f



Anyone using Canon Pixma with non-canon cartridges?

Hello

I need to do short and long runs of flyers for mailing (mostly black text, some photos)

I will never need to print photos on photo quality paper.

I can get replacement cartridges very, very cheap which makes it less expensive in the long run than getting a colour laser printer.

I would like to know your personal experience using the ip4000 or ip5000 with replacement cartridges continously........ has anyone used them non-stop since they bought their printer?  How many have you used so far?  Please mention if you refill yourself or buy no-name cartridges ready to go.  How is your print quality now compared to the original cartridge the printer came with?

The main problem with using these dodgy cartridges appears to be clogging of the print head.  I would be interested in anyone's thoughts on which printer would be best with non-original cartridges.  Would the ip4000 with the 2 picoliter droplets be better than the ip5000 with the 1 picolitre droplets, as it is wider and therefore less chance of clogging?
0
Zan
11/2/2004 3:27:11 AM
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"Zan" <zan5hin@iinet.net.au>
wrotenews:4186fd41$1_2@news.melbourne.pipenetworks.com: 

> Hello
> 
> I need to do short and long runs of flyers for mailing (mostly black
> text, some photos) 
> 
> I will never need to print photos on photo quality paper.
> 
> I can get replacement cartridges very, very cheap which makes it less
> expensive in the long run than getting a colour laser printer. 
> 
> I would like to know your personal experience using the ip4000 or ip5000
> with replacement cartridges continously........ has anyone used them
> non-stop since they bought their printer?  How many have you used so
> far?  Please mention if you refill yourself or buy no-name cartridges
> ready to go.  How is your print quality now compared to the original
> cartridge the printer came with? 
> 
> The main problem with using these dodgy cartridges appears to be
> clogging of the print head.  I would be interested in anyone's thoughts
> on which printer would be best with non-original cartridges.  Would the
> ip4000 with the 2 picoliter droplets be better than the ip5000 with the
> 1 picolitre droplets, as it is wider and therefore less chance of
> clogging? 
> 

I seriously think that all those rumors and innuendos about "dodgy" carts 
and ink are just that...put out by the printer companies.

See, they make all their profits on carts.  Hell, the whole of HP computer 
and everything is only profitable because of HP cart sales!  Carly Fiorina 
made off with over 300 million dollars all told from the shareholders of 
HP, and all that was cart profits!

The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads me 
to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, and they 
sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that they can't 
say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales of bulk ink to 
HP and Canon et al.

The formula and the ink is pretty basic.

I've been refilling my carts for years and have never had a problem you've 
described.
My Epson piece of shit went toast because, it's an epson, not becuase of 
the ink.  It clogs up in a heartbeat.

Those rumors are ciculated to keep you paying $48 for a cartridge that can 
be refilled for under $2.00 by yourself.

Hell, Epson is so greedy for cart sales that they have tiny chip on their 
carts that are read by the printer if they're ever taken out and re-
installed....you have to buy a special chip reprogramer for &17.00 on line 
to refill those carts!  But someone figured out how to do it and is selling 
them!  Yah!  
Another reason why I'll never buy epson again.

I bought my canon because it's so simple to refill them.

-- 
---Mapanari---
0
Mapanari
3/31/2005 11:53:06 PM

Mapanari wrote:

>"Zan" <zan5hin@iinet.net.au>
>wrotenews:4186fd41$1_2@news.melbourne.pipenetworks.com: 
>
>  
>
>>Hello
>>
>>I need to do short and long runs of flyers for mailing (mostly black
>>text, some photos) 
>>
>>I will never need to print photos on photo quality paper.
>>
>>I can get replacement cartridges very, very cheap which makes it less
>>expensive in the long run than getting a colour laser printer. 
>>
>>I would like to know your personal experience using the ip4000 or ip5000
>>with replacement cartridges continously........ has anyone used them
>>non-stop since they bought their printer?  How many have you used so
>>far?  Please mention if you refill yourself or buy no-name cartridges
>>ready to go.  How is your print quality now compared to the original
>>cartridge the printer came with? 
>>
>>The main problem with using these dodgy cartridges appears to be
>>clogging of the print head.  I would be interested in anyone's thoughts
>>on which printer would be best with non-original cartridges.  Would the
>>ip4000 with the 2 picoliter droplets be better than the ip5000 with the
>>1 picolitre droplets, as it is wider and therefore less chance of
>>clogging? 
>>
>>    
>>
>
>I seriously think that all those rumors and innuendos about "dodgy" carts 
>and ink are just that...put out by the printer companies.
>  
>

Some but not all.  I spoke to a guy buying Canon OEM because the dodgies 
clogged his printhead in his i960.  The could not remember the name the 
dodge called himself - maybe a Chrysler? :-)

>See, they make all their profits on carts.  Hell, the whole of HP computer 
>and everything is only profitable because of HP cart sales!  Carly Fiorina 
>made off with over 300 million dollars all told from the shareholders of 
>HP, and all that was cart profits!
>  
>

Well she has brains, looks and money.  Wouldn't you like to?

>The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads me 
>to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, and they 
>sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; 
>
They are made to the Printer Mfg specifications and formulaes so the 
exact stuff is not sold.

>with the caveat that they can't 
>say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales of bulk ink to 
>HP and Canon et al.
>
>The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>
>I've been refilling my carts for years and have never had a problem you've 
>described.
>My Epson piece of shit went toast because, it's an epson, not becuase of 
>the ink.  It clogs up in a heartbeat.
>
>Those rumors are ciculated to keep you paying $48 for a cartridge that can 
>be refilled for under $2.00 by yourself.
>  
>

I buy Canon OEM for $9.00 a cart

>Hell, Epson is so greedy for cart sales that they have tiny chip on their 
>carts that are read by the printer if they're ever taken out and re-
>installed....you have to buy a special chip reprogramer for &17.00 on line 
>to refill those carts!  But someone figured out how to do it and is selling 
>them!  Yah!  
>  
>

WhoRay for them.

>Another reason why I'll never buy epson again.
>
>I bought my canon because it's so simple to refill them.
>
>  
>
0
measekite
4/1/2005 1:49:19 AM
"Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
> The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads me
> to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, and they
> sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that they can't
> say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales of bulk ink to
> HP and Canon et al.
>
> The formula and the ink is pretty basic.

Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives optimum 
lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image quality, optical 
density, color balance and other parameters while still maintaining nozzle 
health is not something printer manufacturers just pick off the shelf.  Printer 
companies invest heavily in ink chemistry and they typically own the 
intellectual property of given formulations.  HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred 
of ink related patents.

- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP


0
Bob
4/1/2005 3:02:56 AM
I agree with Bob, that a great deal of investment is made in designing
the OEM inks. However, many of these designs (which they patent) are
not so much improvements as they are designed to make it difficult to
replicate without patent violation. Now this is not the case in every
patent they make regarding inks, but I've seen some of the Canon, HP,
and Epson patents and it looks like every thing they do they get a
patent for it, whether it has some benefit or not. Given the prices HP
and other companies charge for the cartridges they well afford to
obtain and enforce such patents.

Don't get me wrong, I love HP laser printers (I can live without their
inkjets). But I've used both OEM and 3rd party party products in all
the printers I have available to me and I know that there are 3rd party
solutions that work just as well as the OEM, without killing the
machines.

However, I believe that 3rd party solutions are best used by those who
have the time and abilty to work with their equipment or who can find a
3rd party source thay can trust (referrals from a trusted friend who
can demonstrate their use is always good). I've made 3rd party
solutions into a business and know first hand that their are both well
made and p*** poor sources of 3rd party products out there.

That said, it does not mean that alternate sources can't be just as
good. A great deal of money is invested by 3rd party ink manufacturers
(some of whom act as the OEM co-manufacturer for companies such as HP,
Canon , Epson , Lexmark) in designing inks and toners which replicate
the characteristics of the formulations with patented characteristics
without violating patents. Keep in mind that a good 3rd party solution
may not be just the ink or toner alone, but usually include alternate
media, cartridges and/or processes which permit the 3rd party product
to work like the OEM. The level of involvement you wish to make in your
3rd party solution quite often determines how well it works for your
specific needs. OEM solutions presented by the printer maker are fast
and easy, but you pay the price, since these companies do invest a
great deal of money to make it fast and easy. So the price you pay is
for the technology which makes the printers as easy to use and maintain
as possible with the minimal amount of involvement on your end other
than to click and print.

0
WeInk_TechSupport
4/1/2005 4:59:21 AM
measekite <measekite@yahoo.com>
wrotenews:zM13e.5383$FN4.3354@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com: 


>>
>>I seriously think that all those rumors and innuendos about "dodgy"
>>carts and ink are just that...put out by the printer companies.
>>  
>>
> 
> Some but not all.  I spoke to a guy buying Canon OEM because the dodgies
> clogged his printhead in his i960.  The could not remember the name the 
> dodge called himself - maybe a Chrysler? :-)

Was he really ugly, overpriced and badly made? His momma must have been a 
Dodge Magnum 300.  <s>


> 
>>See, they make all their profits on carts.  Hell, the whole of HP
>>computer and everything is only profitable because of HP cart sales! 
>>Carly Fiorina made off with over 300 million dollars all told from the
>>shareholders of HP, and all that was cart profits!
>>  
>>
> 
> Well she has brains, looks and money.  Wouldn't you like to?

Well, yes...but there are a lot of things I would like to do if I could get 
away with them...like raping underage girls, screwing cattle on the public 
streets, robbing liquer stores when I run dry and shooting out red-light 
cameras....but they're against the law.

In the old days, the corporate rape of PUBLICALLY owned companies would 
send you to jail.

These days, with government owned and operated by big business, it seems to 
be perfectly fine to take all the net profits from the shareholders, and 
stuff it right into your pockets.

> 
>>The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads
>>me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, and
>>they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; 
>>
> They are made to the Printer Mfg specifications and formulaes so the 
> exact stuff is not sold.

.....and, son, when you buy bulk ink online, they ask you what brand and 
model you're buying for and match you up with the bulk they sell.
Verstanzi?

> 
>>with the caveat that they can't 
>>say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales of bulk ink
>>to HP and Canon et al.
>>
>>The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>
>>I've been refilling my carts for years and have never had a problem
>>you've described.
>>My Epson piece of shit went toast because, it's an epson, not becuase of
>>the ink.  It clogs up in a heartbeat.
>>
>>Those rumors are ciculated to keep you paying $48 for a cartridge that
>>can be refilled for under $2.00 by yourself.
>>  
>>
> 
> I buy Canon OEM for $9.00 a cart

If you're talking about bci 3 or 6 series, you're seriously overpaying.  A 
tiny bit of research led me to $4.99 per color cart, black included.



-- 
---Mapanari---
0
Mapanari
4/3/2005 9:13:01 PM
"Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com: 

> 
> "Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
> news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>> The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads
>> me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, and
>> they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that
>> they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales
>> of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>
>> The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
> 
> Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives optimum 
> lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image quality,
> optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
> maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
> pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
> and they typically own the intellectual property of given formulations. 
> HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related patents.
> 
> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
> 
> 
> 

Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will help 
clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better milage....and 
yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS Refinary depot every 
morning from every station and refill their tanker trucks with the same 
gas.

And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas milage by 
using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, which has water in 
it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c a gallon too!

Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media consumption 
market.

Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the diference 
is in advertising, not physical properties.


-- 
---Mapanari---
0
Mapanari
4/3/2005 9:17:13 PM

Mapanari wrote:

>"Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com: 
>
>  
>
>>"Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>    
>>
>>>The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads
>>>me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, and
>>>they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that
>>>they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales
>>>of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>
>>>The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>>      
>>>
>>Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives optimum 
>>lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image quality,
>>optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
>>and they typically own the intellectual property of given formulations. 
>>HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related patents.
>>
>>- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>
>>
>>
>>    
>>
>
>Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will help 
>clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better milage....and 
>yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS Refinary depot every 
>morning from every station and refill their tanker trucks with the same 
>gas.
>
>And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas milage by 
>using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, which has water in 
>it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c a gallon too!
>
>Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media consumption 
>market.
>
>Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the diference 
>is in advertising, not physical properties.
>  
>

And that is why you hear of printhead clogs all over this NG.  And the 
majority of the users reporting these problems are not using OEM BRANDED 
inks.

>
>  
>
0
measekite
4/4/2005 6:48:58 AM
"Son" you really don't know what you are speaking of, about gasoline or 
about inks.  In my neck of the woods, people like you are referred to 
(in polite circles) as "Sophomores" it's greek and it means "wise 
foolish" because you think you know a great deal more than you do.

You are correct that gas is often refined at a centralized locale and 
that the companies use each others refineries and trucking, because it 
makes no sense at all to ship the gasoline hundreds of miles when their 
is a much closer refinery or distribution point.  However, what makes 
gasoline unique and cost different amounts, other than some distilling 
properties, is additives.  And additives are just that, they are added 
to the gasoline either in the tanker itself, at the refinery just as it 
is pumped, or sometimes even at the gas station.

And it is these additives that often do make a difference in 
performance.  There are studies done by independent research facilities 
that prove all gasoline is not the same.  Some additives improve 
combustion, or change flash point temperature, or reduce carbon build up.

Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, but 
  that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least wear. 
Just because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an engine runs 
well and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas mileage doesn't 
mean it doesn't do so.

And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink formulations, 
and if you had any understanding of the complexities of the technologies 
involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer you got a year's use 
out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the marvel of a printer 
capable of such precision costing so little.

I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.

Art


Mapanari wrote:

> "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
> wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com: 
> 
> 
>>"Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>
>>>The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads
>>>me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, and
>>>they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that
>>>they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales
>>>of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>
>>>The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>
>>Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives optimum 
>>lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image quality,
>>optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
>>and they typically own the intellectual property of given formulations. 
>>HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related patents.
>>
>>- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>
>>
>>
> 
> 
> Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will help 
> clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better milage....and 
> yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS Refinary depot every 
> morning from every station and refill their tanker trucks with the same 
> gas.
> 
> And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas milage by 
> using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, which has water in 
> it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c a gallon too!
> 
> Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media consumption 
> market.
> 
> Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the diference 
> is in advertising, not physical properties.
> 
> 
0
Arthur
4/4/2005 11:16:41 AM
In article <tm94e.150918$gJ3.139225@clgrps13>, artistic@telus.net says...
> Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
> required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, but 
>   that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least wear. 
> Just because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an engine runs 
> well and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas mileage doesn't 
> mean it doesn't do so.
> 
> And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
> taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink formulations, 
> and if you had any understanding of the complexities of the technologies 
> involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer you got a year's use 
> out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the marvel of a printer 
> capable of such precision costing so little.
> 
> I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
> things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.
> 
> Art
> 
> 

I have used third party inks for years with Canon printers (going all the way 
back to the BJC-600) and I have found that if you buy high quality ink, you 
wonr have a problem.

As a matter of fact, the only Canon print head Ive had fail on me (so far) 
never had anything other than OEM ink in it.

It was in one of my i950 printers. After about six months of daily use, it 
simply wouldnt print Magenta any more.

I called Canon Tech. support and they put me through a few simple test (which 
I had already done, and then some), and at the end of maybe 20 minutes, the 
tech decided the head needed replacement.

All he required of me was a name, address, and serial number of the printer.

New head arrived within 3 days.

I dont shop for price when I buy ink, rather I stick with what I found early 
on, and so far, it has worked well for me.

For my Canon printers (right now 2 I960, 1 ip4000, 1I950) I use ink from MIS, 
and/or Formulabs. I do not buy generic carts prefilled, I buy OEM carts and 
refill them and I buy empty carts from MIS.


I do NOT mix inkbrands. If a printer has MIS ink in it I simply put a piece 
of masking tape on it (uaually under the lid) with a big letter M on it, and 
a big letter F goes on the printer with Formulabs.

I do, from time to time change the ink from one brand to another in a given 
printer, but ONLY after a good "flushing" with distilled water mixed with 
about 10% household Ammonia.

Since January 1 2005 I have printed over 300 8x10" photos, and about 150 
5x7" photos (going by the difference in paper invetory between then and now) 
and other than a cleaning cycle right after changing carts, no other 
maintenance has been required on the two printers used. (ip400, and my oldest 
I960).

I do recommend however, if you are refilling Canon Cartridges, dont wait 
'till the cartridge is EMPTY.. replace the cart when the indicator says LOW.  
That way you never have a situation where the sponge dries out, and you dont 
have to "prime" the sponge.

I keep about ten sets of carts, filled and ready, and when there are more 
than three or four carts waiting to be filled, I do them all at once, giving 
them about ten minutes to "equalize .(10 minutes is enough time for the 
sponge to fill up if it was low). After the 10 minute wait, I top off any 
carts that have dropped in level when the sponge filled up, then tape over 
ALL openings on the carts, including the vents. Then I store them 'till I 
need them.

REMEMBER THIS IF YOU REFILL:

Any place that sells bulk ink that says "this ink works in all unkjet 
printers" is lying.

There is NO one ink that will work in more than one type of printer reliably.

Strange as it is, those inks seem to be formulated to work in Lexmark 
printers. My friend buys generic refill ink at Sears (at least he did 'till 
they stopped selling it) and it worked in his Lexmark 3 in one. But then we 
are talking Lexmark, not a real printer.

-- 
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
0
Larry
4/4/2005 1:52:57 PM

Arthur Entlich wrote:

> "Son" you really don't know what you are speaking of, about gasoline 
> or about inks.  In my neck of the woods, people like you are referred 
> to (in polite circles) as "Sophomores" it's greek and it means "wise 
> foolish" because you think you know a great deal more than you do.
>
> You are correct that gas is often refined at a centralized locale and 
> that the companies use each others refineries and trucking, because it 
> makes no sense at all to ship the gasoline hundreds of miles when 
> their is a much closer refinery or distribution point.  However, what 
> makes gasoline unique and cost different amounts, other than some 
> distilling properties, is additives.  And additives are just that, 
> they are added to the gasoline either in the tanker itself, at the 
> refinery just as it is pumped, or sometimes even at the gas station.


Hooray!  Perfectly said.  >:o

>
> And it is these additives that often do make a difference in 
> performance.  There are studies done by independent research 
> facilities that prove all gasoline is not the same.  Some additives 
> improve combustion, or change flash point temperature, or reduce 
> carbon build up.
>
> Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
> required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, 
> but  that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least 
> wear. Just because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an 
> engine runs well and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas 
> mileage doesn't mean it doesn't do so.
>
> And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
> taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink 
> formulations, and if you had any understanding of the complexities of 
> the technologies involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer 
> you got a year's use out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the 
> marvel of a printer capable of such precision costing so little.
>
> I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
> things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.


But I would like to give her a :-* .

>
> Art
>
>
> Mapanari wrote:
>
>> "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>> wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com:
>>
>>> "Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>> news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>>
>>>> The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads
>>>> me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, 
>>>> and
>>>> they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that
>>>> they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales
>>>> of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>>
>>>> The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>>
>>>
>>> Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives 
>>> optimum lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image 
>>> quality,
>>> optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>> maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>> pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
>>> and they typically own the intellectual property of given 
>>> formulations. HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related patents.
>>>
>>> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will 
>> help clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better 
>> milage....and yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS 
>> Refinary depot every morning from every station and refill their 
>> tanker trucks with the same gas.
>>
>> And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas 
>> milage by using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, 
>> which has water in it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c 
>> a gallon too!
>>
>> Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media 
>> consumption market.
>>
>> Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the 
>> diference is in advertising, not physical properties.
>>
>>
0
measekite
4/4/2005 6:58:48 PM

Larry wrote:

>In article <tm94e.150918$gJ3.139225@clgrps13>, artistic@telus.net says...
>  
>
>>Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
>>required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, but 
>>  that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least wear. 
>>Just because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an engine runs 
>>well and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas mileage doesn't 
>>mean it doesn't do so.
>>
>>And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
>>taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink formulations, 
>>and if you had any understanding of the complexities of the technologies 
>>involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer you got a year's use 
>>out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the marvel of a printer 
>>capable of such precision costing so little.
>>
>>I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
>>things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.
>>
>>Art
>>
>>
>>    
>>
>
>I have used third party inks for years with Canon printers (going all the way 
>back to the BJC-600) and I have found that if you buy high quality ink, you 
>wonr have a problem.
>  
>
Without real BRANDING by a real manufacturer/formulator; how do you tell 
real quality?

>As a matter of fact, the only Canon print head Ive had fail on me (so far) 
>never had anything other than OEM ink in it.
>
>It was in one of my i950 printers. After about six months of daily use, it 
>simply wouldnt print Magenta any more.
>
>I called Canon Tech. support and they put me through a few simple test (which 
>I had already done, and then some), and at the end of maybe 20 minutes, the 
>tech decided the head needed replacement.
>
>All he required of me was a name, address, and serial number of the printer.
>
>New head arrived within 3 days.
>
>I dont shop for price when I buy ink, rather I stick with what I found early 
>on, and so far, it has worked well for me.
>
>For my Canon printers (right now 2 I960, 1 ip4000, 1I950) I use ink from MIS, 
>and/or Formulabs. I do not buy generic carts prefilled, I buy OEM carts and 
>refill them and I buy empty carts from MIS.
>
>
>I do NOT mix inkbrands. If a printer has MIS ink in it I simply put a piece 
>of masking tape on it (uaually under the lid) with a big letter M on it, and 
>a big letter F goes on the printer with Formulabs.
>
>I do, from time to time change the ink from one brand to another in a given 
>printer, but ONLY after a good "flushing" with distilled water mixed with 
>about 10% household Ammonia.
>
>Since January 1 2005 I have printed over 300 8x10" photos, and about 150 
>5x7" photos (going by the difference in paper invetory between then and now) 
>and other than a cleaning cycle right after changing carts, no other 
>maintenance has been required on the two printers used. (ip400, and my oldest 
>I960).
>
>I do recommend however, if you are refilling Canon Cartridges, dont wait 
>'till the cartridge is EMPTY.. replace the cart when the indicator says LOW.  
>That way you never have a situation where the sponge dries out, and you dont 
>have to "prime" the sponge.
>
>I keep about ten sets of carts, filled and ready, and when there are more 
>than three or four carts waiting to be filled, I do them all at once, giving 
>them about ten minutes to "equalize .(10 minutes is enough time for the 
>sponge to fill up if it was low). After the 10 minute wait, I top off any 
>carts that have dropped in level when the sponge filled up, then tape over 
>ALL openings on the carts, including the vents. Then I store them 'till I 
>need them.
>
>REMEMBER THIS IF YOU REFILL:
>
>Any place that sells bulk ink that says "this ink works in all unkjet 
>printers" is lying.
>
>There is NO one ink that will work in more than one type of printer reliably.
>
>Strange as it is, those inks seem to be formulated to work in Lexmark 
>printers. My friend buys generic refill ink at Sears (at least he did 'till 
>they stopped selling it) and it worked in his Lexmark 3 in one. But then we 
>are talking Lexmark, not a real printer.
>
>  
>
0
measekite
4/4/2005 7:13:11 PM
In article <blg4e.7934$FN4.6023@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>, 
measekite@yahoo.com says...
> Without real BRANDING by a real manufacturer/formulator; how do you tell 
> real quality?
> 

Didn't you read the whole post???

I only use Three inks:

OEM
MIS
Formulabs

Thats it, thats all, out of the few dozen brands I've used over the years.

Those are the ones I rely on.

Im unclear as to whether MIS makes its own ink or not, but they do sell a 
quality product. 

They DO NOT SELL CHEAP "COMPATABLE" cartridges with MIS ink in them.

There is (or used to be) a warning onthe page where you order the cartridges 
telling you that they are NOT filled with MIS ink.

AFAIK there are several places where you can purchase Formulabs ink, but to 
get MIS ink you must deal with MIS.

They have other sites (or did have) but all of them are MIS Associates. 
www.inksupply.com is the one I use for MIS inks..


-- 
Larry Lynch
Mystic, Ct.
0
Larry
4/4/2005 7:43:11 PM
I agree with most everything you say here.  If a person is going to use 
a 3rd party ink, try to buy for a reputable company with a good history, 
go for the ink set that provides the features you need, don't buy 
totally generic inks, they do need to be formulated for the printer 
brand and sometimes model, don't mix and match in the same printer, etc. 
  Don't be surprised if you have to alter your profiles with some inks.

However, recognize than OEM inks often do have some special 
characteristics, and one may be longevity of the print.  Pigment inks, 
and HPs PhotoSmart dye inks have good fade resistant characteristics.
And remember that paper is also important when it comes to image quality 
and permanence.

Art

Larry wrote:

> In article <tm94e.150918$gJ3.139225@clgrps13>, artistic@telus.net says...
> 
>>Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
>>required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, but 
>>  that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least wear. 
>>Just because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an engine runs 
>>well and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas mileage doesn't 
>>mean it doesn't do so.
>>
>>And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
>>taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink formulations, 
>>and if you had any understanding of the complexities of the technologies 
>>involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer you got a year's use 
>>out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the marvel of a printer 
>>capable of such precision costing so little.
>>
>>I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
>>things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.
>>
>>Art
>>
>>
> 
> 
> I have used third party inks for years with Canon printers (going all the way 
> back to the BJC-600) and I have found that if you buy high quality ink, you 
> wonr have a problem.
> 
> As a matter of fact, the only Canon print head Ive had fail on me (so far) 
> never had anything other than OEM ink in it.
> 
> It was in one of my i950 printers. After about six months of daily use, it 
> simply wouldnt print Magenta any more.
> 
> I called Canon Tech. support and they put me through a few simple test (which 
> I had already done, and then some), and at the end of maybe 20 minutes, the 
> tech decided the head needed replacement.
> 
> All he required of me was a name, address, and serial number of the printer.
> 
> New head arrived within 3 days.
> 
> I dont shop for price when I buy ink, rather I stick with what I found early 
> on, and so far, it has worked well for me.
> 
> For my Canon printers (right now 2 I960, 1 ip4000, 1I950) I use ink from MIS, 
> and/or Formulabs. I do not buy generic carts prefilled, I buy OEM carts and 
> refill them and I buy empty carts from MIS.
> 
> 
> I do NOT mix inkbrands. If a printer has MIS ink in it I simply put a piece 
> of masking tape on it (uaually under the lid) with a big letter M on it, and 
> a big letter F goes on the printer with Formulabs.
> 
> I do, from time to time change the ink from one brand to another in a given 
> printer, but ONLY after a good "flushing" with distilled water mixed with 
> about 10% household Ammonia.
> 
> Since January 1 2005 I have printed over 300 8x10" photos, and about 150 
> 5x7" photos (going by the difference in paper invetory between then and now) 
> and other than a cleaning cycle right after changing carts, no other 
> maintenance has been required on the two printers used. (ip400, and my oldest 
> I960).
> 
> I do recommend however, if you are refilling Canon Cartridges, dont wait 
> 'till the cartridge is EMPTY.. replace the cart when the indicator says LOW.  
> That way you never have a situation where the sponge dries out, and you dont 
> have to "prime" the sponge.
> 
> I keep about ten sets of carts, filled and ready, and when there are more 
> than three or four carts waiting to be filled, I do them all at once, giving 
> them about ten minutes to "equalize .(10 minutes is enough time for the 
> sponge to fill up if it was low). After the 10 minute wait, I top off any 
> carts that have dropped in level when the sponge filled up, then tape over 
> ALL openings on the carts, including the vents. Then I store them 'till I 
> need them.
> 
> REMEMBER THIS IF YOU REFILL:
> 
> Any place that sells bulk ink that says "this ink works in all unkjet 
> printers" is lying.
> 
> There is NO one ink that will work in more than one type of printer reliably.
> 
> Strange as it is, those inks seem to be formulated to work in Lexmark 
> printers. My friend buys generic refill ink at Sears (at least he did 'till 
> they stopped selling it) and it worked in his Lexmark 3 in one. But then we 
> are talking Lexmark, not a real printer.
> 
0
Arthur
4/5/2005 9:34:04 AM
A few weeks back, I spent several hours reading up on ink bronzing. 
This is when typically dye inks on glossy papers reflect what is often a 
dichroic color off the surface of the ink after it dries.  It can occur 
with any color ink, but is often most noticeable on black ink, which 
often is made up of several color dyes mixed together.  It is more 
noticeable on darker colors due to the contract between the dark 
background and the brighter reflective color.

Anyway, HP has several research papers and patents on methods of 
reducing or removing this problem.  The science is somewhat complex, and 
understanding the causes, measuring the phenomenon and developing 
methods for developing ink and paper surface formulations to control for 
it weren't simple.

This says to me that indeed "all inks" aren't the same at all, and the 
processes involved are both time consuming and costly to develop.

Sure, pretty much any company that makes colorants can make something 
approaching inkjet ink, but there are complexities to making good ink 
that works well in a specific printer, a specific climate, has good fade 
resistance to light, ozone, and other environmental factors, is accurate 
and repeatable in color, doesn't fall to a great deal of metamerism, 
bronzing, and so on.

Art


measekite wrote:

> 
> 
> Arthur Entlich wrote:
> 
>> "Son" you really don't know what you are speaking of, about gasoline 
>> or about inks.  In my neck of the woods, people like you are referred 
>> to (in polite circles) as "Sophomores" it's greek and it means "wise 
>> foolish" because you think you know a great deal more than you do.
>>
>> You are correct that gas is often refined at a centralized locale and 
>> that the companies use each others refineries and trucking, because it 
>> makes no sense at all to ship the gasoline hundreds of miles when 
>> their is a much closer refinery or distribution point.  However, what 
>> makes gasoline unique and cost different amounts, other than some 
>> distilling properties, is additives.  And additives are just that, 
>> they are added to the gasoline either in the tanker itself, at the 
>> refinery just as it is pumped, or sometimes even at the gas station.
> 
> 
> 
> Hooray!  Perfectly said.  >:o
> 
>>
>> And it is these additives that often do make a difference in 
>> performance.  There are studies done by independent research 
>> facilities that prove all gasoline is not the same.  Some additives 
>> improve combustion, or change flash point temperature, or reduce 
>> carbon build up.
>>
>> Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
>> required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, 
>> but  that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least 
>> wear. Just because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an 
>> engine runs well and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas 
>> mileage doesn't mean it doesn't do so.
>>
>> And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
>> taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink 
>> formulations, and if you had any understanding of the complexities of 
>> the technologies involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer 
>> you got a year's use out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the 
>> marvel of a printer capable of such precision costing so little.
>>
>> I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
>> things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.
> 
> 
> 
> But I would like to give her a :-* .
> 
>>
>> Art
>>
>>
>> Mapanari wrote:
>>
>>> "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>>> wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com:
>>>
>>>> "Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>>> news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>>>
>>>>> The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads
>>>>> me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, 
>>>>> and
>>>>> they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that
>>>>> they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales
>>>>> of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>>>
>>>>> The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives 
>>>> optimum lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image 
>>>> quality,
>>>> optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>>> maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>>> pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
>>>> and they typically own the intellectual property of given 
>>>> formulations. HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related patents.
>>>>
>>>> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will 
>>> help clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better 
>>> milage....and yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS 
>>> Refinary depot every morning from every station and refill their 
>>> tanker trucks with the same gas.
>>>
>>> And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas 
>>> milage by using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, 
>>> which has water in it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c 
>>> a gallon too!
>>>
>>> Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media 
>>> consumption market.
>>>
>>> Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the 
>>> diference is in advertising, not physical properties.
>>>
>>>
0
Arthur
4/5/2005 10:43:00 AM
"Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message 
news:UYt4e.526$VF5.505@edtnps89...
>A few weeks back, I spent several hours reading up on ink bronzing. This is 
>when typically dye inks on glossy papers reflect what is often a dichroic 
>color off the surface of the ink after it dries.  It can occur with any 
>color ink, but is often most noticeable on black ink, which often is made 
>up of several color dyes mixed together.  It is more noticeable on darker 
>colors due to the contract between the dark background and the brighter 
>reflective color.
>
> Anyway, HP has several research papers and patents on methods of reducing 
> or removing this problem.  The science is somewhat complex, and 
> understanding the causes, measuring the phenomenon and developing methods 
> for developing ink and paper surface formulations to control for it 
> weren't simple.
>
> This says to me that indeed "all inks" aren't the same at all, and the 
> processes involved are both time consuming and costly to develop.
>
> Sure, pretty much any company that makes colorants can make something 
> approaching inkjet ink, but there are complexities to making good ink that 
> works well in a specific printer, a specific climate, has good fade 
> resistance to light, ozone, and other environmental factors, is accurate 
> and repeatable in color, doesn't fall to a great deal of metamerism, 
> bronzing, and so on.
>
> Art
>
>
> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Arthur Entlich wrote:
>>
>>> "Son" you really don't know what you are speaking of, about gasoline or 
>>> about inks.  In my neck of the woods, people like you are referred to 
>>> (in polite circles) as "Sophomores" it's greek and it means "wise 
>>> foolish" because you think you know a great deal more than you do.
>>>
>>> You are correct that gas is often refined at a centralized locale and 
>>> that the companies use each others refineries and trucking, because it 
>>> makes no sense at all to ship the gasoline hundreds of miles when their 
>>> is a much closer refinery or distribution point.  However, what makes 
>>> gasoline unique and cost different amounts, other than some distilling 
>>> properties, is additives.  And additives are just that, they are added 
>>> to the gasoline either in the tanker itself, at the refinery just as it 
>>> is pumped, or sometimes even at the gas station.
>>
>>
>>
>> Hooray!  Perfectly said.  >:o
>>
>>>
>>> And it is these additives that often do make a difference in 
>>> performance.  There are studies done by independent research facilities 
>>> that prove all gasoline is not the same.  Some additives improve 
>>> combustion, or change flash point temperature, or reduce carbon build 
>>> up.
>>>
>>> Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
>>> required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, but 
>>> that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least wear. Just 
>>> because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an engine runs well 
>>> and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas mileage doesn't mean it 
>>> doesn't do so.
>>>
>>> And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
>>> taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink formulations, 
>>> and if you had any understanding of the complexities of the technologies 
>>> involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer you got a year's use 
>>> out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the marvel of a printer 
>>> capable of such precision costing so little.
>>>
>>> I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
>>> things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.
>>
>>
>>
>> But I would like to give her a :-* .
>>
>>>
>>> Art
>>>
>>>
>>> Mapanari wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>>>> wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com:
>>>>
>>>>> "Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>>>> news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>>>>
>>>>>> The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, 
>>>>>> leads
>>>>>> me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, 
>>>>>> and
>>>>>> they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that
>>>>>> they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales
>>>>>> of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives optimum 
>>>>> lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image quality,
>>>>> optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>>>> maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>>>> pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
>>>>> and they typically own the intellectual property of given 
>>>>> formulations. HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related 
>>>>> patents.
>>>>>
>>>>> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will 
>>>> help clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better 
>>>> milage....and yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS 
>>>> Refinary depot every morning from every station and refill their tanker 
>>>> trucks with the same gas.
>>>>
>>>> And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas 
>>>> milage by using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, which 
>>>> has water in it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c a 
>>>> gallon too!
>>>>
>>>> Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media 
>>>> consumption market.
>>>>
>>>> Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the 
>>>> diference is in advertising, not physical properties.
>>>>
>>>>

As the Manager of Cartridge World (Oxford) UK. I can agree and accept what 
is being said here. Cartridge World as a whole use one of the top research 
and ink producers in the industry (OCP, Europe).
Like the oem producers, large amounts of money are spent in formulating the 
ink we use for refilling and our own brand cartridges, to be as identical as 
the oem product as possible. It is fair to say that due to trading standards 
we are not allowed to say that our ink is the same as the original, however, 
we can say that the technical make-up is no different to the original.
At the same time we can also say and guarantee (unconditionally), that the 
end user will find no difference between them. We also guarantee the end 
users printer against any problems caused by using our inks, How many other 
suppliers are that confident!
Having used our ink both in refilling and prefills I have had no problems 
with the various Canon printers I have owned. I can accept that some end 
users have had problems that were caused by the ink they used, Generic ink 
being the worse and certainly a no no!. It is also fair to say that problems 
can be from other causes and should not be discounted.
At the end of the day end users will purchase what they feel comfortable 
with, both in effect and cost.

regards
Dave 


0
Stick
4/6/2005 5:56:40 AM

Stick Stickus wrote:

>"Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message 
>news:UYt4e.526$VF5.505@edtnps89...
>  
>
>>A few weeks back, I spent several hours reading up on ink bronzing. This is 
>>when typically dye inks on glossy papers reflect what is often a dichroic 
>>color off the surface of the ink after it dries.  It can occur with any 
>>color ink, but is often most noticeable on black ink, which often is made 
>>up of several color dyes mixed together.  It is more noticeable on darker 
>>colors due to the contract between the dark background and the brighter 
>>reflective color.
>>
>>Anyway, HP has several research papers and patents on methods of reducing 
>>or removing this problem.  The science is somewhat complex, and 
>>understanding the causes, measuring the phenomenon and developing methods 
>>for developing ink and paper surface formulations to control for it 
>>weren't simple.
>>
>>This says to me that indeed "all inks" aren't the same at all, and the 
>>processes involved are both time consuming and costly to develop.
>>
>>Sure, pretty much any company that makes colorants can make something 
>>approaching inkjet ink, but there are complexities to making good ink that 
>>works well in a specific printer, a specific climate, has good fade 
>>resistance to light, ozone, and other environmental factors, is accurate 
>>and repeatable in color, doesn't fall to a great deal of metamerism, 
>>bronzing, and so on.
>>
>>Art
>>
>>
>>measekite wrote:
>>
>>    
>>
>>>Arthur Entlich wrote:
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>>>>"Son" you really don't know what you are speaking of, about gasoline or 
>>>>about inks.  In my neck of the woods, people like you are referred to 
>>>>(in polite circles) as "Sophomores" it's greek and it means "wise 
>>>>foolish" because you think you know a great deal more than you do.
>>>>
>>>>You are correct that gas is often refined at a centralized locale and 
>>>>that the companies use each others refineries and trucking, because it 
>>>>makes no sense at all to ship the gasoline hundreds of miles when their 
>>>>is a much closer refinery or distribution point.  However, what makes 
>>>>gasoline unique and cost different amounts, other than some distilling 
>>>>properties, is additives.  And additives are just that, they are added 
>>>>to the gasoline either in the tanker itself, at the refinery just as it 
>>>>is pumped, or sometimes even at the gas station.
>>>>        
>>>>
>>>
>>>Hooray!  Perfectly said.  >:o
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>>>>And it is these additives that often do make a difference in 
>>>>performance.  There are studies done by independent research facilities 
>>>>that prove all gasoline is not the same.  Some additives improve 
>>>>combustion, or change flash point temperature, or reduce carbon build 
>>>>up.
>>>>
>>>>Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
>>>>required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, but 
>>>>that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least wear. Just 
>>>>because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an engine runs well 
>>>>and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas mileage doesn't mean it 
>>>>doesn't do so.
>>>>
>>>>And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
>>>>taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink formulations, 
>>>>and if you had any understanding of the complexities of the technologies 
>>>>involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer you got a year's use 
>>>>out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the marvel of a printer 
>>>>capable of such precision costing so little.
>>>>
>>>>I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
>>>>things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.
>>>>        
>>>>
>>>
>>>But I would like to give her a :-* .
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>>>>Art
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Mapanari wrote:
>>>>
>>>>        
>>>>
>>>>>"Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>>>>>wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com:
>>>>>
>>>>>          
>>>>>
>>>>>>"Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>>>>>news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>            
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, 
>>>>>>>leads
>>>>>>>me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, 
>>>>>>>and
>>>>>>>they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat that
>>>>>>>they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their sales
>>>>>>>of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>>>>>>              
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives optimum 
>>>>>>lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image quality,
>>>>>>optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>>>>>maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>>>>>pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
>>>>>>and they typically own the intellectual property of given 
>>>>>>formulations. HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related 
>>>>>>patents.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>            
>>>>>>
>>>>>Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will 
>>>>>help clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better 
>>>>>milage....and yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS 
>>>>>Refinary depot every morning from every station and refill their tanker 
>>>>>trucks with the same gas.
>>>>>
>>>>>And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas 
>>>>>milage by using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, which 
>>>>>has water in it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c a 
>>>>>gallon too!
>>>>>
>>>>>Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media 
>>>>>consumption market.
>>>>>
>>>>>Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the 
>>>>>diference is in advertising, not physical properties.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>          
>>>>>
>
>As the Manager of Cartridge World (Oxford) UK. I can agree and accept what 
>is being said here. Cartridge World as a whole use one of the top research 
>and ink producers in the industry (OCP, Europe).
>Like the oem producers, large amounts of money are spent in formulating the 
>ink we use for refilling and our own brand cartridges, to be as identical as 
>the oem product as possible. It is fair to say that due to trading standards 
>we are not allowed to say that our ink is the same as the original, however, 
>we can say that the technical make-up is no different to the original.
>At the same time we can also say and guarantee (unconditionally), that the 
>end user will find no difference between them. We also guarantee the end 
>users printer against any problems caused by using our inks, How many other 
>suppliers are that confident!
>  
>

So if we get a clogged printhead you will just send us a brand new printer?

Also, once is OK but if you repeatedly hawk your company on this NG that 
it is considered spamming.

>Having used our ink both in refilling and prefills I have had no problems 
>with the various Canon printers I have owned. I can accept that some end 
>users have had problems that were caused by the ink they used, Generic ink 
>being the worse and certainly a no no!. It is also fair to say that problems 
>can be from other causes and should not be discounted.
>At the end of the day end users will purchase what they feel comfortable 
>with, both in effect and cost.
>
>regards
>Dave 
>
>
>  
>
0
measekite
4/6/2005 6:15:11 AM
"measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:P7L4e.2488$qD2.2305@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
>
>
> Stick Stickus wrote:
>
>>"Arthur Entlich" <artistic@telus.net> wrote in message 
>>news:UYt4e.526$VF5.505@edtnps89...
>>
>>>A few weeks back, I spent several hours reading up on ink bronzing. This 
>>>is when typically dye inks on glossy papers reflect what is often a 
>>>dichroic color off the surface of the ink after it dries.  It can occur 
>>>with any color ink, but is often most noticeable on black ink, which 
>>>often is made up of several color dyes mixed together.  It is more 
>>>noticeable on darker colors due to the contract between the dark 
>>>background and the brighter reflective color.
>>>
>>>Anyway, HP has several research papers and patents on methods of reducing 
>>>or removing this problem.  The science is somewhat complex, and 
>>>understanding the causes, measuring the phenomenon and developing methods 
>>>for developing ink and paper surface formulations to control for it 
>>>weren't simple.
>>>
>>>This says to me that indeed "all inks" aren't the same at all, and the 
>>>processes involved are both time consuming and costly to develop.
>>>
>>>Sure, pretty much any company that makes colorants can make something 
>>>approaching inkjet ink, but there are complexities to making good ink 
>>>that works well in a specific printer, a specific climate, has good fade 
>>>resistance to light, ozone, and other environmental factors, is accurate 
>>>and repeatable in color, doesn't fall to a great deal of metamerism, 
>>>bronzing, and so on.
>>>
>>>Art
>>>
>>>
>>>measekite wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Arthur Entlich wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>"Son" you really don't know what you are speaking of, about gasoline or 
>>>>>about inks.  In my neck of the woods, people like you are referred to 
>>>>>(in polite circles) as "Sophomores" it's greek and it means "wise 
>>>>>foolish" because you think you know a great deal more than you do.
>>>>>
>>>>>You are correct that gas is often refined at a centralized locale and 
>>>>>that the companies use each others refineries and trucking, because it 
>>>>>makes no sense at all to ship the gasoline hundreds of miles when their 
>>>>>is a much closer refinery or distribution point.  However, what makes 
>>>>>gasoline unique and cost different amounts, other than some distilling 
>>>>>properties, is additives.  And additives are just that, they are added 
>>>>>to the gasoline either in the tanker itself, at the refinery just as it 
>>>>>is pumped, or sometimes even at the gas station.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Hooray!  Perfectly said.  >:o
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>And it is these additives that often do make a difference in 
>>>>>performance.  There are studies done by independent research facilities 
>>>>>that prove all gasoline is not the same.  Some additives improve 
>>>>>combustion, or change flash point temperature, or reduce carbon build 
>>>>>up.
>>>>>
>>>>>Yes, cars will run on pretty much any gasoline that comes close to the 
>>>>>required octane rating for the compression ration of the cylinders, but 
>>>>>that does not mean it will run efficiently and with the least wear. 
>>>>>Just because you may be too oblivious to recognize when an engine runs 
>>>>>well and when it doesn't, or if it gets superior gas mileage doesn't 
>>>>>mean it doesn't do so.
>>>>>
>>>>>And, to a certain extent, the same holds for inks.  If you, as I, had 
>>>>>taken the time to read the patents surrounding inkjet ink formulations, 
>>>>>and if you had any understanding of the complexities of the 
>>>>>technologies involved, instead of b*tching about the $29 printer you 
>>>>>got a year's use out of, you'd be absolutely fascinated by the marvel 
>>>>>of a printer capable of such precision costing so little.
>>>>>
>>>>>I use 3rd party inks, and I voted against everything I could involving 
>>>>>things Carly F. did at HP, but you are way off here.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>But I would like to give her a :-* .
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Art
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>Mapanari wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>"Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>>>>>>wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>"Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>>>>>>news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, 
>>>>>>>>leads
>>>>>>>>me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places, 
>>>>>>>>and
>>>>>>>>they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat 
>>>>>>>>that
>>>>>>>>they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their 
>>>>>>>>sales
>>>>>>>>of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives 
>>>>>>>optimum lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image 
>>>>>>>quality,
>>>>>>>optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>>>>>>maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>>>>>>pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink 
>>>>>>>chemistry
>>>>>>>and they typically own the intellectual property of given 
>>>>>>>formulations. HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related 
>>>>>>>patents.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will 
>>>>>>help clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better 
>>>>>>milage....and yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS 
>>>>>>Refinary depot every morning from every station and refill their 
>>>>>>tanker trucks with the same gas.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas 
>>>>>>milage by using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, 
>>>>>>which has water in it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c 
>>>>>>a gallon too!
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media 
>>>>>>consumption market.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the 
>>>>>>diference is in advertising, not physical properties.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>
>>As the Manager of Cartridge World (Oxford) UK. I can agree and accept what 
>>is being said here. Cartridge World as a whole use one of the top research 
>>and ink producers in the industry (OCP, Europe).
>>Like the oem producers, large amounts of money are spent in formulating 
>>the ink we use for refilling and our own brand cartridges, to be as 
>>identical as the oem product as possible. It is fair to say that due to 
>>trading standards we are not allowed to say that our ink is the same as 
>>the original, however, we can say that the technical make-up is no 
>>different to the original.
>>At the same time we can also say and guarantee (unconditionally), that the 
>>end user will find no difference between them. We also guarantee the end 
>>users printer against any problems caused by using our inks, How many 
>>other suppliers are that confident!
>>
>
> So if we get a clogged printhead you will just send us a brand new 
> printer?

Please check the website for your reply, But basically, if proven to be 
either the refilled cartridge or compatible at fault then, yes.

>
> Also, once is OK but if you repeatedly hawk your company on this NG that 
> it is considered spamming.
>

It is not my intention to 'hawk' the company nor spam, but, rather show a 
response from a producer and, also, an end user perspective.

>>Having used our ink both in refilling and prefills I have had no problems 
>>with the various Canon printers I have owned. I can accept that some end 
>>users have had problems that were caused by the ink they used, Generic ink 
>>being the worse and certainly a no no!. It is also fair to say that 
>>problems can be from other causes and should not be discounted.
>>At the end of the day end users will purchase what they feel comfortable 
>>with, both in effect and cost.
>>
>>regards
>>Dave
>>
>> 


0
Stick
4/9/2005 11:11:28 PM
measekite <measekite@yahoo.com>
wrotenews:ur54e.7826$FN4.7550@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com: 

> 
> 
> Mapanari wrote:
> 
>>"Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>>wrotenews:114pef3n8psai84@corp.supernews.com: 
>>
>>  
>>
>>>"Mapanari" <whosthat@anonmail.com> wrote in message 
>>>news:Xns962AB5F2C2A0Amapi@216.168.3.64...
>>>    
>>>
>>>>The research I've done, and as a former purchasing manger/buyer, leads
>>>>me to believe that almost all OEM ink comes from only a few places,
>>>>and they sell the same bulk ink to online resellers; with the caveat
>>>>that they can't say "Same as HP ink!" because that would screw their
>>>>sales of bulk ink to HP and Canon et al.
>>>>
>>>>The formula and the ink is pretty basic.
>>>>      
>>>>
>>>Your research is faulty.  Making an ink formulation that gives optimum 
>>>lightfastness, black to color bleed, print quality, image quality,
>>>optical density, color balance and other parameters while still
>>>maintaining nozzle health is not something printer manufacturers just
>>>pick off the shelf.  Printer companies invest heavily in ink chemistry
>>>and they typically own the intellectual property of given formulations.
>>>HP, Epson and Cannon have hundred of ink related patents.
>>>
>>>- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>    
>>>
>>
>>Right...and Exxon gas will put a tiger in your tank and BP gas will help
>>clean your valves and Texaco gas will give you better milage....and 
>>yet....all the tanker trucks stop off at the same HESS Refinary depot
>>every morning from every station and refill their tanker trucks with the
>>same gas.
>>
>>And yet, millions of mooing morons will swear they get better gas milage
>>by using Exxon instead of that "no name gas on the corner, which has
>>water in it it and is cheap bad gas!", and pay an extra 30c a gallon
>>too! 
>>
>>Son, you really are a child of the 80's advertising mass media
>>consumption market.
>>
>>Granted, there is a slight diference in some inks, but 90% of the
>>diference is in advertising, not physical properties.
>>  
>>
> 
> And that is why you hear of printhead clogs all over this NG.  And the 
> majority of the users reporting these problems are not using OEM BRANDED
> inks.
> 
>>
>>  
>>
> 

The majority of printhead clogs, from EPSON AND HP and CANON, is due to 
leaving the ink carts out too long to dry.

They warn you about this all over the place, they all do, and yet, most 
people complaining about printers complain about printhead clogs.

Go figure.

In simple terms, it's not the ink, it's the user.

-- 
---Mapanari---
0
Mapanari
4/13/2005 2:39:03 AM
Larry <lastingimagery@comcast.dotnet>
wrotenews:MPG.1cbb62dc8bfc9c1598996d@news.comcast.giganews.com: 

> In article <blg4e.7934$FN4.6023@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>, 
> measekite@yahoo.com says...
>> Without real BRANDING by a real manufacturer/formulator; how do you
>> tell real quality?
>> 
> 
> Didn't you read the whole post???
> 

Obviously he didn't, but felt the need to put it all in his one line 
response.



-- 
---Mapanari---
0
Mapanari
4/13/2005 2:42:16 AM
measekite <measekite@yahoo.com> wrotenews:I7g4e.1387$qD2.156
@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com:

> 
> 
> Arthur Entlich wrote:
> 
>> "Son" you really don't know what you are speaking of, about gasoline 
>> or about inks.  In my neck of the woods, people like you are referred 
>> to (in polite circles) as "Sophomores" it's greek and it means "wise 
>> foolish" because you think you know a great deal more than you do.
>>
>> You are correct that gas is often refined at a centralized locale and 
>> that the companies use each others refineries and trucking, because it 
>> makes no sense at all to ship the gasoline hundreds of miles when 
>> their is a much closer refinery or distribution point.  However, what 
>> makes gasoline unique and cost different amounts, other than some 
>> distilling properties, is additives.  And additives are just that, 
>> they are added to the gasoline either in the tanker itself, at the 
>> refinery just as it is pumped, or sometimes even at the gas station.
> 
> 
> Hooray!  Perfectly said.  >:o

Not really.  Yawl obviusly know nothing about the gas and distribution 
industy since the 90's.

It was true at one time that Texaco tankers delivered Texaco gas, then it 
was true that they centralized for cost all gas and then added this and 
that, but now, it's all the same gas and all the same additives; more cost 
effective and why, if you listen and watch closely the ads for Shell and 
other gases, they won't claim exclusivity nor will you be able to nail 
anything down in the ad that states catagorically that ONLY with Shell gas, 
for example, after filling your tank with special blended Shell gas, and 
while you're tootling down the highway can you hear the agonized mewing 
screams coming from the back of your car as Tony slowly suffocates an 
agonizing death and faint sound of claw scratching coming from your trunk 
that slowly disappears and then everything become silent.

 

-- 
---Mapanari---
0
Mapanari
4/13/2005 2:46:55 AM

Mapanari wrote:

> <snip>
>
>>>      
>>>
>>And that is why you hear of printhead clogs all over this NG.  And the 
>>majority of the users reporting these problems are not using OEM BRANDED
>>inks.
>>
>>    
>>
>>> 
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>
>The majority of printhead clogs, from EPSON AND HP and CANON, is due to 
>leaving the ink carts out too long to dry.
>  
>

I left my HP990 unused for 3 months.  I then pick up printing with it 
without a problem.

>They warn you about this all over the place, they all do, and yet, most 
>people complaining about printers complain about printhead clogs.
>
>Go figure.
>
>In simple terms, it's not the ink, it's the user.
>
>  
>
0
measekite
4/13/2005 4:37:16 AM
measekite <measekite@yahoo.com> wrotenews:0m17e.1112$J12.489
@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com:


>>The majority of printhead clogs, from EPSON AND HP and CANON, is due to 
>>leaving the ink carts out too long to dry.
>>  
>>
> 
> I left my HP990 unused for 3 months.  I then pick up printing with it 
> without a problem.
> 

Please re-read my sentence above, think about it for a while, then get back 
to me.

-- 
---Mapanari---
0
Mapanari
4/20/2005 1:29:51 AM
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I recently bought this printer, but I can't find any driver for it. I have Fedora Core 3. Can anybody help me? If possible, of course. Kaotik wrote: > I recently bought this printer, but I can't find any driver for it. I > have Fedora Core 3. Can anybody help me? If possible, of course. Hi! It might be unrelated but I purchased a Canon Pixma ip3000 and found an article that suggested using the Canon bjc 7000 driver and tried it although it wont give me full features it does allow me to print using an otherwise large paper weight give it a go might work. ...

does Canon have a printer that doesn't use a "FINE" cartridge?
Hello, i need to replace my second Canon printer and notice that the newer ones (Pixmas) have this "FINE" system. I don't need photo, just good color, and preferably an AIO type (one with a flatbed copier capability). Looked at an MP160, MP180, MP460.. They have this "FINE" cartridge system and I'd prefer as few cartridges as absolutely necessary... Anybody with an idea of a model still available that still uses the three-colors + 1-black cartridge configuration like the i series ones? Really appreciate any help you can suggest... Thanks!! Mike ...

Canon i860 Photo Printer compared to Canon MP360 Printer/Scanner/Copier
I'm trying to decide between a Canon i860 and a Canon MP360. The MP360 is a printer/scanner/copier while the i860 is a Photo Printer. I've compared the two units closely and can't see many differences, except the i850 uses 4 cartridges instead of the usual 2 and is a bit faster. They both can print borderless photos, can print on photo paper, and print 4800x1200 dpi. Plus they are about the same price on newegg.com. Are there any features that the i860 has that the MP360 doesn't? Otherwise why not get the MP360 and get a scanner too. any info would be appreciated...

Canon Pixma iP6700D @ canon estore
Some people have been asking about this model. http://estore.usa.canon.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10051&storeId=10051&productId=205252&langId=-1&parent_category_rn=17251&top_category=12054 As a referb it's presently onsale for $40 plus shipping. The reason to be interested is not only the relativly low price, but the fact that canon seems to be abandoning a 6 tank inkjet, and in fact the Pixma MX970 IIRC doesn't use light cyan / magenta. I'm pretty pleased with mine, so I'm not going to bother, but the price is righ...

canon-pixma-ip1000 perbaiki-canon-ip-4000 resetter-pixma-ip-1000
sumber diambil dari http://printer-resetter.blogspot.com http://resettercanon.blogspot.com http://canonresetter.fortunebisnis.com canon-pixma-ip1000 perbaiki-canon-ip-4000 resetter-pixma-ip-1000 cache:odMImodLnt0J:www.canonresetter.fortunebisnis.com/service/ reset.html-reset-canon-i250 free-download-best-software-resetter- printer mereset-ip-1000 pixmaip1000 reset-printer free-download- software-canon-pixma-ip1000 panduan-servis-canon-ip1000 download- Resetter-Printer-Canon-Sekarang-Juga download-Resetter-Printer-Canon- Sekarang-Juga download-software-canon-pixma-iP100 canon-pixma-10...

Canon Ink Durability on Non-Canon papers.
I've read virtually every article on Wilhelm and other sites talking about durability of Inkjet inks and papers but seem to only find results with Canon ink on Canon paper, Epson Ink on Epson Paper, etc. Never intermixing. I've personally been using Epson papers in my Canon i960 (they were buy one/get one free) and the quality is supurb. But is there any data on print longevity with such combinations? What about Kodak papers that claim 100 years. Realistically, what I'm simply looking for is my best option for prints that I give to friends and family. For my o...

Canon i550 Canon i560 Cartridges Compatible?
I have both printers and the cartridge model numbers differ (BCI-3eY, for example, for the i550 and BCI-6Y for the i560. They both use the same black ink cartridge (BCI-3eBK). Can I use the color cartridges interchangeably, or must I order separate model cartridges for the two printers? The cartridges appear to be the same physically. TIA for any insight! Peter van der Goes wrote: > I have both printers and the cartridge model numbers differ (BCI-3eY, > for example, for the i550 and BCI-6Y for the i560. They both use the > same black ink cartridge (BCI-3eBK). Can I use the color cartridges > interchangeably, or must I order separate model cartridges for the > two printers? The cartridges appear to be the same physically. > > TIA for any insight! read recent thread about this: Canon i850--Can I use BCI6 carts? YOU ORDER CANON OEM INK ACCORDING TO THE CANON MANUAL AND YOU WILL NOT HAVE TO ASK THESE STUPID QUESTIONS. Peter van der Goes wrote: >I have both printers and the cartridge model numbers differ (BCI-3eY, for >example, for the i550 and BCI-6Y for the i560. They both use the same black >ink cartridge (BCI-3eBK). Can I use the color cartridges interchangeably, or >must I order separate model cartridges for the two printers? The cartridges >appear to be the same physically. > >TIA for any insight! > > > > > you order canon oem ink according to the canon m...

Canon Pixma Mp160 Printer
Canon Pixma MP470 Photo All-In-One Inkjet Printer (2177B002) Price:$99.99 Image: http://bestdealfinder.us/image.php?id=B000SQ5N4Y Best deal: http://bestdealfinder.us/index.php?id=B000SQ5N4Y Genuine Canon PG-40 CL-41 Ink Cartridge Set for Pixma ip1600 ip1700 ip1800 ip2600 MP140 MP150 MP160 MP170 MP180 MP190 MP210 MP450 MP460 MP470 MX300 MX310 Price:$56.99 Image: http://bestdealfinder.us/image.php?id=B0025HW7FC Best deal: http://bestdealfinder.us/index.php?id=B0025HW7FC Canon Pixma MP210 Photo All-In-One Inkjet Printer (2175B002) Price:$79.99 Image: http://bestdealfinder.us/image.php?id=B0...

Canon S300 printer and GPL driver from canon.jp
hi everyone Like many other users, I'm experiencing problems with my Canon S300 printer. Today I've found a page at linuxprinting.org that state that Canon has released GPLed drivers for S300 in Japan ( http://www.linuxprinting.org/show_printer.cgi?recnum=Canon-S300 ). It's actually true: http://cweb.canon.jp/drv-upd/bj/bjlinux210.html Since I cannot understand japanese and babelfish isn't helping so much I tried to install them without much luck. I downloaded and installed (I'm running Mandrake 10 rc1) bjfilterbjs300-2.1-0.i386.rpm, bjfiltercups-2.2-0.i386.rpm, bjfilte...

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