Re: Bad ways to code data #6 133935

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Ron  wrote

>Proc Format library = Library fmtlib;
>
>value NoYes 1 = 'No'
>            2 = 'Yes';
>*...;
>
>value TrueFalse
>            0 = 'false'
>            1 = 'true';
>
>value YesNo 1 = 'Yes'
>            2 = 'No';
>
>value YesNoMissing
>            1 = 'Yes'
>            2 = 'No'
>          0,. = 'missing';
>
>"Q: What's with the NoYes and YesNo?"
>
>"A: That's the order in which the choices appeared on the data
>collection form."
>

Hehe

Reminds me of the guy who was seen reading a newspaper upside down.  When asked why, he said
"that's how they sold it to me"

Happy TG.

Peter

Peter L. Flom, PhD
Statistical Consultant
Website: www DOT peterflomconsulting DOT com
Writing; http://www.associatedcontent.com/user/582880/peter_flom.html
Twitter:   @peterflom
0
Reply peterflomconsulting 11/24/2009 3:49:30 PM

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Re: Bad ways to code data #6 280807
Oh yes, that's called 100% of the data I deal with. 1-5 scale... 1 is best, 5 is best, surprised I don't see data where 3 is best [on a 1-5 scale]. Every time the same answer... "that's how the data is on the screen/survey/etc." ... -Joe On Tue, Nov 24, 2009 at 8:52 AM, Fehd, Ronald J. (CDC/CCHIS/NCPHI) < rjf2@cdc.gov> wrote: > > From: Peter Flom > > Sent: Friday, November 20, 2009 4:00 PM > > Subject: Bad ways to code data > > > > Nat Wooding just wrote a post on the perils of using a > > numeric ID that had a ...

Re: Bad ways to code data 131744
Peter, My vote is for the VIN or Vehicle Information Number (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_Identification_Number ), particularly the choice for model year. And we were all so concerned about the Y2K problem with 2-digit years! Art -------- On Fri, 20 Nov 2009 15:59:41 -0500, Peter Flom <peterflomconsulting@MINDSPRING.COM> wrote: >Nat Wooding just wrote a post on the perils of using a numeric ID that had a decimal, pointing out that such data can be subject to rounding error .... > >That gave me an idea for a fun thread - bad ways to code data. &g...

Re: Bad ways to code data 280797
At least he didn't use colors to indicate it... -Joe On Fri, Nov 20, 2009 at 2:59 PM, Peter Flom < peterflomconsulting@mindspring.com> wrote: > Nat Wooding just wrote a post on the perils of using a numeric ID that had > a decimal, pointing out that such data can be subject to rounding error .... > > That gave me an idea for a fun thread - bad ways to code data. > > The worst one I've seen recently is a guy who created an Excel file in > which a blank could mean either 0 OR n/a, depending on which column it was > in. Oy vey! > > P...

Re: Bad ways to code data #2 131745
On Fri, 20 Nov 2009 18:08:32 -0500, Peter Flom <peterflomconsulting@MINDSPRING.COM> wrote: >Arthur Tabachneck <art297@NETSCAPE.NET> wrote >>Peter, >> >>My vote is for the VIN or Vehicle Information Number (see: >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_Identification_Number ), >>particularly the choice for model year. >> Hi, How about using an email address as a primary key to a table? Cheers, Chang ...

Re: Bad ways to code data #5 114832
Tom Abernathy <tom.abernathy@GMAIL.COM> wrote >I would shorten the example to >"The worst one I've seen recently is a guy who created an Excel >file ... PERIOD." > Well, that would be about 95% of my clients. Once in a while, I get something that was entered in SPSS Later today, for the first time in at least a year, someone has a file already coded in SAS (not by him). Peter Peter L. Flom, PhD Statistical Consultant Website: www DOT peterflomconsulting DOT com Writing; http://www.associatedcontent.com/user/582880/peter_flom.html Twitter: ...

Re: Bad ways to code data #3 131748
I am going to go with the following: 1. Over-writing consecutive Datasets using the same name but with different data. 2. Using multiple Platforms for code within the same process. 3. Using multiple static changes throughout the code that need to be updated before each run of the code instead of Macro-variables. 4. Not memoing code. 5. No descrete run statements. 6. Repeating the same blocks of code over and over again instead of Macrotizing them and writing it once but with variables that can iterate. 7. Not using dataset/Variable names that have meaning. Ok ...

Re: Bad ways to code data #2 150689
Arthur Tabachneck <art297@NETSCAPE.NET> wrote >Peter, > >My vote is for the VIN or Vehicle Information Number (see: >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_Identification_Number ), >particularly the choice for model year. > Augh!!!!! But at least that has the excuse of trying to code a lot of information into one number (albeit doing it very badly). Another couple of bad ideas that I've run into.... Using multiple rows of an Excel file to write variable names Mixing numbers and letters in represent values of the same variable - e.g., one person re...

Re: Bad ways to code data #4 196990
> From: Peter Flom > Sent: Friday, November 20, 2009 4:00 PM > Subject: Bad ways to code data > > Nat Wooding just wrote a post on the perils of using a > numeric ID that had a decimal, pointing out that such data > can be subject to rounding error .... > > That gave me an idea for a fun thread - bad ways to code data. > > The worst one I've seen recently is a guy who created an > Excel file in which a blank could mean either 0 OR n/a, > depending on which column it was in. Oy vey! > > Peter Proc Format library = Library fmtlib...

Re: Bad ways to code data #5 196991
> From: Peter Flom > Subject: Re: Bad ways to code data > > Hehe > > Reminds me of the guy who was seen reading a newspaper upside > down. When asked why, he said > "that's how they sold it to me" > > Happy TG. thanks, and you with yours, too. "Ours not to wonder why, Ours but to ... crunch the numbers!" http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=1006021002270 see also: poem containing that line. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Charge_of_the_Light_Brigade_(poem) Ron Fehd the macro maven CDC Atlanta GA USA R...