlinux.org/index.php/forum/index
Chakra:    http://chakra-project.org/bbs/
Sabayon:   http://forum.sabayon.org/
Bodhi:     http://forums.bodhilinux.com/
Slackware: 
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/forumdisplay.php?forumid=14
Gentoo:    http://forums.gentoo.org/
Zorin:     http://www.zoringroup.com/forum/
Fuduntu:   http://www.fuduntu.org/forum/




0
DFS
6/7/2015 5:48:17 PM
On 06/07/2015 11:43 AM, ronb wrote:
> Pretty good article on the subject ...
>
> ~~
> How do you know if you are a potential candidate to become a Linux user?
> It's this simple: What's the first app you fire up after booting into
> your system? If you said 'browser', then you are a potential Linux user.
>
> Gone are the days when the operating system used to be the primary
> component of your computing. Today, the browser has taken center stage
> and is the gateway to the highway of information.

This would have come about much sooner if M$ hadn't "cut off Netscape's 
air supply."  It's another example how progress in computing was stifled 
by a monopoly.  It took twenty years for Linux and Google to gain back 
what was destroyed in the 1990's.

[...]

0
Nobody
6/7/2015 6:37:58 PM
On 2015-06-07 1:38 PM, Snit wrote:
> On 6/7/15, 9:43 AM, in article ml1sbl$8l4$1@dont-email.me, "ronb"
> <ronb02NOSPAM@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Pretty good article on the subject ...
>>
>> ~~
>> How do you know if you are a potential candidate to become a Linux user?
>> It's this simple: What's the first app you fire up after booting into
>> your system? If you said 'browser', then you are a potential Linux user.
>
> Good point. For web surfing Linux does a pretty good job.

That's about all it does a good job for. E-mail too.

>> Gone are the days when the operating system used to be the primary
>> component of your computing. Today, the browser has taken center stage
>> and is the gateway to the highway of information.
>
> For many this is true. And if you use your computer this way Linux can be an
> adequate solution. It is not really better than the alternatives (though
> your risk of getting malware is lower than if you use Windows).

With Windows 8, the chances of getting malware are slim. The built-in 
anti-virus makes sure of that. It's extra safe if you don't use Internet 
Explorer and make sure to use a browser extension like Ghostery to make 
sure bad cookies don't load bad ads which serve malware.

< snip >

>> Amarok and Clementine are among the greatest music players and have more
>> features than iTunes or WMP. VLC is the best video player there is, even
>> better than Quicktime or WMP.
>
> It does not say how... and VLC is available for Windows and OS X.

Amarok and Clementine are NOT good players at all. Amarok might respect 
ID3 tags properly but the interface is awful and it's slower than 
molasses. Since Clementine is based on Amarok, you can expect the same 
kind of slow performance except that it adds a ridiculous inability to 
properly support ID3 tags on top of that, despite the fact that its 
parent does it properly. Only Amarok actually saves ratings to file but 
even, only in MP3 files. M4A and OGG are out of luck.

>> All major browsers, including Firefox, Chrome and Opera, are available
>> for Linux; and there are many more.
>
> They are also available for the competition.

I'm not sure how the availability of a browser helps the case for Linux.

>> If you are not content with Google Docs, you have LibreOffice. But that's
>> not all. You also have Calligra, AbiWord and many more.
>
> None of which compete well.

AbiWord hasn't changed much since 2002 and by that point, it was 
considered a bare-bones piece of software. Nobody would boast about its 
availability unless they had psychosis. Calligra is interesting, but 
it's generally associated with KDE which is a terrible desktop environment.

>> Want to work on images? There are neat online image editing tools like
>> Pixler or Sumo Paint. If you are not satisfied with what these have to
>> offer, there are GIMP and Krita. GIMP is a great image editing tool for
>> the average PC user; Krita is one of the best tool for artists and
>> designers.
>
> For their price they are great - but they are far behind the "big boys".

Krita is OK, supposedly better than GIMP. Considering it's free and 
offers a lot of excellent features, it's something the Linux guys can 
indeed boast about since it isn't available for Windows.

< snip >

-- 
Slimer
Encrypt.

"Figuring that linux has only 1.5% of any market share as a desktop os, 
it also implies that the end user is stupid enough to fiddle with an old 
WWII bomb that didn't go off." - GreyCloud
0
Slimer
6/7/2015 7:01:27 PM
ronb wrote:

> Pretty good article on the subject ...
> 
> ~~
> How do you know if you are a potential candidate to become a Linux user?
> It's this simple: What's the first app you fire up after booting into
> your system? If you said 'browser', then you are a potential Linux user.
> 
> Gone are the days when the operating system used to be the primary
> component of your computing. Today, the browser has taken center stage
> and is the gateway to the highway of information.
> 
> Whether you are shopping from Amazon.com, connecting with friends through
> social networking, dealing with clients over email or VoIP, managing your
> time through calendars, collaborating with teams on Google Docs,
> listening to your favorite music or watching the latest blockbuster, you
> pretty much live inside a browser.
> 
> Building the case for Linux
> 
> Fortunately or unfortunately, most of our files have moved to the cloud
> and most of our applications have become services. Gone are the days when
> people listen to music on Windows Media Player; today we listen to
> Pandora and Spotify. Gone are the days when watch MPEG movies in WMP; now
> we stream them from Netflix and HBO Now.
> 
> You don't need Microsoft Office to work on documents, presentations or
> spreadsheets; Google Docs takes care of almost all of it. You don't need
> to save all of your files on the 'Desktop' or on the 'C' drive, which you
> struggle to save every time your Windows crashes; almost all of our data
> resides on Dropbox, Google Drive, etc.
> ...
> 
> But what if I still need applications?
> 
> Depending upon your needs and concerns for privacy you may not want to
> fully move to the cloud. No worries, Linux has you covered. There are
> open source alternatives for almost all proprietary software, some of
> which are actually better than their proprietary counterparts.
> 
> Amarok and Clementine are among the greatest music players and have more
> features than iTunes or WMP. VLC is the best video player there is, even
> better than Quicktime or WMP.
> 
> All major browsers, including Firefox, Chrome and Opera, are available
> for Linux; and there are many more.
> 
> If you are not content with Google Docs, you have LibreOffice. But that's
> not all. You also have Calligra, AbiWord and many more.
> 
> Want to work on images? There are neat online image editing tools like
> Pixler or Sumo Paint. If you are not satisfied with what these have to
> offer, there are GIMP and Krita. GIMP is a great image editing tool for
> the average PC user; Krita is one of the best tool for artists and
> designers.
> ...
> 
> Why Linux?
> 
> On a philosophical note, our tools should not control us; we should
> control our tools.
> 
> Would you eat food from a box not knowing what’s inside it? Even if it
> may have ingredients you are allergic to or that you just don’t want to
> consume? If your answer is yes, then this article is not for you.
> 
> If the answer is no, then why not apply the same logic to the digital
> world? Why use software whose ingredients are hidden and could be harmful
> to you?
> 
> In the proprietary world, the software or hardware maker takes control of
> your digital life; they dictate what you can or can’t do with ‘your’
> computer. These proprietary components have backdoors that can be used to
> track and monitor you.
> 
> Would you be comfortable moving into a house that is bugged and has spy
> cameras installed everywhere to monitor your every move? I wouldn’t be
> comfortable living in such a house.
> 
> That’s where Linux and Open Source enter the scene. Since these are open
> source technologies and developed in public, you can clearly see what
> they do with your data, your communications.
> 
> Linux and Open Source gives you assurance that your PC is not betraying
> you and leaking your data to the Skynet. Rather, it actually helps you in
> further protecting your privacy.
> 
> The best thing about Linux is that it shares knowledge instead of
> restricting it. Instead of locking down information about ‘how the
> software works’ behind fortified walls, Linux and Open Source give us
> full access to that vast knowledge base.
> 
> And one more answer to the question "Why Linux?": It is cost efficient.
> It saves money not only for individuals but also for businesses.
> ...
> 
> My wife used to be a Mac user and I switched her to Ubuntu and then to
> Chrome OS. When she was on Mac, she would often call me to fix something,
> but since moving to Linux/Chrome OS her support requests all but went
> away.
> 
> I have migrated many users to Linux as well. The first thing I do is
> analyze their computer usage to see whether they can live with Linux or
> not, and then suggest the appropriate OS. This article pretty much sums
> up that exercise. And once they switch to Linux, they admit how
> magnificent it is.
> 
> If you don't want to deal with the uncertain future of Windows, don't
> want to worry about viruses, backdoors or compromised privacy, don’t want
> vendor lock-in, and don’t use any of the tools I mentioned above, I
> believe Linux is the right OS for you.
> 
> Give it a try. You won’t regret it.
> ~~
> http://www.itworld.com/article/2922426/linux/is-linux-right-for-you.html


Linux is just too good to me.

Pays wages x 10 years now.

Pays wages for several engineers with it.

Give back as much as possible - some dowloads stats were approaching 2TB per 
month :)

Which reminds me, I have to make an effort to give more back :) :)

0
7
6/7/2015 7:51:27 PM
On Sun, 07 Jun 2015 13:48:17 -0400, DFS wrote:

> On 6/7/2015 12:43 PM, ronb wrote:
> 
>> "...since moving to Linux/Chrome OS her support requests all but went
>> away."
> 
>> http://www.itworld.com/article/2922426/linux/is-linux-right-for-you.html
> 
> 
> Another "works for me" liar.

The author is Swapnil Bhartiya. A well known Linux shill.
You might as well as Bill Gates what he thinks of Windows 10.
0
Tomas
6/7/2015 8:07:29 PM
On 6/7/15, 12:01 PM, in article ml24br$9vp$1@dont-email.me, "Slimer"
<slvrslmr@lv.c> wrote:

> On 2015-06-07 1:38 PM, Snit wrote:
>> On 6/7/15, 9:43 AM, in article ml1sbl$8l4$1@dont-email.me, "ronb"
>> <ronb02NOSPAM@gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>>> Pretty good article on the subject ...
>>> 
>>> ~~
>>> How do you know if you are a potential candidate to become a Linux user?
>>> It's this simple: What's the first app you fire up after booting into
>>> your system? If you said 'browser', then you are a potential Linux user.
>> 
>> Good point. For web surfing Linux does a pretty good job.
> 
> That's about all it does a good job for. E-mail too.

For basic email needs, sure (and that is fine for many).

>>> Gone are the days when the operating system used to be the primary
>>> component of your computing. Today, the browser has taken center stage
>>> and is the gateway to the highway of information.
>> 
>> For many this is true. And if you use your computer this way Linux can be an
>> adequate solution. It is not really better than the alternatives (though
>> your risk of getting malware is lower than if you use Windows).
> 
> With Windows 8, the chances of getting malware are slim. The built-in
> anti-virus makes sure of that. It's extra safe if you don't use Internet
> Explorer and make sure to use a browser extension like Ghostery to make
> sure bad cookies don't load bad ads which serve malware.

Still: Android and Windows are the only OSs where there is a significant
risk. But the risk is exaggerated by some.

> < snip >
> 
>>> Amarok and Clementine are among the greatest music players and have more
>>> features than iTunes or WMP. VLC is the best video player there is, even
>>> better than Quicktime or WMP.
>> 
>> It does not say how... and VLC is available for Windows and OS X.
> 
> Amarok and Clementine are NOT good players at all. Amarok might respect
> ID3 tags properly but the interface is awful and it's slower than
> molasses. Since Clementine is based on Amarok, you can expect the same
> kind of slow performance except that it adds a ridiculous inability to
> properly support ID3 tags on top of that, despite the fact that its
> parent does it properly. Only Amarok actually saves ratings to file but
> even, only in MP3 files. M4A and OGG are out of luck.

