f



Which Linux OS best for beginner to setup as Web / Mail server / Internet sharer and firewall?

We are a small business with no IT employees and have about 20 Windows
ME machines.  None of that is subject to change.  We are installing a
DSL line, and when we do, we want to improve the way our Internet is
handled.  I am planning to try to set up a server which the DSL will
connect to, and will run our web site off the server, as well as
automatically get our POP3 emails from our outside accounts, and hold
them until our local computers want to see them.  It should also share
the internet connection and run a firewall.

We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
Linux.
Is there any other no cost Linux that you would suggest would be
easier for an absolute beginner (no Linux experience at all) to set up
this type of a server on?  I know there are specialized mini versions
of Linux that only act as sharers and firewalls, etc., but I believe
that we will need the flexibility of a full linux to support future
expansion as well as the 4 features I mentioned, HTTP Server, POP3,
Firewall, and Internet sharing.  Feel free to point out if you believe
there is a better solution.  Also, can Linux speak to most DSL modems,
or at the least, can most DSL providers come up with something that
will speak to a Linux system?
0
rocker1 (3)
8/7/2004 7:31:52 PM
comp.os.linux.networking 15677 articles. 0 followers. Post Follow

14 Replies
1222 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 16

Dave Arbok wrote:
> We are a small business with no IT employees and have about 20 Windows
> ME machines.  None of that is subject to change.  We are installing a
> DSL line, and when we do, we want to improve the way our Internet is
> handled.  I am planning to try to set up a server which the DSL will
> connect to, and will run our web site off the server, as well as
> automatically get our POP3 emails from our outside accounts, and hold
> them until our local computers want to see them.  It should also share
> the internet connection and run a firewall.
> 
I don't want to start a flame war, but in my experience OpenBSD is best 
for a PPP gateway/NAT type application.  It's easy to set up, rock 
solid, and the documentation is excellent.  Port forward to internal 
boxes if you must run linux for applications.  Do keep in mind that 
you're going to want a static IP for your DSL connection.

> We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
> and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
> Linux.

How did you come to this decision?  To me, those are versions of Linux 
for windows users...they don't feel as powerful as, say, Debian.

> Is there any other no cost Linux that you would suggest would be
> easier for an absolute beginner (no Linux experience at all) to set up
> this type of a server on?  I know there are specialized mini versions
> of Linux that only act as sharers and firewalls, etc., but I believe
> that we will need the flexibility of a full linux to support future
> expansion as well as the 4 features I mentioned, HTTP Server, POP3,
> Firewall, and Internet sharing.  Feel free to point out if you believe
> there is a better solution.  Also, can Linux speak to most DSL modems,
> or at the least, can most DSL providers come up with something that
> will speak to a Linux system?

I'd say if you're going to bother with Linux, learn how to use it.  Take 
advantage of the power rather than pointing and clicking your way 
through stuff.  Personally I like Debian, particularly for a small 
server of the variety that you would use to host web/mail over a DSL 
line.  You can use KNOPPIX to install it if you don't want to deal with 
the Debian installer, although the Sarge installer is supposed to be 
pretty nice.
    I suppose you did say you had no IT employees...but even in a 
business of 20, someone had better be familiar with basic sysadmin tasks 
so you don't wind up paying somebody to do it at $160/hr.  I know I run 
into this problem at my Dad's office...it's not that hard to learn.  I'd 
like to know how you survived 20 ME machines with no technical staff.

-- 
Franklin M. Siler    UIUC: Undergraduate in Electrical Engineering
Marching Illini Trumpets,  Basketball Band Staff,  ACM SigMation
http://umgawa.bands.uiuc.edu/~fsiler/
0
fsiler (15)
8/7/2004 8:16:47 PM
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1
NotDashEscaped: You need GnuPG to verify this message

In comp.os.linux.networking Dave Arbok <rocker1@shegolfs.com> suggested:
> We are a small business with no IT employees and have about 20 Windows
> ME machines.  None of that is subject to change.  We are installing a
> DSL line, and when we do, we want to improve the way our Internet is
> handled.  I am planning to try to set up a server which the DSL will
> connect to, and will run our web site off the server, as well as
> automatically get our POP3 emails from our outside accounts, and hold
> them until our local computers want to see them.  It should also share
> the internet connection and run a firewall.

You should run a proxy server like squid, to speedup internet
access and more.

> We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
> and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
> Linux.

I'd use the whitebox RH clone, alone the longer live time should
be worth it.

> Is there any other no cost Linux that you would suggest would be
> easier for an absolute beginner (no Linux experience at all) to set up
[..]

> there is a better solution.  Also, can Linux speak to most DSL modems,
> or at the least, can most DSL providers come up with something that
> will speak to a Linux system?


If those have a standard ethernet 10 Mbit (RJ45 or alike)
connection, chances are pretty high. From your post, unless you
are willing to learn lots of knowledge in a short time, I'd
suggest hiring someone experienced for a day or two who can do an
initial secure setup and install webmin for you.

I'd strongly suggest running at least software RAID on the box
and make a plan for regular backups of the machine. 

-- 
Michael Heiming (GPG-Key ID: 0xEDD27B94)
mail: echo zvpunry@urvzvat.qr | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.2.4 (GNU/Linux)

iD8DBQFBFWTOAkPEju3Se5QRAiEAAJsE9SOsO2mgbvSrGy/rYAVaaALAdwCgjmSU
+KyuDu+SIc//d28eDBrK0zo=
=CGld
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
0
USENET22 (5551)
8/7/2004 11:25:03 PM
"Franklin M. Siler" <fsiler@NOSPAMuiuc.edu> wrote in message news:<cf3dbf$sjf$1@news.ks.uiuc.edu>...
> Dave Arbok wrote:
> > We are a small business with no IT employees and have about 20 Windows
> > ME machines.  None of that is subject to change.  We are installing a
> > DSL line, and when we do, we want to improve the way our Internet is
> > handled.  I am planning to try to set up a server which the DSL will
> > connect to, and will run our web site off the server, as well as
> > automatically get our POP3 emails from our outside accounts, and hold
> > them until our local computers want to see them.  It should also share
> > the internet connection and run a firewall.
> > 
> I don't want to start a flame war, but in my experience OpenBSD is best 
> for a PPP gateway/NAT type application.  It's easy to set up, rock 
> solid, and the documentation is excellent.  Port forward to internal 
> boxes if you must run linux for applications.  Do keep in mind that 
> you're going to want a static IP for your DSL connection.

I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "internal boxes," does that mean
virtual machines running linux, or actual physical machines running
linux inside the firewall?  Either way, I think Occam's razor and all
would say that learning two OS's, linux and openbsd would have to be
more complicated than learning one.  I think there are more tutorials
and applications for Linux, and I know I don't want to learn both, so
I think OpenBSD would make things more complicated.
> 
> > We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
> > and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
> > Linux.
> 
> How did you come to this decision?  To me, those are versions of Linux 
> for windows users...they don't feel as powerful as, say, Debian.
I am a Windows user.  I'm not looking for power, as much as looking to
get the job done easily and stably.  We leaned towards those because
people say they are easy to learn, have good support for security
patches and there are likely to be RPM packages for the firewall and
the other 3 apps I mentioned, web server, internet sharing, pop3
server.  I would be open to considering Mandrake or other distros, as
I said in my title, I was asking which distro I should consider.
> 
> > Is there any other no cost Linux that you would suggest would be
> > easier for an absolute beginner (no Linux experience at all) to set up
> > this type of a server on? ... the 4 features I mentioned, HTTP Server, POP3,
> > Firewall, and Internet sharing.  Feel free to point out if you believe
> > there is a better solution.  
> 
> I'd say if you're going to bother with Linux, learn how to use it.  Take 
> advantage of the power rather than pointing and clicking your way 
> through stuff.  Personally I like Debian, particularly for a small 
> server of the variety that you would use to host web/mail over a DSL 
> line.  You can use KNOPPIX to install it if you don't want to deal with 
> the Debian installer, although the Sarge installer is supposed to be 
> pretty nice.
I really would rather point and click through stuff, I think.  This
will basically all be done after hours in my free time, and I'd rather
go out and play than put a lot of effort into it.  If you believe that
Debian will be easier than Fedora or Whitebox, then I'd love to be
persuaded.  Otherwise, it is not a good solution for me.  I've heard
Debian is harder.  I asked for "easiest for an absolute beginner to
set up these 4 services."  Oh, actually add Antivirus scanning of
email attachments for windows viruses as a fifth service.  (I hear
ClamAV is good).

>     I suppose you did say you had no IT employees...but even in a 
> business of 20, someone had better be familiar with basic sysadmin tasks 
> so you don't wind up paying somebody to do it at $160/hr.  I know I run 
> into this problem at my Dad's office...it's not that hard to learn.  I'd 
> like to know how you survived 20 ME machines with no technical staff.

Well, only 10-12 are actually used for general purpose stuff by end
users I guess, the others are to run specific machines.
Basically, you run around once in a while and make sure the security
updates and antivirus updates have been getting through.  If someone
says they don't know how to do something, you tell them to ask another
user who knows the program better.  When we changed email servers it
was a pain, I had to go to everyone's machine and get their old mail
painfully off of the webmail and into a local email program, and many
users had a hard time adjusting to the switch.

Anyway, I still want to know if any no cost Distro will be easier than
Fedora or White box enterprise linux for my 5 tasks: web server,
internet sharing, mail server, antivirus scanning of the mail, and
firewall.

Also, I've heard some people say they like to use a tiny standalone
machine as the firewall, using smoothwall or similar, and run their
web and mail server on a more powerful machine inside the firewall.  I
see how that might be more secure, because the machine that is
connected physically to the outside world, has no valuable data on it
if compromised, but is it worth the trouble?  Isn't Linux very secure
anyway, so there is very little risk using only one machine for my 5
tasks?  If it is worth the trouble, it won't add much expense to the
project, so I'd gladly consider it.  Just convince me.
0
rocker1 (3)
8/8/2004 2:52:38 AM
Dave Arbok wrote:

> "Franklin M. Siler" <fsiler@NOSPAMuiuc.edu> wrote in message news:<cf3dbf$sjf$1@news.ks.uiuc.edu>...
> 
>>Dave Arbok wrote:
[snip]
>>I don't want to start a flame war, but in my experience OpenBSD is best 
>>for a PPP gateway/NAT type application.  It's easy to set up, rock 
>>solid, and the documentation is excellent.  Port forward to internal 
>>boxes if you must run linux for applications.  Do keep in mind that 
>>you're going to want a static IP for your DSL connection.
> 
> 
> I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "internal boxes," does that mean
> virtual machines running linux, or actual physical machines running
> linux inside the firewall?  Either way, I think Occam's razor and all
> would say that learning two OS's, linux and openbsd would have to be
> more complicated than learning one.  I think there are more tutorials
> and applications for Linux, and I know I don't want to learn both, so
> I think OpenBSD would make things more complicated.
> 
I meant physical machines, either inside your network or in a DMZ. 
Obviously you can't run OBSD and Linux on the same physical machine 
without some voodoo.

>>>We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
>>>and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
>>>Linux.
>>
>>How did you come to this decision?  To me, those are versions of Linux 
>>for windows users...they don't feel as powerful as, say, Debian.
> 
> I am a Windows user.  I'm not looking for power, as much as looking to
> get the job done easily and stably.  We leaned towards those because
> people say they are easy to learn, have good support for security
> patches and there are likely to be RPM packages for the firewall and
> the other 3 apps I mentioned, web server, internet sharing, pop3
> server.  I would be open to considering Mandrake or other distros, as
> I said in my title, I was asking which distro I should consider.
> 
Have you ever used any other OSes?  Pardon the expression, but you're 
going to have to undergo a brain fuck regardless of which distribution 
you choose to run.  I'd say you're better off learning how to do stuff 
the way experienced users do it...you'll have more questions but you'll 
also pick up a lot more, and believe it or not those sorts of diagnostic 
skills are helpful for windows applications too.
    It's also one of those "least services" issues...why on earth do you 
want X and a whole bunch of other stuff installed on your firewall or 
web server?  It's not good operating practice.

[snip]
>>I'd say if you're going to bother with Linux, learn how to use it.  Take 
>>advantage of the power rather than pointing and clicking your way 
>>through stuff.  Personally I like Debian, particularly for a small 
>>server of the variety that you would use to host web/mail over a DSL 
>>line.  You can use KNOPPIX to install it if you don't want to deal with 
>>the Debian installer, although the Sarge installer is supposed to be 
>>pretty nice.
> 
> I really would rather point and click through stuff, I think.  This
> will basically all be done after hours in my free time, and I'd rather
> go out and play than put a lot of effort into it.  If you believe that
> Debian will be easier than Fedora or Whitebox, then I'd love to be
> persuaded.  Otherwise, it is not a good solution for me.  I've heard
> Debian is harder.  I asked for "easiest for an absolute beginner to
> set up these 4 services."  Oh, actually add Antivirus scanning of
> email attachments for windows viruses as a fifth service.  (I hear
> ClamAV is good).
> 
I sympathize with your desire to have things work in a manner similar to 
what you're used to, but I have not seen satisfactory GUI tools for a 
lot of what you're talking about.  For example, to me editing an Apache 
config file is much faster than messing with webmin or another app that 
runs in a GUI.  Similarly, firewalls are almost always set up via 
command line, whether it's on a headless OpenBSD machine or a Cisco router.
     As far as the "absolute easiest" way to do things...this attitude 
causes all kinds of problems.  For example, the "easiest way" to do 
stuff on windows is to log in as an Administrator, not patch, use IE, 
use outlook, and two hours later your machine is a zombie.  It sounds 
like you want to 1) secure your network and 2) not do any work, and 
those two things are mutually exclusive.  If you don't want to do it 
right, for the benefit of the rest of us pay someone to do it right.
     On a side note, I don't want to preach a lot about business 
practices, but why on earth would you do this on your own time unless 
you own the place?  If your employer is getting value out of your work, 
you should be getting paid for it.  If you think you're getting 
education out of the experience, I'm inclined to agree but if this is 
the case you should do stuff "the hacker way" and I still think you 
should be getting paid for it.
> 
>>    I suppose you did say you had no IT employees...but even in a 
>>business of 20, someone had better be familiar with basic sysadmin tasks 
>>so you don't wind up paying somebody to do it at $160/hr.  I know I run 
>>into this problem at my Dad's office...it's not that hard to learn.  I'd 
>>like to know how you survived 20 ME machines with no technical staff.
> 
> 
> Well, only 10-12 are actually used for general purpose stuff by end
> users I guess, the others are to run specific machines.
> Basically, you run around once in a while and make sure the security
> updates and antivirus updates have been getting through.  If someone
> says they don't know how to do something, you tell them to ask another
> user who knows the program better.  When we changed email servers it
> was a pain, I had to go to everyone's machine and get their old mail
> painfully off of the webmail and into a local email program, and many
> users had a hard time adjusting to the switch.
>
Well, I don't think this will cause a huge amount of work..all you need 
to do is stick your new firewall at the same IP as the old one.  You can 
use transparent proxies if you want and no one will even notice, except 
that it'll be faster.

> Anyway, I still want to know if any no cost Distro will be easier than
> Fedora or White box enterprise linux for my 5 tasks: web server,
> internet sharing, mail server, antivirus scanning of the mail, and
> firewall.

Again, they're all going to be /some/ work, and I still vote that it's 
worth your while to use Debian, Slackware, or other distros which are 
commonly used for the purposes you have outlined.
> 
> Also, I've heard some people say they like to use a tiny standalone
> machine as the firewall, using smoothwall or similar, and run their
> web and mail server on a more powerful machine inside the firewall.  I
> see how that might be more secure, because the machine that is
> connected physically to the outside world, has no valuable data on it
> if compromised, but is it worth the trouble?  Isn't Linux very secure
> anyway, so there is very little risk using only one machine for my 5
> tasks?  If it is worth the trouble, it won't add much expense to the
> project, so I'd gladly consider it.  Just convince me.

Yes, that is standard practice and the strategy I would recommend, but I 
would use OpenBSD instead of Linux on it.  As I've probably already 
mentioned, the OpenBSD documentation is excellent and it took me under a 
day to fully configure a box with PPP, NAT, and a good firewall ruleset. 
  Of course, now that I now how, I can set one up in about an hour, so 
once you do it you can easily put one in at home or consult to do it for 
money.

-- 
Franklin M. Siler    UIUC: Undergraduate in Electrical Engineering
Marching Illini Trumpets,  Basketball Band Staff,  ACM SigMation
http://umgawa.bands.uiuc.edu/~fsiler/
0
fsiler (15)
8/8/2004 4:10:58 AM
On Sat, 07 Aug 2004 15:16:47 -0500, Franklin M. Siler wrote:

 Personally I like Debian, particularly for a small 
> server of the variety that you would use to host web/mail over a DSL 
> line.  You can use KNOPPIX to install it if you don't want to deal with 
> the Debian installer, although the Sarge installer is supposed to be 
> pretty nice.

I tried to install Debian a couple of times, the installer completely
baffeled me. I an stalled Libranet which is a Debian base distro with an
install that dummies like me could use. It has the stability of Debain
uses its' .deb packages, The best of 2 worlds

Paul




0
abc9498 (27)
8/8/2004 6:13:01 PM
"Dave Arbok" <rocker1@shegolfs.com> wrote in message
news:f74816b5.0408071131.5b68f553@posting.google.com...
> We are a small business with no IT employees and have about 20 Windows
> ME machines.  None of that is subject to change.  We are installing a
> DSL line, and when we do, we want to improve the way our Internet is
> handled.  I am planning to try to set up a server which the DSL will
> connect to, and will run our web site off the server, as well as
> automatically get our POP3 emails from our outside accounts, and hold
> them until our local computers want to see them.  It should also share
> the internet connection and run a firewall.

maybe it's a good idea to split the 'server' from the nat/firewalling
functionality.  Check out http://www.freesco.info and
http://www.smoothwall.org

>
> We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
> and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
> Linux.
> Is there any other no cost Linux that you would suggest would be
> easier for an absolute beginner (no Linux experience at all) to set up
> this type of a server on?  I know there are specialized mini versions
> of Linux that only act as sharers and firewalls, etc., but I believe
> that we will need the flexibility of a full linux to support future
> expansion as well as the 4 features I mentioned, HTTP Server, POP3,
> Firewall, and Internet sharing.  Feel free to point out if you believe
> there is a better solution.  Also, can Linux speak to most DSL modems,
> or at the least, can most DSL providers come up with something that
> will speak to a Linux system?

Whitebox should be pretty good.  It's advisable that somebody quite
knowledgeable about the subject matter could help you set up a good robust
configuration.  What you are asking is not extremely straight forward if
there is no unix knowledge within the organisation.

1. fetchmail for the pop accounts
2. most likely sendmail to relay for internal IPs
3. web server
4. possibly reverse proxy for web accelleration

Brendon
++++


0
bcaligari1 (23)
8/8/2004 8:33:15 PM
"Dave Arbok" <rocker1@shegolfs.com> wrote in message
news:f74816b5.0408071852.7120974b@posting.google.com...
> "Franklin M. Siler" <fsiler@NOSPAMuiuc.edu> wrote in message
news:<cf3dbf$sjf$1@news.ks.uiuc.edu>...
> > Dave Arbok wrote:
>
> Also, I've heard some people say they like to use a tiny standalone
> machine as the firewall, using smoothwall or similar, and run their
> web and mail server on a more powerful machine inside the firewall.  I
> see how that might be more secure, because the machine that is
> connected physically to the outside world, has no valuable data on it
> if compromised, but is it worth the trouble?  Isn't Linux very secure
> anyway, so there is very little risk using only one machine for my 5
> tasks?  If it is worth the trouble, it won't add much expense to the
> project, so I'd gladly consider it.  Just convince me.

There are a lot of advantages in having a seperate firewall/router.  In
particular, it adds an extra layer of defense, and it means that your most
vulnerable system (i.e., the bit nearest the internet) is running as little
as possible.  If one of your server applications has a security flaw that
exposes a tcp/ip port by mistake (or is induced to do so by a cracker), no
harm is done if all traffic to that port is blocked by the extra firewall.
I would strongly recommend getting a simple firewall/NAT router box and
connecting it between your DSL modem and your linux box.  These things cost
peanuts (assuming you don't want VPN, or other such stuff), are easily
configured by a web browser, and have all ports closed off by default.
Having to actively open holes in the firewall is far safer than having to
close off holes, especially for the less experianced user.




0
david9925 (203)
8/9/2004 9:03:53 AM
"Brendon Caligari" <bcaligari@fireforged.com> wrote in message news:<41168e25$0$58816$bed64819@news.gradwell.net>...
> "Dave Arbok" <rocker1@shegolfs.com> wrote in message
> news:f74816b5.0408071131.5b68f553@posting.google.com...
> > We are a small business with no IT employees and have about 20 Windows
> > ME machines.  None of that is subject to change.  We are installing a
> > DSL line, and when we do, we want to improve the way our Internet is
> > handled.  I am planning to try to set up a Linux server ...
> 
> maybe it's a good idea to split the 'server' from the nat/firewalling
> functionality.  Check out http://www.freesco.info and
> http://www.smoothwall.org
> 
> >
> > We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
> > and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
> > Linux.
> > Is there any other no cost Linux ... easier for an absolute beginner
> > (no Linux experience at all) to set up this type of a server on?  
> 
> Whitebox should be pretty good.  It's advisable that somebody quite
> knowledgeable about the subject matter could help you set up a good robust
> configuration.  What you are asking is not extremely straight forward if
> there is no unix knowledge within the organisation.
> 
> 1. fetchmail for the pop accounts
> 2. most likely sendmail to relay for internal IPs
> 3. web server
> 4. possibly reverse proxy for web accelleration
> 

I appreciate everyone's input.  I know people think that this is too
big a project for a lazy ignorant Windows user to undertake, but
unfortunately, no budget means we have to make do.  I hate living with
dialup, and I can't in good conscience tell them to hook us up to DSL
without any firewall. In any case, I think that the ideas I've heard
have been very helpful.  I'll summarize how things have and have not
changed, and what's up now.

1.  I still like my free time, and want the easiest solution that is
relatively secure.  ANY solution will be an improvement.

2.  It has been implied, and I believe it, that because I know nothing
about what I am doing means it is quite likely I will make mistakes
which would lead to security holes.  If I was an expert, I bet I could
make an all-in-one-box Linux server, doing my 5 tasks that was
acceptably secure.  But, because I am not, I think I will follow the
advice of using two separate boxes, one wimpy box running smoothwall
or a similar firewall, (maybe openbsd- I'll read about it), and the
server I had been planning to do the whole thing, I'll use that for
the other stuff.  That should provide an extra layer of security to
protect from mistakes I make.

3.  People seem to agree that the long life cycle of White Box and
long span of support for security updates will help with my goal of
not having to mess around with this server a lot in the future.  I
also thought of something, this may sound silly but it is a serious
question.  When a Linux distribution has security patches, they would
by definition be for things that were part of that distribution...
i.e., if it came with a certain mail server, it would patch it.  If I
had to add a separate mail server that didn't come with it, then I
wouldn't get those patches the same way, right?  Should I try to find
a distribution that includes all the programs that I think I need, so
I know all the patches will come?  Or do most distributions all have a
mail server, antivirus, etc., and this is not a selling point
difference between them?

4.  I will NOT be running the Web Server for our home page right now. 
Our current web host isn't real expensive, it seemed like a nice
freebie to be able to do it, because we'll have DSL and a Linux
machine, but we will try just the other stuff for a while first, and
if it all seems good then we'll think about taking over the web
server.  For now, best to make it simple.  The cost savings over
dialup is enough to justify the project, I don't need to be able to
replace our web host to make the project a go.

So, that leaves 4 tasks:
A.  Internet sharing&proxy caching  /               B.  Firewall
C.  Get mail, store and serve to the win machines / D.  AV scan the
mail

5.  I've heard that scanning with ClamAV can be processor and memory
intensive.  It seems that the mail storing and AV scanning would
definitely go on the powerful server inside the firewall.

6.  Here's another big question I have.  Task A, all this internet
caching, that seems like that might require computer power too. 
Should that go on the internal machine too?  Or does that normally go
on the firewall box?

Thanks for the insight, and I agree with everyone that in a perfect
world I would either have a budget to hire experts, or be ambitious
enough to want to learn a lot about all of this, but, this isn't a
perfect world.
0
rocker1 (3)
8/9/2004 9:46:12 AM
Dave Arbok wrote:
[snip]
> 6.  Here's another big question I have.  Task A, all this internet
> caching, that seems like that might require computer power too. 
> Should that go on the internal machine too?  Or does that normally go
> on the firewall box?
> 
Glad to hear things are coming along.  One thing I forgot to mention 
about your firewall: you seem to have a relatively small number of 
clients, so you might consider looking into a small router that will do 
the firewalling stuff for you.
    Proxies can be included on the firewall or placed on another 
machine.   I've personally never set up squid or any other HTTP proxy, 
but I've done several internal/caching DNS server installs and they seem 
to help things feel faster.  I really don't know how much benefit your 
~20 clients might see from using a proxy like Squid; it depends a lot on 
what kinds of traffic you do (obviously if you're accessing mostly 
dynamic content it wouldn't help much).

-- 
Franklin M. Siler    UIUC: Undergraduate in Electrical Engineering
Marching Illini Trumpets,  Basketball Band Staff,  ACM SigMation
http://umgawa.bands.uiuc.edu/~fsiler/
0
fsiler (15)
8/9/2004 9:57:22 AM
>
> I appreciate everyone's input.  I know people think that this is too
> big a project for a lazy ignorant Windows user to undertake, but
> unfortunately, no budget means we have to make do.  I hate living with
> dialup, and I can't in good conscience tell them to hook us up to DSL
> without any firewall. In any case, I think that the ideas I've heard
> have been very helpful.  I'll summarize how things have and have not
> changed, and what's up now.
>
> 1.  I still like my free time, and want the easiest solution that is
> relatively secure.  ANY solution will be an improvement.
>
> 2.  It has been implied, and I believe it, that because I know nothing
> about what I am doing means it is quite likely I will make mistakes
> which would lead to security holes.  If I was an expert, I bet I could
> make an all-in-one-box Linux server, doing my 5 tasks that was
> acceptably secure.  But, because I am not, I think I will follow the
> advice of using two separate boxes, one wimpy box running smoothwall
> or a similar firewall, (maybe openbsd- I'll read about it), and the
> server I had been planning to do the whole thing, I'll use that for
> the other stuff.  That should provide an extra layer of security to
> protect from mistakes I make.
>

Buy a dedicated firewall/router, rather than using something like
smoothwall.  They are cheap, easy to configure, are smaller and lower-power
than a dinosaur PC, and will save you a lot of effort.  There's a lot of fun
to be had with linux (or bsd) firewalls (for example, there's the coolness
factor of running a working system in "halt" mode), and you can do far more
with them (traffic shaping, monitoring and logging, etc.), but I would leave
that for when you need it.

>
> So, that leaves 4 tasks:
> A.  Internet sharing&proxy caching  /               B.  Firewall
> C.  Get mail, store and serve to the win machines / D.  AV scan the
> mail
>
> 5.  I've heard that scanning with ClamAV can be processor and memory
> intensive.  It seems that the mail storing and AV scanning would
> definitely go on the powerful server inside the firewall.
>

Think about what sort of mail quantities you are dealing with - ClamAV is
going to take a lot more power to handle hundreds of mails per minute than
hundreds of mails per day.

> 6.  Here's another big question I have.  Task A, all this internet
> caching, that seems like that might require computer power too.
> Should that go on the internal machine too?  Or does that normally go
> on the firewall box?

Caching should not take noticeable processor power.  More memory might help,
but I doubt that caching is something to worry about.  Also, ask yourself
whether web caching is actually relevant - do you have lots of users going
regularly to the same graphics-intensive sites?  Are the users on-line so
much that you are pushing the downstream bandwidth enough to justify the
effort of having a cache?

>
> Thanks for the insight, and I agree with everyone that in a perfect
> world I would either have a budget to hire experts, or be ambitious
> enough to want to learn a lot about all of this, but, this isn't a
> perfect world.



0
david9925 (203)
8/9/2004 10:25:35 AM
David Brown wrote:

> I would strongly recommend getting a simple firewall/NAT router box and
> connecting it between your DSL modem and your linux box.��These�things
> cost peanuts (assuming you don't want VPN, or other such stuff)

Some of them also directly support a VPN and others that don't can be
configured to pass the VPN to some internal system.

-- 

(This space intentionally left blank)
0
james.knott (739)
8/9/2004 11:55:54 AM
"James Knott" <james.knott@rogers.com> wrote in message
news:eDJRc.1580011$Ar.661813@twister01.bloor.is.net.cable.rogers.com...
> David Brown wrote:
>
> > I would strongly recommend getting a simple firewall/NAT router box and
> > connecting it between your DSL modem and your linux box. These things
> > cost peanuts (assuming you don't want VPN, or other such stuff)
>
> Some of them also directly support a VPN and others that don't can be
> configured to pass the VPN to some internal system.
>

Indeed they do - we have a ZyWall 10 at the office and ZyWall 1's at home
offices to support VPNs - having hardware boxes from the same manufacturer
makes configuring the VPNs easy.  My point was merely that if they don't
have VPNs (or other unnecessary features, such as WiFi), they cost very
little - something like $40 at a guess.  And as you say, you can pass VPNs
through "simple" routers anyway.



0
david9925 (203)
8/9/2004 12:33:55 PM
On 7 Aug 2004 12:31:52 -0700, rocker1@shegolfs.com (Dave Arbok) wrote:

>We are a small business with no IT employees and have about 20 Windows
>ME machines.  None of that is subject to change.  We are installing a
>DSL line, and when we do, we want to improve the way our Internet is
>handled.  I am planning to try to set up a server which the DSL will
>connect to, and will run our web site off the server, as well as
>automatically get our POP3 emails from our outside accounts, and hold
>them until our local computers want to see them.  It should also share
>the internet connection and run a firewall.

The ideal thing would be to separate firewall/routing from at least the web
server if not the mail server on the principle that the fewer services
running on a server, the harder it is to compromise it.

Plus it breaks the project into several clearly defined areas -
router/firewall, email and webserver which can be implemented on a stage by
stage basis.


>We are only considering no cost versions of Linux for this purpose,
>and we were planning on running either Fedora or White box enterprise
>Linux.
>Is there any other no cost Linux that you would suggest would be
>easier for an absolute beginner (no Linux experience at all) to set up
>this type of a server on?  I know there are specialized mini versions
>of Linux that only act as sharers and firewalls, etc., but I believe
>that we will need the flexibility of a full linux to support future
>expansion as well as the 4 features I mentioned, HTTP Server, POP3,
>Firewall, and Internet sharing.  Feel free to point out if you believe
>there is a better solution.

e-smith?

Probably somewhat dated (based on RH 7.3) but might be worth a look.

Mitel may provide a (differently named?) commercial version but the free
version is available.

At the other extreme there is Astaro...

(Probably you won't be able to run your webserver on it though!)

Instructive to look at the calculator for system resources...

>  Also, can Linux speak to most DSL modems,
>or at the least, can most DSL providers come up with something that
>will speak to a Linux system?


-- 

Regards,

David
0
David2422 (4)
8/9/2004 2:25:22 PM
On Mon, 9 Aug 2004 09:46:12 UTC, rocker1@shegolfs.com (Dave Arbok) 
wrote:

> "Brendon Caligari" <bcaligari@fireforged.com> wrote in message news:<41168e25$0$58816$bed64819@news.gradwell.net>...
> > "Dave Arbok" <rocker1@shegolfs.com> wrote in message
> > ... I am planning to try to set up a Linux server ...

> I appreciate everyone's input. 
> So, that leaves 4 tasks:
> A.  Internet sharing&proxy caching  
> B.  Firewall
> C.  Get mail, store and serve to the win machines / D.  AV scan the
> mail


You might want to look at the Smoothwall Express and ClarkConnect 
linux distros. These are small dedicated router/firewall distros. 
The March 2004 issue of Linux Format    www.linuxformat.co.uk had 
reviews of 6 different firewalls. (My knowledge is limited to reading 
the article YMMV!) The Smoothwall and ClarkConnect distros were the 
recommended distros for a small business/home setup.  Try 
smoothwall.org and clarkconnect.org    Both are free.

Smoothwall is entirely web driven so you don't have to know a raft of 
obscure command line switches. It will handle 3 NICS so you can have 
an external DSL connection, a DMZ zone connection for web-servers etc.
and an internal connection. Smoothwall takes care of port forwarding 
incoming traffic to the proper machine/interface. It also handles VPNs
and squid proxying. It sounds very well thought out and should cover 
exactly what you are trying to do under A and B above. A mailserver 
and spamassassin (prefereably on a different box in the DMZ) will 
cover C and D.

Not necessarily simple to get it all up and running, because you will 
need a fair knowledge of IP networking, and will have to set up a 
proxy and a mailserver but not impossible, especially if you have some
technical Linux help available to hold your hand.

Geoff


0
8/10/2004 2:55:44 PM
Reply:

Similar Artilces:

IN your opinion what is the best way to share files between LInux and IN your opinion what is the best way to share files between LInux and MAC OS X?
IN your opinion what is the best way to share files between LInux and MAC OS X? I set up SAMBA on the LInux machine and the MAC (running the very latest OSX) can copy files to the SAMBA share at lightning speeds. When I try and copy files from the LInux machine to the Mac they take an eternity. So slow in fact I have to kill the process . I would appreciate any thoughts on why that maybe and also if there is a better way to share files (I guess HTTP-FTP would be the most sensible option ). navti wrote: > IN your opinion what is the best way to share files between LInux and > MAC O...

[News] Making Linux More Like OS X and OS X More Like Linux
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Mac OS X - Highly Customized Linux ,----[ Quote ] | Few players in the Linux arena creates their Linux distro to look like Mac OS | X or Windows.... | | Here I'm going to list some distro which looks like Mac OS. `---- http://linuxtreat.blogspot.com/2008/07/mac-os-x-highly-customized-linux.html A Linux User's Guide to Mac ,----[ Quote ] | Take a deep breath and repeat after me: A computer is just a tool. It is only | so good as it serves to make life better for users. A "better" life is | obviously not the same thing for everyone. For me, it means making my Mac | more like Linux, as I began to discuss in my last article. `---- http://www.ofb.biz/safari/article/474.html Yesterday: Ubuntu: Challenge the Mac ,----[ Quote ] | Normally I would just provide a Diigo link to this if it weren’t something | I’ve been saying a lot in talks. Over at InformationWeek, Serdar Yegulaip was | a piece called “Shuttleworth’s Ubuntu Ambitions: Challenge the Mac”. He | quotes Mark Shuttleworth saying in a Datamation article: | |     … our goal, very simply, is to make sure the Free software ecosystem can |     deliver a Mac OS-like experience, or an experience that will compete with |     the Mac OS. | | I think this is exactly right. It’s time to look past Windows, even with its | huge installed base, as any sort of “gold standard” (as Mark calls it), | especially for user interface. ...

[News] Many Reasons for Linux on the Server; GNU/Linux Beats Mac OS X
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1 Seven Reasons to Move to Linux ,----[ Quote ] | Selling businesses on the benefits of Linux has been a tough proposition for | many years. Common reasons cited for not moving to the open-source operating | system include system complexity, lack of in-house IT skills and a shortage | of business applications. Both the open-source software community and the | vendor world have done a lot to address these shortcomings, and the inroads | gained are plain for all to see. `---- http://www.smallbusinesscomputing.com/testdrive/article.php/3756141 ...

Linux should disown elementary OS Linux for the Scam that it is.
No Problem'o, DooFuS. I can blame it all on the Linux Mint TEXT size being = too small on my 19 inch monitor. As Moi was saying... I tried two more additional downloads of elementary OS Linux. Both of them= likewise failed. While they could have been discriminating against Moi for his ZERO contribu= tion, I will be damned if I am going to PAY GOOD money for something when t= here is no guarantee that the stupid DOWNLOAD wont fail, JUST TO FIND OUT t= hat it WONT work at all on my computer hardware, let alone whether OR NOT i= t will actually do what is being claimed. Moi has NEVER experienced a download problem with Linux Mint. From what I have seen, elementary OS Linux is a scam, much like those Windo= ws come ons that claim that they can fix your computer problems merely by m= ucking with the Windows Registry. The Linux World should disown elementary OS Linux for being the Scam that i= t is. Or, can any phony distro claim to be Linux? Yeah, where are the Linu= x police? On 7/8/2015 8:22 AM, John Gohde wrote: > No Problem'o, DooFuS. I can blame it all on the Linux Mint TEXT size > being too small on my 19 inch monitor. I blame it on your small cerebrum. > The Linux World should disown elementary OS Linux for being the Scam > that it is. Or, can any phony distro claim to be Linux? Yeah, where > are the Linux police? The Linux police are outside your door right now. I'm not kidding. Look out...

Is Linux the best in all OS areas?
Can anyone fill in the blanks on this? I am considering buying RHAT or another Linux stock as I think Linux is leading in many OS areas and wondering if this is true. Also, what other stocks are good Linux plays perhaps? LNUX, MDKFF, SUNW, NOVL? Is Linux the best operating system for: Server OS? Yes, RedHat PC user? Yes, Mandrake Tech saavy user? Yes, Gentoo Graphics manipulation OS? Real-time OS? Embedded OS? MPP (loosely coupled) OS? Yes. Beowulf. Massively SMP OS? (How many processors have been run under 1 Linux OS instance?) Gaming OS? PDA OS? Customizeable for performance? ...

[News] [Linux] Linux Has Advantage in the Mobile OS World
How Linux morphed from a server to a mobile OS ,----[ Quote ] | When evaluating Linux as a possible OS candidate, it is important to | remember that the Linux "model" for mobile devices is horizontal. That | is, Linux is not presented as a vertically integrated top to bottom | solution for a mobile device supplied by one vendor. | | It's a sharp contrast to the other OS suppliers such as Microsoft | with Windows Mobile, Symbian and PalmSource. These suppliers | support a highly integrated software stack, incorporating not | only an OS but also extensive middleware and application layer | pieces. Arguably the price for such integration is lack of | flexibility and loss of control. `---- http://www.wirelessnetdesignline.com/howto/broadband/199600344;jsessionid=N1IAB5VKZRD0QQSNDLRCKH0CJUNN2JVN http://tinyurl.com/2c3z7z Microsoft taps mobiles for developing world ,----[ Quote ] | Microsoft is facing fierce competition from Linux, however, most | notably the One Laptop per Child project to ship low cost | notebooks to schools in developing nations. | | Linux vendor Red Hat unveiled a Global Desktop last week | targeting computers at small and medium sized businesses as | well as governments in third world nations. `---- http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2189936/microsoft-taps-mobile-tech Related: 70 percent of smartphones use Symbian ,----[ Quote ] | At 3GSM it became clear that 70 percent of all smartphones use Symbian. | | Linux accounts for 16.9 perc...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331157603)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331157603) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/problem solving skills MCSE, CNE or RHCE certifcations Scope: The selected candidate will be responsible for executing tests for server, storage, and networking products. Candidate may research technology & create new tests. As a representative of the test group and part of the cross-functional development team, the individual will be responsible for performing test activities for assigned projects, providing test status, providing detailed test reports, assisting engineers in fault isolation and resolution. Please send your current resume in confidence to <staffing@eurosoft-inc.com> ..45331157603. ...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45329959094)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45329959094) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331757602)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331757602) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331414406)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331414406) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45330557606)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45330557606) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332057607)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332057607) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331714406)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331714406) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332957604)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332957604) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45330557606)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45330557606) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45330514401)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45330514401) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331457604)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331457604) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332657608)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332657608) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/problem solving...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332032407)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332032407) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331714406)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331714406) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332332402)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332332402) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332032407)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332032407) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331414406)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45331414406) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/p...

US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332614407)
US-TX-Round Rock: Test Technician, Linux or Netware, Server OS, Server HW; (45332614407) ======================================================================================== Position: Test Technician Reference: SMC01670 Location: Round Rock TX Duration: Skills: Linux or Netware experience Server, storage and netwrok technologies exp. Exp with installation and configuration of server OS's. RAID Basic understanding of server hardware. OS expertise. Strong troubleshooting/problem solving...

Web resources about - Which Linux OS best for beginner to setup as Web / Mail server / Internet sharer and firewall? - comp.os.linux.networking

Endian Firewall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. , a non-profit organization.

China’s firewall cracks: Facebook allowed in free-trade zone of Shanghai
... out that China looks quite dark. That may change soon. According to the South China Morning Post , Beijing is lifting the Internet firewall ...

NSA Firewall - Don't be spied on! on the App Store on iTunes
Get NSA Firewall - Don't be spied on! on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.

Great Firewall of China - Flickr - Photo Sharing!
... has blocked access to all images on Flickr in China. http://www.flickr.com/help/forum/41998/ Oops! My blog too! http://www.greatfirewallofchina.org/ ...

"Firewall" (Say NO to #SOPA and #Protect-IP) - YouTube
Music and Lyrics by Leah Kauffman Visit http://www.voteforthenet.com and http://www.stopcensorship.org to save the internet! Buy single on iTunes ...

Security appliances are riddled with serious vulnerabilities, researcher says - firewalls, Citrix, antispam ...
The majority of email and Web gateways, firewalls, remote access servers, UTM (united threat management) systems and other security appliances ...

Google encrypts China searches, defying Great Firewall
Google has begun routinely encrypting web searches conducted in China, posing a bold new challenge to that nation's powerful system for censoring ...

Forget the firewall, it's time to cosy up to your data
Businesses must go beyond the ‘perimeter’ approach to security and focus on understanding the nature of their data and managing access accordingly. ...

FBI director: Forget firewalls, Sabu proves attribution wins domestic cyber war
In a call to arms aimed at the private sector, the FBI’s director of 11 years Robert S. Mueller has declared that war on the new 'terror', cyber, ...

Great Firewall 'upgrade' hits China internet users
... access to internet disrupted. Chinese authorities who have long sought to limit access to information have reinforced the so-called Great Firewall ...

Resources last updated: 3/14/2016 1:03:29 PM