Microsoft's security chief suggests 'Net tax to clean computers

  • Permalink
  • submit to reddit
  • Email
  • Follow


<Quote>
How will we ever get a leg up on hackers who are infecting computers
worldwide? Microsoft's security chief laid out several suggestions
today, including a possible Internet usage tax to pay for the
inspection and quarantine of machines.

Most hacked PCs run Microsoft's Windows operating system...

....an Internet usage tax might be the way to go. "You could say it's a
public safety issue and do it with general taxation," [Microsoft
security chief said].

According to Microsoft, there are 3.8 million infected botnet
computers worldwide, 1 million of which are in the U.S. They are used
to steal sensitive information and send spam and were a launching
point for 190,000 distributed denial-of-service attacks in 2008.
</Quote>

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9164438/Microsoft_s_security_chief_suggests_Net_tax_to_clean_computers

Yep, all you Linux and OS/X user out there, cough up!!
0
Reply nessuno7491 (871) 3/2/2010 8:53:37 PM

See related articles to this posting


nessuno wrote:

> <Quote>
> How will we ever get a leg up on hackers who are infecting computers
> worldwide? Microsoft's security chief laid out several suggestions
> today, including a possible Internet usage tax to pay for the
> inspection and quarantine of machines.


What about taxing the profits of Micoshaft Crocporation?
Then they would be in a hurry to repair the problem.

Banning windummy users who get infected 3 times
and only allow them back on after installing Linux
would help a long way to avoid taxing the internet
and promote good practice across the globe.



> Most hacked PCs run Microsoft's Windows operating system...
> 
> ...an Internet usage tax might be the way to go. "You could say it's a
> public safety issue and do it with general taxation," [Microsoft
> security chief said].
> 
> According to Microsoft, there are 3.8 million infected botnet
> computers worldwide, 1 million of which are in the U.S. They are used
> to steal sensitive information and send spam and were a launching
> point for 190,000 distributed denial-of-service attacks in 2008.
> </Quote>
> 
> 
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9164438/Microsoft_s_security_chief_suggests_Net_tax_to_clean_computers
> 
> Yep, all you Linux and OS/X user out there, cough up!!


0
Reply 7 3/2/2010 8:57:44 PM

nessuno pulled this Usenet boner:

> <Quote>
> How will we ever get a leg up on hackers who are infecting computers
> worldwide? Microsoft's security chief laid out several suggestions
> today, including a possible Internet usage tax to pay for the
> inspection and quarantine of machines.

No!  Microsoft gets *enough* charity.

> Most hacked PCs run Microsoft's Windows operating system...
>
> ...an Internet usage tax might be the way to go. "You could say it's a
> public safety issue and do it with general taxation," [Microsoft
> security chief said].

Let them tax *Microsoft*.

> According to Microsoft, there are 3.8 million infected botnet
> computers worldwide, 1 million of which are in the U.S. They are used
> to steal sensitive information and send spam and were a launching
> point for 190,000 distributed denial-of-service attacks in 2008.
> </Quote>
>
> http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9164438/Microsoft_s_security_chief_suggests_Net_tax_to_clean_computers
>
> Yep, all you Linux and OS/X user out there, cough up!!

Frickin' idiocy.

-- 
Q:	Are we not men?
A:	We are Vaxen.
0
Reply Chris 3/2/2010 9:03:28 PM

7 wrote:
>only allow [windummy users] back on after installing Linux
>
Your strokes are too narrow.
**Anything other than Windoze** would cover it.
After the point when Apphole switched over from OS 9,
EVERYONE now uses a Unix-like security model
(*except* Redmond).
0
Reply JeffM 3/2/2010 11:39:50 PM

On Tuesday 02 March 2010 23:39 JeffM wrote:

> 7 wrote:
>>only allow [windummy users] back on after installing Linux
>>
> Your strokes are too narrow.
> **Anything other than Windoze** would cover it.
> After the point when Apphole switched over from OS 9,
> EVERYONE now uses a Unix-like security model
> (*except* Redmond).

By Jove - I never thought of it that way.
Now, hanging on to that word "security", I wonder if there are any
inferences to be drawn there?
e.g. Do you think that we ought to start gathering some statistics?

0
Reply bbgruff 3/2/2010 11:53:33 PM

>JeffM wrote:
>>EVERYONE now uses a Unix-like security model
>>(*except* Redmond).
>>
bbgruff wrote:
>By Jove - I never thought of it that way.
>
Sometimes you have to take a step back to appreciate the view.

>[...]that word "security"[...]
>Do you think that we ought to start gathering some statistics?
>
Y'mean like *zero botnets*?  The only times I've seen
non-M$ stuff with anything resembling a widespread problem,
it was because some utterly clueless Webmaster
was sending passwords in the clear.
0
Reply JeffM 3/3/2010 12:03:51 AM

>JeffM wrote:
>>EVERYONE now uses a Unix-like security model
>>(*except* Redmond).
>>
bbgruff wrote:
>By Jove - I never thought of it that way.
>
Sometimes you have to take a step back to appreciate the view.

>[...]that word "security"[...]
>Do you think that we ought to start gathering some statistics?
>
Y'mean like *zero botnets*?  The only times I've seen
non-M$ stuff with anything resembling a widespread problem,
it was because some utterly clueless Webmaster
was sending passwords in the clear.
0
Reply JeffM 3/3/2010 12:05:42 AM

On Tue, 02 Mar 2010 12:53:37 -0800, nessuno wrote:

> <Quote>
> How will we ever get a leg up on hackers who are infecting computers
> worldwide? Microsoft's security chief laid out several suggestions
> today, including a possible Internet usage tax to pay for the inspection
> and quarantine of machines.
> 
> Most hacked PCs run Microsoft's Windows operating system...
> 
> ...an Internet usage tax might be the way to go. "You could say it's a
> public safety issue and do it with general taxation," [Microsoft
> security chief said].
> 
> According to Microsoft, there are 3.8 million infected botnet computers
> worldwide, 1 million of which are in the U.S. They are used to steal
> sensitive information and send spam and were a launching point for
> 190,000 distributed denial-of-service attacks in 2008. </Quote>
> 
> http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9164438/
Microsoft_s_security_chief_suggests_Net_tax_to_clean_computers
> 
> Yep, all you Linux and OS/X user out there, cough up!!

Microsoft *could* charge an extra fee for those using their Malware Magnet 
OS -- and then pass that fee along to whomever. I bet *that* would go well 
with their customers. 

"Yeah, you're right, we *do* produce a Malware Magnet OS. So... I think 
the best situation is to charge you more to try to protect others from our 
crap... We'll just add it to the EULA."

-- 
RonB
Registered Linux User #498581
CentOS 5.4 or Vector Linux Deluxe 6.0
0
Reply RonB 3/3/2010 12:11:49 AM

On Mar 3, 9:53=A0am, nessuno <nessuno7...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> Most hacked PCs run Microsoft's Windows operating system...
>
> ...an Internet usage tax might be the way to go. "You could say it's a
> public safety issue and do it with general taxation," [Microsoft
> security chief said].
>

Microsoft some years suggested a email tax to minimise spam.  Only
trouble was that the penny a email would flow into MS coffers.
0
Reply peterwn 3/3/2010 1:04:24 AM

On Mar 2, 3:53=A0pm, nessuno <nessuno7...@gmail.com> wrote:
> <Quote>
> How will we ever get a leg up on hackers who are infecting computers
> worldwide? Microsoft's security chief laid out several suggestions
> today, including a possible Internet usage tax to pay for the
> inspection and quarantine of machines.

Microsoft's Antivirus can't keep up, so now they want to disable
computers that are running "viruses" and "malware" based on their
definitions.
Does this include:
  FireFox?
  Thunderbird?
  Linux VMs?
  VMWare and VirtualBox?
  Eclipse?

Plug-ins for any of the above?

> Most hacked PCs run Microsoft's Windows operating system...

Ironically, people actually DO pay premium prices for AntiMalware
software that actually WORKS.  They pay as much as $50/year/PC for
either Norton, McCaffee, or Symantic antivirus packages.

> ...an Internet usage tax might be the way to go. "You could say it's a
> public safety issue and do it with general taxation," [Microsoft
> security chief said].

So now Microsoft wants to use the Government to impose a tax which
will be paid directly to Microsoft to cover the cost of the failure of
Microsoft to close the "back doors" of it's own operating system?

> According to Microsoft, there are 3.8 million infected botnet
> computers worldwide, 1 million of which are in the U.S.

I would guess that this estimate is actually low, probably 3-5 times
that number, but I don't have any current information on that.

> They are used
> to steal sensitive information and send spam and were a launching
> point for 190,000 distributed denial-of-service attacks in 2008.

> http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9164438/Microsoft_s_security_c...

> Yep, all you Linux and OS/X user out there, cough up!!

I think Microsoft aught to be TAXED for all the mischief they've but
into their operating systems, e-mail, web browsers, and security
systems.  Microsoft's IE vulnerabilities were published almost
immediately after IE 4.0 was released in 1997.  Microsoft's solution
was to slap injunctions against sites that published such information.

When government agencies, security specialists, and IBM engineers
pointed out these same vulnerabilities, Microsoft's solution was to
release a "liability patch".  The patch disabled the back doors.  But
since nothing worked anymore, users backed out the security patch -
absolving Microsoft of the liability.

0
Reply Rex 3/3/2010 4:44:20 AM

On Mar 2, 7:03=A0pm, JeffM <jef...@email.com> wrote:
> >JeffM wrote:
> >>EVERYONE now uses a Unix-like security model
> >>(*except* Redmond).
> bbgruff wrote:
> >By Jove - I never thought of it that way.

> Y'mean like *zero botnets*? =A0The only times I've seen
> non-M$ stuff with anything resembling a widespread problem,
> it was because some utterly clueless Webmaster
> was sending passwords in the clear.

In 1994, slackware set the default password for root to "root".
Another web hosting site installed rsh and put an asterisk in the
first line of the /etc/hosts.equiv.

The Lion virus sucessfully exploited these "holes" and infected a
whopping 8,000 servers.  The admins involved were fired.

In 1987, the Morris Worm, a program designed to map out all of the
servers on the internet using UUCP commands, had an error in a timing
loop, probing a new server every 15 seconds instead of every 15
minutes.  The worm shut down thousands of UNIX servers and made
national headlines.

Normally, when a UNIX system has a glitch, it makes headlines.  Even
when Google had a glitch in a server configuration - it made
headlines.

This is because it happens so rarely.

0
Reply Rex 3/3/2010 4:51:54 AM

Rex Ballard wrote:

> Ironically, people actually DO pay premium prices for AntiMalware
> software that actually WORKS.  They pay as much as $50/year/PC for
> either Norton, McCaffee, or Symantic antivirus packages.

That was not my experience. When I ran Norton on an XP system, not much
of anything worked - or if it did, by the time it did I'd forgotten what
I was trying to do and wandered off for a beer. Talk about a resourse
hog!
-- 
Enkidu


0
Reply Enkidu 3/3/2010 5:32:03 AM

On 03/03/2010 05:32, Enkidu wrote:
> Rex Ballard wrote:
>
>> Ironically, people actually DO pay premium prices for AntiMalware
>> software that actually WORKS.  They pay as much as $50/year/PC for
>> either Norton, McCaffee, or Symantic antivirus packages.
>
> That was not my experience. When I ran Norton on an XP system, not much
> of anything worked - or if it did, by the time it did I'd forgotten what
> I was trying to do and wandered off for a beer. Talk about a resourse
> hog!

It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will affect 
system performance.
0
Reply Phil 3/3/2010 9:16:00 AM

On Wed, 03 Mar 2010 09:16:00 +0000, Phil Da Lick! wrote:

> On 03/03/2010 05:32, Enkidu wrote:
>> Rex Ballard wrote:
>>
>>> Ironically, people actually DO pay premium prices for AntiMalware
>>> software that actually WORKS.  They pay as much as $50/year/PC for
>>> either Norton, McCaffee, or Symantic antivirus packages.
>>
>> That was not my experience. When I ran Norton on an XP system, not much
>> of anything worked - or if it did, by the time it did I'd forgotten what
>> I was trying to do and wandered off for a beer. Talk about a resourse
>> hog!
> 
> It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will affect 
> system performance.

I've slammed Symantec at every opportunity because as far as I am
concerned, the company died when Peter Norton sold/left it.

The programs got bigger and more bloated over the years and some
versions were so bad and would intertwine themselves into the
registry so tightly, that Symantec actually has specific removal
tools on their website because control panel-->remove programs
leaves a lot of droppings around.

I have actually seen cases where removing Symantec from a
preloaded computer, especially a laptop, has resulted in a
substantial increase in speed of the unit.
It's like the processor or memory got kicked up a couple of
notches.

That being said, I am testing Symantec Endpoint Protection for a
friend of mine who owns a small company and is considering
deploying it.
I find it works very well, doesn't seem to effect resources any
more and maybe even less than the current light weight which IMHO
is Avira which is to say I don't even notice it there.

That being said, no antivirus program is 100 percent and they
never will be.
The user is the weak link and will always be.
 
0
Reply M0she_ 3/3/2010 2:50:51 PM

Phil Da Lick! wrote:

> On 03/03/2010 05:32, Enkidu wrote:
>> Rex Ballard wrote:
>>
>>> Ironically, people actually DO pay premium prices for AntiMalware
>>> software that actually WORKS.  They pay as much as $50/year/PC for
>>> either Norton, McCaffee, or Symantic antivirus packages.
>>
>> That was not my experience. When I ran Norton on an XP system, not much
>> of anything worked - or if it did, by the time it did I'd forgotten what
>> I was trying to do and wandered off for a beer. Talk about a resourse
>> hog!
>
> It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will affect 
> system performance.

Only because everyone running windows is forced to buy newer, more
powerful hardware to run the newer bloatware.
-- 
Enkidu
0
Reply Enkidu 3/4/2010 12:49:50 AM

On 4 Mar 2010 00:49:50 GMT, Enkidu wrote:

> Phil Da Lick! wrote:
> 
>> On 03/03/2010 05:32, Enkidu wrote:
>>> Rex Ballard wrote:
>>>
>>>> Ironically, people actually DO pay premium prices for AntiMalware
>>>> software that actually WORKS.  They pay as much as $50/year/PC for
>>>> either Norton, McCaffee, or Symantic antivirus packages.
>>>
>>> That was not my experience. When I ran Norton on an XP system, not much
>>> of anything worked - or if it did, by the time it did I'd forgotten what
>>> I was trying to do and wandered off for a beer. Talk about a resourse
>>> hog!
>>
>> It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will affect 
>> system performance.
> 
> Only because everyone running windows is forced to buy newer, more
> powerful hardware to run the newer bloatware.

Try Avira.
Just about zero impact on performance.
0
Reply M0she_ 3/4/2010 12:58:13 AM

On Wed, 3 Mar 2010 19:58:13 -0500
M0she_ <goldee_loxnbagels@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 4 Mar 2010 00:49:50 GMT, Enkidu wrote:
> 
> > Phil Da Lick! wrote:
> >> It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will
> >> affect system performance.
> > 
> > Only because everyone running windows is forced to buy newer, more
> > powerful hardware to run the newer bloatware.
> 
> Try Avira.
> Just about zero impact on performance.

It's malware in itself!
Avira AntiVir Personal (with frequent mandatory pop-up ads looking like
malware) 

Greets

-- 
http://maxa.homedns.org/

Sometimes online sometimes not


0
Reply Branimir 3/4/2010 1:02:16 AM

On Thu, 4 Mar 2010 02:02:16 +0100, Branimir Maksimovic wrote:

> On Wed, 3 Mar 2010 19:58:13 -0500
> M0she_ <goldee_loxnbagels@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> On 4 Mar 2010 00:49:50 GMT, Enkidu wrote:
>> 
>>> Phil Da Lick! wrote:
>>>> It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will
>>>> affect system performance.
>>> 
>>> Only because everyone running windows is forced to buy newer, more
>>> powerful hardware to run the newer bloatware.
>> 
>> Try Avira.
>> Just about zero impact on performance.
> 
> It's malware in itself!
> Avira AntiVir Personal (with frequent mandatory pop-up ads looking like
> malware) 
> 
> Greets

Try paying for it...I know that's tough for you freetards, but
that's life.
You want top quality, you have to pay for it.
You want crap, try Linux.
It's free.
0
Reply M0she_ 3/4/2010 1:15:40 AM

On Wed, 3 Mar 2010 20:15:40 -0500
M0she_ <goldee_loxnbagels@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Thu, 4 Mar 2010 02:02:16 +0100, Branimir Maksimovic wrote:
> 
> > On Wed, 3 Mar 2010 19:58:13 -0500
> > M0she_ <goldee_loxnbagels@gmail.com> wrote:
> > 
> >> On 4 Mar 2010 00:49:50 GMT, Enkidu wrote:
> >> 
> >>> Phil Da Lick! wrote:
> >>>> It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will
> >>>> affect system performance.
> >>> 
> >>> Only because everyone running windows is forced to buy newer, more
> >>> powerful hardware to run the newer bloatware.
> >> 
> >> Try Avira.
> >> Just about zero impact on performance.
> > 
> > It's malware in itself!
> > Avira AntiVir Personal (with frequent mandatory pop-up ads looking
> > like malware) 
> > 
> > Greets
> 
> Try paying for it...I know that's tough for you freetards, but
> that's life.
> You want top quality, you have to pay for it.
> You want crap, try Linux.
> It's free.

Well, I think there are no AV software that can catch everything
out there, perhaps 70-80% most.
 Besides that, I don;t have AV software and
have full control of what is going on in my machine.
Look firewall in windows does not have purpose to
protect you from outside world, rather opposite,
to protect outside world from you!

Greets


-- 
http://maxa.homedns.org/

Sometimes online sometimes not


0
Reply Branimir 3/4/2010 1:28:41 AM

Branimir Maksimovic wrote:

>> Try Avira.
>> Just about zero impact on performance.
>
> It's malware in itself!
> Avira AntiVir Personal (with frequent mandatory pop-up ads looking like
> malware) 

A better plan: Dump Windows for Linux and continue to use your old
hardware. No malware, no virus, no AV drag on system performance.
-- 
Enkidu
0
Reply Enkidu 3/4/2010 1:33:22 AM

On 04/03/2010 00:49, Enkidu wrote:
> Phil Da Lick! wrote:
>
>> On 03/03/2010 05:32, Enkidu wrote:
>>> Rex Ballard wrote:
>>>
>>>> Ironically, people actually DO pay premium prices for AntiMalware
>>>> software that actually WORKS.  They pay as much as $50/year/PC for
>>>> either Norton, McCaffee, or Symantic antivirus packages.
>>>
>>> That was not my experience. When I ran Norton on an XP system, not much
>>> of anything worked - or if it did, by the time it did I'd forgotten what
>>> I was trying to do and wandered off for a beer. Talk about a resourse
>>> hog!
>>
>> It's not so bad these days. Still, any premium AV suite will affect
>> system performance.
>
> Only because everyone running windows is forced to buy newer, more
> powerful hardware to run the newer bloatware.

No, they had a massive de-bloating program in place during the 
development cycle of at least 3 versions, starting (I think) with 2006. 
The year before they started this it was such a lumbering dinosaur that 
it brought most systems to their knees after a while. Like I said, it's 
better thanks to this, but like any premium suite it will impact on 
system resources.
0
Reply Phil 3/4/2010 9:32:23 AM

Branimir Maksimovic pulled this Usenet boner:

> On Wed, 3 Mar 2010 20:15:40 -0500
> M0she_ <goldee_loxnbagels@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> >> Try Avira.
>> >> Just about zero impact on performance.
>> > 
>> > It's malware in itself!
>> > Avira AntiVir Personal (with frequent mandatory pop-up ads looking
>> > like malware) 
>> 
>> Try paying for it...I know that's tough for you freetards, but
>> that's life.
>> You want top quality, you have to pay for it.
>> You want crap, try Linux.
>> It's free.

I'll take the Free crap you get with Linux,
rather than the free crap you get with Windows.

Any day.

> Well, I think there are no AV software that can catch everything
> out there, perhaps 70-80% most.
>
> Besides that, I don;t have AV software and
> have full control of what is going on in my machine.
> Look firewall in windows does not have purpose to
> protect you from outside world, rather opposite,
> to protect outside world from you!

