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Apple IIe RGB card?

I have an Apple card which is labeled:

A//e Ext. 80 col/RGB (1984 video 7)

This will sound like a dumb question, but is this an RGB card? I don't have
the dongle for it, so I'm not sure. Would this go into the AUX slot?

Does anyone know the pin-outs for this, so that I could have a dongle made
for it? It has 16 pins on the plug.

It also has two dip switches. Does anyone know what those are for?

Thanks.

E.


0
9/19/2004 5:05:54 PM
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In <S%i3d.10888$wV.8700@attbi_s54> Ernest wrote:
> I have an Apple card which is labeled:
> 
> A//e Ext. 80 col/RGB (1984 video 7)
> 
> This will sound like a dumb question, but is this an RGB card? I don't 
> have the dongle for it, so I'm not sure. Would this go into the AUX 
> slot?
>
> Does anyone know the pin-outs for this, so that I could have a dongle 
> made for it? It has 16 pins on the plug.
>
> It also has two dip switches. Does anyone know what those are for?
> 
> Thanks.
> 
> E.

It's the Apple combined 64KB RAM/RGB video card for the Apple IIe 
auxilliary slot. I knew Video 7 used to make RGB adapters for the IIc, 
but I never knew the IIe card sold under Apple's name was made by Video 
7 too.

The card ouputs digital RGB video in the Apple III XRGB format. The 
connector it's supposed to have will be a 15-pin D socket, wired the 
same as the Apple III. It's designed to drive the AppleColor 100 display.

Switches on RGB cards are generally for setting a single foreground and 
a single background colour in text mode, instead of just white on black. 
The IIGS lets you do the same thing. However this card is unusual in 
that it allows for full software control of the text colours. Each 
character can have its own foreground and background colours. 
Unfortunately this extended text mode never made it to the IIc, IIGS or 
other RGB cards, and I don't know of any software that supports it 
except for a demonstration disk that originally came with the card. A 
disk image is available from one of the Apple II software archives (
sorry, I can't remember which one I saw it on).

-- 
Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/
________________________________________________________________________
  No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?

              Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"
0
rojaws2 (362)
9/20/2004 11:22:46 AM
"Roger Johnstone" <rojaws@orcon.net.nz> wrote in message
news:20040920232227655+1200@News.Individual.NET...
> In <S%i3d.10888$wV.8700@attbi_s54> Ernest wrote:
> > I have an Apple card which is labeled:
> >
> > A//e Ext. 80 col/RGB (1984 video 7)
> >
> > This will sound like a dumb question, but is this an RGB card? I don't
> > have the dongle for it, so I'm not sure. Would this go into the AUX
> > slot?
> >
> > Does anyone know the pin-outs for this, so that I could have a dongle
> > made for it? It has 16 pins on the plug.
> >
> > It also has two dip switches. Does anyone know what those are for?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > E.
>
> It's the Apple combined 64KB RAM/RGB video card for the Apple IIe
> auxilliary slot. I knew Video 7 used to make RGB adapters for the IIc,
> but I never knew the IIe card sold under Apple's name was made by Video
> 7 too.
>
> The card ouputs digital RGB video in the Apple III XRGB format. The
> connector it's supposed to have will be a 15-pin D socket, wired the
> same as the Apple III. It's designed to drive the AppleColor 100 display.
>
> Switches on RGB cards are generally for setting a single foreground and
> a single background colour in text mode, instead of just white on black.
> The IIGS lets you do the same thing. However this card is unusual in
> that it allows for full software control of the text colours. Each
> character can have its own foreground and background colours.
> Unfortunately this extended text mode never made it to the IIc, IIGS or
> other RGB cards, and I don't know of any software that supports it
> except for a demonstration disk that originally came with the card. A
> disk image is available from one of the Apple II software archives (
> sorry, I can't remember which one I saw it on).
>
> -- 
> Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
> http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/


I had read on one site that video 7 produced the rgb board which apple then
adopted.

Here ia a site with some pinouts .

http://www.apple2.org.za/mirrors/ground.icaen.uiowa.edu/MiscInfo/Video/rgb15pin


0
laine (122)
9/20/2004 2:03:43 PM
Finally!!  That explains it!

I've been looking for that info for quite some time. My first Apple //e had
one of those cards with the Monitor 100. I was wondering for a long time why
I could turn on the 80col card, turn off 80col mode and use aux memory to
set the background color and forground color by writing to the high and low
nibbles of the appropriate bytes in the aux memory text page 1. I really
miss that ability.

"Roger Johnstone" <rojaws@orcon.net.nz> wrote in message
news:20040920232227655+1200@News.Individual.NET...
> It's the Apple combined 64KB RAM/RGB video card for the Apple IIe
> auxilliary slot. I knew Video 7 used to make RGB adapters for the IIc,
> but I never knew the IIe card sold under Apple's name was made by Video
> 7 too.
>
> The card ouputs digital RGB video in the Apple III XRGB format. The
> connector it's supposed to have will be a 15-pin D socket, wired the
> same as the Apple III. It's designed to drive the AppleColor 100 display.
>
> Switches on RGB cards are generally for setting a single foreground and
> a single background colour in text mode, instead of just white on black.
> The IIGS lets you do the same thing. However this card is unusual in
> that it allows for full software control of the text colours. Each
> character can have its own foreground and background colours.
> Unfortunately this extended text mode never made it to the IIc, IIGS or
> other RGB cards, and I don't know of any software that supports it
> except for a demonstration disk that originally came with the card. A
> disk image is available from one of the Apple II software archives (
> sorry, I can't remember which one I saw it on).
>
> -- 
> Roger Johnstone, Invercargill, New Zealand
> http://vintageware.orcon.net.nz/
> ________________________________________________________________________
>   No Silicon Heaven? Preposterous! Where would all the calculators go?
>
>               Kryten, from the Red Dwarf episode "The Last Day"


0
rk1 (63)
9/20/2004 3:49:06 PM
Reply: