f



ACORN is D E A D !!!

Yes, it's dead, it rests in peace.

Let it rest in peace, nobody should disturb the dead or revive them !

Buy a PC , NOW !
0
celt_sites
5/31/2004 6:44:48 AM
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On 2004-05-31, Pablo Rena <celt_sites@yahoo.com.mx> wrote:

> Yes, it's dead, it rests in peace.
>
> Let it rest in peace, nobody should disturb the dead or revive them !
>
> Buy a PC , NOW !

Indeed it is; thankfully, several other companies took off where it left 
off, so there's no need for us to buy 'a PC'. 

Cheers,

N.

-- 
Harriet: I'm only going to ask you this once, Richard, and I expect a straight
answer. Were you or were you not intending to eat my ex-husband's brains?
  -- Tracey Stern, "Angel", 'The Bachelor Party'
0
Nick
5/31/2004 9:03:20 AM
> Yes, it's dead, it rests in peace.
> Let it rest in peace, nobody should disturb the dead or revive them !
> Buy a PC , NOW !

Well, I don't know about Acorn, but RISC OS is alive - more than ever.
I once did buy a PC, indeed. But thank God, I've got an Iyonix as well.

Kind regards,
Paul Sprangers

0
Paul
5/31/2004 9:12:28 AM
On 31 May 2004 celt_sites@yahoo.com.mx (Pablo Rena) wrote:

> Buy a PC , NOW !

An Iyonix PC, a RiscPC, a PowerPC - just as long as it doesn't run
Windows.

-- 
Richard Porter
Mail to username ricp at domain minijem.plus.com
"You can't have Windows without pains."
0
Richard
5/31/2004 8:28:51 PM
In article <7cd1dfb74c.news@user.argonet.co.uk>,
   Richard Porter <dontusethis@address.uk.invalid> wrote:

> > Buy a PC , NOW !
>
> An Iyonix PC, a RiscPC, a PowerPC - just as long as it doesn't run
> Windows.

Panther PC ?

-- 
dgs@argonet.co.uk | RISC OS user near London? http://www.jellybaby.net/rougol/

'  So.  If Posty isn't used, it's unlikely to go wrong, then.  '
            - VinceH

0
dgs
5/31/2004 9:11:58 PM
In message <50a97d4f.0405302244.3a704ad5@posting.google.com>
          celt_sites@yahoo.com.mx (Pablo Rena) wrote:

> Yes, it's dead, it rests in peace.

In pieces I think.

> Let it rest in peace, nobody should disturb the dead or revive them !

Are you referring to the NAME of the newsgroup? It has been raised
several times that it is out of date. And dismissed as to much trouble
to change.

> Buy a PC , NOW !

Why on earth would I want to do that? A PC drops in value quicker than
a new car. Any time I want a PC I rescue one on route to a skip.

Were I going to _buy_ a computer other than a new RISC OS system, it
would certainly be a Mac

-- 
Jess   msn: phantasm_39@hotmail.com  icq: 91353267  
mailto:nospam@itworkshop.uklinux.net Hotmail is spamtrap, don't email it
RISC OS 4.39 kinetic 128+128+2MB 20GB  586-133 I-3 ADSL
   http://www.itworkshop-online.co.uk     http://www.b1-11.net
0
Jess
6/1/2004 6:42:55 AM
Much as I dislike troll feeding, here goes.
I am happily using a 1996 Risc PC (Strong ARM and RISC OS Adjust).
The (Future Proof) PCs bought at the same time (PII and Windows 3.11)
are the ones that are dead. (Unless rescued by LINUX of course).
I use my RISC PC for accessing e-mail and news because it would be very
unwise to use a Windows PC with all the viruses about.  The XP PC's on
my home network are constantly infested with Adware despite firewall and
virus checker and so I am uploading ADAWARE and SPYBOT to keep control!

The only time I see DEAD DEAD DEAD on my machine is when a file is being
created (downloaded typically) and it shows up in that way to show it is
not yet valid (whereas Windows does not even acknowledge that it is
being created and needs a View>Refresh to show new files in a filer
window, instead of doing it by itself)

-- 
Mark Foweraker
0
Mark
6/1/2004 6:41:00 PM
Thrice the brinded cat hath mewed, and Mark did decree on 1 Jun 2004...

> Much as I dislike troll feeding, here goes.
> I am happily using a 1996 Risc PC (Strong ARM and RISC OS Adjust).
> The (Future Proof) PCs bought at the same time (PII and Windows 3.11)
> are the ones that are dead. (Unless rescued by LINUX of course).
> I use my RISC PC for accessing e-mail and news because it would be very
> unwise to use a Windows PC with all the viruses about.  The XP PC's on
> my home network are constantly infested with Adware despite firewall and
> virus checker and so I am uploading ADAWARE and SPYBOT to keep control!
> 
> The only time I see DEAD DEAD DEAD on my machine is when a file is being
> created (downloaded typically) and it shows up in that way to show it is
> not yet valid (whereas Windows does not even acknowledge that it is
> being created and needs a View>Refresh to show new files in a filer
> window, instead of doing it by itself)
> 
Yeah, you tell him!  RISC OS is very much alive, and although I've
never done a census (thankfully) the number of people using it would
probably come to many thousands. 
-- 
- Martin Bazley - "The only good zombie is a dead zombie" /
martin@bazley.freeuk.com    _____________________________/_
Wimbledon, London, England /|> | <  /   /\ <   |>|  | |  |_�<   /\ |/
__________________________/ |\ | _> \_  \/ _>  |\ \/  |_ |_ _>  \/ |\
0
Martin
6/3/2004 5:33:03 PM
In message <c9c759b84c%Mark@foweraker.foweraker.freeuk.com>
          Mark <mark@foweraker.com> wrote:

> Much as I dislike troll feeding, here goes.
> I am happily using a 1996 Risc PC (Strong ARM and RISC OS Adjust).

Here, we use a Risc PC with Arm 710, OS 3.6. This is in daily use
for all our computer needs. (Also have a mac with a very dusty
power button - not at all fond of the OS)

Cheers,
Rachael.

-- 
[ Acorn Risc PC 700 | Cambridge z88 | Mac PPC 4400 | Amstrad NC100 ]
"If not ourselves, we are nothing" 
0
R
6/4/2004 8:43:57 AM
In article <f73a5bb94c.martin@freeuk.com>,
   Martin Bazley <martin@bazley.freeuk.com> wrote:

> Yeah, you tell him!  RISC OS is very much alive, and although I've
> never done a census (thankfully) the number of people using it would
> probably come to many thousands. 

....and not a whiff of irony ...

-- 
Kell Gatherer
kell@locsource.com
www.locationworks.com
0
Kell
6/4/2004 3:03:44 PM
In article <4cb9d16555nospam@locsource.com>,
   Kell Gatherer <nospam@locsource.com> wrote:

> > Yeah, you tell him!  RISC OS is very much alive, and although I've
> > never done a census (thankfully) the number of people using it would
> > probably come to many thousands. 
>
> ...and not a whiff of irony ...

If you had to guess, Kell, how many people would you say use RISC OS
once a month or more?

(This gives us ideas about your definition of "many", of course...)

-- 
dgs@argonet.co.uk | RISC OS user in London? http://www.jellybaby.net/rougol/

"... and such posts should be cancelled on sight.  (And I did)."
          - John David Galt

0
dgs
6/6/2004 8:42:32 PM
In <4cbaf815e0dgs@argonet.co.uk>,
dgs <dgs@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <4cb9d16555nospam@locsource.com>,
>    Kell Gatherer <nospam@locsource.com> wrote:
>
>> > Yeah, you tell him!  RISC OS is very much alive, and although I've
>> > never done a census (thankfully) the number of people using it would
>> > probably come to many thousands. 
>>
>> ...and not a whiff of irony ...
>
> If you had to guess, Kell, how many people would you say use RISC OS
> once a month or more?
>
> (This gives us ideas about your definition of "many", of course...)

And still no whiff of irony...

There may be many thousands of people who use RISC OS at least
occasionally. But how many of them even really know what RISC OS is and
that you can still buy new computers to run it natively? Are they
developing stuff for it? When was the last time they bought something
for it? If it breaks down or their needs outgrow it, will they buy a
RISC OS replacement or upgrade, or will they think, "Oh well, that's a
shame, I'd better buy a proper computer now."

Should that last sentence end with a question mark? OT language thread,
anyone?

It's the enthusiasts who really matter, whether it's the sort of person
who's bought an Iyonix and keeps all their software up to date with paid
upgrades and doesn't mind paying for things like browsers that are
inferior to what you can get for free on other platforms, or a
developer. RISC OS got boring many years ago so it needs a lot of
imagination or effort to get enthusiastic about it.


-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/6/2004 9:27:52 PM
In article <slrncc732o.kvv.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
   Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> >> > Yeah, you tell him!  RISC OS is very much alive, and although I've
> >> > never done a census (thankfully) the number of people using it would
> >> > probably come to many thousands. 
> >>
> >> ...and not a whiff of irony ...
> >
> > If you had to guess, Kell, how many people would you say use RISC OS
> > once a month or more?
> >
> > (This gives us ideas about your definition of "many", of course...)
>
> And still no whiff of irony...
>
> There may be many thousands of people who use RISC OS at least
> occasionally.

Good, it sounds like we're in agreement then.

> But how many of them even really know what RISC OS is

About the same proportion as with any other OS.

Perhaps more...

> and that you can still buy new computers to run it natively? Are they
> developing stuff for it?

Yes indeed, it seems like quite a large proportion of them are.

> When was the last time they bought something for it?

Ask your local RISC OS dealer...

-- 
dgs@argonet.co.uk | RISC OS user in London? http://www.jellybaby.net/rougol/

"There exists a fallback solution which is not discussed in public for
obvious reasons."  -  Andrew Gierth.

0
dgs
6/7/2004 8:19:21 AM
In <4cbb37e18bdgs@argonet.co.uk>,
dgs <dgs@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <slrncc732o.kvv.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
>    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> and that you can still buy new computers to run it natively? Are they
>> developing stuff for it?
>
> Yes indeed, it seems like quite a large proportion of them are.

Judging by the number of developments they must be incredibly
unproductive or they're a large proportion of somewhat less than many
thousands.

>> When was the last time they bought something for it?
>
> Ask your local RISC OS dealer...

I don't think there are any left locally.

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/7/2004 2:11:41 PM
On 7 Jun 2004 Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> In <4cbb37e18bdgs@argonet.co.uk>,
> dgs <dgs@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> 
> > In article <slrncc732o.kvv.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
> >    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> >> and that you can still buy new computers to run it natively? Are they
> >> developing stuff for it?
> >
> > Yes indeed, it seems like quite a large proportion of them are.
> 
> Judging by the number of developments they must be incredibly
> unproductive or they're a large proportion of somewhat less than many
> thousands.

Tony, stop trolling, you know damn well whats what in the RISC OS market,
or even if you haven't been keeping up, you know where to find out.

---druck

-- 
The ARM Club Free Software - http://www.armclub.org.uk/free/
The 32bit Conversions Page - http://www.quantumsoft.co.uk/druck/
0
druck
6/7/2004 5:27:37 PM
In <9f136abb4c.druck@druck.freeuk.net>,
druck <news@druck.freeuk.com> wrote:

> On 7 Jun 2004 Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> In <4cbb37e18bdgs@argonet.co.uk>,
>> dgs <dgs@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
>> 
>> > In article <slrncc732o.kvv.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
>> >    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
>> >
>> >> and that you can still buy new computers to run it natively? Are they
>> >> developing stuff for it?
>> >
>> > Yes indeed, it seems like quite a large proportion of them are.
>> 
>> Judging by the number of developments they must be incredibly
>> unproductive or they're a large proportion of somewhat less than many
>> thousands.
>
> Tony, stop trolling, you know damn well whats what in the RISC OS market,
> or even if you haven't been keeping up, you know where to find out.

I haven't really been keeping up, but if there'd been a sea-change I
would have noticed on csa.announce etc. I do know damn well there's not
enough going on to make me believe in the fruitful labours of a large
proportion of many thousands of enthusiastic developers. If you're
trying to suggest otherwise it's time to ask yourself who's the real
troll.

Can you name any companies that have recently entered the RISC OS market
for the first time (renames and mergers don't count) or even a convert
user since Robert Richards a few years back? The fact that people
remember him as the convert shows how rare they are.

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/7/2004 6:26:48 PM
Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

[snip]
> Can you name any companies that have recently entered the RISC OS market
> for the first time (renames and mergers don't count) or even a convert
> user since Robert Richards a few years back? The fact that people remember
> him as the convert shows how rare they are.
> 
Oooh I'm famous! ;-)
0
Rob
6/7/2004 11:11:51 PM
In message <9f136abb4c.druck@druck.freeuk.net>
          druck <news@druck.freeuk.com> wrote:

> On 7 Jun 2004 Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> 
> > In <4cbb37e18bdgs@argonet.co.uk>,
> > dgs <dgs@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> > 
> > > In article <slrncc732o.kvv.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
> > >    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> > >
> > >> and that you can still buy new computers to run it natively? Are they
> > >> developing stuff for it?
> > >
> > > Yes indeed, it seems like quite a large proportion of them are.
> > 
> > Judging by the number of developments they must be incredibly
> > unproductive or they're a large proportion of somewhat less than many
> > thousands.
> 
> Tony, stop trolling, you know damn well whats what in the RISC OS market,
> or even if you haven't been keeping up, you know where to find out.
> 
Dave after all these years surely have realised how useless it is to respond
to Mr T.H.

regards,

Malcolm

-- 
Malcolm Ripley uses a RiscOS StrongArm computer.
Current new sender keyword is : terrier
Email address is : "mripley" not forgetting: "@ukonline.co.uk"
0
nospam
6/8/2004 6:41:24 PM
In article <gemini.hyyofp00091p6028o.spambin@beardsdomain.co.uk>,
   Rob <spambin@beardsdomain.co.uk> wrote:

> Oooh I'm famous! ;-)

Where as Tony is infamous and the signs are he wishes to keep it that
way. ;-)

Lionel

-- 
    ___          ______
   /  /         /  ___/       4 children         | Sea Vixen for pugnacity
  /  / ionel A.|   \ mith     8 grandchildren,   | Hunter for elegance
 /  /____     __\   | no wonder life is a breeze | Phantom for clout 
/_______/    /_____/  http://www.argonet.co.uk/users/lionels  |  ZFC B+4+3

From an OS that Windows is too young to remember. ;-)
0
Lionel
6/8/2004 8:53:39 PM
In <fbaaf4bb4c.mripley@mripley.ukonline.co.uk>,
nospam@hotmail.com <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Dave after all these years surely have realised how useless it is to respond
> to Mr T.H.

I'm not surprised you feel it's useless:- you're usually trying to reach
the moral high ground from one of Lionel's South African mines with a
spade.

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/8/2004 10:36:22 PM
In article <slrncccfr6.h9o.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>, Tony
Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> In <fbaaf4bb4c.mripley@mripley.ukonline.co.uk>, nospam@hotmail.com
> <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:

> > Dave after all these years surely have realised how useless it is to
> > respond to Mr T.H.

> I'm not surprised you feel it's useless:- you're usually trying to reach
> the moral high ground from one of Lionel's South African mines with a
> spade.

Welcome back Tony. It's so good to have you around.
Any particular itches you want to scratch?

-- 
Steve Pampling
0
Steven
6/9/2004 5:18:19 PM
In <4cbc70e5e4steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com>,
Steven Pampling <steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

> In article <slrncccfr6.h9o.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>, Tony
> Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
>> In <fbaaf4bb4c.mripley@mripley.ukonline.co.uk>, nospam@hotmail.com
>> <nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>> > Dave after all these years surely have realised how useless it is to
>> > respond to Mr T.H.
>
>> I'm not surprised you feel it's useless:- you're usually trying to reach
>> the moral high ground from one of Lionel's South African mines with a
>> spade.
>
> Welcome back Tony. It's so good to have you around.

I never went anywhere. Everybody else did.

> Any particular itches you want to scratch?

You don't get under my skin that much. At least you only have a go at me
when I deserve it, while turning a blind eye when RISC OS supporters
deserve it, rather than having a go at me when your buddies are out of
line.

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/9/2004 8:14:42 PM
In <4cbc00c6aelionels@argonet.co.uk>,
Lionel Smith <lionels@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <gemini.hyyofp00091p6028o.spambin@beardsdomain.co.uk>,
>    Rob <spambin@beardsdomain.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> Oooh I'm famous! ;-)
>
> Where as Tony is infamous and the signs are he wishes to keep it that
> way. ;-)

Infamy, infamy, they've all got it infamy!

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/9/2004 9:02:40 PM
In article <slrncccfr6.h9o.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
   Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> I'm not surprised you feel it's useless:- you're usually trying to reach
> the moral high ground from one of Lionel's South African mines with a
> spade.

Hey! You keep my mines out of it they are mine!

Lionel

-- 
    ___          ______
   /  /         /  ___/       4 children         | Sea Vixen for pugnacity
  /  / ionel A.|   \ mith     8 grandchildren,   | Hunter for elegance
 /  /____     __\   | no wonder life is a breeze | Phantom for clout 
/_______/    /_____/  http://www.argonet.co.uk/users/lionels  |  ZFC B+4+3

From an OS that Windows is too young to remember. ;-)
0
Lionel
6/9/2004 9:26:43 PM
In article <slrnccerti.bsj.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
   Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> You don't get under my skin that much.

Could try harder (as the old school reports said)

> At least you only have a go at me
> when I deserve it, while turning a blind eye when RISC OS supporters
> deserve it, rather than having a go at me when your buddies are out of
> line.

Contrary to my teachers viewpoint it appears life is here for my amusement
:-)

-- 
Steve Pampling
0
Steven
6/10/2004 4:56:32 PM
In <4cbcf2bd10steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com>,
Steven Pampling <steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

> In article <slrnccerti.bsj.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
>    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> You don't get under my skin that much.
>
> Could try harder (as the old school reports said)

If that was your aim I'm surprised at your lack of success. You've been
given plenty of examples to follow, and you can see it doesn't require
much intelligence.

>> At least you only have a go at me
>> when I deserve it, while turning a blind eye when RISC OS supporters
>> deserve it, rather than having a go at me when your buddies are out of
>> line.
>
> Contrary to my teachers viewpoint it appears life is here for my amusement
>:-)

Ssh, you're not supposed to admit that you find flamewars amusing here!
The official policy is that I'm not just disagreeing with one person's
dogma, I'm making attacks on entire ISPs and user groups and emailing
Extremely Serious Allegations about them.

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/10/2004 7:13:07 PM
On 10 Jun 2004 Steven Pampling <steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

> In article <slrnccerti.bsj.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
>    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> 
> > You don't get under my skin that much.
> 
> Could try harder (as the old school reports said)

My reports used to say "trying". My father was quite pleased with me
until one term when the teacher wrote "still very trying" :-)

-- 
Richard Porter
Mail to username ricp at domain minijem.plus.com
"You can't have Windows without pains."
0
Richard
6/10/2004 9:34:26 PM
In article <slrncchcm3.7m7.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>, Tony
Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> In <4cbcf2bd10steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com>, Steven Pampling
> <steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

> > In article <slrnccerti.bsj.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>, Tony
> >    Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> >> You don't get under my skin that much.
> >
> > Could try harder (as the old school reports said)

> If that was your aim I'm surprised at your lack of success. You've been
> given plenty of examples to follow, and you can see it doesn't require
> much intelligence.

I should have said the same reports also said "he shows much talent and
could do far better if he put his mind to it" The thing is I don't tend
to annoy people until they annoy me. Pax  an all that...

> >> At least you only have a go at me when I deserve it, while turning a
> >> blind eye when RISC OS supporters deserve it, rather than having a go
> >> at me when your buddies are out of line.

> > Contrary to my teachers viewpoint it appears life is here for my
> > amusement
> >:-)

> Ssh, you're not supposed to admit that you find flamewars amusing here!
> The official policy is that I'm not just disagreeing with one person's
> dogma, I'm making attacks on entire ISPs and user groups and emailing
> Extremely Serious Allegations about them.

Hey, I had fun in a meeting the other day just by telling the truth.[1]
A not so minor detail an admin bod had neglected to tell people which now
they know they can plan for (when they come down from orbit) and make a
business case for the money required before the approaching deadline.

[1] Ever watched ants after you lift a stone?

-- 
Steve Pampling
0
Steven
6/10/2004 9:59:00 PM
In <4cbd0e6e58steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com>,
Steven Pampling <steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:

> I should have said the same reports also said "he shows much talent and
> could do far better if he put his mind to it" The thing is I don't tend
> to annoy people until they annoy me. Pax  an all that...

Perhaps if the grades weren't pegged at about 70%, talented people might
be encouraged to put their minds to doing better. And even the most
interesting subject can be boring if you have to go at the pace of the
slowest learner.

> Hey, I had fun in a meeting the other day just by telling the truth.[1]

No wonder you welcomed me back to csa ;-).

[2] In fact I could be even less attentive in those if the pace was
slow, because I didn't have to try so hard to get a good grade.

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/10/2004 11:02:22 PM
In <slrncchq3u.dlm.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> [2] In fact I could be even less attentive in those if the pace was
> slow, because I didn't have to try so hard to get a good grade.

As you can see I still have a short attention span, changing my mind
about whole paragraphs and forgetting to get rid of the footnotes that
go with them!

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/10/2004 11:04:24 PM
In article <slrncchq7o.e01.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
   Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> In <slrncchq3u.dlm.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
> Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> > [2] In fact I could be even less attentive in those if the pace was
> > slow, because I didn't have to try so hard to get a good grade.

> As you can see I still have a short attention span, changing my mind
> about whole paragraphs and forgetting to get rid of the footnotes that
> go with them!

Um. You've noted a feature of my posts (in common with a number of others)
I presume?

Missing words. This occurs when the mind gets well ahead of the fingers (or
the mouth in other circumstances)

-- 
Steve Pampling
0
Steven
6/11/2004 6:42:50 AM
In article <4cbcf2bd10steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com>,
   Steven Pampling <steve.pampling@dsl.pipex.com> wrote:
> In article <slrnccerti.bsj.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
>    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:


> > At least you only have a go at me
> > when I deserve it, while turning a blind eye when RISC OS supporters
> > deserve it, rather than having a go at me when your buddies are out of
> > line.

> Contrary to my teachers viewpoint it appears life is here for my
> amusement

Not only yours. ;-)

Tony ever the master of the coherent statement. ;-)

Lionel

-- 
    ___          ______
   /  /         /  ___/       4 children         | Sea Vixen for pugnacity
  /  / ionel A.|   \ mith     8 grandchildren,   | Hunter for elegance
 /  /____     __\   | no wonder life is a breeze | Phantom for clout 
/_______/    /_____/  http://www.argonet.co.uk/users/lionels  |  ZFC B+4+3

From an OS that Windows is too young to remember. ;-)
0
Lionel
6/11/2004 12:36:40 PM
In message <c9c759b84c%Mark@foweraker.foweraker.freeuk.com>
Mark wrote:
> Much as I dislike troll feeding, here goes.
> I am happily using a 1996 Risc PC (Strong ARM and RISC OS Adjust).
> The (Future Proof) PCs bought at the same time (PII and Windows 3.11)
> are the ones that are dead. (Unless rescued by LINUX of course).
> I use my RISC PC for accessing e-mail and news because it would be very
> unwise to use a Windows PC with all the viruses about.  The XP PC's on
> my home network are constantly infested with Adware despite firewall and
> virus checker and so I am uploading ADAWARE and SPYBOT to keep control!
> 
> The only time I see DEAD DEAD DEAD on my machine is when a file is being
> created (downloaded typically) and it shows up in that way to show it is
> not yet valid (whereas Windows does not even acknowledge that it is
> being created and needs a View>Refresh to show new files in a filer
> window, instead of doing it by itself)
I agree M$ Windows XP is crap, as Greg Harris words put it, "XP has a 
Telly Tubbies user interface", that is what comes of taking features from 
MicroShafts Bob program.

-- 
Norwich Sinclair and Clones Show (ORSAM 2004)
http://www.speccyverse.me.uk/orsam/
http://www.PetitionOnline.com/Sinclair/petition.html (Bring Back YS)
0
Time
6/15/2004 2:59:26 PM
"Time for a Change" <accus@nojunkmail2.com> wrote in message
news:a2327bbf4c.planet14@localhost.local...
> "XP has a Telly Tubbies user interface",

But you CAN change it back to the "classic" Windows 2000 interface........


0
Gordon
6/15/2004 4:34:10 PM
In message <epL7ZavUEHA.2520@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl>
"Gordon" wrote:
> "Time for a Change" <accus@nojunkmail2.com> wrote in message
> news:a2327bbf4c.planet14@localhost.local...
> > "XP has a Telly Tubbies user interface",
> But you CAN change it back to the "classic" Windows 2000 interface........
Just like when I compared operating systems with M$ Windoze users 
predecessors M$ Dross users, they say add third party software or change 
the setup. In reality for cost, maintenance (and other reasons) 
universities, companies, libraries etc. will not allow you to do this. So 
lets talk about reality, lets compare oranges with oranges, when we do 
other OSes will win. 
  Acorn got the RISC OS GUI interface right over 15 years ago, M$ has 
changed it's GUI again and again, costing companies in retraining costs.

-- 
Reboot Movement (An Anti-Wintel Campaign) 
http://www.speccyverse.me.uk/comp/reboot/
0
Time
6/15/2004 6:23:04 PM
"Time for a Change" <accus@nojunkmail3.com> wrote in message
news:2ed78dbf4c.planet14@localhost.local...
>   Acorn got the RISC OS GUI interface right over 15 years ago, M$ has
> changed it's GUI again and again, costing companies in retraining costs.
>

I think that's a bit simplistic - in Windows it's been Start-Programs to
access program files ever since Windows 95, which must be at least 10 years.
The average User doesn't even want to know about things like Event Viewer,
Task manager, MMC etc etc.and the differences in the GUI certainly between
W98, W2K and Win XP if the classic interface is used in XP are fairly
minimal for the average user. I agree the step from Windows 3.11 to Windows
95 WAS a big step and incurred a lot of training costs, but the subsequent
steps are hardly in the category of rocket science, are they, once the user
is used to the Windows environment?


0
Gordon
6/15/2004 6:53:04 PM
In article <#oVtBowUEHA.4048@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl>, Gordon
<me6@privacy.net> wrote:
> I agree the step from Windows 3.11 to Windows 95 WAS a big step and
> incurred a lot of training costs, but the subsequent steps are hardly in
> the category of rocket science, are they, once the user is used to the
> Windows environment?

I always thought it was a giggle how M$ left versions of the old Program
Manager, File manager etc. in W95/98. You could, if you really wanted to,
use the later OS's in exactly the same way as W3.1x. Not that they made
much of a noise about it.

Haven't checked WNT/XP to see if they have them...

Mind you, there was the switch from Arthur to RO2 on the Acorn platform.
ISTR that most users breathed a sigh of relief when it happened... :)

-- 
 //\  // Chika <zvlhxv@penfuarg.bet.hx. - ROT13>
//  \//  The second ZFC coming <crashnet.org.uk/zedeffcee> 

.... My haystack had no needle!
0
Chika
6/17/2004 1:37:56 PM
In message <4cc07b6850miyuki@no.spam.here>
          Chika <miyuki@spam-no-way.invalid> wrote:
[snip]

> Mind you, there was the switch from Arthur to RO2 on the Acorn platform.
> ISTR that most users breathed a sigh of relief when it happened... :)

How bad was arthur?

The screen shots I've seen look similar in concept to RO but very GEM
looking. 

-- 
Jess   msn: phantasm_39@hotmail.com  icq: 91353267  
mailto:nospam@itworkshop.uklinux.net Hotmail is spamtrap, don't email it
RISC OS 4.39 kinetic 128+128+2MB 20GB  586-133 I-3 ADSL
   http://www.itworkshop-online.co.uk     http://www.b1-11.net
0
Jess
6/17/2004 5:30:07 PM
On 17 Jun 2004 Jess <phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote:

> In message <4cc07b6850miyuki@no.spam.here>
>           Chika <miyuki@spam-no-way.invalid> wrote:
> [snip]
> 
> > Mind you, there was the switch from Arthur to RO2 on the Acorn platform.
> > ISTR that most users breathed a sigh of relief when it happened... :)
> 
> How bad was arthur?

As long as you stayed on the command line, as most people did, Arthur was
just like the good old BBC Model B, but up to 25x quicker.

> The screen shots I've seen look similar in concept to RO but very GEM
> looking. 

The windowing system was pretty naff, shocking colour scheme and single
tasking. The built in applications such as the sprite editor were very poor.
There were a few good applications such as Clare's Graphics Writer which was
powerful, but ran outside the desktop, and were very different to use than
any modern RISC OS application.

RISC OS 2 was a big advance, it had a proper consistent and usable
multi-tasking desktop, and of course the people were totally amazed by
the power of the built in applications such as !Draw and !Paint, even
!Edit was considered good at the time.

---druck

-- 
The ARM Club Free Software - http://www.armclub.org.uk/free/
The 32bit Conversions Page - http://www.quantumsoft.co.uk/druck/
0
druck
6/17/2004 9:19:29 PM
In article <16aaa5c04c.druck@druck.freeuk.net>,
   druck <news@druck.freeuk.com> wrote:
> RISC OS 2 was a big advance, it had a proper consistent and usable
> multi-tasking desktop, and of course the people were totally amazed by
> the power of the built in applications such as !Draw and !Paint, even
> !Edit was considered good at the time.

As long as you didn't do anything that could screw up the Filecore (I
still remember the interminable "Filecore In Use" errors that plagued RO2,
a fault that was cleared to a great extent in RO3)

-- 
 //\  // Chika <zvlhxv@penfuarg.bet.hx. - ROT13>
//  \//  The second ZFC coming <crashnet.org.uk/zedeffcee> 

.... Where there's a will, there's an Inheritance Tax.
0
Chika
6/18/2004 9:28:59 AM
In article <16aaa5c04c.druck@druck.freeuk.net>,
   druck <news@druck.freeuk.com> wrote:
> As long as you stayed on the command line, as most people did, Arthur was
> just like the good old BBC Model B, but up to 25x quicker.

I bought my Archimedes in 1987 and was *extremely* pleased to find
it was a super-fast BBC Micro with more memory, better graphics
and everything you could want in a machine. I never really liked
the 6502 (I was brought up on the Z80) but the ARM was a totally
different matter. I suspect you can probably still configure an
Iyonix to boot into Basic and behave like a ultra-fast BBC Micro
if you really want to.

Dave Daniels

0
Dave
6/18/2004 5:30:56 PM
Thrice the brinded cat hath mewed, and Lionel Smith did decree on 9 Jun 2004...

> In article <slrncccfr6.h9o.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
>    Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> 
> > I'm not surprised you feel it's useless:- you're usually trying to reach
> > the moral high ground from one of Lionel's South African mines with a
> > spade.
> 
> Hey! You keep my mines out of it they are mine!
No pun intended, I presume.
-- 
- Martin Bazley - "The only good zombie is a dead zombie" /
martin@bazley.freeuk.com    _____________________________/_
Wimbledon, London, England /|> | <  /   /\ <   |>|  | |  |_�<   /\ |/
__________________________/ |\ | _> \_  \/ _>  |\ \/  |_ |_ _>  \/ |\
0
Martin
6/18/2004 8:32:17 PM
In article <4cc114937fdave_daniels@argonet.co.uk>, Dave Daniels
<dave_daniels@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <16aaa5c04c.druck@druck.freeuk.net>, druck
>    <news@druck.freeuk.com> wrote:
> > As long as you stayed on the command line, as most people did, Arthur
> > was just like the good old BBC Model B, but up to 25x quicker.

> I bought my Archimedes in 1987 and was *extremely* pleased to find it
> was a super-fast BBC Micro with more memory, better graphics and
> everything you could want in a machine. I never really liked the 6502
> (I was brought up on the Z80) but the ARM was a totally different
> matter.

Different and better, yes, but ISTR ARM designs were intended to be a
progression of the 6502 paradigm, whereas the Z80s CISC successors are
the power-hungry-heaters found in pee seas.

> I suspect you can probably still configure an Iyonix to boot
> into Basic and behave like a ultra-fast BBC Micro if you really want to.

Can you?

-- 

  To avoid receiving spam, mailto: 1@invalid.org.uk will not work.
      To contact me and/or obtain your own spam-proof address:
                    http://www.invalid.org.uk/

.... "If I lose mine honour, I lose myself" Ant & Cleo, Act iii, Sc.4
0
Tim
6/20/2004 8:40:55 AM
On 18 Jun 2004 Dave Daniels <dave_daniels@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <16aaa5c04c.druck@druck.freeuk.net>,
>    druck <news@druck.freeuk.com> wrote:
> > As long as you stayed on the command line, as most people did, Arthur was
> > just like the good old BBC Model B, but up to 25x quicker.
> 
> I bought my Archimedes in 1987 and was *extremely* pleased to find
> it was a super-fast BBC Micro with more memory, better graphics
> and everything you could want in a machine. I never really liked
> the 6502 (I was brought up on the Z80) but the ARM was a totally
> different matter.

I liked the 6502, but the ARM is fantatasic.

> I suspect you can probably still configure an Iyonix to boot into Basic and
> behave like a ultra-fast BBC Micro if you really want to.

Yep. But its probably around 4410x as fast as a BBC Micro now.

(ARM 2 Arichimedes was 25x faster, ARM 3 Archimedes 3x, ARM600 Risc PC 2x
AM700 Risc PC 40%, Strong ARM 7x, Iyonix 3x)

---druck

-- 
The ARM Club Free Software - http://www.armclub.org.uk/free/
The 32bit Conversions Page - http://www.quantumsoft.co.uk/druck/
0
druck
6/20/2004 10:27:57 AM
In message <4cc1ebb9471@invalid.org.uk>
          Tim Hill <1@invalid.org.uk> wrote:
[snip]


> Different and better, yes, but ISTR ARM designs were intended to be a
> progression of the 6502 paradigm, whereas the Z80s CISC successors are
> the power-hungry-heaters found in pee seas.

The Z80 shares a common ancestor the 8080, but x86 processors aren't
descendants of the Z80.

(An engineer who used the Z80 in embedded designs told me that to match
a 4MHz Z80 you needed at least a 386 processor)

-- 
Jess   msn: phantasm_39@hotmail.com  icq: 91353267  
mailto:nospam@itworkshop.uklinux.net Hotmail is spamtrap, don't email it
RISC OS 4.39 kinetic 128+128+2MB 20GB  586-133 I-3 ADSL
   http://www.itworkshop-online.co.uk     http://www.b1-11.net
0
Jess
6/20/2004 9:40:15 PM
In <a11233c24c.news@itworkshop.invalid>,
Jess <phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote:

> (An engineer who used the Z80 in embedded designs told me that to match
> a 4MHz Z80 you needed at least a 386 processor)

He must have been some kind of zealot. I remember being surprised that
even an 8086 was quite capable of running Elite with solid-filled
polygons. Not even a pair of 6502s in a BBC could manage that, and they
were on a par with the Z80s.

-- 
The address in the Reply-To is genuine and should not be edited.
See <http://www.realh.co.uk/contact.html> for more reliable contact addresses.
0
Tony
6/20/2004 10:06:37 PM
In message <slrncdc2jd.hmc.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>
          Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> In <a11233c24c.news@itworkshop.invalid>,
> Jess <phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > (An engineer who used the Z80 in embedded designs told me that to match
> > a 4MHz Z80 you needed at least a 386 processor)
> 
> He must have been some kind of zealot. I remember being surprised that
> even an 8086 was quite capable of running Elite with solid-filled
> polygons. Not even a pair of 6502s in a BBC could manage that, and they
> were on a par with the Z80s.

Are you sure 6502s are on a par with Z80s? I was under the impression
that the Z80 had a significant edge. (Maybe you should compare Z80
based systems with PCs, though there is major variance eg spectrum the
processor does everything, Einstein and Master have significant
hardware graphics functions)

My former colleague was talking about use in embedded designs, where
the other hardware was comparible. One example he gave was that they
were unable to do the same with a 186 (12 or 16 MHz?) as a Z80 (4MHz).



-- 
Jess   msn: phantasm_39@hotmail.com  icq: 91353267  
mailto:nospam@itworkshop.uklinux.net Hotmail is spamtrap, don't email it
RISC OS 4.39 kinetic 128+128+2MB 20GB  586-133 I-3 ADSL
   http://www.itworkshop-online.co.uk     http://www.b1-11.net
0
Jess
6/21/2004 6:57:54 AM
In article <a11233c24c.news@itworkshop.invalid>,
   Jess <phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > Different and better, yes, but ISTR ARM designs were intended to be a
> > progression of the 6502 paradigm, whereas the Z80s CISC successors are
> > the power-hungry-heaters found in pee seas.

> The Z80 shares a common ancestor the 8080, but x86 processors aren't
> descendants of the Z80.

There was a short lived war for supremacy in the 16-bit market when Zilog
released the Z8000, the 16-bit successor to the Z80. I even worked on one
for a bit; it was an Olivetti system, set up as a cash receipting system
for a certain local authority. However, with the might of IBM behind it,
the 8086/8088 machines soon won that one.

> (An engineer who used the Z80 in embedded designs told me that to match
> a 4MHz Z80 you needed at least a 386 processor)

Sounds about right! :)

-- 
 //\  // Chika <zvlhxv@penfuarg.bet.hx. - ROT13>
//  \//  The second ZFC coming <crashnet.org.uk/zedeffcee> 

.... Is that lemon in your tea?  No, s'lime.
0
Chika
6/21/2004 8:20:45 AM
In article <slrncdc2jd.hmc.this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk>,
   Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:
> In <a11233c24c.news@itworkshop.invalid>,
> Jess <phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote:

> > (An engineer who used the Z80 in embedded designs told me that to match
> > a 4MHz Z80 you needed at least a 386 processor)

> He must have been some kind of zealot. I remember being surprised that
> even an 8086 was quite capable of running Elite with solid-filled
> polygons. Not even a pair of 6502s in a BBC could manage that, and they
> were on a par with the Z80s.

Depends on what you mean by "on a par". Generally speaking, a 1 MHz 6502
would have the same performance as a 4 MHz Z80, but each had its
specialities where they could outperform the other, which was why you
generally found Z80's doing heavy number crunching duties whilst the 6502
was much better for flinging data about. As for solid-filled polygon
manipulation, that doesn't really surprise me at all. You have to remember
why everyone moved to 16-bit, then to 32-bit processors.

-- 
 //\  // Chika <zvlhxv@penfuarg.bet.hx. - ROT13>
//  \//  The second ZFC coming <crashnet.org.uk/zedeffcee> 

.... On second thoughts, lets not go to Camelot.  It is a silly place.
0
Chika
6/21/2004 8:24:38 AM
In article <a11233c24c.news@itworkshop.invalid>, Jess
<phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote:
> In message <4cc1ebb9471@invalid.org.uk> Tim Hill <1@invalid.org.uk>
> wrote: [snip]


> > Different and better, yes, but ISTR ARM designs were intended to be a
> > progression of the 6502 paradigm, whereas the Z80s CISC successors
> > are the power-hungry-heaters found in pee seas.

> The Z80 shares a common ancestor the 8080, but x86 processors aren't
> descendants of the Z80.

I was only trying to imply their CISC nature was inherited.

-- 

  To avoid receiving spam, mailto: 1@invalid.org.uk will not work.
      To contact me and/or obtain your own spam-proof address:
                    http://www.invalid.org.uk/

.... "Who can control his fate?" Othello, Act v, Sc.2
0
Tim
6/21/2004 9:56:17 AM
On 20 Jun 2004 Tony Houghton <this.address.is.fake@realh.co.uk> wrote:

> In <a11233c24c.news@itworkshop.invalid>,
> Jess <phantasm_39@hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > (An engineer who used the Z80 in embedded designs told me that to match
> > a 4MHz Z80 you needed at least a 386 processor)
> 
> He must have been some kind of zealot. I remember being surprised that
> even an 8086 was quite capable of running Elite with solid-filled
> polygons. Not even a pair of 6502s in a BBC could manage that, and they
> were on a par with the Z80s.

Given the same memory speeds, the 6502 could have easily done it.

---druck

-- 
The ARM Club Free Software - http://www.armclub.org.uk/free/
The 32bit Conversions Page - http://www.quantumsoft.co.uk/druck/
0
druck
6/21/2004 4:41:25 PM
In article <f085f5c14c.druck@druck.freeuk.net>,
   druck <news@druck.freeuk.com> wrote:

> Yep. But its probably around 4410x as fast as a BBC Micro now.

> (ARM 2 Arichimedes was 25x faster, ARM 3 Archimedes 3x, ARM600 Risc PC 2x
> AM700 Risc PC 40%, Strong ARM 7x, Iyonix 3x)

> ---druck

Using the following exhaustive suite of benchmark tests:

10 T=TIME
20 FOR N%=1 TO 10000
30 NEXT
40 PRINT TIME-T

I have established that my Iyonix is 2,800 times faster
than my Electron. The Electron took 2.45 seconds to
run through the test suite. The final count had to be
raised to 28,000,000 for the Iyonix to take the same
amount of time. The results of this test were repeatable
and this gives me great confidence in the validity of
the results.

Dave Daniels

0
Dave
6/21/2004 8:07:37 PM
On 21 Jun 2004 as I do recall,
          Chika wrote:

[snip]
> Generally speaking, a 1 MHz 6502
> would have the same performance as a 4 MHz Z80, but each had its
> specialities where they could outperform the other, which was why you
> generally found Z80's doing heavy number crunching duties whilst the 6502
> was much better for flinging data about.

The Z80's got a lot of dedicated instructions for 'moving data about',
whereas the 6502 just seems to have a selection of weird addressing
modes to enable it to work around not having enough registers to
specify a 32k address;  does this very low-level approach make it
faster?

-- 
Harriet Bazley                     ==  Loyaulte me lie ==

If you see an onion ring - answer it.
0
Harriet
6/22/2004 12:10:50 AM
In article <31b2c4c24c.harriet@freeuk.com>, Harriet Bazley
<bazley@feathermail.co.uk> wrote:
> On 21 Jun 2004 as I do recall, Chika wrote:

> [snip]
> > Generally speaking, a 1 MHz 6502 would have the same performance as a
> > 4 MHz Z80, but each had its specialities where they could outperform
> > the other, which was why you generally found Z80's doing heavy number
> > crunching duties whilst the 6502 was much better for flinging data
> > about.

> The Z80's got a lot of dedicated instructions for 'moving data about',
> whereas the 6502 just seems to have a selection of weird addressing
> modes to enable it to work around not having enough registers to specify
> a 32k address;  does this very low-level approach make it faster?

<sad admission>
I used to write Z80 routines on the back of beer mats while down the pub.
(college coursework )

Incredibly easy since the routines that most lecturers[1] expected were
also expected to be done with the simple instructions many combinations of
which could often be substituted by a single complex instruction.

Downside? Most of those instructions took several cycles to run. End result
- the program code was shorter but the run time was longer.

Solution: More beer mats required.

[1] Mine had a bit of a fit when he requested an assignment in four hours
earlier (so he could p*** off south on hols, leaving someone else to cover
his lecture) and after insisting that he didn't mind "just the notes" and
wouldn't knock off marks for untidiness. So I (reluctantly) handed him the
stack of (spilt) beermats with said notes.

</sad admission>

No, those complex instructions frequently don't turn out faster. Hence the
development of things like the ARM by removing (or not adding in the first
place) complex processor instructions and sticking to optimised simple
instructions.

-- 
Steve Pampling
0
Steven
6/22/2004 5:54:08 AM
In article <31b2c4c24c.harriet@freeuk.com>, Harriet Bazley
<bazley@feathermail.co.uk> wrote:
> On 21 Jun 2004 as I do recall, Chika wrote:

> [snip]
> > Generally speaking, a 1 MHz 6502 would have the same performance as a
> > 4 MHz Z80, but each had its specialities where they could outperform
> > the other, which was why you generally found Z80's doing heavy number
> > crunching duties whilst the 6502 was much better for flinging data
> > about.

> The Z80's got a lot of dedicated instructions for 'moving data about',
> whereas the 6502 just seems to have a selection of weird addressing
> modes to enable it to work around not having enough registers to specify
> a 32k address;  does this very low-level approach make it faster?

Yes, it did. The trouble with the Z80's special instructions was that it
took more cycles to process, much as the microcode in other processors
takes time to process, whilst the minimal approach of the 6502 meant that
it took far fewer cycles on the whole to process an instruction. Where the
6502 was weaker than the Z80 was in number crunching.

-- 
 //\  // Chika <zvlhxv@penfuarg.bet.hx. - ROT13>
//  \//  The second ZFC coming <crashnet.org.uk/zedeffcee> 

.... None of you exists, my sysop types all this in!
0
Chika
6/22/2004 4:44:42 PM
Reply:

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D/A A/D
We are designing a PC104 format system that sends out a stimulus sample from an array and then A/D's the response. It repeats this process 5000 times a second for about 10 secs. We are using an Apex Status X A/D/A board with Matlab and the Real Time Toolbox, selecting the drivers for the MCC board CIO DAS1602/16. This works just fine. No problem. But now we need the C program version, but the MCC Universal Library for the product does not support this functionality. "Pacer" capability is needed. (Is one part of the problem that the D/A on the CIO DAS1602/16 has no F...

s u b j e c t : L o w c o s t m e d i c a l a n d m e d i c i n e f r o m C h i n a
s u b j e c t : L o w c o s t m e d i c a l a n d m e d i c i n e f r o m C h i n a U n i V i s u a l G r o u p I n c . M o n t h l y N e w s - - - August E d i t i o n ########################################################## U L T R A S O U N D ......................... $ 6 5 0 P A C S ........................... $ 1 0 0 0 H I S ............................. $ 1 0 0 0 P a t i e n t M o n i t o r .................. $ 1 28 0 C a b l e E C G ............................ $ 9 9 9 M i c r o s c o...

D;e ***Hot stuff
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extracting D from 1 / D*D
Hi Folks, Incredibly busy summer here, so before burning my brain cells, Googling or -worst- digging in my very dusty math courses, I submit this question to the DSP experts who usually float around, hoping some aren't at the beaches ;-) How would you extract D from a X = K / (D * D) value (16 bits) ? - in a small FPGA indeed, which has no embedded mult (but a mult could be synthesized) - please don't answer to synthesize sqrt(1/x) ! - I have lots of clock cycles available to compensate the lack of FPGA resources. - I would like to avoid a Piece-Wise Linear estimator if possible ...

C H A N G E . E V E R Y . D I G I T . O F . T H E . D I A G O N A L
ROW n +-----------------> ROW 1 ! 0 . 3 4 3 2 3 3 . . ROW 2 ! 0 . 1 1 0 0 0 0 . . ROW 3 ! 0 . 9 9 9 9 9 9 . . ROW 4 ! 0 . 3 2 3 2 3 2 . . ROW 5 ! 0 . 3 4 4 4 3 3 . . ROW 6 ! 0 . 5 5 5 5 5 5 .. ROW 7 v ... OH LOOKY HERE! A 3 ROW 1 ! 0 . 3 4 3 2 3 3 . . LOOK DOWN! ROW 2 ! 0 . 1 ROW 3 ! 0 . 9 ROW 4 ! 0 . 3 ROW 5 ! 0 . 3 ROW 6 ! 0 . 5 ROW 7 v ... SEE ANY ANTI(3)? WHERE ANTI(D) =/= D ? JUST SWAP ROW 1 & 2! ROW n +-----------------> ROW 2 ! 0 . 1 1 0 0 0 0 . . ROW 1 ! 0 . 3 4 3 2 3 3 . . ROW 3 ! 0 . 9 9 9 9 9 9 . . ROW 4 ! ...

Hi :D FRIENZ :D FOR ALL YOU FASHION FANZ OUT HERE :D :D URGENT
Hi frienz, check this out http://www.zazzle.com/nikla01 Thanx, have a great day to all. ...

the question about: printf("%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\n",i,++i,--i,i--,i++,-i--);
int i=8; printf("%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\n",i,++i,--i,i--,i++,-i--); printf("%d\n", i); why the results is: 8 8 7 8 8 -8 7 How to explain? WeiWangJi wrote: > int i=8; > printf("%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\t%d\n",i,++i,--i,i--,i++,-i--); > printf("%d\n", i); > > why the results is: > > 8 8 7 8 8 -8 > 7 > > How to explain? > There is no explaination. Because you modify the same varaible more than once in the same function call your code is illegal, and it's be...

printf("%d%d%d")
Dear all, Consider: include <stdio.h> int main(void) { printf("%d%d%d"); return (0); } I'm having a bad time trying to explain someone (elsewhere) why the aforementioned code is a constraint violation and thus requires a (implementation defined) warning. I have cited the part of the standard about stdio.h, where they explicitly state that "If there are insufficient arguments for the format, the behavior is undefined." He's arguments have been: - a undefined behavior doesn't imply a constraint violation -> I can't word out why he&...

printf("%d,%d,%d", a, a++, a++)
int main(void) { int a = 3; printf("%d, %d, %d", a, a++, a++); } with Gcc, the output is "5 4 3", I just confused. Xiaofeng Ye wrote: > int main(void) > { > int a = 3; > printf("%d, %d, %d", a, a++, a++); > } > > with Gcc, the output is "5 4 3", I just confused. Question 3.2 of the faq will be elucidating. See: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/q3.2.html - Al Bowers Tampa, Fl USA mailto: xabowers@myrapidsys.com (remove the x to send email) http://www.geocities.com/abowers822/ In article <cplkgg$17pq$1@mail.cn99.com>...

So you hate^D^D^D^D extremely dislike the manual DSC tag configuration...
If you need to configure the DSC to use large numbers of tags, but you don't know what those tags will be before your program is running, I believe www.autohotkey.com will help. AutoHotKey is a GPL'd macro/script recorder for Windows, and its scripts can be compiled to exe's to take command line arguments. The format of the .txt file that can be manually exported is pretty easy to generate (especially if you don't need alarms or anything like that, just memory tags), and you can launch the TCE from a .VI, so...a script that waits for the TCE to open, then sends the necessary co...

Transform string : "c;b;a;e;d" -> "a;b;c;d;e" ?
Thank's for your help ! Indrid On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 22:47:26 -0400, "Indrid Colt" <indrid@colt.com> wrote: Well, you could use the Split function to create an array with 5 elements. Then use any suitable sorting algorithm to sort these items. Then use the Join function to stitch the elements back together. -Tom. >Thank's for your help ! > > >Indrid > Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7744@cox.net> wrote in news:fkc6d1thuadliq28absbqrjpc535d4m1p0@4ax.com: > On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 22:47:26 -0400, "Indrid Colt" > <indrid@colt.com...

(a-b, b-c, c-d, d-e,...)
I have used IDL to analyse data in my MSc project. I am writing up my dissertation now and want to know if there is a specific term for one of the processes I have used. The data are in several vectors of the form (a, b, c, d,...). I have found the change in value from one point to the next and then analysed those, i.e. the data is in the format (a-b, b-c, c-d, d-e,...). Can someone tell me what the name for this process is (if there is one, and I'm sure there is). Many thanks On Sep 28, 10:48 am, Jimoid <jimmy.cul...@gmail.com> wrote: > I have used IDL to analyse data in my M...

d&d
Hi, Are the any decent ad&d crpgs recently/coming out? Implaying through bg1-2 again and need a new fix! -- -=Matt=- "-=Matt=-" <DieSpam@DieSpamDie.co.uk> wrote in message news:c7c0tf$vm0$2@news8.svr.pol.co.uk... > Hi, > > Are the any decent ad&d crpgs recently/coming out? > Implaying through bg1-2 again and need a new fix! You could always replay the IWD series or PS:T. ToEE was ad&d, wasn't it. Can't remember - I played it for all of 10 minutes and then moved on. A thousand monkeys banging on keyboards posted the following under the ...

[wxPython] D&D of controls? Wanna d&d wxStaticText from wxPanel to wxPanel
Hi all, I'd like to drag a wxStaticText or a wxButton from one wxPanel to an other. I looked at the samples in the wxPython Wiki, but additional enlightenment would be of great help. My code simply doesn't do what I'd like it to do. I have 4 objects here (a wxFrame, 2 wxPanels and a wxStaticText) and I guess I've messed up my drop sources, targets, and data. Does anyone know of any samples where similar things are done? Many thanks in advance and best regards Franz GEIGER ...

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