A troll's wet dream?:

-- 
The countdown had stalled at 'T' minus 69 seconds when Desiree, the first
female ape to go up in space, winked at me slyly and pouted her thick,
rubbery lips unmistakably -- the first of many such advances during what
would prove to be the longest, and most memorable, space voyage of my
career.
		-- Winning sentence, 1985 Bulwer-Lytton bad fiction contest.
0
Reply Chris 3/4/2010 11:44:21 AM
comp.os.linux.advocacy 118330 articles. 12 followers. Post

21 Replies
148 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 59


  • Permalink
  • submit to reddit
  • Email
  • Follow


Reply:

Similar Artilces:

Microsoft's security chief suggests 'Net tax to clean computers
<Quote> How will we ever get a leg up on hackers who are infecting computers worldwide? Microsoft's security chief laid out several suggestions today, including a possible Internet usage tax to pay for the inspection and quarantine of machines. Most hacked PCs run Microsoft's Windows operating system... ....an Internet usage tax might be the way to go. "You could say it's a public safety issue and do it with general taxation," [Microsoft security chief said]. According to Microsoft, there are 3.8 million infected botnet computers worldwide, 1 million...

A Computer That Works With Google, Not Microsoft
Advocates of Linux, the free open-source operating system, like to say that buying a standard-issue computer involves a Microsoft Tax, because you have no choice but to pay for Windows. New versions of Linux and inexpensive hardware like the new Everex gPC TC2502 make that tax avoidable. This computer has a 1.5-gigahertz Via processor, 512 megabytes of memory and an 80-gigabyte hard drive. What makes it stand out, however, is GOS, a version of Linux specially made to run Google applications like GMail and Google Documents. It also runs OpenOffice, an open-source office suite that can handle...

Security suggestion for Microsoft
This has also been posted at http://tech_sec.blog.ca where my musings about tech and security go. Microsoft Windows desperately needs a browser-only browser An open letter from a linux user to Bill Gates ============================================== If you wonder why a linux user like me is concerned about Windows security, let me point out that the vast majority of spam I block (and that which I receive) comes from compromised Windows machines. Spam amounts to a denial of service attack in many instances. Plus which, the compromised Windows machines can be marshalled into botn...

Microsoft should make computers more secure
This from the latest SANS newsletter (http://www.sans.org) --Microsoft Should Focus on Increasing the Number of Secure Machines (31 May 2004) Bruce Schneier points out that the security of each computer on the Internet depends on the security of others; Microsoft's decision not to make Windows XP SP2 available to unlicensed users puts everyone's security at risk. http://www.nwfusion.com/columnists/2004/0531schneier.html [Editor's Note (Grefer): It should be easy enough to split SP2 into a Security Pack (SP2a), available regardless of the licensing situation, which would address kn...

Microsoft vs. Computer Security
http://www.slate.com/id/2133993/ Why the software giant still can't get it right. Four years ago, Bill Gates dispatched a companywide e-mail promising that security and privacy would be Microsoft's top priorities. Gates urged that new design approaches must "dramatically reduce" the number of security-related issues as well as make fixes easier to administer. "Eventually," he added, "our software should be so fundamentally secure that customers never even worry about it." Microsoft customers haven't stopped worryi...

Microsoft offers $1m for secure computing curricula
Microsoft offers $1m for secure computing curricula Joris Evers Aug 03 2004 Microsoft's research group is making available $1m (�550m) to help create courses in computer science, business and law that focus on secure computing. [...] "The goal there is to dedicate $1m over the next two years to help develop curricula for Trustworthy Computing and really improve the state of the art in terms of education for students," [Rick Rashid - Microsoft] "There have not been really well-defined curricula in this space," http://tinyurl.com/4ohv4 http://www.computerweekly.com/...

[News] [Linux] Linux More Secure Than Windows, Suggests Microsoft
[...But Microsoft finds an excuse] Windows Server 2008 Features Address Linux Challenge ,----[ Quote ] | "We also have server core, which doesn't have the GUI [graphical | user interface], so I would say that is a response to the options | people had with Linux that they didn't have with Windows," he said. | | There are also several computing tasks in which Linux is particularly | strong, Laing said, pointing to compute clusters as one. `---- http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2132581,00.asp This is hilarious. They still try to reinvent Linux, and they do so poorly (e....

Grid computing using web services over Microsoft .Net
Hi group! I am an undergraduate student and I am very much interested in grid computing. I was planning to do my senior year project in grid computing. Somebody gave me the idea that grid computing is also possible over the Microsoft .Net platform using web services. I want to know to what extent is this correct? Is a grid computing project feasible over the Microsoft .Net platform using web services. If not what can be an alternative. If somebody can guide me to some work already done in this area I'll be thankful. Thanks Griffin wrote: > > Hi group! > ...

Leader in computer security
I guess they don't want to run linux and have their website hacked and owned the way that www.schestowitz.com was hacked and infested with malware or the way that the Ubuntu servers were hacked and started attacking each other. http://www.rsa.com/node.aspx?id=1003 ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com ** "Ezekiel" <b@a.com> writes: > I guess they don't want to run linux and have their website hacked and owned > the way that www.schestowitz.com was hacked and infested with malware or the > way that the Ubuntu servers were hacked and started attacking ...

[News] [Rival] Microsoft Only Gets Worse at Security, Suggest Numbers
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Microsoft slates colossal Windows patch next week http://www.techworld.com.au/article/335198/microsoft_slates_colossal_windows_patch_next_week?fp=2&fpid=1&rid=1 Unlucky 13 Microsoft Patches Due Next Week http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2358892,00.asp Microsoft Patches Coming Tuesday: Brace Yourself ,----[ Quote ] | And a system restart will be required for | these Windows patches, which will mean down | time for servers. In fact, 10 of the record- | tying 13 bulletins require a restart. `---- http://www.pcworld.com/article/188...

[News] Don't Rely on Microsoft for Security, Suggests Kaspersky
Microsoft unlikely to lead anti-virus sector ,----[ Quote ] | Natalya Kaspersky, CEO of Internet security firm Kaspersky, says | that Microsoft is unlikely to be the leader of the anti-virus | sector, despite the security enhancements of Vista and its own | anti-virus product. | | In an article published by Kaspersky Lab - Security from | Microsoft -- the door to a brave new world? - Kaspersky gives three | reasons why the software giant will struggle to join the | anti-virus sector. `---- http://www.it-observer.com/news/7018/microsoft_unlikely_lead_anti_virus_sector/ Related: Study: Sy...

[News] Shuttle Computer Comes Without Microsoft Tax, GNU/Linux is Preinstalled
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Shuttle offers all-in-one with factory Linux ,----[ Quote ] | Other features for the machine include a 160GB HDD, 1.3-megapixel webcam, | memory card reader, mic, and stereo speakers. Shuttle made the all-in-one a | scant little rig with a thickness of 3.6 cm, that's hardly fatter than most | notebooks. The machine is available to purchase right now (though only in | Europe so far, it seems) from Shuttle for EUR 444 ($AUD749). `---- http://apcmag.com/shuttle-offers-all-in-one-with-factory-linux.htm Recent: Shuttle offers Linux-loaded ...

[News] People Furious at Microsoft After Suggestion of 'Windows Zombie Tax'
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Taxing every citizen for Microsoft Windows problems? Are we insane? ,----[ Quote ] | Just when you think you've heard | everything, something new arrives. Two | years ago, we heard that half a million | computers are infected with malicious bots | every day (a "bot" is a software program | that enters your computer from the Internet | or inside infected files, then runs in the | background to steal your data, send spam or | wreak havoc in some other way). | | This is a huge problem both because we | depend on digital data ...

Microsoft Vista gets contacted by computers from Halliburton, US Dept of Defense, and probably Homeland Security.
More info at http://Muvy.org You really ought to be a little more analytical! The article talks about how the guy installed Vista on his computer and fired up PeerGuardian 2 on Vista. Did you really look at his screen shots. He is obviously running it on Windows XP. Fool! -- Regards, Richard Urban Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User (For email, remove the obvious from my address) <plenty560@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:1186570888.639566.20300@l70g2000hse.googlegroups.com... > More info at http://Muvy.org > * Richard Urban: > You really ought to be a little more...

[News] Microsoft Gets 38 Patents in One Day, Patents "Detection of Security Vulnerabilities in Computer Programs"
This is hysterical. Have a look at the list. Microsoft patent applications published on 12 April 2007 http://www.latestpatents.com/2007/04/12/microsoft-patent-applications-published-on-12-april-2007/ "Mobile Device Expansion System" "Use of licensed content without identification thereof" "Physical location verification" What on earth is going on?!?!11111111111 In other news, OpenDocument makes everything nice, clean, consistent, open, and free. OpenDocument Makes Formatting Compliance Simpler ,----[ Quote ] | The Validator operates on the Mozilla Applicat...

SECUR> [NetGold] COMPUTER: SECURITY: Computer File Recovery
From: NetHappenings Moderator Date: Tue, 14 Oct 2003 11:18:36 -0500 To: comp.internet.net-happenings Subject: SECUR> [NetGold] COMPUTER: SECURITY: Computer File Recovery ************************************************************** Net Happenings - From Educational CyberPlayGround ************************************************************** From: "David P. Dillard" <jwne@astro.ocis.temple.edu> To: Gleason Sackmann <gleason@edu-cyberpg.com> Sent: Tue, 14 Oct 2003 11:52:41 -0400 (EDT) Subject: [NetGold] COMPUTER: SECURITY: Computer File Recovery � Date...

Tcl dot net (Tcl.net, yes microsoft net framework) ? realistic?
I am not a microsoft fan, but I think .net is a good thing. To make a nice gui with winforms and vb.net is more easy for me then using tk. Or with .net it`s easy to use win api functions. What about Tcl.net? The tcl syntax is more easy then C# / vb. Tcl.net with Microsoft Visual Studio and full oop by standard would be the most awesome thing I can imagine as programing language. Is there a statement about this idea from the tcl developers? What about the tcl core team? Is it still interested, active and alive or out of breath? On May 26, 7:44 pm, Michael Reichenbach <Reichenb...@discar...

have a look at my blog site for asp.net .. there is microsoft contest also ( u can win so much)have a look at my blog site for asp.net .. there is microsoft contest also ( u can win so much)
hi please a have a look at my site http://justpratik.blogspot.com and there's link for contest so hurry before 15th june ...

have a look at my blog site for asp.net .. there is microsoft contest also ( u can win so much)have a look at my blog site for asp.net .. there is microsoft contest also ( u can win so much)
hi please a have a look at my site http://justpratik.blogspot.com and there's link for contest so hurry before 15th june ...

Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005
Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005 - , ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Security programs 2005 - Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Multi CD NR 17 543 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Terminal Server Base Module Multi CD NR 17 544 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Terminal Ser...

Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005
Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005 - , ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Security programs 2005 - Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Multi CD NR 17 543 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Terminal Server Base Module Multi CD NR 17 544 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Terminal Ser...

Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005
Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005 - , ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Security programs 2005 - Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Multi CD NR 17 543 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Terminal Server Base Module Multi CD NR 17 544 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 ...

Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005
Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005 - , ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Security programs 2005 - Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Multi CD NR 17 543 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 Terminal Server Base Module Multi CD NR 17 544 Utimaco SafeGuard Advanced Security v4.30.0.335 ...

pgp programs 2005 -, Security programs 2005
pgp programs 2005 -, Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005 - , ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- pgp programs 2005 - PGP.CommandLine.for.Linux.v8.5.0 PGP.CommandLine.for.Solaris.v8.5.0 PGP.CommandLine.v8.5.0 (week 31/2004) PGP.Desktop.v8.1.for.Windows PGP.Personal.Desktop.v8.1.for.Macintosh (week 26/2004) PGP.Enterprise.v8.0.3 (week 49/20030 PGP.v8.0.3 (week 42/2003) 15/...

pgp programs 2005 -, Security programs 2005
pgp programs 2005 -, Security programs 2005 - , Firewall programs 2005 -, Antivirus programs 2005 -, APPDEV DOT NET SECURITY, Linux Security and Firewall programs 2005 -, CiscoWorks ( CW ) Security programs 2005 - , ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- pgp programs 2005 - PGP.CommandLine.for.Linux.v8.5.0 PGP.CommandLine.for.Solaris.v8.5.0 PGP.CommandLine.v8.5.0 (week 31/2004) PGP.Desktop.v8.1.for.Windows PGP.Personal.Desktop.v8.1.for.Macintosh (week 26/2004) PGP.Enterprise.v8.0.3 (week 49/20030 PGP.v8.0.3 (week 42/2003) 15/...