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5.25" Drive in PC with Omniflop

Hi all,

After reading about Omniflop, and it's ability to read and write various 
formats to/from a floppy disc in a PC, I begun to think...I have a 
Cumana 5.25" drive (40/80 switchable), and I was wondering if this would 
work as an internal drive in my PC (after being removed from the case, 
of course), and then be able to be used to read and write BBC floppies.

Next question, which I know is probably beyond the scope of this group, 
would this same setup also work for reading and writing Commodore 64 
floppies?
(It would actually suit better to be able to read and write C64 floppies 
as I haven't a clue on how to transfer them using the native hardware I 
have - a C64 and two 1571 drives).

Cheers,

Gerald.

-- 
gerald at hollypops dot co dot uk
0
Gerald
6/1/2015 7:02:17 PM
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On 01/06/2015 20:02, Gerald Holdsworth wrote:
> After reading about Omniflop, and it's ability to read and write various
> formats to/from a floppy disc in a PC, I begun to think...I have a
> Cumana 5.25" drive (40/80 switchable), and I was wondering if this would
> work as an internal drive in my PC (after being removed from the case,
> of course), and then be able to be used to read and write BBC floppies.

Unless its an ancient PC that came with a floppy drive, it probably wont 
have any support for a floppy drive.

---druck

0
druck
6/1/2015 7:41:55 PM
On 01/06/2015 20:41, druck wrote:
> On 01/06/2015 20:02, Gerald Holdsworth wrote:
>> After reading about Omniflop, and it's ability to read and write various
>> formats to/from a floppy disc in a PC, I begun to think...I have a
>> Cumana 5.25" drive (40/80 switchable), and I was wondering if this would
>> work as an internal drive in my PC (after being removed from the case,
>> of course), and then be able to be used to read and write BBC floppies.
>
> Unless its an ancient PC that came with a floppy drive, it probably wont
> have any support for a floppy drive.

It already has a 3.5" drive, connected to the floppy connector on the 
motherboard.

Gerald

-- 
gerald at hollypops dot co dot uk
0
Gerald
6/2/2015 5:32:50 AM
Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:

> formats to/from a floppy disc in a PC, I begun to think...I have a 
> Cumana 5.25" drive (40/80 switchable), and I was wondering if this would
> work as an internal drive in my PC (after being removed from the case,
> of course), and then be able to be used to read and write BBC floppies.

• What kind of PC (esp. mainboard type: vendor and model) is it exactly?

• Have you been to the BIOS-POST-Setup before booting the OS and have a
look there, whether you can set up »5,25"« there, instead or
additionally to the 3,5" one?

• Which program would you use to read/write the BBC floppies, which
format is this?

Some can do it nowadays, a lot not.

Regards
Götz
-- 
http://www.3rz.org/
0
usenet
6/2/2015 8:02:01 AM
On 02/06/2015 09:02, Goetz Hoffart wrote:
> Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> formats to/from a floppy disc in a PC, I begun to think...I have a
>> Cumana 5.25" drive (40/80 switchable), and I was wondering if this would
>> work as an internal drive in my PC (after being removed from the case,
>> of course), and then be able to be used to read and write BBC floppies.
>
> • What kind of PC (esp. mainboard type: vendor and model) is it exactly?

It's a Gigabyte GA-8S855FX.

>
> • Have you been to the BIOS-POST-Setup before booting the OS and have a
> look there, whether you can set up »5,25"« there, instead or
> additionally to the 3,5" one?

There are two entries in the BIOS - Drive A and Drive B. Both can be any of:
None; 360K, 5.25 in; 1.2M 5.25 in; 720K, 3.5 in; 1.44M, 3.5 in; or 
2.88M, 3.5 in

>
> • Which program would you use to read/write the BBC floppies, which
> format is this?

Omniflop to read/write Acorn DFS, primarily. Also, I would like to 
read/write D71 for the Commodore 64, and maybe Acorn ADFS.

Cheers,

Gerald.

-- 
gerald at hollypops dot co dot uk
0
Gerald
6/2/2015 6:28:00 PM
Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:
> On 02/06/2015 09:02, Goetz Hoffart wrote:
> > Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> >> formats to/from a floppy disc in a PC, I begun to think...I have a
> >> Cumana 5.25" drive (40/80 switchable), and I was wondering if this would
> >> work as an internal drive in my PC (after being removed from the case,
> >> of course), and then be able to be used to read and write BBC floppies.
> >
> > • What kind of PC (esp. mainboard type: vendor and model) is it exactly?
> 
> It's a Gigabyte GA-8S855FX.

Hmm, zero hits on Google, even for variations of that.  Are you sure?
What kind of CPU does it have?  (Pentium II, Core 2, Core i7, etc)

The main question is what the floppy chip is - it's likely to be a
rectangular chip, like the ones shown here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_I/O
SM(S)C, Winbond, ITE, National Semiconductor and UMC are common
manufacturers.

Theo
0
Theo
6/2/2015 7:51:00 PM
Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:

> There are two entries in the BIOS - Drive A and Drive B. Both can be any of:
> None; 360K, 5.25 in; 1.2M 5.25 in; 720K, 3.5 in; 1.44M, 3.5 in; or 
> 2.88M, 3.5 in

Sounds perfect. Now you just need to use the proper (�switched�) floppy
cable and go on.

> Omniflop to read/write Acorn DFS, primarily. Also, I would like to 
> read/write D71 for the Commodore 64, and maybe Acorn ADFS.

Sure all of these are using MFM? I thought that the 1541 for the C64 at
least uses GCR, which should be incompatible to the PCs floppy
controller, which can only do MFM.

Only the 1571 for the C128 had an additional MFM controller, IIRC.

Regards
G�tz
-- 
http://www.3rz.org/
0
usenet
6/2/2015 8:47:45 PM
Theo Markettos <theom+news@chiark.greenend.org.uk> wrote:

> The main question is what the floppy chip is

If the POST-Setup offers 5,25" and 360, 720, 1440k, then the likelihood
that this floppy chip does not offer these values are quite low.

Regards
G�tz
-- 
http://www.3rz.org/
0
usenet
6/3/2015 5:52:57 AM
On 02/06/2015 20:51, Theo Markettos wrote:
> Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:
>> On 02/06/2015 09:02, Goetz Hoffart wrote:
>>> Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:
>>>
>>>> formats to/from a floppy disc in a PC, I begun to think...I have a
>>>> Cumana 5.25" drive (40/80 switchable), and I was wondering if this would
>>>> work as an internal drive in my PC (after being removed from the case,
>>>> of course), and then be able to be used to read and write BBC floppies.
>>>
>>> • What kind of PC (esp. mainboard type: vendor and model) is it exactly?
>>
>> It's a Gigabyte GA-8S855FX.
>
> Hmm, zero hits on Google, even for variations of that.  Are you sure?
> What kind of CPU does it have?  (Pentium II, Core 2, Core i7, etc)

Apologies - mistyped it...it's GA-8S655FX

>
> The main question is what the floppy chip is - it's likely to be a
> rectangular chip, like the ones shown here:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_I/O
> SM(S)C, Winbond, ITE, National Semiconductor and UMC are common
> manufacturers.

Looks like an ITE chip

Gerald.

-- 
gerald at hollypops dot co dot uk
0
Gerald
6/3/2015 8:39:51 AM
On 02/06/2015 21:47, Goetz Hoffart wrote:
> Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> There are two entries in the BIOS - Drive A and Drive B. Both can be any of:
>> None; 360K, 5.25 in; 1.2M 5.25 in; 720K, 3.5 in; 1.44M, 3.5 in; or
>> 2.88M, 3.5 in
>
> Sounds perfect. Now you just need to use the proper (�switched�) floppy
> cable and go on.

Think I've got one - found a ribbon cable with both types of connectors. 
I had thought I could connect it direct to the mobo as a single drive - 
afterall, the ribbon cable into the drive casing goes directly into the 
drive.

Gerald.

-- 
gerald at hollypops dot co dot uk
0
Gerald
6/3/2015 8:42:26 AM
Gerald Holdsworth <nospam@hollypops.co.uk> wrote:
> On 02/06/2015 20:51, Theo Markettos wrote:
> 
> Apologies - mistyped it...it's GA-8S655FX
>
> Looks like an ITE chip

I hoping you'd tell us the number on the chip.

Anyway, google managed to find a clear enough picture online.  It's an
IT8705F for which the datasheet is here:
http://pdf.datasheetcatalog.com/datasheets2/99/997800_1.pdf

Looks like it's of an age where single density is quite likely to be broken,
because lots of contemporary PC controllers were.  360K/720K DOS floppies
are double density.  So early BBC disks are possibly problematic.
It claims to support FM mode (SD, as opposed to MFM which is DD) but it may
not actually work.

Theo
0
Theo
6/3/2015 8:30:59 PM
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