FAT16 FS type on USB stick

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I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
upgrading.

I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.

$fdisk sda

displays

        ID:  6
System:  FAT16

for this stick.

Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
stick to backup /home?

Thanks & Best Regards,

Vwaju
New York City
0
Reply slack (4) 12/20/2009 9:14:14 PM

See related articles to this posting


Vwaju <slack@rcn.com> wrote:
> I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
> upgrading.
> 
> I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
> 
> $fdisk sda
> 
> displays
> 
>        ID:  6
> System:  FAT16
> 
> for this stick.
> 
> Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
> stick to backup /home?
> 
> Thanks & Best Regards,
> 
> Vwaju
> New York City

Use tar or cpio or dump, something *designed* to do a backup, not cp.

I'd recomend tar for your case, it's the simplest to use for both the
backup & restore.

	Jerry
0
Reply Jerry 12/20/2009 9:53:56 PM

On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:

> I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
> upgrading.
> 
> I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
> 
> $fdisk sda
> 
> displays
> 
>         ID:  6
> System:  FAT16
> 
> for this stick.
> 
> Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
> stick to backup /home?
> 
> Thanks & Best Regards,
> 
> Vwaju
> New York City

Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use FAT16, 
if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows box then 
format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system. Linux will 
mount the stick with just about any file system but there is no reason to 
use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
 
0
Reply General 12/20/2009 9:58:58 PM

On Dec 20, 4:58=A0pm, General Schvantzkoph <schvantzk...@yahoo.com>
wrote:
> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:
> > I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
> > upgrading.
>
> > I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
>
> > $fdisk sda
>
> > displays
>
> > =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 ID: =A06
> > System: =A0FAT16
>
> > for this stick.
>
> > Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
> > stick to backup /home?
>
> > Thanks & Best Regards,
>
> > Vwaju
> > New York City
>
> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use FAT16,
> if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows box then
> format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system. Linux will
> mount the stick with just about any file system but there is no reason to
> use an inefficient one if you don't have to.

Thanks for your helpful comments, General.  gparted is not in the
Slackware 12.2 installation.  Couldn't I use fdisk?  (Or is there
another utility that I could/should use?)

Best, Vwaju
0
Reply Vwaju 12/20/2009 10:34:11 PM

On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 14:34:11 -0800, Vwaju wrote:

> On Dec 20, 4:58 pm, General Schvantzkoph <schvantzk...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:
>> > I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
>> > upgrading.
>>
>> > I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
>>
>> > $fdisk sda
>>
>> > displays
>>
>> >         ID:  6
>> > System:  FAT16
>>
>> > for this stick.
>>
>> > Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
>> > stick to backup /home?
>>
>> > Thanks & Best Regards,
>>
>> > Vwaju
>> > New York City
>>
>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows
>> box then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system.
>> Linux will mount the stick with just about any file system but there is
>> no reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
> 
> Thanks for your helpful comments, General.  gparted is not in the
> Slackware 12.2 installation.  Couldn't I use fdisk?  (Or is there
> another utility that I could/should use?)

	I have been using fdisk to format USB sticks for some time now, 
without any problems. I use ext2, rather than ext3, and I do backups on 
my USB sticks with rsync.


0
Reply Harold 12/21/2009 12:59:37 AM

On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 14:34:11 -0800, Vwaju wrote:

> On Dec 20, 4:58 pm, General Schvantzkoph <schvantzk...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:
>> > I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
>> > upgrading.
>>
>> > I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
>>
>> > $fdisk sda
>>
>> > displays
>>
>> >         ID:  6
>> > System:  FAT16
>>
>> > for this stick.
>>
>> > Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
>> > stick to backup /home?
>>
>> > Thanks & Best Regards,
>>
>> > Vwaju
>> > New York City
>>
>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows
>> box then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system.
>> Linux will mount the stick with just about any file system but there is
>> no reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
> 
> Thanks for your helpful comments, General.  gparted is not in the
> Slackware 12.2 installation.  Couldn't I use fdisk?  (Or is there
> another utility that I could/should use?)
> 
> Best, Vwaju

fdisk is fine, so is regular parted, or you could just use mke2fs.
0
Reply General 12/21/2009 2:42:36 AM

General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> writes:

> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 14:34:11 -0800, Vwaju wrote:
>
>> On Dec 20, 4:58�pm, General Schvantzkoph <schvantzk...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:
>>> > I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
>>> > upgrading.
>>>
>>> > I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
>>>
>>> > $fdisk sda
>>>
>>> > displays
>>>
>>> > � � � � ID: �6
>>> > System: �FAT16
>>>
>>> > for this stick.
>>>
>>> > Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
>>> > stick to backup /home?
>>>
>>> > Thanks & Best Regards,
>>>
>>> > Vwaju
>>> > New York City
>>>
>>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows
>>> box then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system.
>>> Linux will mount the stick with just about any file system but there is
>>> no reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
>> 
>> Thanks for your helpful comments, General.  gparted is not in the
>> Slackware 12.2 installation.  Couldn't I use fdisk?  (Or is there
>> another utility that I could/should use?)
>> 
>> Best, Vwaju
>
> fdisk is fine, so is regular parted, or you could just use mke2fs.

Though, of course, partioning it and setting the partition type is one
operation while putting a file system on it is another.  So, for
instance, you would use fdisk to repartition it, and then e2fsck to put
the file system on.
-- 
As we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should
be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
and this we should do freely and generously. (Benjamin Franklin)
0
Reply Joe 12/21/2009 6:46:28 AM

On December 20, 2009 16:14, in comp.os.linux.hardware, slack@rcn.com wrote:

> I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
> upgrading.
> 
> I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
> 
> $fdisk sda
> 
> displays
> 
>         ID:  6
> System:  FAT16
> 
> for this stick.
> 
> Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
> stick to backup /home?

No, but you /can/.

First and foremost, you need a filesystem that supports Unix file attributes
(UID, GID, permission bits, etc.). You can either
  - format the USB stick with a UNIXish filesystem (ext2, minix, ...) or
  - format a loopback file on the FAT16 fs with a unixish filesystem
Make this choice first.

If you choose to wipe the entire USB stick, then you can chose to either
  - partition the USB stick, or
  - use the entire USB stick, unpartitioned

If you choose to partition the entire USB stick, then you will probably want
to flag the Linux fs partitions with the LINUX partition ID before you
format the partition with your UNIXish filesystem.

If you choose to use the entire USB stick, unpartitioned, then you format
the entire device with your UNIXish filesystem, because in such a
situation, there /is no/ partition type.

If you choose to use a loopback file on the USB stick, then you only need to
format the file with the UNIXish filesystem; your partition type (if there
is one) should remain FAT16

HTH
-- 
Lew Pitcher
Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training   | Registered Linux User #112576
Me: http://pitcher.digitalfreehold.ca/ | Just Linux: http://justlinux.ca/
----------      Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing.         ------


0
Reply Lew 12/21/2009 3:51:15 PM

In article <7p7l12F5niU1@mid.individual.net>, schvantzkoph@yahoo.com
(General Schvantzkoph) writes:

> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:

<snip>

>> Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
>> stick to backup /home?
>
> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows
> box then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system.
> Linux will mount the stick with just about any file system but there
> is no reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.

This might be a bit off-topic, but has anyone noticed reliability
problems when adding large files to a FAT16-formatted memory stick?
I have a 2GB stick which I use to back up files from my Windows system
at work; I've found that if I write a lot more data (several hundred
megabytes) to a partially filled stick from a Windows box, some of the
files will often encounter strange (and unrecoverable) errors when I
try to read them back.  At first I thought that my stick was going bad
and got another one - but the second one did exactly the same thing.
The only way I can get reliable results is to format the stick each
time I write a lot of data to it, although I can add a few small files
later without problems.

I now suspect that the problem is either in the Windows drivers,
or is due to some design defect in the FAT16 file system.  My
Linux boxes can read and write the FAT16 sticks with no trouble,
although I continue to avoid adding large amounts of data to a
partly-filled stick.

Has anyone else encountered this problem?  Is it another example
of typical Microsoft quality control?

-- 
/~\  cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs)
\ /  I'm really at ac.dekanfrus if you read it the right way.
 X   Top-posted messages will probably be ignored.  See RFC1855.
/ \  HTML will DEFINITELY be ignored.  Join the ASCII ribbon campaign!

0
Reply Charlie 12/21/2009 4:59:07 PM

On 21 Dec 09 08:59:07 -0800, Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> wrote:
>In article <7p7l12F5niU1@mid.individual.net>, schvantzkoph@yahoo.com
>(General Schvantzkoph) writes:

>> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:

><snip>

>>> Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
>>> stick to backup /home?
>>
>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows
>> box then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system.
>> Linux will mount the stick with just about any file system but there
>> is no reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.

>This might be a bit off-topic, but has anyone noticed reliability
>problems when adding large files to a FAT16-formatted memory stick?
>I have a 2GB stick which I use to back up files from my Windows system
>at work; I've found that if I write a lot more data (several hundred
>megabytes) to a partially filled stick from a Windows box, some of the
>files will often encounter strange (and unrecoverable) errors when I
>try to read them back.  At first I thought that my stick was going bad
>and got another one - but the second one did exactly the same thing.
>The only way I can get reliable results is to format the stick each
>time I write a lot of data to it, although I can add a few small files
>later without problems.

>I now suspect that the problem is either in the Windows drivers,
>or is due to some design defect in the FAT16 file system.  My
>Linux boxes can read and write the FAT16 sticks with no trouble,
>although I continue to avoid adding large amounts of data to a
>partly-filled stick.

>Has anyone else encountered this problem?  Is it another example
>of typical Microsoft quality control?

FAT is an amazing piece of shit.  It should never have been used on
anything larger than 180K.  It takes nothing to corrupt it.
It can be reliable if your hardware is absolutely perfect.
0
Reply AZ 12/21/2009 5:33:42 PM

On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 21:58:58 +0000, General Schvantzkoph wrote:

> On Sun, 20 Dec 2009 13:14:14 -0800, Vwaju wrote:
> 
>> I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
>> upgrading.
>> 
>> I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
>> 
>> $fdisk sda
>> 
>> displays
>> 
>>         ID:  6
>> System:  FAT16
>> 
>> for this stick.
>> 
>> Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
>> stick to backup /home?
>> 
>> Thanks & Best Regards,
>> 
>> Vwaju
>> New York City
> 
> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows box
> then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system. Linux
> will mount the stick with just about any file system but there is no
> reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.

Also, you won't need journaling.  So, don't use the -j option when 
formatting the USB stick to ext3.


Stef
0
Reply Stefan 12/21/2009 6:23:47 PM

Stefan Patric wrote:

[putolin]

>> 
>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows box
>> then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system. Linux
>> will mount the stick with just about any file system but there is no
>> reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
> 
> Also, you won't need journaling.  So, don't use the -j option when
> formatting the USB stick to ext3.
> 
> 

That would be formatting the stick to ext2... not ext3


0
Reply GangGreene 12/22/2009 1:19:02 AM

On 2009-12-21, Lew Pitcher <lpitcher@teksavvy.com> wrote:

> On December 20, 2009 16:14, in comp.os.linux.hardware, slack@rcn.com wrote:
>
>> I want to backup /home on my Slackware Linux 12.2 installation before
>> upgrading.
>> 
>> I have a Dane Elec 2GB USB stick for the back up.
>> 
>> $fdisk sda
>> 
>> displays
>> 
>>         ID:  6
>> System:  FAT16
>> 
>> for this stick.
>> 
>> Do I need to create a Linux partition (ID: 83) before I can use the
>> stick to backup /home?
>
> No, but you /can/.
>
> First and foremost, you need a filesystem that supports Unix file attributes
> (UID, GID, permission bits, etc.). You can either
>   - format the USB stick with a UNIXish filesystem (ext2, minix, ...) or
>   - format a loopback file on the FAT16 fs with a unixish filesystem
> Make this choice first.

Sounds like a lot of bother. Since the OP is using this for backup, 
what's wrong with simply packing the files, *nix attributes and all, 
into a tarball, cpio, whatever archive and simply storing that on the 
vfat filesystem?  

-- 

-John (john@os2.dhs.org)
0
Reply John 12/22/2009 3:15:29 AM

On Mon, 21 Dec 2009 20:19:02 -0500, GangGreene wrote:

> Stefan Patric wrote:
> 
> [putolin]
> 
> 
>>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows
>>> box then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system.
>>> Linux will mount the stick with just about any file system but there
>>> is no reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
>> 
>> Also, you won't need journaling.  So, don't use the -j option when
>> formatting the USB stick to ext3.
>> 
>> 
>> 
> That would be formatting the stick to ext2... not ext3

Essentially, yes.  But to avoid confusion, I worded it the way I did.  
Also, there are distinct, but minor differences, between the two.  Ext3 
is not just ext2 with a journal.

Here's a quick overview of several Linux filesystems, including ext2 & 3:

   http://colbyframeco.com/~maco/nix/fs.pdf


Stef

   
0
Reply Stefan 12/22/2009 7:00:07 AM

On 2009-12-22, Stefan Patric <not@thisaddress.com> wrote:

> is not just ext2 with a journal.

I have ext2 and ext3 and vfat files on the same vfat flash drive.  I can't
say about archiving.  Otherwise, works fine.  Provide umask access for
reg users when mounting drive and they too can copy from key.

nb     
0
Reply notbob 12/22/2009 2:42:49 PM

GangGreene wrote:
> Stefan Patric wrote:
> 
> [putolin]
> 
>>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows box
>>> then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system. Linux
>>> will mount the stick with just about any file system but there is no
>>> reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
>> Also, you won't need journaling.  So, don't use the -j option when
>> formatting the USB stick to ext3.
>>
>>
> 
> That would be formatting the stick to ext2... not ext3

Actually a usb stick might be one of the smarter places to use
a journal since it may be yanked out at any time, possibly without
unmounting. The journal will reduce the chances of corruption and loss.
Not that I'm in any way suggesting that removal with unmounting is ok.
0
Reply Joe 12/22/2009 7:18:21 PM

Joe Beanfish wrote:

> GangGreene wrote:
>> Stefan Patric wrote:
>> 
>> [putolin]
>> 
>>>> Use gparted to reformat it to EXT3. There is no reason to ever use
>>>> FAT16, if it's important to you to be able to plug it into a Windows
>>>> box then format it to FAT32, but EXT3 is a much better file system.
>>>> Linux will mount the stick with just about any file system but there is
>>>> no reason to use an inefficient one if you don't have to.
>>> Also, you won't need journaling.  So, don't use the -j option when
>>> formatting the USB stick to ext3.
>>>
>>>
>> 
>> That would be formatting the stick to ext2... not ext3
> 
> Actually a usb stick might be one of the smarter places to use
> a journal since it may be yanked out at any time, possibly without
> unmounting. The journal will reduce the chances of corruption and loss.
> Not that I'm in any way suggesting that removal with unmounting is ok.

It depends, if you are using it for a backup infrequenly then ext3 is ok, 
but if your running an OS which writes very frequently thyen you have the 
potentical to ruin the usb drive due to too many writes.


0
Reply GangGreene 12/22/2009 11:07:21 PM

I demand that Charlie Gibbs may or may not have written...

[snip]
> This might be a bit off-topic, but has anyone noticed reliability problems
> when adding large files to a FAT16-formatted memory stick? I have a 2GB
> stick which I use to back up files from my Windows system at work; I've
> found that if I write a lot more data (several hundred megabytes) to a
> partially filled stick from a Windows box, some of the files will often
> encounter strange (and unrecoverable) errors when I try to read them back.

Are you *sure* that the actual capacity of the stick is what's claimed?

[snip]
-- 
| Darren Salt            | linux at youmustbejoking | nr. Ashington, | Doon
| using Debian GNU/Linux | or ds    ,demon,co,uk    | Northumberland | Army
| + http://wiki.debian.org/DebianEeePC/

Mr Flibble says... "GAME OVER, BOYS!"
0
Reply Darren 12/25/2009 3:43:47 PM
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I found this tutorial for installing Fedora onto my USB drive. http://www.pendrivelinux.com/2008/05/17/install-fedora-9-to-a-flash-drive- using-windows/ The thing I cannot figure out, inspite of google attempts, is this: Normally there is an OS partition, swap etc. and a "/home" on most non-USB- linux systems that I've worked with. Do these Linux-on-a-stick systems allow me to store my data on the same USB stick too? Or do I need to do something special. I'd like to be able to store my data too and thus create a truely portable Fedora system that never touched the HDD...

how to reuse usb mount point after usb stick rudely plugged out
Hi gurus, I'm involving in a project using Fedora 6, 2.6.8 kernel and met with some probelm with umounting usb devices. /misc/sdc to /misc/sdh are used for mounting point for usb stick. suppose currently sdc used, after plugged out the usb when sth. relative running,/misc/sdc cannot be used anymore except rebooting. Is there some way to free the mounting point? suppose I have to use it according to my application logic -- not graceful, but it was there. I'm not familiar with this field and any tips is appreciated. Thank you. Hardy <wyhang@gmail.com> wrote: >Hi gurus, I...

usb-sticks
hi there, i want to buy some usb-sticks (100-1500 pieces) for a company (a friend) who wants to print their logo on it and so on. do you know where i can get them? i think for a bigger amount of sticks i should contact a producer of the sticks directly. can you give me some hints where to look for? i dont know names of such prioducers in asia....?! which storage devices should i avoid (chip)? -- thanx Bastian -------------- Gentoo Linux - KNode (KDE) ...

USB stick
I've got an USB stick that works fine under my OS/2 as long as it is formatted in FAT. As with FAT, the filenames are limited to 8.3 (when using "classic" tools like MrFilePM), I formatted it in FAT32 using a WinXP. Then though, OS/2 still sees the device when I plug it in, but it doesn't see any directory nor files that I stored on it. I am aware of the VFAT2EA tool so instead of MrFilepPM, I use that plus the PMSHELL to copy files to/from the USB stick. But, FAT32 would be much easier for me. Any solution? Some levels: 2005/12/21 14:13:40 D:\OS2\BOOT\USBD....

USB stick
In the hope of being able to read USB sticks, I installed the 186 drivers. The mobo has 2 controllers each with 2 ports. Only 2 ports are external. Drives object shows 2 additional floppy drives which cannot be accessed. Sysinfo/2>Disks>F: reports IFS is unknown. What else should I do to enable reading the sticks? In <c1.2c.3Xj52y$0iD@PC1.BIGPOND.COM>, on 10/18/2012 at 09:45 AM, johnsuth@nospam.com.au said: >In the hope of being able to read USB sticks, Formatted how? The only issue that I had with thumb drives was nonstandard formatting, which DF...

Sun Type 6 USB keyboard and crossbow USB mouse
I have a few dozens. Buy one or all. Email me your offer ...

FS types
what's the "FS type" list supported by OpenBSD36 ? I only now 3: - RAID - CCD - 4.2BSD Thanx Raul Collantes S. see disklabel.h: static char *fstypenames[] = { "unused", "swap", "Version6", "Version7", "SystemV", "4.1BSD", "Eighth-Edition", "4.2BSD", "MSDOS", "4.4LFS", "unknown", "HPFS", "ISO9660", "boot", "ADOS", "HFS", "ADFS", "ext2fs", "ccd", ...

USB sticks
As a visually disabled person I receive a newsletter from time to time in MP3 format on a USB stick. (Unknown make, 64MB). For once, the *Cannot use this device* didn't appear. However, I can find no way to access the contents on my iPad3! <sigh> Given the fact that the device wasn't refused, should I be able to, and if so, how? Also, is there any known brand of memory stick that _will_ work? -- zulu In article <KVbKs.541$ls1.417@fx07.fr7>, zulu <zulu.romeotangohotel@ntlworld.com> wrote: > As a visually disabled person I receive a newsl...

