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Re: '^=' and '~='?

Duckhye,

According to the doc ( http://xrl.us/befwjx ) they, and one other set of
characters, and the mnemonic 'NE' all represent 'NOT EQUAL'.

Art
-------
On Wed, 11 Feb 2009 16:52:40 -0600, Duck-Hye Yang <dyang@CHAPINHALL.ORG>
wrote:

>Hello,
>What is the difference between '^='  and '~='?
>
>Thanks,
>Duckhye
0
art297 (4212)
2/11/2009 11:03:43 PM
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'is not' or '!='
A newbie question to you; what is the difference between statements like: if x is not None: and if x != None: Without any context, which one should be preferred? IMHO, the latter is more readable. On 2014-08-18 21:35, ElChino wrote: > A newbie question to you; what is the difference between statements > like: > if x is not None: > and > if x != None: > > Without any context, which one should be preferred? > IMHO, the latter is more readable. > "x == y" tells you whether x and y refer to objects that are equal. "x is y" tells you whether x and y actually refer to the same object. In the case of singletons like None (there's only one None object), it's better to use "is". "ElChino" <elchino@cnn.cn>: > A newbie question to you; what is the difference between statements > like: > if x is not None: > and > if x != None: Do the following: take two $10 bills. Hold one bill in the left hand, hold the other bill in the right hand. Now, the bill in the left hand "is not" the bill in the right hand. However, the bill in the left hand "==" the bill in the right hand. > Without any context, which one should be preferred? > IMHO, the latter is more readable. In almost all cases, both tests would result in the same behavior. However, the "is not" test is conceptually the correct one since you want...

'^=' and '~='?
Hello, What is the difference between '^=' and '~='? Thanks, Duckhye ...

Re: if str_mo not in ('','.') and str_da not in ('','.') and str_yy not in ('','.') Any shorter ? #2
Igor, There are many ways to make it more concise, however the parsimony is likely to be achieved at the expense of clarity. For instance, the expressions length ( input (mm||dd||yy, $10.) ) > 2 length ( compress(mm||dd||yy, ' .') ) > 2 and like might be somewhat shorter than the original, but they will execute slower, and their intent is far less eminent. Since it appears that you are trying to validate the components of a date, maybe it is not a worthless idea to try the date informat conforming to the mask you are testing. Say if all the pieces are 2-digit, the expression input (mm||dd||yy, ?? mmddyy6.) will return a missing value for the case you are testing and also if any irregularities in the input value that prevent it from being interpreted as a valid date should be found. And if you want a note in the log to alert you about it, leave one of the question marks off. Kind regards, ================= Paul M. Dorfman Jacksonville, FL ================= >From: Igor Kurbeko <ikurbeko@ATHEROGENICS.COM> >Reply-To: Igor Kurbeko <ikurbeko@ATHEROGENICS.COM> >To: SAS-L@LISTSERV.UGA.EDU >Subject: if str_mo not in ('','.') and str_da not in ('','.') and str_yy > not in ('','.') Any shorter ? >Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2003 17:13:37 -0400 > >Hi, there. > > > >I'm just curious if it ever dawned on anybody how to abbreviate this >line : > >if ...

Re: if str_mo not in ('','.') and str_da not in ('','.') and str_ yy not in ('','.') Any shorter ? #4
Igor, Without robust error checking: %macro check ( vars , values , op = in /* not in */, con = and /* or */ ) ; %local i w ; %let i = 1 ; %let w = %scan(&vars,&i) ; %do %while ( %length ( &w ) > 0 ) ; %if &i > 1 %then &con ; &w &op &values %let i = %eval ( &i + 1 ) ; %let w = %scan(&vars,&i) ; %end ; %mend check ; option mprint ; data w ; retain x y z "a" r " " s t "a" a b 99 c . ; if %check( x y z , ('','.'), op = not in ) then put &qu...

Re: if str_mo not in ('','.') and str_da not in ('','.') and str_ yy not in ('','.') Any shorter ? #3
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'''''''''''''The Running Update/Append Queries Using VBA code Ordeal'''''''''''''' #2
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if str_mo not in ('','.') and str_da not in ('','.') and str_yy not in ('','.') Any shorter ?
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A function with 'and' , 'not' , 'null' , 'car' and 'cdr'
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Re: '^=' and '~='? #4
Yeah, <> works in PROC SQL, wasn't sure about elsewhere... thanks for confirmation! Didn't know about the MAX operator, that's interesting. -Joe On Thu, Feb 12, 2009 at 8:51 AM, Chang Chung <chang_y_chung@hotmail.com>wrote: > On Wed, 11 Feb 2009 17:03:27 -0600, Joe Matise <snoopy369@GMAIL.COM> > wrote: > > >No difference that I know of ... SAS has all sorts of things you can use > as > >operators. > > > >LT,< > >LE,<= > >ne, ^=, ~=, <> in some contexts at least > > hi, > at least in the data step, <>, does not mean not equal, it is the MAX > operator, returning the larger of the two. Similarly there is MIN operator, > ><. in MS Visual Basic, though, "<>" means "not equal." > There are three symbols used as the logical operators OR and another three > for logical NOT, but the availability of these symbols are platform > dependent. > Read about 9.2 (data step) language Operators at http://tinyurl.com/4w5hen > or > http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/lrcon/59522/HTML/default/a00078 > 0367.htm<http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/lrcon/59522/HTML/default/a00078%0A0367.htm> > hth. > Cheers, > Chang > ...

Re: '^=' and '~='? #8
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Re: '^=' and '~='? #3
On Wed, 11 Feb 2009 17:03:27 -0600, Joe Matise <snoopy369@GMAIL.COM> wrote: >No difference that I know of ... SAS has all sorts of things you can use as >operators. > >LT,< >LE,<= >ne, ^=, ~=, <> in some contexts at least hi, at least in the data step, <>, does not mean not equal, it is the MAX operator, returning the larger of the two. Similarly there is MIN operator, ><. in MS Visual Basic, though, "<>" means "not equal." There are three symbols used as the logical operators OR and another three for logical NOT, but the availability of these symbols are platform dependent. Read about 9.2 (data step) language Operators at http://tinyurl.com/4w5hen or http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/lrcon/59522/HTML/default/a00078 0367.htm hth. Cheers, Chang ...

Re: '^=' and '~='? #2
No difference that I know of ... SAS has all sorts of things you can use as operators. LT,< LE,<= ne, ^=, ~=, <> in some contexts at least eq, = <<< these actually DO have a difference or two, particularly as relates to assignment I don't recall where the full list is, but http://support.sas.com/onlinedoc/913/getDoc/en/lrdict.hlp/a000202951.htm#a000290128has the list of them usable in WHERE statements (which, IIRC, is slightly greater than that of normal code, as it allows for SQL syntax in ways the rest of SAS does not). -Joe On Wed, Feb 11, 2009 at 4:52 PM, Duck-Hye Yang <dyang@chapinhall.org> wrote: > Hello, > What is the difference between '^=' and '~='? > > Thanks, > Duckhye > ...

Re: '^=' and '~='? #5
Sorry, I posted under the wrong subject. My friend asked me to post this, she got an error message in processing the XML file. I don't have much experience in working with XML file. Any help is appreciated! On Thu, Feb 12, 2009 at 10:29 AM, Akshaya Nathilvar < akshaya.nathilvar@gmail.com> wrote: > 32 libname erap 'T:\9SOW\AHRQ_E Rap\Data\E-RAP Data\December 2008'; > NOTE: Libref ERAP was successfully assigned as follows: > Engine: V9 > Physical Name: T:\9SOW\AHRQ_E Rap\Data\E-RAP Data\December 2008 > 33 options nodate nonumber formdlim='-'; > 34 /* Program: E-RAP Load XML to SAS with map v2.sas*/ > 35 > /************************************************************************* > 36 Update path and file name below. > 37 > **************************************************************************/ > 38 %let data_path = T:\9SOW\AHRQ_E Rap\Data\E-RAP Data\December > 2008\Raw XML Data; > 39 %let input_file = 035151_12232008.xml; > 40 > **************************************************************************; > 41 > 42 filename xml_lib "&data_path.\&input_file."; > 43 filename SXLEMAP "&data_path.\xml_map_v2.map"; > 44 libname xml_lib xml xmlmap=SXLEMAP access=READONLY; > NOTE: Libref XML_LIB was successfully assigned as follows: > Engine: XML > Physical Name: XML_LIB &g...

Re: '^=' and '~='? #9
On Thu, 12 Feb 2009 08:58:21 -0600, Joe Matise <snoopy369@GMAIL.COM> wrote: >Yeah, <> works in PROC SQL, wasn't sure about elsewhere... thanks for >confirmation! Didn't know about the MAX operator, that's interesting. .... hi, In proc SQL, I do get a note saying that: NOTE: The "<>" operator is interpreted as "not equals". In general, i find that we have different sas expressions, mostly identical one another. Still, there remain definite differences among all of these expressions: (1) data step expressions (2) where statement expressions (3) sql-expressions used in proc sql (4) macro expressions this is a less than ideal situation :-) but this may be an inevitable consequence of sas' being around for a long time. cheers, chang ...

Re: '^=' and '~='? #7
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Re: '^=' and '~='? #6
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