f



Linux chief: =?UTF-8?Q?=E2=80=98Open?= source is safer, and Linux is more secure than any other =?UTF-8?Q?OS=E2=80=99?=

   http://venturebeat.com/2013/11/26/linux-chief-open-source-is-safer-and-linux-is-more-secure-than-any-other-os-exclusive/

We also learn about the much-alluded-to Linux backdoor.

-- 
For every action, there is an equal and opposite criticism.
		-- Harrison
0
OFeem1987 (1905)
11/27/2013 2:20:08 PM
comp.os.linux.advocacy 124139 articles. 3 followers. Post Follow

3 Replies
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On Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:20:16 -0500, Chris Ahlstrom wrote:

>    http://venturebeat.com/2013/11/26/linux-chief-open-source-is-safer-and-linux-is-more-secure-than-any-other-os-exclusive/
> 
> We also learn about the much-alluded-to Linux backdoor.

And in other news, Bill Gates claims Windows is the bset operating
system......

Duh.....

Wonder what the "Linux Chief"  thinks of Android security, or lack
there of.........

Bwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!


-- 
flatfish+++
Thinking of trying Linux?
Better Read This First:
http://linuxfonts.narod.ru/why.linux.is.not.ready.for.the.desktop.current.html
http://tinyurl.com/63qhmal

PLEASE VISIT OUR HALL OF LINUX IDIOTS:
http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
0
phlatphish (6977)
11/27/2013 2:23:01 PM
what about openbsd?
0
11/27/2013 3:17:33 PM
On Wed, 27 Nov 2013 07:17:33 -0800 (PST), visphatesjava@gmail.com
wrote:

> what about openbsd?

Shhh....
You'll let the cat out the bag.

Linux loons don't like discussing BSD.

They don't like discussing Android security either.
lol!

-- 
flatfish+++
Thinking of trying Linux?
Better Read This First:
http://linuxfonts.narod.ru/why.linux.is.not.ready.for.the.desktop.current.html
http://tinyurl.com/63qhmal

PLEASE VISIT OUR HALL OF LINUX IDIOTS:
http://linuxidiots.blogspot.com/
0
phlatphish (6977)
11/27/2013 3:25:36 PM
Reply:

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http://chromespot.com/2013/03/12/the-new-279-99-acer-c710-2055-acer-c7-chromebook-upgraded/ At this price, though, the new Acer Chromebook is competing against the Samsung Chromebook, which is actually cheaper at $250. So why would any user choose the Acer C710-2055 over the Samsung Chroembook? Well, the Acer counterpart does offer a 320 GB HDD. It also sports a plethora of ports the other Chromebooks mostly lack; like 3 USB ports, an HDMI port, a VGA port, a headphone/mic jack and a card reader. The Acer C710-2055 is available now, according to the manufacturer’s press release, but we are not seeing any retailers offering it at the moment. You can pre-order it from Amazon.com as of now, though. Are you signing up for one? -- Everything that I've learned about computers at MIT I have boiled down into three principles: Unix: You think it won't work, but if you find the right wizard, he can make it work. Macintosh: You think it will work, but it won't. PC/Windows: You think it won't work, and it won't. -- Philip Greenspun Chris Ahlstrom <OFeem1987@teleworm.us> writes: > http://chromespot.com/2013/03/12/the-new-279-99-acer-c710-2055-acer-c7-chromebook-upgraded/ > > At this price, though, the new Acer Chromebook is competing against > the Samsung Chromebook, which is actually cheaper at $250. So why > would any user choose the Acer C710-2055 over...

=?utf-8?Q?Apple=E2=80=99s_iOS_7_includes_a_surprise:_a_ticket_to_the_next_generation_of_the_internet?=
http://qz.com/126642/apples-ios7-includes-a-surprise-a-ticket-to-the-next-generation-of-the-internet/ Nice one Apple…. On 2013-09-22 8:54 AM, Gary wrote: > http://qz.com/126642/apples-ios7-includes-a-surprise-a-ticket-to-the-next-generation-of-the-internet/ > > > > Nice one Apple…. > http://nrg.cs.ucl.ac.uk/mptcp/ http://internet.verticalnews.com/articles/9018723.html Hate to burst the fanbois' bubble but it's been around as a download for Android for a few years now. Apple made it operational in Siri because it needed to elevate the service from the JOKE it was to something marginally useful. Oh and here's a link to download it on various OS's. IOS is not in the list. http://multipath-tcp.org/pmwiki.php/Users/HowToInstallMPTCP Idiot it's not "available for download for Android". It's available for a grand total of *two* Android phones. On 2013-09-22 9:30 AM, KDT wrote: > Idiot it's not "available for download for Android". > It's available for a grand total of *two* Android phones. > Hey dumbass, it still has been available for Android for many years even though it's "only available" for 2 models. Where did I say, moron, that it was available for every single android device, Dim? In article <l1mp69$io2$1@dont-email.me>, Nashton <nonna@nana.ca> wrote: > On 2013-09-22 9:30 AM, KDT wrote: > > Idiot it&#...

Standard =?utf-8?Q?key=E2=80=90binding?= for search-forward?
If I invoke a (non‐regexp) search with M-x search-forward, Emacs says: You can run the command `search-forward' with <find> —which suggests to me that there is a standard key‐binding for it, but where is it, on a standard PC keyboard? -- Ian ◎ Ian Clifton <ian.clifton@chem.ox.ac.uk> writes: > If I invoke a (non‐regexp) search with M-x search-forward, Emacs says: > > You can run the command `search-forward' with <find> > > —which suggests to me that there is a standard key‐binding for it, but > where is it, on a standard PC keyboard? Probably none, but I think nobody cares as C-s `isearch-forward', bound to C-s, is much more convenient. -- Sergei. Sergei Organov <osv@javad.com> writes: > Ian Clifton <ian.clifton@chem.ox.ac.uk> writes: >> If I invoke a (non‐regexp) search with M-x search-forward, Emacs says: >> >> You can run the command `search-forward' with <find> >> >> —which suggests to me that there is a standard key‐binding for it, but >> where is it, on a standard PC keyboard? > > Probably none, but I think nobody cares as C-s `isearch-forward', bound > to C-s, is much more convenient. Ah—Thank you! -- Ian ◎ ...

=?UTF-8?Q?=22Apple=E2=80=99s?= Commitment to Customer Privacy"
<http://www.apple.com/apples-commitment-to-customer-privacy/> Two weeks ago, when technology companies were accused of indiscriminately sharing customer data with government agencies, Apple issued a clear response: We first heard of the government’s “Prism” program when news organizations asked us about it on June 6. We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer content must get a court order. Like several other companies, we have asked the U.S. government for permission to report how many requests we receive related to national security and how we handle them. We have been authorized to share some of that data, and we are providing it here in the interest of transparency. From December 1, 2012 to May 31, 2013, Apple received between 4,000 and 5,000 requests from U.S. law enforcement for customer data. Between 9,000 and 10,000 accounts or devices were specified in those requests, which came from federal, state and local authorities and included both criminal investigations and national security matters. The most common form of request comes from police investigating robberies and other crimes, searching for missing children, trying to locate a patient with Alzheimer’s disease, or hoping to prevent a suicide. Regardless of the circumstances, our Legal team conducts an evaluation of each request and, only if appropriate, we retrieve...

Half of All =?UTF-8?Q?PC=E2=80=99s?= Sold in 2014 to Be Tablets, Most of Them Running Android
http://www.androidheadlines.com/2013/11/half-pcs-sold-2014-tablets-running-android.html According to a new report from market research firm, Canalys, 50% of all computers sold in 2014 will be tablets (285 million of them, to be exact, which is more than notebooks), and 65% of those will run Android. That means there will be ~185 million new Android tablets sold in 2014, which is actually slightly more than the total amount of tablets being sold in 2013 (182 million). -- "Linux was made by foreign terrorists to take money from true US companies like Microsoft." - Some AOL'er. "To this end we dedicate ourselves..." -Don -- From the sig of "Don", don@cs.byu.edu On 2013-11-27, Chris Ahlstrom <OFeem1987@teleworm.us> claimed: > http://www.androidheadlines.com/2013/11/half-pcs-sold-2014-tablets-running-android.html > > According to a new report from market research firm, Canalys, 50% of all > computers sold in 2014 will be tablets (285 million of them, to be exact, > which is more than notebooks), and 65% of those will run Android. > That means there will be ~185 million new Android tablets sold in 2014, > which is actually slightly more than the total amount of tablets being > sold in 2013 (182 million). In 2014 I'm going to buy my first Anal (Ainol, acutally). The specs sound pretty good. But I really like the joke potential even more. I ...

GroupServer 11.03 =?UTF-8?Q?=E2=80=94?= Pineapple Snow at a Child's Party
The team at OnlineGroups.Net is pleased to announce the release of GroupServer 11.03 — Pineapple Snow at a Child's Party. Pineapple Snow is now available from: http://groupserver.org/downloads/ Changes in this release concentrate on a new Change Email Settings page. The the release notes contain more details on the changes that have been made: http://groupserver.org/downloads/release_notes/ GroupServer is written in Python utilising the Zope and the ZTK framework. We believe that GroupServer has the ease of use of web based groups such as Google Groups, the administrative freedom of mailing list managers such as Mailman, and the developer-freedom of open source software with the GPL Licence. A feature comparison is available: http://groupserver.org/groupserver/features/ We are now looking forward to the next release: GroupServer 11.04 — Slushy Followed by a Pounding Headache. Details of what we are planning in each release can be seen on the GroupServer Trac site: https://projects.iopen.net/groupserver/roadmap If you wish to report a bug, please do so here: http://groupserver.org/reportbug We would love to hear what you think about GroupServer, you can email us at: <support@onlinegroups.net> We would like to acknowledge the ongoing support of the e-Democracy.org project <http://e-democracy.org> in making GroupServer releases possible. If you would like to have features added to GroupSer...

Web resources about - Linux chief: =?UTF-8?Q?=E2=80=98Open?= source is safer, and Linux is more secure than any other =?UTF-8?Q?OS=E2=80=99?= - comp.os.linux.advocacy

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