How to detect if an USB Flash Stick/other device supports USB 2.0 (or only 1.1) ?
Is there a way or tool which allows me to detect if a (currently plugged in) USB Stick resp other device (e.g.scanner) supports the USB version 2.0 or only USB 1.1 ? Tom ...

ThinkPad T30 corrupted my USB stick and USB floppy doesn't work
A couple of weeks ago I bought a used ThinkPad T30. Everything seems to be fine until yesterday when I inserted for the first time my USB stick. Most files looked like Ex?e?7??~1.e\e To my shock the files on the USB stick looked the same on my other ThinkPads (T21, A31p). Therefore I formatted it without any problems on my A31p with format f: /fs:fat32 and copied some files on it. After I've inserted the newly formatted USB stick to the T30 the file system was corrupted again. Then I tried to format it on my T30 also with format f: /fs:fat32 However, on the T30 it didn...

??Question about sparc solaris commands to mount, read/write to usb memory jumpdrives/ USB memory stick
uname -a SunOS 5.9 Generic_117171-15 sun4u sparc SUNW,Sun-Fire-V440 in /var/adm/messages Apr 5 12:38:47 quasar.EECS.Berkeley.EDU usba: [ID 855233 kern.info] USB-device: storage@1, scsa2usb0 at bus address 2 Apr 5 12:38:47 quasar.EECS.Berkeley.EDU usba: [ID 593373 kern.info] LEXAR MEDIA JUMPDRIVE ELITE 1069A303163338041204 Apr 5 12:38:47 quasar.EECS.Berkeley.EDU genunix: [ID 936769 kern.info] scsa2usb0 is /pci@1e,600000/usb@a/storage@1 Apr 5 12:38:47 quasar.EECS.Berkeley.EDU genunix: [ID 408114 kern.info] /pci@1e,600000/usb@a/storage@1 (scsa2usb0) online Apr 5 12:38:47 quasar.EECS.Be...

FS: 4 ZIPLINQ USB A-B cables + 5 ZIPLINQ 4-pin Mini USB cables
I bought these from a vendor at the CES show in Vegas a while back and have done nothing but let them sit on a shelf. They are all in brand new in retail boxed packaging. I can ship one of any of these in the retail box in a standard USPS Priority Mail box, or I can include any combination of these removed from the retail boxes in a single USPS Priority Mail small box. Check them out at the vendor website: http://www.ziplinq.com/retractable-cable-usb.html Make me an offer! I can sell them all in a single lot or individually. First come first serve (for all reasonable offers) ...

USB Memory sticks ?
hello group, subject says it: is it possible to use such sticks with p5 boxes equipped with an USB outlet ? I opened a PMR (asked the question to IBM) and IBM has no plans to support USB flash memory sticks in pSeries. Bummer, I know. Ryan Ryan wrote: > I opened a PMR (asked the question to IBM) and IBM has no plans to > support USB flash memory sticks in pSeries. Bummer, I know. > > Ryan The only supported usb devices on AIX are keyboard, mouse etc .. you can install pLinux tho as that has support for usb goodies .. I have tried it with an external usb disk drive .. HT...

USB sticks and devfs
Hi. I'm noticing something strange on one pc (gentoo). I use devfsd (still on 2.4.x due to openafs), and correctly it created a /dev/sdb and /dev/sdb1 device symlinks when it realizes a usb stick is inserted. Now, after a while, I reinserted it, and, wonder, it created /dev/sdc*. It seems that after the reboot, the system has tarred /dev and restored it. So, devfs had to create a new device. How can I avoid it? I know, disable /dev tarring, but I can't: I need the /dev tarring since vmware needs it to run properly at boot. Can anyone help me? -- Sensei <mailto:senseiwa@...

Formatting USB stick
Hi, I am sure this has been asked many times before but if I ever remembered the answer, I have certainly forgotten it now. Sorry if this question is a bit basic. I have several thumb drives / memory sticks / USB flash drives (call them what you will. I am using a RiscPC 700 Adjust 4.39 & want to format them to be compatible (& with Windows etc) They are all 2GB or below to be usable on my machine. I want to format some of them to clear stuff & ensure there are no errors. If I stick them in my Windows machine & choose Format, the top of the list is FAT so I presume this means ...