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Video capture cards under Linux

	I would like to get a video capture card supported under Linux (to record
TV shows for my 2 year old daughter, so that I can convert them to DVD
easily). Since I have no clue about what such cards are supported under
Linux, I would be grateful if contributors to this forum with experience
on the subject could provide some feedback on what card to get. 


0
T.Carter (45)
7/7/2006 12:31:15 AM
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Thomas Carter writes:

> 	I would like to get a video capture card supported under Linux (to record
> TV shows for my 2 year old daughter, so that I can convert them to DVD
> easily). Since I have no clue about what such cards are supported under
> Linux, I would be grateful if contributors to this forum with experience
> on the subject could provide some feedback on what card to get. 

The other day I wiped the dust off an old box that I haven't used in a 
couple of years.  I had a similar purpose in mind.

I ended up grabbing the Hauppauge PVR-350 card, and loading up MythTV on it. 
Works like a charm.

A word of caution -- this enterprise does regular quite a bit of technical 
skill and know-how.  It's not for the faint of heart.

But, I can tell you that this works.  And it works very well.  I schedule 
shows with the PVR-350's remote.  After they're done, MythTV tries to find 
and mark off all the commercial breaks.  It gets it right maybe 80% of the 
time, so I always go in with the remote, fix up the commercial breaks, and 
tell MythTV to take them out.  Commercial break marking, and editing them 
out takes a while, so what I usually do is that I always have a bunch of 
recorded shows already edited, and when I sit down to watch some Tee-Vee, I 
take a few minutes to edit the newer shows that were just recorded, and 
after fixing up the commercial breaks, and queueing them up for reencoding, 
I go back and watch the shows that I cleaned up the day before.  Then, 
tommorow I watch the shows that were recorded and edited today, and so on.

I haven't really gotten to the part where I'd burn some of these suckers to 
a DVD, but it shouldn't be that hard.  The files are just plain 
garden-variety MPEG files, so burning them to DVD should be easy.  I just 
don't have any particular need to.

But, as I said, buying the hardware will be the easy part for you.  The 
Hauppauge PVR line is the best supported MPEG encoder for Linux.  But you do 
need to do your homework and figure out which specific model you want.

The tough part is going to be installing and configuring all the software 
you'll need.  You'll be juggling four different pieces of major software 
that come from four different software developer groups: MySQL, LIRC, IVTV, 
and MythTV.  You'll be trying to fit them together like a big jigsaw puzzle. 
It's doable, but, unless you have a technical background, may or may not 
turn out to be a major bitch.



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0
sam217 (1634)
7/7/2006 1:07:04 AM
Thomas Carter wrote:

> I would like to get a video capture card supported under Linux (to record
> TV shows for my 2 year old daughter, so that I can convert them to DVD
> easily). Since I have no clue about what such cards are supported under
> Linux, I would be grateful if contributors to this forum with experience
> on the subject could provide some feedback on what card to get.


In Europe the DVB-standard (digital video broadcasting) is popular. It
provides a good posibility to record video with cheap budget TV cards.
Since the video stream arrives in digital form at the antenna it can be
directly saved to the hard disk without much conversion or recompression.
Thus system load during recording is low. I think that these cards will in
general be cheaper than capture cards (including a room antenna) 
I don't know if DVB is available at your location, however.

I have made good experience with the KNC TV Station DVB-T on SuSE Linux
10.1. Whether the installation of the card is easy or not will depend on
your Linux distribution. It might be necessary to compile the kernel by
yourself.

More details and Lists of supported cards can be found at www.linuxtv.org
0
7/7/2006 8:54:03 AM
In comp.os.linux.misc Thomas Carter <T.Carter@nanobots.com>:
>        I would like to get a video capture card supported under Linux (to record
> TV shows for my 2 year old daughter, so that I can convert them to DVD
> easily). Since I have no clue about what such cards are supported under
> Linux, I would be grateful if contributors to this forum with experience
> on the subject could provide some feedback on what card to get. 

Hard to tell, since you are missing to tell us where you come
from? There are different TV standards and different TV cards.

Terratec makes small external USB DVB-T boxes (Cinergy II) or so
that work out of the box with FC5. 

Good luck

-- 
Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig > GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94)
mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
#bofh excuse 399: We are a 100% Microsoft Shop.
0
USENET22 (5552)
7/7/2006 9:48:01 AM
On Fri, 07 Jul 2006 11:48:01 +0200, Michael Heiming wrote:

> In comp.os.linux.misc Thomas Carter <T.Carter@nanobots.com>:
>>        I would like to get a video capture card supported under Linux
>>        (to record
>> TV shows for my 2 year old daughter, so that I can convert them to DVD
>> easily). Since I have no clue about what such cards are supported under
>> Linux, I would be grateful if contributors to this forum with experience
>> on the subject could provide some feedback on what card to get.
> 
> Hard to tell, since you are missing to tell us where you come from? There
> are different TV standards and different TV cards.

	I live in California. I did not know that one's geographical location
was an issue here :-(

> 
> Terratec makes small external USB DVB-T boxes (Cinergy II) or so that work
> out of the box with FC5.
> 
> Good luck

0
T.Carter (45)
7/7/2006 2:36:31 PM
Thomas Carter <T.Carter@nanobots.com> wrote in
news:pan.2006.07.07.00.31.15.296238@nanobots.com: 

>      I would like to get a video capture card supported under Linux
>      (to record 
> TV shows for my 2 year old daughter, so that I can convert them to DVD
> easily). Since I have no clue about what such cards are supported
> under Linux, I would be grateful if contributors to this forum with
> experience on the subject could provide some feedback on what card to
> get. 
> 
> 

Probably the easiest way to check is to look and the kernel compilation
setup: in the video for linux section they mention the cards that are
supported without having to hunt for drivers. This of course depends on
your kernel version as to which cards are there. 

-- 
(setq (chuck nil)  car(chuck) )
0
chuck47 (177)
7/7/2006 11:34:14 PM
On Fri, 07 Jul 2006 14:36:31 +0000, Thomas Carter wrote:
 
>> Hard to tell, since you are missing to tell us where you come from? There
>> are different TV standards and different TV cards.
> 
> 	I live in California. I did not know that one's geographical location
> was an issue here :-(
> 

Each country/region has its own standards, so which cards work and are
available varies.

I would look at teh PVR-150; it does hardware compression on-board and the
MCE version can be had for $50.  It will work with modest hardware.  (It
uses about 10% CPU on my 1GHz backend.)  Don't worry about all the various
versions out there; buy the cheapest PVR-150 you can find.  They're all
the same; they only differ in the accessories like remotes, FM tuners, etc.

Otherwise, most BT878 cards work quite well, but you need a fast CPU. 
IRRC mine uses about 80% CPU on my Athlon 2800 to do 640x480 vidcaps.  I
really don't use it anymore since I have a PVR-150.

--Yan

-- 
  o__
  ,>/'_          o__
  (_)\(_)        ,>/'_        o__
Yan Seiner, PE  (_)\(_)       ,>/'_     o__
Certified Personal Trainer   (_)\(_)    ,>/'_        o__
Licensed Professional Engineer         (_)\(_)       ,>/'_
Who says engineers have to be pencil necked geeks?  (_)\(_)

0
yan (1424)
7/9/2006 2:44:46 PM
On Thu, 06 Jul 2006 20:07:04 -0500, Sam wrote:


> The tough part is going to be installing and configuring all the software 
> you'll need.  You'll be juggling four different pieces of major software 
> that come from four different software developer groups: MySQL, LIRC, IVTV, 
> and MythTV.  You'll be trying to fit them together like a big jigsaw puzzle. 
> It's doable, but, unless you have a technical background, may or may not 
> turn out to be a major bitch.

Well, yes.  But you can always get KnoppMyth, or another one which is
fedora-based, and they pretty much work out of the box.  The only thing I
ever have to change on my KnoppMyth is LIRC, as I use a custom LIRC setup.

But the most important thing about Mythtv, treat it like an appliance.
Once it works, *LEAVE IT ALONE*.  And that's hard for us fiddlers.

--Yan

-- 
  o__
  ,>/'_          o__
  (_)\(_)        ,>/'_        o__
Yan Seiner, PE  (_)\(_)       ,>/'_     o__
Certified Personal Trainer   (_)\(_)    ,>/'_        o__
Licensed Professional Engineer         (_)\(_)       ,>/'_
Who says engineers have to be pencil necked geeks?  (_)\(_)

0
yan (1424)
7/9/2006 2:50:57 PM
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