Have not used either much.
 
>>> All major browsers, including Firefox, Chrome and Opera, are available
>>> for Linux; and there are many more.
>> 
>> They are also available for the competition.
> 
> I'm not sure how the availability of a browser helps the case for Linux.

It is free.

>>> If you are not content with Google Docs, you have LibreOffice. But that's
>>> not all. You also have Calligra, AbiWord and many more.
>> 
>> None of which compete well.
> 
> AbiWord hasn't changed much since 2002 and by that point, it was
> considered a bare-bones piece of software. Nobody would boast about its
> availability unless they had psychosis. Calligra is interesting, but
> it's generally associated with KDE which is a terrible desktop environment.

Correct. KDE is heavily broken.

>>> Want to work on images? There are neat online image editing tools like
>>> Pixler or Sumo Paint. If you are not satisfied with what these have to
>>> offer, there are GIMP and Krita. GIMP is a great image editing tool for
>>> the average PC user; Krita is one of the best tool for artists and
>>> designers.
>> 
>> For their price they are great - but they are far behind the "big boys".
> 
> Krita is OK, supposedly better than GIMP. Considering it's free and
> offers a lot of excellent features, it's something the Linux guys can
> indeed boast about since it isn't available for Windows.

Never used it... will look into it.

-- 
* Mint MATE Trash, Panel, Menu:     <http://youtu.be/C0y74FIf7uE>
* Mint KDE bugs or Easter eggs?     <http://youtu.be/CU-whJQvtfA>
* Mint KDE working with folders:    <http://youtu.be/7C9nvniOoE0>
* Mint KDE creating files:          <http://youtu.be/N7-fZJaJUv8>
* Mint KDE help:                    <http://youtu.be/3ikizUd3sa8>
* Mint KDE general navigation:      <http://youtu.be/t9y14yZtQuI>
* Mavericks / Pages 5.1:            <http://youtu.be/D3BPWANQoIk>
* OS / Word Processor Comparison:   <http://youtu.be/w6Qcl-w7s5c>

0
Snit
6/7/2015 8:22:14 PM
On 2015-06-07 3:51 PM, 7 wrote:
> ronb wrote:
>
>> Pretty good article on the subject ...
>>
>> ~~
>> How do you know if you are a potential candidate to become a Linux user?
>> It's this simple: What's the first app you fire up after booting into
>> your system? If you said 'browser', then you are a potential Linux user.
>>
>> Gone are the days when the operating system used to be the primary
>> component of your computing. Today, the browser has taken center stage
>> and is the gateway to the highway of information.
>>
>> Whether you are shopping from Amazon.com, connecting with friends through
>> social networking, dealing with clients over email or VoIP, managing your
>> time through calendars, collaborating with teams on Google Docs,
>> listening to your favorite music or watching the latest blockbuster, you
>> pretty much live inside a browser.
>>
>> Building the case for Linux
>>
>> Fortunately or unfortunately, most of our files have moved to the cloud
>> and most of our applications have become services. Gone are the days when
>> people listen to music on Windows Media Player; today we listen to
>> Pandora and Spotify. Gone are the days when watch MPEG movies in WMP; now
>> we stream them from Netflix and HBO Now.
>>
>> You don't need Microsoft Office to work on documents, presentations or
>> spreadsheets; Google Docs takes care of almost all of it. You don't need
>> to save all of your files on the 'Desktop' or on the 'C' drive, which you
>> struggle to save every time your Windows crashes; almost all of our data
>> resides on Dropbox, Google Drive, etc.
>> ...
>>
>> But what if I still need applications?
>>
>> Depending upon your needs and concerns for privacy you may not want to
>> fully move to the cloud. No worries, Linux has you covered. There are
>> open source alternatives for almost all proprietary software, some of
>> which are actually better than their proprietary counterparts.
>>
>> Amarok and Clementine are among the greatest music players and have more
>> features than iTunes or WMP. VLC is the best video player there is, even
>> better than Quicktime or WMP.
>>
>> All major browsers, including Firefox, Chrome and Opera, are available
>> for Linux; and there are many more.
>>
>> If you are not content with Google Docs, you have LibreOffice. But that's
>> not all. You also have Calligra, AbiWord and many more.
>>
>> Want to work on images? There are neat online image editing tools like
>> Pixler or Sumo Paint. If you are not satisfied with what these have to
>> offer, there are GIMP and Krita. GIMP is a great image editing tool for
>> the average PC user; Krita is one of the best tool for artists and
>> designers.
>> ...
>>
>> Why Linux?
>>
>> On a philosophical note, our tools should not control us; we should
>> control our tools.
>>
>> Would you eat food from a box not knowing what’s inside it? Even if it
>> may have ingredients you are allergic to or that you just don’t want to
>> consume? If your answer is yes, then this article is not for you.
>>
>> If the answer is no, then why not apply the same logic to the digital
>> world? Why use software whose ingredients are hidden and could be harmful
>> to you?
>>
>> In the proprietary world, the software or hardware maker takes control of
>> your digital life; they dictate what you can or can’t do with ‘your’
>> computer. These proprietary components have backdoors that can be used to
>> track and monitor you.
>>
>> Would you be comfortable moving into a house that is bugged and has spy
>> cameras installed everywhere to monitor your every move? I wouldn’t be
>> comfortable living in such a house.
>>
>> That’s where Linux and Open Source enter the scene. Since these are open
>> source technologies and developed in public, you can clearly see what
>> they do with your data, your communications.
>>
>> Linux and Open Source gives you assurance that your PC is not betraying
>> you and leaking your data to the Skynet. Rather, it actually helps you in
>> further protecting your privacy.
>>
>> The best thing about Linux is that it shares knowledge instead of
>> restricting it. Instead of locking down information about ‘how the
>> software works’ behind fortified walls, Linux and Open Source give us
>> full access to that vast knowledge base.
>>
>> And one more answer to the question "Why Linux?": It is cost efficient.
>> It saves money not only for individuals but also for businesses.
>> ...
>>
>> My wife used to be a Mac user and I switched her to Ubuntu and then to
>> Chrome OS. When she was on Mac, she would often call me to fix something,
>> but since moving to Linux/Chrome OS her support requests all but went
>> away.
>>
>> I have migrated many users to Linux as well. The first thing I do is
>> analyze their computer usage to see whether they can live with Linux or
>> not, and then suggest the appropriate OS. This article pretty much sums
>> up that exercise. And once they switch to Linux, they admit how
>> magnificent it is.
>>
>> If you don't want to deal with the uncertain future of Windows, don't
>> want to worry about viruses, backdoors or compromised privacy, don’t want
>> vendor lock-in, and don’t use any of the tools I mentioned above, I
>> believe Linux is the right OS for you.
>>
>> Give it a try. You won’t regret it.
>> ~~
>> http://www.itworld.com/article/2922426/linux/is-linux-right-for-you.html
>
>
> Linux is just too good to me.
>
> Pays wages x 10 years now.
>
> Pays wages for several engineers with it.
>
> Give back as much as possible - some dowloads stats were approaching 2TB per
> month :)
>
> Which reminds me, I have to make an effort to give more back :) :)

You can give Linux the ultimate reward by hanging yourself.


-- 
Slimer
Encrypt.

"Figuring that linux has only 1.5% of any market share as a desktop os, 
it also implies that the end user is stupid enough to fiddle with an old 
WWII bomb that didn't go off." - GreyCloud
0
Slimer
6/7/2015 10:21:17 PM
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