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install linux without floppy and cdrom

I have an very old Fujitsu S-series notebook.
It does not have internal floppy and cdrom,
just has expanson slots (Fujitsu proprietary) for floppy and cdrom
but I lose both floppy and cdrom drives.

Now the question is how can I install linux without floppy and cdrom?
I know I can install via network, but how can I boot it firstly?

0
bolero92 (33)
1/4/2005 1:01:20 PM
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In article <1104843680.862968.13390@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, 
bolero92@yahoo.com wrote:
> I have an very old Fujitsu S-series notebook.
> It does not have internal floppy and cdrom,
> just has expanson slots (Fujitsu proprietary) for floppy and cdrom
> but I lose both floppy and cdrom drives.
> Now the question is how can I install linux without floppy and cdrom?
> I know I can install via network, but how can I boot it firstly?

Assuming you can put something on it via a network connection and some 
operating system (MSWin), I can conceive of putting the contents of an 
install floppy set (boot and root diskettes from, say, slackware or an 
older RedHat, say 6.2) onto the hard drive and booting them with 
LOADLIN.EXE.  

On the other hand, if the hard disk is relatively easy to remove, you 
could take it out and put in on a machine, install Linux and then put it 
back in the laptop.  (Laptop hard drives require an "adapter" to plug into 
a regular IDE cable, which costs about $20US.)

Either way, it may not be worth the effort.  Not having an idea of what 
its intended use is, be aware that you might not have enough memory, CPU 
speed may disappoint, diskspace may be tight, and getting X to work on 
the graphics chip may be difficult--even practically impossible.  If your 
time is worth $$, there might be more friendly, more capable laptops 
available at used computer outlets. 

I recently pressed a 1996 vintage Dell laptop into service as a 
nameserver-dhcpserver, but I had to drop back to RH 6.2 to get a distro 
that would install in 16 MB of memory. 

-- 
Dave Brown  Austin, TX
0
dhbrown (307)
1/4/2005 3:41:23 PM
bolero92@yahoo.com wrote:
> I have an very old Fujitsu S-series notebook.
> It does not have internal floppy and cdrom,
> just has expanson slots (Fujitsu proprietary) for floppy and cdrom
> but I lose both floppy and cdrom drives.
> 
> Now the question is how can I install linux without floppy and cdrom?
> I know I can install via network, but how can I boot it firstly?

Does the laptop's NIC support Ethernet booting?  Lots of newer ones do. 
  Older NICs can be hit-or-miss.
0
jpstewart (2598)
1/4/2005 4:18:52 PM
In comp.os.linux.misc bolero92@yahoo.com:
> I have an very old Fujitsu S-series notebook.
> It does not have internal floppy and cdrom,
> just has expanson slots (Fujitsu proprietary) for floppy and cdrom
> but I lose both floppy and cdrom drives.

> Now the question is how can I install linux without floppy and cdrom?
> I know I can install via network, but how can I boot it firstly?

If your NIC is PXE able, you can boot through the network, all
you need is:

dhcp server
tftpserver
syslinux (probably)

In addition to a tagged boot kernel, some distro come with it per
default but you can tag a kernel using mknbi.

And of course the install images on ftp/http/nfs whatever your
distro supports.

The work required to get some setup like this working can't be
usually justified for a single system. If your box can boot
through USB floppy/CD, it should be much easier to borrow those
for install.

Good luck

-- 
Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig > GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94)
mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
#bofh excuse 430: Mouse has out-of-cheese-error
0
USENET22 (5551)
1/4/2005 5:08:23 PM
bolero92@yahoo.com wrote:
> I have an very old Fujitsu S-series notebook.
> It does not have internal floppy and cdrom,
> just has expanson slots (Fujitsu proprietary) for floppy and cdrom
> but I lose both floppy and cdrom drives.
>
> Now the question is how can I install linux without floppy and cdrom?
> I know I can install via network, but how can I boot it firstly?

Depending on the OS that's currently on it, you could try booting using
something like loadlin.  A quick Google search turned up this page:

http://elserv.ffm.fgan.de/~lermen/quickstart.txt

>From the looks of it, you'll need a kernel image and an initrd.  Not
sure what you would use for an initrd, though.  You'd probably want to
use something small as a jumping-off point to load a more full-sized
distribtion.

Does your laptop support USB?  That might let you plug in an external
floppy or CDROM drive.  (Not to boot from, obviously, but possibly as
something to put distro installation CDs in.

Alternatively, you might look at removing the laptop's HD, putting it
into a desktop PC, and installing a minimal system that way.  Could be
a lot less work, though you'd need to get the IDE adaptor for the drive.

0
mikemol (371)
1/5/2005 6:18:07 PM
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

bolero92@yahoo.com writes:

> I have an very old Fujitsu S-series notebook.
> It does not have internal floppy and cdrom,
> just has expanson slots (Fujitsu proprietary) for floppy and cdrom
> but I lose both floppy and cdrom drives.
>
> Now the question is how can I install linux without floppy and cdrom?
> I know I can install via network, but how can I boot it firstly?

Can you boot off the network using BOOTP or PXE?  If so, put a TFTP
server and a DHCP server on an existing machine, and have it serve a
boot image.  You might optionally need a PXE daemon if your laptop
requires it.

I did this with an IBM laptop just before Christmas and the
Debian-Installer Sarge netboot images.

http://ftp.debian.org/debian/dists/testing/main/installer-i386/rc2/images/netboot/


Regards,
Roger

- -- 
Roger Leigh
                Printing on GNU/Linux?  http://gimp-print.sourceforge.net/
                Debian GNU/Linux        http://www.debian.org/
                GPG Public Key: 0x25BFB848.  Please sign and encrypt your mail.
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0
Roger
1/5/2005 7:51:07 PM
On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 10:18:07 -0800, Mike Mol wrote:

> bolero92@yahoo.com wrote:
>> I have an very old Fujitsu S-series notebook.
>> It does not have internal floppy and cdrom,
>> just has expanson slots (Fujitsu proprietary) for floppy and cdrom
>> but I lose both floppy and cdrom drives.
>>
>> Now the question is how can I install linux without floppy and cdrom?
>> I know I can install via network, but how can I boot it firstly?
> 
> Depending on the OS that's currently on it, you could try booting using
> something like loadlin.  

One chance to get it right, hm?

>>From the looks of it, you'll need a kernel image and an initrd.  Not
> sure what you would use for an initrd, though.  You'd probably want to
> use something small as a jumping-off point to load a more full-sized
> distribtion.

It's probably worth looking at what's in tomsrtbt disk, and the Boot Disk
How-To http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Bootdisk-HOWTO/

> Does your laptop support USB?  That might let you plug in an external
> floppy or CDROM drive.  (Not to boot from, obviously, but possibly as
> something to put distro installation CDs in.

Why's it obviously not for booting?  Lots of machines can boot off USB
drives.  I once booted off a USB ZIP disk.

> Alternatively, you might look at removing the laptop's HD, putting it
> into a desktop PC, and installing a minimal system that way.  Could be
> a lot less work, though you'd need to get the IDE adaptor for the drive.

Or borrow another portable.
-- 
Mark South: World Citizen, Net Denizen

0
marksouth (79)
1/5/2005 9:41:07 PM
Mark South wrote:
> On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 10:18:07 -0800, Mike Mol wrote:

> > Does your laptop support USB?  That might let you plug in an
external
> > floppy or CDROM drive.  (Not to boot from, obviously, but possibly
as
> > something to put distro installation CDs in.
>
> Why's it obviously not for booting?  Lots of machines can boot off
USB
> drives.  I once booted off a USB ZIP disk.

Depends on how old the machine is.  AFAIK, older machines don't support
booting off of USB storage devices.  I never got it working on any of
my desktop systems.  I suppose it depends on the vendor, model and
system age, though.

Worth a shot, if he can find the hardware.

>
> > Alternatively, you might look at removing the laptop's HD, putting
it
> > into a desktop PC, and installing a minimal system that way.  Could
be
> > a lot less work, though you'd need to get the IDE adaptor for the
drive.
>
> Or borrow another portable.

I've only seen a few different laptops, but the one thing they had in
common was that their hard disk interfaces were all different.  But if
he's got a similar-model portable available to borrow, he might also
have the proprietary CD-ROM and floppy devices available to borrow, as
well.

0
mikemol (371)
1/6/2005 2:23:08 AM
Reply: