f



Replacement for Iyonix

I'm looking at replacing my Iyonix - its been a good work horse but is
showing its age. ARMX6 looks a rather nice machine with its powerful
4k graphics and rapid SSD but what puts me off is putting a
significant amount of money into a machine that runs an OS with no
decent browser software*.  There are numerous browsers out there but
sadly very few are RISC OS compatible. I've had a look at Otter but
disappointed in its reliability. It is becoming crucial to have a
reliable JavaScript enabled browser as without it many operations like
banking and purchasing are almost impossible to do.

The alternative would be to purchase a PC system (I'm not enamoured
with Windows 10 - bring back 7) and run one of the UNIX distributions
where I've been informed that providing one buys fast processor
hardware the OS can be fast and there are less browser isues.

Apple are out of the question now they've announced a 20% price
increase - 10% I can accept but 20% - what rip off merchants. What are
other RISC OS users doing?

*One thing occurred to me - has anyone been able to run the ARMX6 in a
dual-boot mode i.e. to have RISC OS running when required but to
switch to a UNIX/LINUX distribution to operate a browser and is it
easy to do?

Richard
0
Richard
10/30/2016 1:03:14 PM
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In article <mpro.ofvfdr001sjl006hp.news@pittdj.co.uk>,
   David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> If Nicola Sturgeon prevails will Apple's computers be cheaper in Scotland
> than in England!!

I wouldn't bank on it.

At risk of being taken to task for going O.T.

She is forever harping on about independence yet wants to surrender rule
of Scotland to Brussels. Someone please explain her logic because it makes
no sense to me.

-- 
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
sending tools across the world
http://www.twam.co.uk/
0
Stuart
10/30/2016 1:01:01 AM
In article <55d72aff37basura@invalid.addr.uk>,
   Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> *One thing occurred to me - has anyone been able to run the ARMX6 in a
> dual-boot mode i.e. to have RISC OS running when required but to
> switch to a UNIX/LINUX distribution to operate a browser and is it
> easy to do?

I would recommend at looking what Elesar

http://shop.elesar.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=51

are up to. Note, towards the bottom the page, GoLinux.

I think CJE and RComp are doing stuff with this board.

See also  http://www.riscository.com/tag/r-comp/

and

https://www.riscosopen.org/forum/forums/1/topics/3940

The ARMX6 is a lovely machine, I own one, but the Titanium might suit your
requirements better and is supposed to be faster

-- 
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
sending tools across the world
http://www.twam.co.uk/
0
Stuart
10/30/2016 1:01:01 AM
In article <55d73e7790noise@audiomisc.co.uk>,
   Jim Lesurf <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <55d73558c4Spambin@argonet.co.uk>, Stuart
> <Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

> > The ARMX6 is a lovely machine, I own one, but the Titanium might suit
> > your requirements better and is supposed to be faster

> This has been making me wonder why an ARMX6 couldn't also run Linux in a
> similar way. Particularly given than an RPi can.

I see no reason either, just needs someone to give it a try.

> I did ask on usenet what the "graphical" part of the annouced
> description meant. But as yet I've not seen an explanation. Maybe
> because the relevant people are busy with a show. My guess is that they
> simply meant it runs a desktop, windowing system, etc.

My understanding is that the Linux to run on ARM was initially a command
line version and RComp have produced a version that boots straight into a
GUI.

> Jim

-- 
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
sending tools across the world
http://www.twam.co.uk/
0
Stuart
10/30/2016 1:01:01 AM
In article <55d72aff37basura@invalid.addr.uk>,
   Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:

> Apple are out of the question now they've announced a 20%
> price increase - 10% I can accept but 20% - what rip off
> merchants.

Not a rip off at all. Apple price their stuff in US$, and
since the � has fallen by just over 21% since the close of
business on 23 June (1.479 then, 1.219 now - see xe.com), 
from their point of view the price has, very slightly, gone
down.

Happily using a number of RPCs with RO 4.02 for some things,
Win XP for others.

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
10/30/2016 1:45:38 PM
Richard Ashbery, on 30 Oct, wrote:

> I'm looking at replacing my Iyonix - its been a good work horse but is
> showing its age. ARMX6 looks a rather nice machine with its powerful 4k
> graphics and rapid SSD but what puts me off is putting a significant
> amount of money into a machine that runs an OS with no decent browser
> software*.  There are numerous browsers out there but sadly very few are
> RISC OS compatible. I've had a look at Otter but disappointed in its
> reliability. It is becoming crucial to have a reliable JavaScript enabled
> browser as without it many operations like banking and purchasing are
> almost impossible to do.

As far as I can see NetSurf is going nowhere, and that is not just a RISC OS
thing, the Linux build is equally useless.

> The alternative would be to purchase a PC system (I'm not enamoured with
> Windows 10 - bring back 7) and run one of the UNIX distributions where
> I've been informed that providing one buys fast processor hardware the OS
> can be fast and there are less browser isues.

I find I quite like Windows 10, though one one might care to consider
privacy settings. Over simplifying ever so slightly Windows 10 is just
Windows 7 with a veneer of stuff over it. Firefox is Firefox whether on
Window 10 or Linux, in real terms there just are no browser issues.

> Apple are out of the question now they've announced a 20% price increase -
> 10% I can accept but 20% - what rip off merchants. What are other RISC OS
> users doing?

Though Apple are never cheap this price hike is mainly down to the our
Brexit decision. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way so cannot complain
now about the consequences. In the fullness of etc.. Windows imports will
also go up.

My current solution is two machines, an iMac for the real world and a
Titanium. I do also have a Raspberry Pi 3 but there are some compatibility
issues with that.

The iMac can also run Ubuntu and Windows 10 as virtual machines. 
 
> *One thing occurred to me - has anyone been able to run the ARMX6 in a
> dual-boot mode i.e. to have RISC OS running when required but to switch to
> a UNIX/LINUX distribution to operate a browser and is it easy to do?

The Titanium, I believe, can dual boot between a Linux and RISC OS, I have
not tried it, I have Ubuntu on Virtualbox which works very well.

The Raspberry Pi can run Linux, it is just a matter of changing over SD
cards.

Overall RISC OS is in fine fettle here, with alternatives available for the
"browsing issue'.

It is simply a matter of using the right tool for the job.
-- 
David Pitt
0
David
10/30/2016 1:57:57 PM
In article <55d72aff37basura@invalid.addr.uk>,
   Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> I'm looking at replacing my Iyonix - its been a good work horse but is
> showing its age. ARMX6 looks a rather nice machine with its powerful
> 4k graphics and rapid SSD but what puts me off is putting a
> significant amount of money into a machine that runs an OS with no
> decent browser software*.  There are numerous browsers out there but
> sadly very few are RISC OS compatible. I've had a look at Otter but
> disappointed in its reliability. It is becoming crucial to have a
> reliable JavaScript enabled browser as without it many operations like
> banking and purchasing are almost impossible to do.

It's something, surely, that was apparent many many years ago? Which is
why I never bothered upgrading this RPC. It does what RISC OS does best
just OK. But it shares hardware with a PC via a KVM switch (I did upgrade
the RPC to a digital Viewfinder card). The PC looks after browsing and
handling AV stuff etc. UniControl and LanMan allow easy enough interface
between the two as needed.

-- 
*It was all so different before everything changed.

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
                  To e-mail, change noise into sound.
0
Dave
10/30/2016 2:06:49 PM
On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:

> Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way

Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?
-- 
Brian Howlett - Email to From: address deleted unseen
------------------------------------------------------------------
Last year I went fishing with Salvador Dali. He was using a dotted
line. He caught every other fish.
0
Brian
10/30/2016 4:12:17 PM
In article <55d73558c4Spambin@argonet.co.uk>, Stuart
<Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

> The ARMX6 is a lovely machine, I own one, but the Titanium might suit
> your requirements better and is supposed to be faster

This has been making me wonder why an ARMX6 couldn't also run Linux in a
similar way. Particularly given than an RPi can.

I did ask on usenet what the "graphical" part of the annouced description
meant. But as yet I've not seen an explanation. Maybe because the relevant
people are busy with a show. My guess is that they simply meant it runs a
desktop, windowing system, etc.

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
10/30/2016 4:35:54 PM
In article <044e3cd755.BrianNews@bhowlett.plus.net>, Brian Howlett
<news-spamtrap@brianhowlett.me.uk> wrote:
> On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:

> > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way

> Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?

More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
10/30/2016 4:39:25 PM
Brian Howlett, on 30 Oct, wrote:

> On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> 
> > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way
> 
> Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?

Oops!! Unless inadvertently presupposing a second referendum to restore
Apple's pricing regime to normality.
-- 
David Pitt
0
David
10/30/2016 5:08:02 PM
Jim Lesurf, on 30 Oct, wrote:

> In article <044e3cd755.BrianNews@bhowlett.plus.net>, Brian Howlett
> <news-spamtrap@brianhowlett.me.uk> wrote:
> > On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> 
> > > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way
> 
> > Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?
> 
> More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

If Nicola Sturgeon prevails will Apple's computers be cheaper in Scotland
than in England!!

-- 
David Pitt
0
David
10/30/2016 5:32:15 PM
In article <55d73ec9e5noise@audiomisc.co.uk>, Jim Lesurf
<noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <044e3cd755.BrianNews@bhowlett.plus.net>,
> Brian Howlett <news-spamtrap@brianhowlett.me.uk> wrote:
> > On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:

> > > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way

> > Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?

> More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

Or still more precisely, 37:34:29 for those allowed to vote.
When you take into account all those under 18, members of
the House of Lords and those in jail it is more like
27:24:49.

Of course, if this had been a trade union strike ballot that
'won' with 37% of the vote, the daily mail and the like
would be to first to complain, loudly.

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
10/30/2016 5:47:43 PM
In article <55d7450aacsee.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid>,
   Russell Hafter News <see.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid> wrote:
[Snippy]
> Of course, if this had been a trade union strike ballot that
> 'won' with 37% of the vote, the daily mail and the like
> would be to first to complain, loudly.

All newspapers are partisan about one thing or another (Or many things),
just like people.

With regard to Trade Union ballots, don't forget to include the percentage
who will have been strong armed into voting how the union masters want,
regardless of how they really wanted to vote.

Even old Davy (Me) is partisan about a few things, the rest I don't care
much about...  ;-)

But back to the thread...
Yes indeed it would be nice to have one of the shiny, whizzy, new RISC OS
machines, particulary one that could run both RISC OS and Linux, but these
days I can't justify the expenditure (Nb), so I make do with a Win PC
Hosting a RISC OS Emulator which actually does the job quite well.

Dave

Nb: Not only the financial aspect needs to be considered, but the lack of
certain important apps... You know what they are without me naming them.

D.

-- 

Dave Triffid
0
Dave
10/30/2016 6:22:18 PM
In message <55d72aff37basura@invalid.addr.uk>
     Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:

> Apple are out of the question now they've announced a 20% price increase
> - 10% I can accept but 20% - what rip off merchants. What are other RISC
> OS users doing?

If you are interested in Macs, some stores such as John Lewis are still
selling at pre-increase prices. Not the latest laptops of course. About to
save me 150 GBP.

If you're not already a Mac user, the future costs of maintaining your
investment might be a put-off though.

-- 
Fred
0
Fred
10/30/2016 7:16:54 PM
In article <55d7483549dave@triffid.co.uk>,
   Dave Symes <dave@triffid.co.uk> wrote:

> With regard to Trade Union ballots, don't forget to
> include the percentage who will have been strong armed
> into voting how the union masters want, regardless of how
> they really wanted to vote.

Sorry, I really cannot let that pass.

Have you never heard of secret ballots?

Workplace ballots were outlawed years ago, though I am sure
that it must have happened in the past: it certainly did for
parliamentary elections in the past.

I can assure you that in my days as a Trade Union rep it
never happened - I did not even know where most of my
members lived!

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
10/30/2016 9:21:39 PM
In message <55d758a0dfsee.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid>
          Russell Hafter News <see.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid> 
wrote:

> In article <55d7483549dave@triffid.co.uk>,
>    Dave Symes <dave@triffid.co.uk> wrote:

>> With regard to Trade Union ballots, don't forget to
>> include the percentage who will have been strong armed
>> into voting how the union masters want, regardless of how
>> they really wanted to vote.

> Sorry, I really cannot let that pass.

> Have you never heard of secret ballots?

> Workplace ballots were outlawed years ago, though I am sure
> that it must have happened in the past: it certainly did for
> parliamentary elections in the past.

> I can assure you that in my days as a Trade Union rep it
> never happened - I did not even know where most of my
> members lived!

And of course peer pressure and being sent to "Coventry" by work mates 
doesn't happen in an alternative universe.

It may be less prevalent now but I know of some people who still to 
this day do not talk to colleagues even 30+ years after events. Sad 
but that is what happens as us humans are complex beasts.

Anyway getting back on track then a ARMX6 is a great product and dare 
I say a cheap Linux machine can do what a Windows one can and a  
Raspberry Pi does make a nice Linux machine, as it does a RISC OS one.



-- 
See and experience the future using ARM Technology - LaPi laptop, 
Raspberry PI and RISC OS 5.23.
0
Doug
10/30/2016 9:45:44 PM
In article <55d73e7790noise@audiomisc.co.uk>,
   Jim Lesurf <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <55d73558c4Spambin@argonet.co.uk>, Stuart
> <Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

> > The ARMX6 is a lovely machine, I own one, but the Titanium might suit
> > your requirements better and is supposed to be faster

> This has been making me wonder why an ARMX6 couldn't also run Linux in a
> similar way. Particularly given than an RPi can.

It might well be able to, but the ARMX6 developers have been making a RISC
OS machine for a particular market. The Pi was made as a linux macine. RISC
OS has been successfully ported on to it.

-- 
from KT24 in Surrey, England
0
charles
10/30/2016 9:59:20 PM
In article <55d75b060cSpambin@argonet.co.uk>,
   Stuart <Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <mpro.ofvfdr001sjl006hp.news@pittdj.co.uk>,
>    David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> > If Nicola Sturgeon prevails will Apple's computers be cheaper in
> > Scotland than in England!!

> I wouldn't bank on it.

> At risk of being taken to task for going O.T.

> She is forever harping on about independence yet wants to surrender rule
> of Scotland to Brussels. Someone please explain her logic because it makes
> no sense to me.

Since the UK became part of the EU, Scotland has enjoyed far more funding
for capital projects than was ever given by Westminster.

-- 
from KT24 in Surrey, England
0
charles
10/30/2016 10:01:10 PM
In article <55d75b060cSpambin@argonet.co.uk>, Stuart
<Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <mpro.ofvfdr001sjl006hp.news@pittdj.co.uk>, David Pitt
>    <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> > If Nicola Sturgeon prevails will Apple's computers be cheaper in
> > Scotland than in England!!

> I wouldn't bank on it.

> At risk of being taken to task for going O.T.

I'm sure that we will be!

> She is forever harping on about independence yet wants to surrender rule
> of Scotland to Brussels. Someone please explain her logic because it
> makes no sense to me.
If you believe that Brussels 'rules' anyone then it may be beyond Nicola's
or my powers to explain it to you! :-)

Alan

-- 
Alan Calder, Milton Keynes, UK.
0
Alan
10/30/2016 10:13:43 PM
In article <3ad55ad755.dougjwebb@doug.j.webb.btinternet.com>,
   Doug Webb <doug.j.webb@btinternet.com> wrote:
> In message <55d758a0dfsee.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid>
>           Russell Hafter News <see.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid> 
> wrote:

> > In article <55d7483549dave@triffid.co.uk>,
> >    Dave Symes <dave@triffid.co.uk> wrote:

> >> With regard to Trade Union ballots, don't forget to
> >> include the percentage who will have been strong armed
> >> into voting how the union masters want, regardless of how
> >> they really wanted to vote.

> > Sorry, I really cannot let that pass.

> > Have you never heard of secret ballots?

> > Workplace ballots were outlawed years ago, though I am sure
> > that it must have happened in the past: it certainly did for
> > parliamentary elections in the past.

> > I can assure you that in my days as a Trade Union rep it
> > never happened - I did not even know where most of my
> > members lived!

> And of course peer pressure and being sent to "Coventry" by work mates 
> doesn't happen in an alternative universe.

Given that ballots, as Russell says, are secret then I can only assume that
you believe that union members are endowed with the super power of
mind-reading!

Yes,  a generation ago in the days of large industrial plants with open
voting such things did happen but then it's within my mother's memory there
was time when she didn't have the vote - anyone can play that game!

Nothing to do with 'union masters' - people can be very supportive of what
they see as 'their team' - wheter it be Brexit or Man U.

Alan



[Snip]

-- 
Alan Calder, Milton Keynes, UK.
0
Alan
10/30/2016 10:23:07 PM
In message <55d75e4191alan_calder@o2.co.uk>
          Alan Calder <alan_calder@o2.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <3ad55ad755.dougjwebb@doug.j.webb.btinternet.com>,
>    Doug Webb <doug.j.webb@btinternet.com> wrote:

[snip]

>>> 

>> And of course peer pressure and being sent to "Coventry" by work mates
>> doesn't happen in an alternative universe.

> Given that ballots, as Russell says, are secret then I can only assume that
> you believe that union members are endowed with the super power of
> mind-reading!

I say that as a current union member of over 40+ plus years of 
standing and one that believes they play an important part in society.

So no one talks about the pro and cons of a deal or proposals then in 
this utopian and alternative universe and makes their views known?

People come under all sorts of pressure and though a secret ballot 
makes things easier there is none the less still pressure exerted on 
an individual from both sides when important decisions are being made.

Anyway this is off topic so that will be my last contribution on the 
off topic element.

-- 
See and experience the future using ARM Technology - LaPi laptop, 
Raspberry PI and RISC OS 5.23.
0
Doug
10/30/2016 10:47:55 PM
On 30 Oct, Stuart wrote in message
    <55d75b060cSpambin@argonet.co.uk>:

> She is forever harping on about independence yet wants to surrender rule
> of Scotland to Brussels. Someone please explain her logic because it makes
> no sense to me.

Possibly what you're missing is that "being part of the EU" does not equate
to "surrendering rule to Brussels" outside of the pages of the Daily Mail.

-- 
Steve Fryatt - Leeds, England

http://www.stevefryatt.org.uk/
0
Steve
10/30/2016 11:00:31 PM
In article <mpro.ofvukj06blyzo02ix.news@stevefryatt.org.uk>,
   Steve Fryatt <news@stevefryatt.org.uk> wrote:

> Possibly what you're missing is that "being part of the EU" does not
> equate to "surrendering rule to Brussels"

Hate to break your rose tinted spectacles but the ultimate aim of the EU
is precisely that. Closer and ever closer "political union" with an
eventual single European government ruling all. Whether they will ever
agree on it's location as Brussels or Strasbourg remains to be seen.

-- 
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
sending tools across the world
http://www.twam.co.uk/
0
Stuart
10/31/2016 1:01:01 AM
In article <55d72aff37basura@invalid.addr.uk>,
   Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> *One thing occurred to me - has anyone been able to run the ARMX6 in a
> dual-boot mode i.e. to have RISC OS running when required but to
> switch to a UNIX/LINUX distribution to operate a browser and is it
> easy to do?

As noted further up the thread, yes, Elesar's Titanium can run Debian Jessie
Linux (other flavours exist if you're brave enough to roll your own)
  https://github.com/elesar-uk/titanium-build

Because the Titanium has a boot flash ROM there's ordinarily nothing in the
micro SD card socket, so we produced a card with Linux pre-installed
  http://shop.elesar.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=62

You'd probably find Linux will struggle on a Cortex-A9 (ARMX6/Pandaboard) as
it's a relatively old CPU now (2012). One area Linux is ahead of RISC OS by
some distance is being able to run on multiple cores, and hence use both of
the 1.5GHz Cortex-A15 cores on Titanium.

Assuming you bought the RISC OS version rather than the Linux version, your
computer would start up in RISC OS as usual. To switch to Linux you simply
run the !GoLinux application from the desktop and it'll quit RISC OS and run
the normal uboot loader
  http://support.elesar.co.uk/downloads/golinux.zip

contains some instructions to illustrate this further.

Regards,
Elesar Sales.
0
Elesar
10/31/2016 9:10:07 AM
In article <mpro.ofvfdr001sjl006hp.news@pittdj.co.uk>, David Pitt
<news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> Jim Lesurf, on 30 Oct, wrote:

> > In article <044e3cd755.BrianNews@bhowlett.plus.net>, Brian Howlett
> > <news-spamtrap@brianhowlett.me.uk> wrote:
> > > On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> > 
> > > > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way
> > 
> > > Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?
> > 
> > More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

> If Nicola Sturgeon prevails will Apple's computers be cheaper in
> Scotland than in England!!

Dunno. Must admit that specific issue isn't the main one that I'd have in
mind if scots ref two comes to pass. 

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
10/31/2016 9:42:49 AM
In article <55d75b060cSpambin@argonet.co.uk>, Stuart
<Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <mpro.ofvfdr001sjl006hp.news@pittdj.co.uk>, David Pitt
>    <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> > If Nicola Sturgeon prevails will Apple's computers be cheaper in
> > Scotland than in England!!

> I wouldn't bank on it.

> At risk of being taken to task for going O.T.

> She is forever harping on about independence yet wants to surrender rule
> of Scotland to Brussels. Someone please explain her logic because it
> makes no sense to me.

Understandable, given the over-simpliciations in your comments that fog the
real issues. :-)

Whenever *any* government makes *any* agreements with other governments,
or bodies of other kinds they accept it means they have to move away from
such an unreal absolutist view of "independence".

Hence the Scots may not want to "surrender rule" as you simplistically put
it to either the UK or EU. But may wish a close relationship with one, or
the other, or both. Through the medium of making deals where the *Scots*
government have the authority to decide for Scotland rather then a UK
Westminster one which dilutes or ignores differences between Scotland and
the rest of the UK.

So in reality it is a matter of who is making what choices, and on the
basis of what electorate's wishes. The "independence" is really a matter of
who has the authority to make the decisions on behalf of the people
affected. Not a fantasy of an isolated entity who waves magic wands - be
they in Scotland or in London - and who then can command whatever they
fancy to come to pass.

Personally, given only the choice of having to work though the UK or work
though the EU, I'd be inclined to prefer the EU. But in the end, such
decisions are made on the basis of the real details and circumstances when
a choice has to be made. Many factors would have to be weighed.

Note that during the Scots referendum one of the main arguments the "No"
camp repeatedly trotted out was that independence would mean Scotland would
be out of the EU as well as out of the UK. That did swing some votes. The
Scots now know that argument is either void or reversed. But I have no idea
what effect that would have in the event of another vote. Time will tell.
Depends a lot on just what brexit drops us into.

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
10/31/2016 10:04:40 AM
In article <55d7997d7dsales@sprow.co.uk>, Elesar Sales
<sales@elesar.co.uk> wrote:

> Because the Titanium has a boot flash ROM there's ordinarily nothing in
> the micro SD card socket, so we produced a card with Linux pre-installed
>   http://shop.elesar.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=62

> You'd probably find Linux will struggle on a Cortex-A9
> (ARMX6/Pandaboard) as it's a relatively old CPU now (2012). 

That does seem an odd claim to me TBH given that Linux runs on RPis, etc. I
don't know, but have assumed that most users of the board will be running
something based on Linux anyway(?)

What definition of "struggle" do you have in mind that the user of a
well-targetted port of Linux to the ARMX6 would encounter when running
something like the desktops the titanium runs?

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
10/31/2016 10:11:58 AM
In article <3ad55ad755.dougjwebb@doug.j.webb.btinternet.com>,
   Doug Webb <doug.j.webb@btinternet.com> wrote:
> In message <55d758a0dfsee.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid>
>           Russell Hafter News <see.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid> 
> wrote:

> > In article <55d7483549dave@triffid.co.uk>,
> >    Dave Symes <dave@triffid.co.uk> wrote:

> >> With regard to Trade Union ballots, don't forget to
> >> include the percentage who will have been strong armed
> >> into voting how the union masters want, regardless of how
> >> they really wanted to vote.

> > Sorry, I really cannot let that pass.

> > Have you never heard of secret ballots?

> > Workplace ballots were outlawed years ago, though I am sure
> > that it must have happened in the past: it certainly did for
> > parliamentary elections in the past.

> > I can assure you that in my days as a Trade Union rep it
> > never happened - I did not even know where most of my
> > members lived!

> And of course peer pressure and being sent to "Coventry" by work mates 
> doesn't happen in an alternative universe.

As a member of a few unions over my working years, I never saw that. Or
any imtimidation, either. And the idea of many hairy arsed miners etc
being intimidated by a few doesn't somehow work here. But did get the
blood pressure up in the parlours of Mail readers.

> It may be less prevalent now but I know of some people who still to 
> this day do not talk to colleagues even 30+ years after events. Sad 
> but that is what happens as us humans are complex beasts.

Are you sure that wasn't down to strike breaking? That is a very different
matter from voting. 

> Anyway getting back on track then a ARMX6 is a great product and dare 
> I say a cheap Linux machine can do what a Windows one can and a  
> Raspberry Pi does make a nice Linux machine, as it does a RISC OS one.

-- 
*Can fat people go skinny-dipping?

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
                  To e-mail, change noise into sound.
0
Dave
10/31/2016 11:13:11 AM
In article <55d75b060cSpambin@argonet.co.uk>,
   Stuart <Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <mpro.ofvfdr001sjl006hp.news@pittdj.co.uk>,
>    David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:
> > If Nicola Sturgeon prevails will Apple's computers be cheaper in
> > Scotland than in England!!

> I wouldn't bank on it.

> At risk of being taken to task for going O.T.

> She is forever harping on about independence yet wants to surrender rule
> of Scotland to Brussels. Someone please explain her logic because it
> makes no sense to me.

And the little Englanders went on an on about taking back control from the
EU. To be in charge of their own destiny. But this isn't allowed for
Scotland?

-- 
*No I haven't stolen it , I'm just a shit driver*

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
                  To e-mail, change noise into sound.
0
Dave
10/31/2016 11:15:51 AM
In article <55d7679fd3Spambin@argonet.co.uk>,
   Stuart <Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <mpro.ofvukj06blyzo02ix.news@stevefryatt.org.uk>,
>    Steve Fryatt <news@stevefryatt.org.uk> wrote:

> > Possibly what you're missing is that "being part of the EU" does not
> > equate to "surrendering rule to Brussels"

> Hate to break your rose tinted spectacles but the ultimate aim of the EU
> is precisely that. Closer and ever closer "political union" with an
> eventual single European government ruling all. Whether they will ever
> agree on it's location as Brussels or Strasbourg remains to be seen.

Wonder which language they will choose for this union. Which legal system,
etc. Which religion. Oh - and get MEPs to agree it.

-- 
*I took an IQ test and the results were negative.

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
                  To e-mail, change noise into sound.
0
Dave
10/31/2016 11:18:40 AM
In article <55d79e7c05noise@audiomisc.co.uk>, Jim Lesurf
<noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:

> Note that during the Scots referendum one of the main
> arguments the "No" camp repeatedly trotted out was that
> independence would mean Scotland would be out of the EU
> as well as out of the UK. That did swing some votes. The
> Scots now know that argument is either void or reversed.

I am sure that you know (though others may not) that Henry
McLeish, former Labour First Minister who campaigned for
'No' in 2014 is now in favour of Independence for Scotland,
on just that point.

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
10/31/2016 11:27:55 AM
In article <55d7679fd3Spambin@argonet.co.uk>, Stuart
<Spambin@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
> In article
> <mpro.ofvukj06blyzo02ix.news@stevefryatt.org.uk>, Steve
> Fryatt <news@stevefryatt.org.uk> wrote:

> > Possibly what you're missing is that "being part of the
> > EU" does not equate to "surrendering rule to Brussels"

> Hate to break your rose tinted spectacles but the
> ultimate aim of the EU is precisely that. Closer and ever
> closer "political union" with an eventual single European
> government ruling all. Whether they will ever agree on
> it's location as Brussels or Strasbourg remains to be
> seen.

That was, after all, the programme that we signed up for in
1972. The plan dates back to 1950:  French Foreign Minister
Robert Schuman wanted to "make war [between France and
Germany] not only unthinkable but materially impossible". As
a means to this end he wanted to start a process of European
unification.

I remember (Conservative Prime Minister) Edward Heath
stating quite clearly (on TV) that a European political
union was always the ultimate goal of "the common market"
that he took the UK into. Heath, like Helmut Schmidt, his
successor Helmut Kohl and Val�ry Giscard d'Estaing, had
experienced at first hand the horrors of the Second World
War. These leaders were determined to see that such a war
would never happen again.

Sadly, far too many of the current generation of politicians
do not have that perspective.

As someone who had a father in the RAF, an uncle in the
Royal Navy, and cousins (conscripted) in the Wehrmacht,
having some type of European Government, with full
participation by the various nations of the British Isles
seems to be not just a noble goal, but essential for all of
us to have some hop of a peaceful future.

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
10/31/2016 11:40:59 AM
In article <3ad55ad755.dougjwebb@doug.j.webb.btinternet.com>, Doug Webb
<doug.j.webb@btinternet.com> wrote:

> > I can assure you that in my days as a Trade Union rep it never
> > happened - I did not even know where most of my members lived!

> And of course peer pressure and being sent to "Coventry" by work mates
> doesn't happen in an alternative universe.

You seem to have overlooked the significance of the term "secret ballot".

And back on topic. Yes, Like many others I simply use different hardware
for Linux. The dual-boot ability strikes me as a good idea, though, and may
well suit some people.

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
10/31/2016 12:22:52 PM
In article <55d7a74d64see.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid>, Russell Hafter
News <see.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid> wrote:
> having some type of European Government, with full participation by the
> various nations of the British Isles seems to be not just a noble goal,
> but essential for all of us to have some hop of a peaceful future.

Amen to that. We all need hops.

-- 
from Tim Hill who welcomes incoming email to tim at timil dot com.
* Ethical? Energy: http://tjrh.eu/coopnrg Telecoms: http://tjrh.eu/phone
* Have a genuine & spam-proof address for Usenet http://www.invalid.org.uk/
* RISC OS downloads http://timil.com/riscos
0
Tim
10/31/2016 12:45:36 PM
I'm sure I only asked about replacing an Iyonix not about peoples
political views. Couldn't you take that somewhere else please.

Richard

0
Richard
10/31/2016 3:18:40 PM
In article <55d7bb3b45basura@invalid.addr.uk>, Richard Ashbery
<basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> I'm sure I only asked about replacing an Iyonix not about peoples
> political views. Couldn't you take that somewhere else please.

From what has been said it probably depends on what you want to do wrt
browsers. At basis you can either

A) Run a machine like the ARMX6 that doesn't (currently) run Linux, and use
a different machince (from RPi to conventional 'PC'<sic>) for better
browsing than on RO.

B) Run a Linux (or windows) box and use that for browsing, and to run
RPCEmu. In my experience RPCEmu works nicely on Linux.

C)Choose the Titanium dual-boot.

As things stand it isn't clear to me how capable the Titanium may be in
these regards wrt an ARMX6, so I can't assess that. I may know more when
the question I asked wrt Linux on an ARMX6 is answered. It seems likely
that an ARMX6 *can* run linux, but presumably someone would need to sort
out an installable distro. The machine does have an extra SSD slot, so
could presumably dual boot using that.

Simply for RO the ARMX6 seems pretty good to me. I've not felt any need to
change to a Titanium. But as I think I've said, I run Linux on other boxes
anyway. That said, I still do most browsing using NetSurf on RO, anyway!

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
10/31/2016 5:16:49 PM
In article <55d7c60cbenoise@audiomisc.co.uk>, Jim Lesurf
<noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <55d7bb3b45basura@invalid.addr.uk>, Richard Ashbery
> <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> > I'm sure I only asked about replacing an Iyonix not about peoples
> > political views. Couldn't you take that somewhere else please.

> From what has been said it probably depends on what you want to do
> wrt browsers. At basis you can either

> A) Run a machine like the ARMX6 that doesn't (currently) run Linux,
> and use a different machince (from RPi to conventional 'PC'<sic>)
> for better browsing than on RO.

> B) Run a Linux (or windows) box and use that for browsing, and to
> run RPCEmu. In my experience RPCEmu works nicely on Linux.

> C)Choose the Titanium dual-boot.

> As things stand it isn't clear to me how capable the Titanium may
> be in these regards wrt an ARMX6, so I can't assess that.

The graphics side is important to me - is it possible to drive 4K
monitors with the Titanium. Anyone?

> I may
> know more when the question I asked wrt Linux on an ARMX6 is
> answered. It seems likely that an ARMX6 *can* run linux, but
> presumably someone would need to sort out an installable distro.
> The machine does have an extra SSD slot, so could presumably dual
> boot using that.

I too would be interested in the answer.

> Simply for RO the ARMX6 seems pretty good to me. I've not felt any
> need to change to a Titanium. But as I think I've said, I run Linux
> on other boxes anyway. That said, I still do most browsing using
> NetSurf on RO, anyway!

NetSurf is brilliant for speed and reasonably reliable but no use for
the numerous sites that use JavaScript.


Thanks Jim - that's more like it :-)

Richard

0
Richard
10/31/2016 7:52:40 PM
In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
          Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:


[snip]

>> 

> The graphics side is important to me - is it possible to drive 4K
> monitors with the Titanium. Anyone?

Not at 4k resolution as each display port is limited to 2048 x 2048 
max and is only beta for displaying an image over two ports to two 
monitors. ARMX6 is better for top end graphics resolution.

[snip]

>> Simply for RO the ARMX6 seems pretty good to me. I've not felt any
>> need to change to a Titanium. But as I think I've said, I run Linux
>> on other boxes anyway. That said, I still do most browsing using
>> NetSurf on RO, anyway!

> NetSurf is brilliant for speed and reasonably reliable but no use for
> the numerous sites that use JavaScript.

Otter is Ok on RISC OS but has some issues that need working on.

-- 
See and experience the future using ARM Technology - LaPi laptop, 
Raspberry PI and RISC OS 5.23.
0
Doug
10/31/2016 8:22:03 PM
In article <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>,
   Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> In article <55d7c60cbenoise@audiomisc.co.uk>, Jim Lesurf
> <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> > In article <55d7bb3b45basura@invalid.addr.uk>, Richard Ashbery
> > <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> > > I'm sure I only asked about replacing an Iyonix not about peoples
> > > political views. Couldn't you take that somewhere else please.

> > From what has been said it probably depends on what you want to do
> > wrt browsers. At basis you can either

> > A) Run a machine like the ARMX6 that doesn't (currently) run Linux,
> > and use a different machince (from RPi to conventional 'PC'<sic>)
> > for better browsing than on RO.

> > B) Run a Linux (or windows) box and use that for browsing, and to
> > run RPCEmu. In my experience RPCEmu works nicely on Linux.

> > C)Choose the Titanium dual-boot.

> > As things stand it isn't clear to me how capable the Titanium may
> > be in these regards wrt an ARMX6, so I can't assess that.

> The graphics side is important to me - is it possible to drive 4K
> monitors with the Titanium. Anyone?

> > I may
> > know more when the question I asked wrt Linux on an ARMX6 is
> > answered. It seems likely that an ARMX6 *can* run linux, but
> > presumably someone would need to sort out an installable distro.
> > The machine does have an extra SSD slot, so could presumably dual
> > boot using that.

> I too would be interested in the answer.


you should have come to the ROUGOL London RISC OS Show last Saturday.  You
could have asked both Andrew Rawnsley and Chris Evans - both of whose firms
make machines using the Titanium.

-- 
from KT24 in Surrey, England
0
charles
10/31/2016 8:53:09 PM
On 31/10/2016 09:10, Elesar Sales wrote:
> As noted further up the thread, yes, Elesar's Titanium can run Debian Jessie
> Linux (other flavours exist if you're brave enough to roll your own)
>   https://github.com/elesar-uk/titanium-build

[Snip]

> One area Linux is ahead of RISC OS by
> some distance is being able to run on multiple cores, and hence use both of
> the 1.5GHz Cortex-A15 cores on Titanium.
>
> Assuming you bought the RISC OS version rather than the Linux version, your
> computer would start up in RISC OS as usual. To switch to Linux you simply
> run the !GoLinux application from the desktop and it'll quit RISC OS and run
> the normal uboot loader

It isn't really practical to suggest someone reboots out of RISC OS in 
to Linux any time they want to use a decent browser. This means you have 
to have more than one machine, and that counts against spending a lot of 
money on new RISC OS hardware.

What is needed is for the Titanium (or the other boards) to run RISC OS 
in a virtual machine on top of Linux. That way you always have the full 
power of the multi-core box available to run powerful Linux applications 
such as browsers. But you also have RISC OS running natively on ARM 
hardware available all the time too, and with virtual machine manager 
facilities such as cut & paste, you can easily grab a URL from within 
RISC OS, and open it on Linux firefox. The same for file transfers, from 
peripherals such as scanners.

It sounds a bit like the argument for an emulator, but unlike certain 
emulators, the VM wouldn't be some poorly supported buggy crap which 
hasn't been properly updated in years, it would allow the latest 
versions of RISC OS to be run with full access all the hardware 
facilities of the underlying hardware. Plus its running ARM code on ARM 
hardware, not x86.

That would allow you to use one machine for RISC OS and browsering, with 
no reboots, which would be worth parting with a fair chunk of cash for.

---druck

0
druck
10/31/2016 8:58:47 PM
In article <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>, Richard
Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:

> NetSurf is brilliant for speed and reasonably reliable
> but no use for the numerous sites that use JavaScript.

Numerous sites that use JavaScript?

TBH I cannot recall the last time I found myself on a site
that did NOT use JS - probably last century.

I ran a JS blocker on Firefox for a few months many years
ago, but quickly abandoned it as it interfered with every
site I used.

I guess though it depenends what sites one uses?

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
10/31/2016 9:11:14 PM
I think it's time to filter this thread staight into the bin.

Not picking on anyone in particular.

-- 
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
sending tools across the world
http://www.twam.co.uk/
0
Stuart
11/1/2016 1:01:01 AM
In article <55d73ec9e5noise@audiomisc.co.uk>,
   Jim Lesurf <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <044e3cd755.BrianNews@bhowlett.plus.net>, Brian Howlett
> <news-spamtrap@brianhowlett.me.uk> wrote:
> > On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:

> > > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way

> > Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?

> More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

So compared with general elections, very democratic. :-)

Plenty of re-moaning still going on then.


Bob.

0
Bob
11/1/2016 11:25:45 AM
In article <55d829be5bbob@sick-of-spam.invalid>,
   Bob Latham <bob@sick-of-spam.invalid> wrote:
> In article <55d73ec9e5noise@audiomisc.co.uk>,
>    Jim Lesurf <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> > In article <044e3cd755.BrianNews@bhowlett.plus.net>, Brian Howlett
> > <news-spamtrap@brianhowlett.me.uk> wrote:
> > > On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:

> > > > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way

> > > Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?

> > More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

> So compared with general elections, very democratic. :-)

> Plenty of re-moaning still going on then.

Requiring a union ballot for something so unimportant as strike action to
be much more rigorous than the simple majority of those who can be
bothered to vote in something so momentous as that referendum says it all.

-- 
*Young at heart -- slightly older in other places

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
                  To e-mail, change noise into sound.
0
Dave
11/1/2016 12:07:37 PM
In article <55d829be5bbob@sick-of-spam.invalid>, Bob Latham
<bob@sick-of-spam.invalid> wrote:
> In article <55d73ec9e5noise@audiomisc.co.uk>, Jim Lesurf
>    <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> > In article <044e3cd755.BrianNews@bhowlett.plus.net>, Brian Howlett
> > <news-spamtrap@brianhowlett.me.uk> wrote:
> > > On 30 Oct, David Pitt <news@pittdj.co.uk> wrote:

> > > > Brexit []. We have chosen in in a 52:48 sort of way

> > > Surely we^W you chose out in a 52:48 sort of way...?

> > More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

> So compared with general elections, very democratic. :-)

> Plenty of re-moaning still going on then.

Please could this discussion be taken to 
alt.moaning.about.europe
which has been going on for 41 years.

Thanks.

-- 
from Tim Hill who welcomes incoming email to tim at timil dot com.
* Ethical? Energy: http://tjrh.eu/coopnrg Telecoms: http://tjrh.eu/phone
* Have a genuine & spam-proof address for Usenet http://www.invalid.org.uk/
* RISC OS downloads http://timil.com/riscos
0
Tim
11/1/2016 12:31:42 PM
In article <55d829be5bbob@sick-of-spam.invalid>, Bob Latham
<bob@sick-of-spam.invalid> wrote:

> > More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

> So compared with general elections, very democratic. :-)

Since you can't resist making such a snide comment I'll add just one
more response...

You may have missed the points that the result of any "general election"
can be changed at the next one, and that any laws passed by one Parliament
can be repealed or altered by the next. Thus it doesn't have the "trapdoor"
nature of the referendum. This is a fundamental difference which many
seem either ignorant of, or prefer to gloss over.

You (and many others) may also have forgotten that the first Scots
Independence referendum (no, not the one a couple of years ago) set a
minimum 'bar' that had to be reached for a "leave" vote to be valid.
Precisely for the above reason.

However "Dave" was too arrogant/stupid/ignorant to take any of the above
into account. For the same reason he gave zero thought to the effect of
treating the UK as a synonym for "Engerland". Which is, in effect, what the
vote has become.

> Plenty of re-moaning still going on then.

Yes, that shows the smug patronising tone of your response. :-) And why I
decided to write the above. It is a politician's trick to try and dismiss
the above realities as "moaning". School debating ploy to stick a label on
something that might deter them from actually thinking about it.

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
11/1/2016 1:26:08 PM
On 31/10/2016 21:11, Russell Hafter News wrote:
> I ran a JS blocker on Firefox for a few months many years
> ago, but quickly abandoned it as it interfered with every
> site I used.

Yes it would, but most of the Javascript is not from the site you are 
visiting, its advertising, tracking, and potential malware. The JS 
blocker should be set up to whitelist the domain the website is on, and 
you'll have to spend some time initially whitelisting related scripting 
sites necessary for it to work. But you'll quickly find the rest can be 
safely blocked, and your experience will be a lot better for it - faster 
loading, less intrusive advertising, and safe from a lot of drive by 
threats.

---druck

0
druck
11/1/2016 7:43:17 PM
In article <nvar84$goo$1@dont-email.me>, druck
<news@druck.org.uk> wrote:
> On 31/10/2016 21:11, Russell Hafter News wrote:
> > I ran a JS blocker on Firefox for a few months many
> > years ago, but quickly abandoned it as it interfered
> > with every site I used.

> Yes it would, but most of the Javascript is not from the
> site you are visiting, its advertising, tracking, and
> potential malware. The JS blocker should be set up to
> whitelist the domain the website is on, and you'll have
> to spend some time initially whitelisting related
> scripting sites necessary for it to work. But you'll
> quickly find the rest can be safely blocked, and your
> experience will be a lot better for it - faster loading,
> less intrusive advertising, and safe from a lot of drive
> by threats.

I do not get advertising - Adblocker sees to that. I also
run Ghostery which stops a lot of tracking, but quite often
that blocking has to be turned off or nothing happens when
one clicks on a link.

Increasingly I find, links are made via JS, not <A HREF
....>.

As to spending time whitelisting stuff, that was just not
practicable at the time as in many cases two minutes or less
on the site was sufficient to tell me that it was not of any
relevance.

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
11/1/2016 8:14:59 PM
In article <55d834c3c5noise@audiomisc.co.uk>, Jim Lesurf
<noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <55d829be5bbob@sick-of-spam.invalid>, Bob
> Latham <bob@sick-of-spam.invalid> wrote:

> > > More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

> > So compared with general elections, very democratic. :-)

The referendum on 23 June was ADVISORY. Yet UK politicians
who voted to remain part of an organisation that was only
recently (2012) awarded the Nobel Peace Prize now seem quite
intent on ripping the UK out of that organisation, quite
possibly causing irreparable damage to the EU in the
process.

I guess UK electors have the right to make a mess of the UK.
What they do not have the right to do is damage the rest of
Europe, and in the process give support to the politician so
admired by Nigel Farage and Donald Trump - ie Vladimir
Putin.

> Since you can't resist making such a snide comment I'll
> add just one more response...

> You may have missed the points that the result of any
> "general election" can be changed at the next one, and
> that any laws passed by one Parliament can be repealed or
> altered by the next. Thus it doesn't have the "trapdoor"
> nature of the referendum. This is a fundamental
> difference which many seem either ignorant of, or prefer
> to gloss over.

> You (and many others) may also have forgotten that the
> first Scots Independence referendum (no, not the one a
> couple of years ago) set a minimum 'bar' that had to be
> reached for a "leave" vote to be valid. Precisely for the
> above reason.

I stand to be corrected, but I assume you are talking about
the 1979 referendum on the Scotland Act 1978 (from which I
was barred from voting because I was living in Switzerland
at the time). This was about the setting up of a Scottish
Assembly, not independence.

The original act was amended to require that 40% of the
electorate voted in favour, so that although 51.6% of those
voting were in favour, with a low turnout of 64%, only 32.9%
of the Scottish electorate had voted in favour, so the act
never came into force.

This result was very controversial in some quarters at the
time, and, arguably, the long term effects of this have not
been beneficial.

Nevertheless, the principle of meeting a threshold greater
than a simple majority of those participating is very sound
when it comes to voting on major changes to the
constitution.

For example, amendments to the US constitution must be
ratified by 75% of the individual states. (Referendums,
though, do not come into the process).

Switzerland, which knows a thing or two about referendums,
does not have a minimum threshold as in the Scottish
referendum of 1979, but referendums which aim to amend the
constitution (as most referendums do) need, in addition to a
simple majority voting in favour, a majority of the 20
cantons and 6 half cantons also to vote in favour.

The is specifically to make it difficult for the large,
populous cantons to over-rule the small ones.

It is worth noting though, that in Switzerland amending the
constitution by means of a referendum is a fairly
straightforward process. And exactly the same process can be
used (and is used) to have a second referendum on a very
similar topic.

Had there been such a provision on 23 June, three of the
four nations of the UK would have needed to vote in favour,
which did not happen.

> > Plenty of re-moaning still going on then.

[Snip]

Nobody is 'moaning' - this is simply far too important for
that.

-- 
Russell
Russell Hafter
E-mail to russell at russellhafter dot me dot uk
Need a hotel? <http://www.hrs.com/?client=en__blue&customerId=416873103>
0
Russell
11/1/2016 9:19:17 PM
In message <55d8601546see.sig@russellhafter.me.invalid>
 on 1 Nov 2016 Russell Hafter News  wrote:
 
> I stand to be corrected, but I assume you are talking about
> the 1979 referendum on the Scotland Act 1978 (from which I
> was barred from voting because I was living in Switzerland
> at the time). This was about the setting up of a Scottish
> Assembly, not independence.
> 
> The original act was amended to require that 40% of the
> electorate voted in favour, so that although 51.6% of those
> voting were in favour, with a low turnout of 64%, only 32.9%
> of the Scottish electorate had voted in favour, so the act
> never came into force.
> 
> This result was very controversial in some quarters at the
> time, and, arguably, the long term effects of this have not
> been beneficial.

I had a colleague (an SNP local councillor) where I worked in Scotland who
told me this was the only poll in which the dead had had a vote, as those who
were on the electoral roll but who had subsequently died in effect counted
against meeting the threshold.

Given the low turnout that cannot have been the deciding factor, but he was
still quite bitter about it 25 years later.

-- 
Matthew Phillips
Durham
0
Matthew
11/1/2016 10:20:57 PM
In message <nvar84$goo$1@dont-email.me>
          druck <news@druck.org.uk> wrote:

> On 31/10/2016 21:11, Russell Hafter News wrote:
>> I ran a JS blocker on Firefox for a few months many years

[snip]

>> 

> Yes it would, but most of the Javascript is not from the site you are
> visiting,

[snip]

> ---druck
The only answer then is to go back to the High Street and use a 
fountain pen!

Get real druck! We need a browser that supports Javascript.

Chris
-- 
chris.j.craig@btinternet.com
ARMX6 Cortex-A9 RISC OS 5.23

0
Chris
11/2/2016 7:46:35 AM
On 02/11/16 07:46, Chris Craig wrote:
> In message <nvar84$goo$1@dont-email.me>
>           druck <news@druck.org.uk> wrote:
>
>> On 31/10/2016 21:11, Russell Hafter News wrote:
>>> I ran a JS blocker on Firefox for a few months many years
>
> [snip]
>
>>>
>
>> Yes it would, but most of the Javascript is not from the site you are
>> visiting,
>
> [snip]
>
>> ---druck
> The only answer then is to go back to the High Street and use a
> fountain pen!
>
> Get real druck! We need a browser that supports Javascript.

If you'd actually read my post, you'd know I was not saying javascript 
isn't necessary, but if you want your javascript browser working for you 
rather than advertisers and malware authors, be careful what javascript 
you allow it to run - or you'll be getting a real headache.

---druck

0
druck
11/2/2016 8:17:16 AM
In article <55d834c3c5noise@audiomisc.co.uk>,
   Jim Lesurf <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <55d829be5bbob@sick-of-spam.invalid>, Bob Latham
> <bob@sick-of-spam.invalid> wrote:

> > > More precisely, it was closer to a 36:34 sort of way.

> > So compared with general elections, very democratic. :-)

> Since you can't resist making such a snide comment I'll add just one
> more response...

Taken to email.

Bob.

0
Bob
11/2/2016 10:47:43 AM
In article <nvc7di$8gc$1@dont-email.me>,
   druck <news@druck.org.uk> wrote:
> If you'd actually read my post, you'd know I was not saying javascript 
> isn't necessary, but if you want your javascript browser working for you 
> rather than advertisers and malware authors, be careful what javascript 
> you allow it to run - or you'll be getting a real headache.

I'm sure this has some substance, but many just use a browser as it comes.
I do have AVG free and Spybot running though. And to the best of my
knowledge have never picked up any nasties. As regards ads and so on, the
price you pay for a 'free' service. Like ads on TV.

-- 
*I finally got my head together, now my body is falling apart.

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
                  To e-mail, change noise into sound.
0
Dave
11/2/2016 11:02:16 AM
In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
          Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:

> In article <55d7c60cbenoise@audiomisc.co.uk>, Jim Lesurf
> <noise@audiomisc.co.uk> wrote:

>> From what has been said it probably depends on what you want to do
>> wrt browsers. At basis you can either

You may find that on a newer machine (ARMX6 or Titanium) Otter or 
Qupzilla are more useable due to the extra processing power. Still not 
perfect for browsing all sites though.

>> A) Run a machine like the ARMX6 that doesn't (currently) run Linux,
>> and use a different machince (from RPi to conventional 'PC'<sic>)
>> for better browsing than on RO.

>> B) Run a Linux (or windows) box and use that for browsing, and to
>> run RPCEmu. In my experience RPCEmu works nicely on Linux.

Agreed.

>> C)Choose the Titanium dual-boot.

> The graphics side is important to me - is it possible to drive 4K
> monitors with the Titanium. Anyone?

If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go. 
It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options. Titanium 
can drive two displays, but each of "only" HD size.

One option no one has suggested yet is to get an ARMX6 or Titanium, 
then add RISCOSbits GeminiX to add an internal PC to give Windows in a 
window!

  http://www.riscosbits.co.uk/geminx.htm

Listed as "Coming soon" but it was running at the London Show.

Bryan.

-- 
RISC OS User Group Of London  -  http://www.rougol.jellybaby.net/
RISC OS London Show           -  http://www.riscoslondonshow.co.uk/
0
Bryan
11/2/2016 2:39:42 PM
In message <55d8ab6e11dave@davenoise.co.uk>
       "Dave Plowman (News)" <dave@davenoise.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <nvc7di$8gc$1@dont-email.me>,
>    druck <news@druck.org.uk> wrote:
> > If you'd actually read my post, you'd know I was not saying
> > javascript  isn't necessary, but if you want your javascript
> > browser working for you  rather than advertisers and malware
> > authors, be careful what javascript  you allow it to run - or
> > you'll be getting a real headache.
> 
> I'm sure this has some substance, but many just use a browser as it
> comes. I do have AVG free and Spybot running though. And to the best
> of my knowledge have never picked up any nasties. As regards ads and
> so on, the price you pay for a 'free' service. Like ads on TV.

I use Firefox on my PC and use the Bluhell add-on, in addition to AVG.

The difference is makes is astonishing. With Bluhell, Firefox shows as
using 2-3% of the available processing power when Firefox is not
actively downloading or rendering anything. Without Bluehell,
Firefox typically consumes 25% (i.e. all of one core).

-- 
Nick Roberts           tigger @ orpheusinternet.co.uk           

Hanlon's Razor: Never attribute to malice that which
can be adequately explained by stupidity.
0
Nick
11/2/2016 5:30:11 PM
In message <2e56bfd855.bryan@helpful.demon.co.uk>
 on 2 Nov 2016 Bryan Hogan  wrote:

> One option no one has suggested yet is to get an ARMX6 or Titanium, then
> add RISCOSbits GeminiX to add an internal PC to give Windows in a window!
> 
>   http://www.riscosbits.co.uk/geminx.htm
> 
> Listed as "Coming soon" but it was running at the London Show.

Well, the GeminX I saw was mounted to fit in a podule slot, and there aren't
any podule slots in the ArmX6 or the Titanium are there?

-- 
Matthew Phillips
Durham
0
Matthew
11/2/2016 8:17:09 PM
On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 14:39:45 UTC, Bryan Hogan  wrote:
> In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
>           Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
>
> > The graphics side is important to me - is it possible to drive 4K
> > monitors with the Titanium. Anyone?
> 
> If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go. 
> It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options.

According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower than my pandaboard. A big 4k display is one thing, but dragging windows around could be a bit annoying I think
-- 
Mike
0
mike
11/2/2016 10:46:05 PM
In message <d4c8610f-bee8-4532-9f56-a6b0ed3519f4@googlegroups.com>
          mike.fr33stone@gmail.com wrote:

> On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 14:39:45 UTC, Bryan Hogan  wrote:
>> In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
>>           Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> The graphics side is important to me - is it possible to drive 4K
>>> monitors with the Titanium. Anyone?
>> 
>> If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go.
>> It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options.

> According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow
> graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower
> than my pandaboard. A big 4k display is one thing, but dragging
> windows around could be a bit annoying I think

That is probably outdated info.

The video on the ARMX6 is very fast and there is no lag at all on 
moving windows etc.. I rarely take any notice of these comparisons of 
performance since you can't type any faster. But I prefer to see the 
physical thing in action, and it much faster then a pandaboard.


-- 
Chris Hughes
0
Chris
11/2/2016 11:18:51 PM
In article <edddeed855.chris@mytarbis.plus.com>, Chris Hughes
<chris@mytardis.me.uk> wrote:

> > According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow
> > graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower
> > than my pandaboard. A big 4k display is one thing, but dragging
> > windows around could be a bit annoying I think

> That is probably outdated info.

> The video on the ARMX6 is very fast and there is no lag at all on
> moving windows etc.. I rarely take any notice of these comparisons of
> performance since you can't type any faster. But I prefer to see the
> physical thing in action, and it much faster then a pandaboard.

Having migrated from an ARMiniX to an ARMX6 I'd agree. I don't see any
problems when dragging windows, etc.

FWIW the main reason I'm still using an 'HDTV' moded monitor is that Andrew
R. hasn't yet told me he has found a higher rez monitor and HDMI switch
that will do what I require. The snag being that I want an HDMI switch that
can cope with the higher screen sizes *and* give me a good digital audio
extraction.

Jim

-- 
Please use the address on the audiomisc page if you wish to email me.
Electronics  http://www.st-and.ac.uk/~www_pa/Scots_Guide/intro/electron.htm
Armstrong Audio  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/Armstrong/armstrong.html
Audio Misc  http://www.audiomisc.co.uk/index.html

0
Jim
11/3/2016 9:32:00 AM
In message <353bded855.Matthew@sinenomine.freeserve.co.uk>
          Matthew Phillips <spam2011m@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

> In message <2e56bfd855.bryan@helpful.demon.co.uk>
>  on 2 Nov 2016 Bryan Hogan  wrote:

>> One option no one has suggested yet is to get an ARMX6 or Titanium, then
>> add RISCOSbits GeminiX to add an internal PC to give Windows in a window!
>> 
>>   http://www.riscosbits.co.uk/geminx.htm
>> 
>> Listed as "Coming soon" but it was running at the London Show.

> Well, the GeminX I saw was mounted to fit in a podule slot, and there aren't
> any podule slots in the ArmX6 or the Titanium are there?

There are versions that fit inside an ARMX6 and Titanium case too. It 
just needs somewhere to draw its power. It's based on the Intel 
Compute Stick IIRC.

Bryan.

-- 
RISC OS User Group Of London  -  http://www.rougol.jellybaby.net/
RISC OS London Show           -  http://www.riscoslondonshow.co.uk/
0
Bryan
11/3/2016 2:04:28 PM
In message <d4c8610f-bee8-4532-9f56-a6b0ed3519f4@googlegroups.com>
          mike.fr33stone@gmail.com wrote:

> On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 14:39:45 UTC, Bryan Hogan  wrote:
>> 
>> If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go.
>> It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options.

> According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow
> graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower
> than my pandaboard. A big 4k display is one thing, but dragging
> windows around could be a bit annoying I think

I have queried that RectCopy result before, as it seems completely out 
of line with all the other results. Maybe they need rerunning with the 
latest RISC OS ROM image.

Bryan.

-- 
RISC OS User Group Of London  -  http://www.rougol.jellybaby.net/
RISC OS London Show           -  http://www.riscoslondonshow.co.uk/
0
Bryan
11/3/2016 2:20:08 PM
In message <d4c8610f-bee8-4532-9f56-a6b0ed3519f4@googlegroups.com>
          mike.fr33stone@gmail.com wrote:

> On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 14:39:45 UTC, Bryan Hogan  wrote:
>> In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
>>           Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> The graphics side is important to me - is it possible to drive 4K
>>> monitors with the Titanium. Anyone?
>> 
>> If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go.
>> It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options.

> According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow
> graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower
> than my pandaboard. A big 4k display is one thing, but dragging
> windows around could be a bit annoying I think

On one specific test where the others are all significantly faster 
than a Risc PC and also similar if not faster to the Panda ES on the 
others all at a significantly higher resolution plus a far faster disc 
access set up.

The other thing is that all the modern systems really should be 
compared using the same ROM and disc set up as improvements or changes 
in the ROM could account for some speed differences.

Really just goes to show that real world tests are better than 
selective synthetic benchmarkings that can be skewed.

-- 
0
Doug
11/3/2016 3:53:03 PM
In article <bbf1ced855.tigger@bc63.orpheusinternet.co.uk>,
   Nick Roberts <tigger@orpheusinternet.co.uk> wrote:
> In message <55d8ab6e11dave@davenoise.co.uk>
>        "Dave Plowman (News)" <dave@davenoise.co.uk> wrote:

> > In article <nvc7di$8gc$1@dont-email.me>,
> >    druck <news@druck.org.uk> wrote:
> > > If you'd actually read my post, you'd know I was not saying
> > > javascript  isn't necessary, but if you want your javascript
> > > browser working for you  rather than advertisers and malware
> > > authors, be careful what javascript  you allow it to run - or
> > > you'll be getting a real headache.
> > 
> > I'm sure this has some substance, but many just use a browser as it
> > comes. I do have AVG free and Spybot running though. And to the best
> > of my knowledge have never picked up any nasties. As regards ads and
> > so on, the price you pay for a 'free' service. Like ads on TV.

> I use Firefox on my PC and use the Bluhell add-on, in addition to AVG.

> The difference is makes is astonishing. With Bluhell, Firefox shows as
> using 2-3% of the available processing power when Firefox is not
> actively downloading or rendering anything. Without Bluehell,
> Firefox typically consumes 25% (i.e. all of one core).

Thanks for that - I'll give it a try.

-- 
*I went to school to become a wit, only got halfway through.

    Dave Plowman        dave@davenoise.co.uk           London SW
                  To e-mail, change noise into sound.
0
Dave
11/3/2016 4:01:15 PM
On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 23:20:35 UTC, Chris Hughes  wrote:
> In message <d4c8610f-bee8-4532-9f56-a6b0ed3519f4@googlegroups.com>
>           mike.fr33stone@gmail.com wrote:
> 
> > On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 14:39:45 UTC, Bryan Hogan  wrote:
> >> In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
> >>           Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> >> If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go.
> >> It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options.
> >
> > According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow
> > graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower
> > than my pandaboard.
>
> That is probably outdated info.
>
> The video on the ARMX6 is very fast and there is no lag at all on 
> moving windows etc.. I rarely take any notice of these comparisons of 
> performance since you can't type any faster. But I prefer to see the 
> physical thing in action, and it much faster then a pandaboard.

My experience was trying one out in person at the wakefield show in April 2016 but the table says the ARMX6 was for a January ROM, I'll email Chris to ask him to update the table
-- 
Mike
0
mike
11/6/2016 2:20:29 PM
On Sunday, November 6, 2016 at 2:20:30 PM UTC, mike.fr...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 23:20:35 UTC, Chris Hughes  wrote:
> > In message <d4c8610f-bee8-4532-9f56-a6b0ed3519f4@googlegroups.com>
> >           mike.fr33stone@gmail.com wrote:
> > 
> > > On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 14:39:45 UTC, Bryan Hogan  wrote:
> > >> In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
> > >>           Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
> > >> If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go.
> > >> It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options.
> > >
> > > According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow
> > > graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower
> > > than my pandaboard.
> >
> > That is probably outdated info.
> >
> > The video on the ARMX6 is very fast and there is no lag at all on 
> > moving windows etc.. I rarely take any notice of these comparisons of 
> > performance since you can't type any faster. But I prefer to see the 
> > physical thing in action, and it much faster then a pandaboard.
> 
> My experience was trying one out in person at the wakefield show in April
 2016 but the table says the ARMX6 was for a January ROM, I'll email Chris 
to ask him to update the table
> -- 
> Mike
ARMX6 graphics are fast. The rectangle copy characterises screen scrolling after
an f12 which is noticeably slow but, of course, irrelevant to desktop use.

The June 2016 ROM has identical 'rect copy' figure.
0
svrsig
11/7/2016 10:32:52 AM
In message <9a584635-0843-4091-80be-0ff3b5119538@googlegroups.com>
          svrsig <chris@svrsig.org> wrote:

> On Sunday, November 6, 2016 at 2:20:30 PM UTC, mike.fr...@gmail.com wrote:
>> On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 23:20:35 UTC, Chris Hughes  wrote:
>>> In message <d4c8610f-bee8-4532-9f56-a6b0ed3519f4@googlegroups.com>
>>>           mike.fr33stone@gmail.com wrote:
>>> 
>>>> On Wednesday, 2 November 2016 14:39:45 UTC, Bryan Hogan  wrote:
>>>>> In message <55d7d4508ebasura@invalid.addr.uk>
>>>>>           Richard Ashbery <basura@invalid.addr.uk> wrote:
>>>>> If it's graphics that are important, then the ARMX6 is the way to go.
>>>>> It can drive 4K displays, and other fancy widescreen options.
>>>>
>>>> According to http://www.svrsig.org/HowFast.htm it has pretty slow
>>>> graphics performance, only 50% faster than a Risc PC (!) and 6x slower
>>>> than my pandaboard.
>>>
>>> That is probably outdated info.
>>>
>>> The video on the ARMX6 is very fast and there is no lag at all on
>>> moving windows etc.. I rarely take any notice of these comparisons of
>>> performance since you can't type any faster. But I prefer to see the
>>> physical thing in action, and it much faster then a pandaboard.
>> 
>> My experience was trying one out in person at the wakefield show in April
>  2016 but the table says the ARMX6 was for a January ROM, I'll email Chris
> to ask him to update the table
>> --
>> Mike
> ARMX6 graphics are fast. The rectangle copy characterises screen
> scrolling after
> an f12 which is noticeably slow but, of course, irrelevant to desktop use.

> The June 2016 ROM has identical 'rect copy' figure.

That's interesting. The one operation I have noticed being slow is 
when switching to the ARMX6 via the KVM. It generally produced a brief 
view of the desktop, then goes black for a few seconds, then 
redisplays. I suppose this could be the above function.

-- 
Alan Adams, from Northamptonshire
alan@adamshome.org.uk
http://www.nckc.org.uk/
0
Alan
11/7/2016 11:11:28 AM
In article <353bded855.Matthew@sinenomine.freeserve.co.uk>,
   Matthew Phillips <spam2011m@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> In message <2e56bfd855.bryan@helpful.demon.co.uk>
>  on 2 Nov 2016 Bryan Hogan  wrote:

> > One option no one has suggested yet is to get an ARMX6 or Titanium,
> > then add RISCOSbits GeminiX to add an internal PC to give Windows in a
> > window!
> > 
> >   http://www.riscosbits.co.uk/geminx.htm
> > 
> > Listed as "Coming soon" but it was running at the London Show.

> Well, the GeminX I saw was mounted to fit in a podule slot, and there
> aren't any podule slots in the ArmX6 or the Titanium are there?

It was fitted in a podule slot, mainly to save me taking more than one
machine (the PiPOD obviously requires a Podule slot) but it will fit
equally well in a PCI bracket slot, and, depending on the room inside the
case, 2x low profile PCI slots.

0
RISCOSbits
11/13/2016 7:43:43 PM
On my computer I've left your comment in place for posterity while the rest 
has been dumped - bye, thanks for all the fish.
-- 

Geoff
0
glavallin
11/18/2016 1:01:01 AM
In article <5b3de8e055.glavallin@gjlavallin.plus.com>, glavallin
<glavallin@gjlavallin.plus.com> wrote:

> On my computer I've left your comment in place for posterity while the
> rest has been dumped - bye, thanks for all the fish.

Wow! What was that about?

Alan

-- 
Alan Calder, Milton Keynes, UK.
0
Alan
11/18/2016 10:47:44 AM
In article <55e0e7795falan_calder@o2.co.uk>,
   Alan Calder <alan_calder@o2.co.uk> wrote:

> Wow! What was that about?

I guess the thread drift - a pity the helpful post(s) wasn't quoted to
inform us of which it was - but as this was not the OP replying, how
relevant is it?.

Personally I'm using a RPi 2B original ARM7 model and have just acquired 
two more to guarantee availability.

Obviously no CD writer - yet!

John

-- 
John Williams, now back in the UK - no attachments to these addresses!
Non-RISC OS posters change user to johnrwilliams or put 'risc' in subject!
Who is John Williams? http://petit.four.free.fr/picindex/author/
0
John
11/18/2016 11:03:54 AM
In article <55e0e8f43eUCEbin@tiscali.co.uk>, John Williams (News)
<UCEbin@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
> In article <55e0e7795falan_calder@o2.co.uk>, Alan Calder
>    <alan_calder@o2.co.uk> wrote:

> > Wow! What was that about?

> I guess the thread drift - a pity the helpful post(s) wasn't quoted to
> inform us of which it was - but as this was not the OP replying, how
> relevant is it?.

He started a new sub-thread (twice) which doesn't have content relevant
to the OP. It is EXACTLY what is being complained of by creating multiple
instances of thread drift to complain about thread drift.

Getting close to also filtering future posts to this subject into the bin.

FWIW my answer to the OP is that a RaspberryPi Two is a reasonable
replacement for an Iyonix - if a direct replacement is what you want;
similarly capable hardware - but much faster and more expensive options
are available. For the price of a dozen or more RaspberryPi2s you can go
faster and drive a quadHD monitor, for example.

As with anything, it is whether the features offered by the hardware you
pick match what you want to do with it now and in the future.

-- 
from Tim Hill who welcomes incoming email to tim at timil dot com.
* Ethical? Energy: http://tjrh.eu/coopnrg Telecoms: http://tjrh.eu/phone
* Have a genuine & spam-proof address for Usenet http://www.invalid.org.uk/
* RISC OS downloads http://timil.com/riscos
0
Tim
11/18/2016 11:47:30 AM
Reply: