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If Mel really didn't approve of compilers and if refused to use an "optimizing assembler", existed others developers that really didn't approve of compilers and if refused to use an "optimizing assemb

This is the last topic that I post about the history of machine language using the Google Translate.

According  Ed Nather in The Story of Mel, this is part of the history of machine language:

"The Story of Mel

This was posted to Usenet by its author, Ed Nather (<nather@astro.as.utexas.edu>), on May 21, 1983.


A recent article devoted to the macho side of programming
made the bald and unvarnished statement:

    Real Programmers write in FORTRAN.

Maybe they do now,
in this decadent era of
Lite beer, hand calculators, and "user-friendly" software
but back in the Good Old Days,
when the term "software" sounded funny
and Real Computers were made out of drums and vacuum tubes,
Real Programmers wrote in machine code.
Not FORTRAN.  Not RATFOR.  Not, even, assembly language.
Machine Code.
Raw, unadorned, inscrutable hexadecimal numbers.
Directly.

Lest a whole new generation of programmers
grow up in ignorance of this glorious past,
I feel duty-bound to describe,
as best I can through the generation gap,
how a Real Programmer wrote code.
I'll call him Mel,
because that was his name...

I had been hired to write a FORTRAN compiler
for this new marvel and Mel was my guide to its wonders.
Mel didn't approve of compilers.

"If a program can't rewrite its own code",
he asked, "what good is it?"

Mel had written,
in hexadecimal,
the most popular computer program the company owned...

Mel loved the RPC-4000
because he could optimize his code:
that is, locate instructions on the drum
so that just as one finished its job,
the next would be just arriving at the "read head"
and available for immediate execution.
There was a program to do that job,
an "optimizing assembler",
but Mel refused to use it.

"You never know where it's going to put things",
he explained, "so you'd have to use separate constants".

It was a long time before I understood that remark...  

Part of that story is true or everything that I mentioned above according to the History of Mel is Fictional?

If Mel really didn't approve of compilers and if refused to use an "optimizing assembler", existed others developers that really didn't approve of compilers and if refused to use an "optimizing assembler"?

Exist currently developers that really didn't approve of compilers and if refuse to use an "optimizing assembler"?

I heard that exist universities that there are still assembly lessons and in some other universities there are even binary coding lessons.

reference: http://archive-org.com/page/3491382/2014-01-08/http://forums.freebsd.org/viewtopic.php?f=34&t=42856

If is not much to ask, please speak the names of universities that there are even binary coding lessons.;) 


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