f



Why I like Linux and why you should , too

(Finally got back to normal; posting through Google is *not* a nice
experience!<grin>)

Why do I like Linux?

Well, it's not just because it's free beer, for a start. Of course, that's
a factor. It's nice to get something so useful for the price of magazine,
or, as in the case of my old Red Hat 9.0, a book. Get the distro free and
pay for the support of the book/mag that tells you how to run it. Very
nice.

But there's a lot more to it than that. Free beer is an encouragement
because you don't have to worry about experimentation - if something
screws up, you aren't going to be out of pocket, and can try again in full
confidence.

But then, to buy it doesn't break the bank either, and then you get nice
manuals and proper support, from people who actually care.

You get thousands of apps - and access to thousands more if you're lucky
enough to have broadband. With so many great apps to chose from, you're
bound to find something to suit all your needs, even if those needs are a
bit off the beaten track. And, like me, you'll find programs you never
heard of, that don't exist in the Windows world, that lead you into new
discoveries.

And then there's the wonderful variety of window managers and desktop
environments. The fast minimalism of fluxbox or blackbox, the gorgeous eye
candy of enlightenment, the sturdy configurability or gnome or kde, to
name but a few.

File managers? You name 'em, Linux has got 'em. Xffm, rox-filer,
konqueror, xfe, gentoo, mc. Use one or use 'em all.

Want to have your own network and run apps via ssh or through remote
desktop? Easy. Take your desktop wherever you go? Get out the Live CDs.
You can even customise Knoppix just to your liking, and keep your home dir
and settings on a USB stick; and it's a rescue CD too.

I ask myself: what's *not* to like about Linux?

Few security issues compared with Windows, and it's stable. You can change
your hardware around as much as you like, and no one is going to demand
you 'reactivate' like Windows. How is it any business of MS' what hardware
goes on *my* machines? Linux is there to be used, for whatever purpose
suits *you*.

No malware to speak of, no viruses, and it just keeps chugging on. Man,
you would have to be bananas to complain.

Buggy? Not really. No worse than anything else, and at least you know the
developers are working on that all the time. Easily installed, unless
you're talking Gentoo or something, and even then, all you need is
patience and reading skills. The rest are hardly rocket science - just
stick the disk in and follow the instructions.

Harware? Can be a downside, but pick your hardware sensibly and it
needn't be a problem. I've got three PCs and two laptops with only a
couple of hardware issue between the lot of them. So don't let the
FUDsters scare you.

There's so much to do in and with Linux that you'll never be bored.

All in all, it's been a happy few years, and I look forward to enjoying
many more.

Windows? Pffft.

-- 
Kier


0
vallon (8614)
10/28/2005 10:09:58 AM
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On Fri, 28 Oct 2005 11:09:58 +0100, Kier wrote:

> (Finally got back to normal; posting through Google is *not* a nice
> experience!<grin>)
> 
> Why do I like Linux?
> 
> Well, it's not just because it's free beer, for a start. Of course, that's
> a factor. It's nice to get something so useful for the price of magazine,
> or, as in the case of my old Red Hat 9.0, a book. Get the distro free and
> pay for the support of the book/mag that tells you how to run it. Very
> nice.
> 
> But there's a lot more to it than that. Free beer is an encouragement
> because you don't have to worry about experimentation - if something
> screws up, you aren't going to be out of pocket, and can try again in full
> confidence.
> 
> But then, to buy it doesn't break the bank either, and then you get nice
> manuals and proper support, from people who actually care.
> 
> You get thousands of apps - and access to thousands more if you're lucky
> enough to have broadband. With so many great apps to chose from, you're
> bound to find something to suit all your needs, even if those needs are a
> bit off the beaten track. And, like me, you'll find programs you never
> heard of, that don't exist in the Windows world, that lead you into new
> discoveries.
> 
> And then there's the wonderful variety of window managers and desktop
> environments. The fast minimalism of fluxbox or blackbox, the gorgeous eye
> candy of enlightenment, the sturdy configurability or gnome or kde, to
> name but a few.
> 
> File managers? You name 'em, Linux has got 'em. Xffm, rox-filer,
> konqueror, xfe, gentoo, mc. Use one or use 'em all.
> 
> Want to have your own network and run apps via ssh or through remote
> desktop? Easy. Take your desktop wherever you go? Get out the Live CDs.
> You can even customise Knoppix just to your liking, and keep your home dir
> and settings on a USB stick; and it's a rescue CD too.
> 
> I ask myself: what's *not* to like about Linux?
> 
> Few security issues compared with Windows, and it's stable. You can change
> your hardware around as much as you like, and no one is going to demand
> you 'reactivate' like Windows. How is it any business of MS' what hardware
> goes on *my* machines? Linux is there to be used, for whatever purpose
> suits *you*.
> 
> No malware to speak of, no viruses, and it just keeps chugging on. Man,
> you would have to be bananas to complain.
> 
> Buggy? Not really. No worse than anything else, and at least you know the
> developers are working on that all the time. Easily installed, unless
> you're talking Gentoo or something, and even then, all you need is
> patience and reading skills. The rest are hardly rocket science - just
> stick the disk in and follow the instructions.
> 
> Harware? Can be a downside, but pick your hardware sensibly and it
> needn't be a problem. I've got three PCs and two laptops with only a
> couple of hardware issue between the lot of them. So don't let the
> FUDsters scare you.
> 
> There's so much to do in and with Linux that you'll never be bored.
> 
> All in all, it's been a happy few years, and I look forward to enjoying
> many more.
> 
> Windows? Pffft.

There are perfectly legitimate reasons to prefer or require MS. One of
which is the need to run proprietary software for a specific purpose.

0
ray65 (5421)
10/28/2005 2:48:49 PM
ray wrote:

> 
> There are perfectly legitimate reasons to prefer or require MS. One of
> which is the need to run proprietary software for a specific purpose.

I run proprietary software on Linux quite often (Mathematica). So ?
0
10/28/2005 2:52:24 PM
Kier  is an expert geek.

He forgets to tell you about the hardware issues you will have as a
newbie.
OCR not working, Printers not supported, graphics cards now working,
learning to root and terminal, other drives not automounting on gnome,
and lots of crap.

He also forgot to tell you about all the time you will need to google
to
find answers to things.  Yep, you can confure things.  Do you
really want to learn to configure the fstab?  know where it is?
it is not not on a gui menu!  You goof, and it may not boot.
No typo's allowed.

You are not going to the local games store to buy a game.
You are not going to get your Lexmark printer working.

He says it, all you need is patience and reading skills.
And lots of time.

And you never be bored, that for sure.  FRUSTED AS ALL HELL,
but not bored.  Always something to learn to configure, since
they don't have a lot of nice easy to use gui's.

0
10/28/2005 2:56:28 PM
On Fri, 28 Oct 2005 07:56:28 -0700, tab wrote:

> Kier  is an expert geek.
> 
> He forgets to tell you about the hardware issues you will have as a
> newbie.
> OCR not working, Printers not supported, graphics cards now working,
> learning to root and terminal, other drives not automounting on gnome,
> and lots of crap.
> 
> He also forgot to tell you about all the time you will need to google
> to
> find answers to things.  
<snip>

Lame-ass argument considering the tens of thousands of posts regarding
Windows errors, incompatibility, driver problems... on and on...

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&q=windows+printer+error&qt_s=Search
http://groups.google.com/groups?q=windows+driver+error&start=10&hl=en&

0
10/28/2005 3:23:04 PM
tab wrote:

> Kier  is an expert geek.
> 
> He forgets to tell you about the hardware issues you will have as a
> newbie.
> OCR not working

That's a software issue

> , Printers not supported

Buy the right brand. HP are good, and I prefer their printers on hardware
grounds too.

> , graphics cards now working,

Only the 3D accel, and you only need that for gaming

> 
> learning to root and terminal,

nothing to do with hardware really.

> other drives not automounting on gnome, 

nothing to do with gnome. has to do with fstab.

> and lots of crap.
> 
> He also forgot to tell you about all the time you will need to google
> to
> find answers to things.

and how do you get help with Windows? well first you look in the inbuilt
help, then you look on Ms's website. Same difference.

> Yep, you can confure things.  Do you 
> really want to learn to configure the fstab?  know where it is?

From a newbies POV:
hmm...let me think...well that nice Linux book I have talks about the Linux
filesystem, it says configuration files are in /etc/ so maybe fstab's
there? YES!

> it is not not on a gui menu!  You goof, and it may not boot.

Should do, just to runlevel S.
From which if you thought to make a backup, you can restore it.
Or you can get someone to help you fix it.
Or you can boot a live distro and fix from there.
Or you can boot into any other OSes you might have. of course you can't fix
stuff on a Linux partition from Windows.

> No typo's allowed.
> 
> You are not going to the local games store to buy a game.

That's about the only problem with Linux. But you can always dual boot
Windows for your gaming.

> You are not going to get your Lexmark printer working.

For newer models that is true.

> 
> He says it, all you need is patience and reading skills.
> And lots of time.
> 
> And you never be bored, that for sure.  FRUSTED AS ALL HELL,
> but not bored.  Always something to learn to configure, since
> they don't have a lot of nice easy to use gui's.

Some distro's don't. Some do. SuSE does. The GUI config tool (Yast2) made
setting up LVM child's play for example; I have no clue how to do that in
another distro mind you, it's what I get for laziness.
-- 
Tom Wootten, Fresher NatSci, Trinity Hall.
oof.trinhall.cam.ac.uk
There was only ever one valid use for the notorious <blink> tag:
Schrodinger's cat is <blink>not</blink> dead.
0
tw296 (768)
10/28/2005 4:46:59 PM
On 2005-10-28, ray <ray@zianet.com> posted something concerning:

> There are perfectly legitimate reasons to prefer or require MS. One of
> which is the need to run proprietary software for a specific purpose.

Another is being a big shareholder in an anti-spyware/virus company
that relies on crappy underpinnings to sell its wares.

Still another is being a monkey man or a Chief Software Architect at a
big monopoly company that helps you rake in billions each year through
shearing your "customers" (aka "marks").

Then there's the preference for it by those who wasted a lot of cash to
get a piece of paper with the letters MCSE attached (presumably because
there was only an empty cardboard roll left behind by the last person
using the stall, since the usual paper should be a whole lot cheaper
when buying in quantities of 4 or more).

Another reason is because one is /forced/ to use it by people still
stuck in the dark ages. I know I /prefer/ to use it at work because I
can't otherwise communicate with the people there that are still living
in the past. That's only a preference because it's a requirement to
have the job, though. If we could educate a few souls, I'd _really_
prefer to do away with it.

-- 
Microsoft is not the answer. Microsoft is the question.
The answer is NO!
0
sinister656 (2009)
10/30/2005 11:48:03 AM
On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 11:48:03 +0000, Sinister Midget wrote:

> On 2005-10-28, ray <ray@zianet.com> posted something concerning:
> 
>> There are perfectly legitimate reasons to prefer or require MS. One of
>> which is the need to run proprietary software for a specific purpose.
> 
> Another is being a big shareholder in an anti-spyware/virus company
> that relies on crappy underpinnings to sell its wares.
> 

If you think that buying a companies products will enable you to,
single-handedly, keep it afloat, I've got a few thousand share of DCX I'll
sell you at a bargain rate.

> Still another is being a monkey man or a Chief Software Architect at a
> big monopoly company that helps you rake in billions each year through
> shearing your "customers" (aka "marks").
> 
> Then there's the preference for it by those who wasted a lot of cash to
> get a piece of paper with the letters MCSE attached (presumably because
> there was only an empty cardboard roll left behind by the last person
> using the stall, since the usual paper should be a whole lot cheaper
> when buying in quantities of 4 or more).
> 
> Another reason is because one is /forced/ to use it by people still
> stuck in the dark ages. I know I /prefer/ to use it at work because I
> can't otherwise communicate with the people there that are still living
> in the past. That's only a preference because it's a requirement to
> have the job, though. If we could educate a few souls, I'd _really_
> prefer to do away with it.

0
ray65 (5421)
10/30/2005 3:47:57 PM
On 2005-10-30, ray <ray@zianet.com> posted something concerning:
> On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 11:48:03 +0000, Sinister Midget wrote:
>
>> On 2005-10-28, ray <ray@zianet.com> posted something concerning:
>> 
>>> There are perfectly legitimate reasons to prefer or require MS. One of
>>> which is the need to run proprietary software for a specific purpose.
>> 
>> Another is being a big shareholder in an anti-spyware/virus company
>> that relies on crappy underpinnings to sell its wares.
>> 
>
> If you think that buying a companies products will enable you to,
> single-handedly, keep it afloat, I've got a few thousand share of DCX I'll
> sell you at a bargain rate.

You said "There are a few legitimate reasons to prefer or require....".
I named a few. One being a stockholder in the company selling trash
(i.e. having a _preference_ for people using it because of
self-interest). Another being that I, as a (theoretical anti-malware)
company, am dependent on people _needing_ my product because what it
gets used with is substandard pap. That would also translate to
self-interest.

I don't know how that's supposed to mean anything to do with my being
the sole reason for a company to sink or swim.

The only mention of myself was that I "prefer" to use it because of a
condition of employment, and that I'd _really_ prefer that others be
educated enough that there was no such condition

-- 
Microsoft: The company that made viewing pictures dangerous.
0
sinister656 (2009)
10/31/2005 10:02:51 AM
Reply: