f



Storing "retired" HDD

What is the best way of storing "retired" hard drives to give the best
chance of them remaining useable?

Is it best to store in a computer, powered but without a data connection,
so they are kept spinning to avoid bearings seizing up, or put safely away
in anti-static bags.

-- 
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
sending tools across the world
http://www.twam.co.uk/
0
Stuart
11/4/2016 1:01:01 AM
comp.sys.acorn.hardware 3619 articles. 0 followers. Post Follow

3 Replies
295 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 17

In article <nvip75$pr5$1@dont-email.me>,
   druck <news@druck.org.uk> wrote:
> It will probably last longest in a permanently powered machine, with a 
> stable internal temperature - plug the data lead in, so at least the 
> SMART data can be monitored. However, that will cost you a lot in 
> electricity - after a few years probably the same as that amount of data 
> on a new higher capacity drive.

> If the machine is switched on an off regularly, the thermal cycling 
> isn't good for the drive, but whether it will last longer than if left 
> on the shelf isn't easy to say.

Thanks Druck, it's more or less as I thought.
There are two scenarios here.

One is maintaining a couple of old drives which will work on a RPC
mother-board interface. These were still good (and tested in the last
couple of days) when removed to replace with larger drives. If the current
drive fails I may need to put one of the old ones back in.

The Kinetic RPC in question was long ago moved into a PC case with a front
mounted fan blowing over the drives. The case also means I have spare
drive slots and a PSU capable of powering extra drives. There are already
two additional 40G drives in there, hanging off an ARCin card. One is used
for data and the other holds a backup of the first. The mother-board and
first data drive are also backed up to a NAS box

The second is maintaining a cloned drive.

In 2013 I did complete re-install of Windows XP, installed some basic
programs and, once it had loaded the latest updates, cloned the drive.
That computer has become very slow to boot up so I have just put in the
cloned drive and so far, all is looking very good. Once it has finished
updating (it has the registry hack suggested by virtual Acorn so thinks
it's a POS machine) I will clone again to another drive.

All my computers are normally left running 24/7 unless I need to turn one
off for some reason. All machines back themselves up to the NAS overnight.

-- 
Stuart Winsor

Tools With A Mission
sending tools across the world
http://www.twam.co.uk/
0
Stuart
11/4/2016 1:01:01 AM
On 04/11/2016 12:16, Stuart wrote:
> What is the best way of storing "retired" hard drives to give the best
> chance of them remaining useable?
>
> Is it best to store in a computer, powered but without a data connection,
> so they are kept spinning to avoid bearings seizing up, or put safely away
> in anti-static bags.

It will probably last longest in a permanently powered machine, with a 
stable internal temperature - plug the data lead in, so at least the 
SMART data can be monitored. However, that will cost you a lot in 
electricity - after a few years probably the same as that amount of data 
on a new higher capacity drive.

If the machine is switched on an off regularly, the thermal cycling 
isn't good for the drive, but whether it will last longer than if left 
on the shelf isn't easy to say.

---druck
0
druck
11/4/2016 7:57:42 PM
On 04/11/2016 23:49, Stuart wrote:
> All my computers are normally left running 24/7 unless I need to turn one
> off for some reason. All machines back themselves up to the NAS overnight.

I can only afford to run the Raspberry Pi's 24/7 these days, but at 
least with any other Ethernet connected machines (except for RISC OS of 
course), I can log in to the Pi and use Wake-on-Lan to fire them up when 
needed, and send them back to sleep after.

---druck

0
druck
11/5/2016 8:26:39 PM
Reply: