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Various HP printer ink expiration dates analyzed

Q: What is the significance of the date printed on the HP ink PACKAGE?
    SINGAPORE MAY 2003

> Relevant Hewlett Packard ink cartridge dates are:
> - The date HP manufactured the ink cartridge
> - The date HP prints on the ink cartridge
> - The date HP prints on the ink cartridge package consumer cardboard box
> - The date HP printer cartridges are installed in the printer
> - The date HP first stops printing (due to false "low ink" messages)
> - The date HP usually stops printing (due to false "expiration" messages)
> - The date HP actually stops printing (due to true expiration messages)

Since we now know full well HP inserts up to three false expiration
dates before the final (true) expiration date, I ask this question:

Q: What is the MEANING of this date printed on the HP package box?
     SINGAPORE MAY 2003

   Note 1: Box-print-date is NOT the date the cardboard box was
           actually  printed   (as a quick look at packages on the  
           store shelves shows most, if not all, to be in the future).

   Note 2: Box-print-date also can not be the Cartridge_print_date as
           the date printed on the HP ink cartridge is easily proven
           to be different simply by opening a box.

Given that actual re-fill tests proved (in ascending order):
 a) derived_true_manufacture_date  
      = 2001/12/10 (cartridge printed date - 2.5 years)
 b) date_cartridge_was_purchased 
    === 2002/01/12 (date cartridge was purchased)
 c) date_cartridge_was_installed 
    === 2002/01/14 (date cartridge was placed in service)
 d) date_hp_prints_on_the_ink_box  
      = MAY 2003   (What is the significance of this date?)
 e) 1st_false_hp_empty_date       
     ~= 2004/05/14 (approx. 800 pages of ink printing)
 f) 2nd_false_hp_expiration_date   
      = 2004/06/10 (date actually printed on ink tank)
 g) 3rd_false_hp_expiration_date   
      = 2004/07/14 (2.5 years of contiguous printer service)
 h) true_hp_ink_expiration_date    
      = 2006/06/10 (cartridge printed date + 2 years)

Q: What is the significance of the date HP prints on the 
   outside PACKAGE of the cardboard box containing ink tanks?
     MAY 2003   (What is the significance of this date?)
0
9/17/2004 1:26:34 PM
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"Agent Orange" <agentorange@arboral-systems.com> wrote in message 
news:ieplk053v0lv0qlm08j97eqatblq2hef2t@4ax.com...
> Q: What is the significance of the date printed on the HP ink PACKAGE?
>    SINGAPORE MAY 2003

As the box says, this is the "install by" date.  Exactly what this means 
depends on whether it is an integrated printhead vs. a separate ink supply, but 
in general if the box says "install by May 2003" it is not likely to be very 
good today sixteen months later.  If it is an integrated ink and printhead 
design (such as the #78 or #45) there is no "lockout" for old cartridges and 
you can try them, with possibly poor printing results.  The products that have 
separate ink and printheads do enforce an expiration date to avoid clogging a 
printhead with old ink. See: 
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?objectID=bpa02069#N10087

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
MS MVP Printing/Imaging 


0
bobh (178)
9/18/2004 5:35:50 AM
On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 22:35:50 -0700, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
wrote:

>"Agent Orange" <agentorange@arboral-systems.com> wrote in message 
>news:ieplk053v0lv0qlm08j97eqatblq2hef2t@4ax.com...
>> Q: What is the significance of the date printed on the HP ink PACKAGE?
>>    SINGAPORE MAY 2003
>
>As the box says, this is the "install by" date.  Exactly what this means 
>depends on whether it is an integrated printhead vs. a separate ink supply

I guess the unanswered question for today is:
 Q: What is the (true) HP #-of-pages ink-to-empty calculation method?

Hi Bob,

We much appreciate your reply. 
It makes sense for HP to print a suggested "install by" date.

This particular ink cartridge is a black HP 14 (hp c5011d).
Contrary to what you'd think, the cardboard retail package is
decidedly NOT stamped with "install by" or "suggested install by" or
anything which says this is the suggested install by date.

The box is stampled with the words (sans anything else):
 SINGAPORE MAY 2003

Until I read your suggested web page, I hadn't realized the date
printed on the hp ink cartridge was the actual "end of warranty date".
I'll update my HP ink dates list accordingly.

Given your direction, the appropriate web page (for me) would be:
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?objectID=bpa02075&locale=en_US
where it says the suggested install by date "is calculated by adding
12 months (printheads), and 18 months (ink supplies) to the date of
manufacture. The date is printed on the outside of the retail
package."

As a doublecheck, looking at the cardboard retail package even
further, I see yet another date on one of the glued flaps, which seems
to be the date the package was printed (which is probably not
meaningful so I won't bother to provide that date).

Here is an update on the various HP printer ink dates:
 1) 2001/12/10 (derived_true_manufacture_date).
    Calculated by subtracting 2.5 years from the 
    warranty expiration date, which itself is the date
    printed on the ink cartridge itself.
 2) 2002/01/12 (arbitrary cartridge purchase date).
    Note the warranty expiration date apparently has 
    nothing to do with the date you purchased the hp
    ink cartridge, contrary to what you'd have thought.
 3) 2002/01/14 (arbitrary service date).
    This is the arbitrary date the hp ink cartridge was
    placed in service in the HP d145 printer. Note that
    the first false expiration date does have a bearing
    on this installation date, but that the actual 
    expiration date is not related to the install date.
 4) MAY 2003 SINGAPORE (hp_suggested_install-by_date).
    Calculated by adding 1.5 years to the date of manufacture.
    Basically this is a warning to the user BEFORE they
    purchase an hp ink cartridge that they are getting 
    dangerously close to the expiration date (especially
    if they, like most people, refill the ink tanks).
 5) 2004/05/14 (1st_false_hp_empty_lockdown_date)
    Reputedly calculated simply by the d145 counting pages 
    (despite what you'd think, the HP d145 printer apparently
    does NOT count sprayed ink drops. It apparently just 
    counts pages (which is nearly meaningless). Especially
    if you refill your hp ink tanks (as most of us do), 
    this incorrect calculation is virtually worthless. 
    However, even with your 20 dollar lifetime supply of 
    refill ink, if you wish to continue to print past this
    point, you'll need to turn OFF this counterproductive
    calculation by following instructions widely posted 
    on the Internet and included in the reference URLs below.
    Note: Never let the ink tanks dry out for two reasons:
    - The tank sponge reputedly shrinks, causing leakage.
    - The separate printheads purportedly can be damaged.
    I do NOT know the HP ink-to-empty calculation method.
    I'm told it's based on ink volume & coverage percent, 
    e.g., given 26 ml (.88 fluid ounce) of ink, and, say, 
    a 15% coverage, you end up with, say, 750 pages which
    are what is reputedly actually counted. Can anyone
    reliably confirm or deny this hypothesis?
 6) 2004/06/10 (date actually printed on ink tank)
    This is the HP warranty expiration date (which, contrary
    to all common conventions, seems to have absolutely
    no bearing on when you actually purchased or installed 
    the hp ink cartridge in your d145 HP printer).
 7) 2004/07/14 (second false expiration date)
    Calculated by adding 2.5 years to the date the 
    cartridge was installed in the HP d145 printer if
    (and only if) that service is contiguous. Since the
    hp d145 printer "remembers" the last two cartridges, 
    this calculation metric separately applies to the 
    previous ink cartridge also. (That's why most of us
    cycle three refilled ink cartridges, thereby 
    fulfilling HP's dream of selling 3 cartridges to 
    every Customer and no more.)
 8) 2006/06/10 (true_hp_ink_expiration_date).
    Calculated by adding 2 years to the date printed on
    top of the hp ink cartridge. There is probably an
    intelligent method to overcome this date (see multiple
    attempts by folks covering the connections with tape
    and/or resetting printer dates) but I have not checked
    any of these as my d145 printer is too new for me to 
    have had to overcome this clever HP marketing ploy. 

Some helpful URLs to better understand hp printer ink dates:
http://www.alotofthings.com/supportforrefillers/resettingthehpC5010A5011A.html
http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=9220
http://www.valueshop.co.uk/printer-ink-links.asp 
http://www.cacartridge.com/ink_jets.php
http://www.stratitec.com/inkrefill/support/hplowink.html 

HP printer ink refill manufacturers:
http://www.atlascopy.com/refills/resetters.htm
http://www.ink-etc.com  
http://www.amerijet.org/technical.html
http://www.reinkkit.com/InkRefillKitsDir/index.html
http://www.ink-refills.com/d135officejet.htm
http://store1.inetu.net/inkexpress/StoreFront.bok
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?objectID=bpa02075&locale=en_US

HP A/D cartridge woes:
http://atlascopy.com/C6578.htm

I guess the unanswered question for today is:
 Q: What is the HP number-of-pages calculation method?

Is it 26 ml (.88 fluid ounce) of black ink at 15% coverage
per page, yields approximately 750 pages, which is the 
derived number actually imputed (i.e., pages, not ink drops) 
for the first hp d145 false printer ink empty lockdown?

Can anyone reliably confirm or deny this hypothesis?
0
9/18/2004 1:33:51 PM
"Agent Orange" <agentorange@areyoucrazyforspam.com> wrote in message 
news:89eok0potr2lgpe8d9mah0nr5t2n31f1g5@4ax.com...

>    Reputedly calculated simply by the d145 counting pages
>    (despite what you'd think, the HP d145 printer apparently
>    does NOT count sprayed ink drops. It apparently just
>    counts pages (which is nearly meaningless).

I think you have been misinformed.  HP printers that calculate ink usage 
typically count drops and may also apply correction factors based on storage 
time, temperature or other factors.

 - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP


0
bobh (178)
9/19/2004 5:20:36 AM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 22:20:36 -0700 in comp.periphs, "Bob Headrick"
<bobh@proaxis.com> wrote:

>
>"Agent Orange" <agentorange@areyoucrazyforspam.com> wrote in message 
>news:89eok0potr2lgpe8d9mah0nr5t2n31f1g5@4ax.com...
>
>>    Reputedly calculated simply by the d145 counting pages
>>    (despite what you'd think, the HP d145 printer apparently
>>    does NOT count sprayed ink drops. It apparently just
>>    counts pages (which is nearly meaningless).
>
>I think you have been misinformed.  HP printers that calculate ink usage 
>typically count drops and may also apply correction factors based on storage 
>time, temperature or other factors.
>
> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP

I sincerely doubt that the cheap printers have TOY clocks, temp
sensors, or registers capable of counting ink drops at the rate they
are printed. 
High end professional printers may have some of these features, but I
sincerely doubt whether they could be cost justified in terms of
functionality delivered even in the high end models. 
Besides, who cares about warning levels: inks and toners are used
until the output is too faint or one colour runs out, and a page or
document is reprinted. 
If a cartridge fails to work, or stops working when there is still
adequate ink in it, it is returned to the store for replacement. 

-- 
Thanks. Take care, Brian Inglis 	Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Brian.Inglis@CSi.com 	(Brian[dot]Inglis{at}SystematicSW[dot]ab[dot]ca)
    fake address		use address above to reply
0
Brian.Inglis (314)
9/19/2004 6:17:00 AM
Brian Inglis <Brian.Inglis@SystematicSW.Invalid> wrote in message news:<2j8qk0toltc5kdd5m1qctlgqq6s9d5c5f4@4ax.com>... 
> I sincerely doubt that the [consumer] printers have ... clocks, temp
> sensors, or registers capable of counting ink drops at the rate they
> are printed.  

If the HP consumer printers really do count ink drips, can anyone tell
us where the sensor which does so is located?

Anyone have a photo of this sensor? For *any* HP consumer printer?
Or a diagram? Or a datasheet? 
Or an HP web page which says so?

Orak Listalavostok
0
oraklistal (35)
9/19/2004 11:15:50 AM
Brian Inglis <Brian.Inglis@SystematicSW.Invalid> wrote in message news:<2j8qk0toltc5kdd5m1qctlgqq6s9d5c5f4@4ax.com>...
> > HP printers that calculate ink usage typically count drops 
> > and may also apply correction factors based on storage time & temperature.
 
> Besides, who cares about warning levels ...

The only problem I have is that my HP ink tanks expire before I'm done
with them. I refill them using professional grade inks from the local
printing ship (at about 5 US dollars for 250 ml of high-quality ink).

My only problem is the final hp ink tank expiration date.

I have to start all over with new HP ink cartridges (which have that
lousy HP ink in them). Which means I have to again suffer through
about 500 pages of spotty HP printing before I can go professional
again with the better refill ink.

So, the most important question I'd like answered by printing experts
is:

HOW (the heck) DOES HP STORE & COMPARE THE TWO DATES?

Does HP store & compare the ink tank expire & current dates:
  a) in the pc?
  b) in the printer?
  c) in the ink cartridge?

Where is the current date & expiry date actually stored?

    ------------- Bob Bonda --------------
0
bob_bonda (1)
9/19/2004 11:45:02 AM
It doesn't need a sensor.  Each time a jet is fired, some logic level must be 
going from 0 to 1 to do it, so you just use this same signal to advance a 
counter.  That's the way I would do it, anyway.


"Orak Listalavostok" <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:44d113e9.0409190315.71177817@posting.google.com...
> Brian Inglis <Brian.Inglis@SystematicSW.Invalid> wrote in message 
> news:<2j8qk0toltc5kdd5m1qctlgqq6s9d5c5f4@4ax.com>...
>> I sincerely doubt that the [consumer] printers have ... clocks, temp
>> sensors, or registers capable of counting ink drops at the rate they
>> are printed.
>
> If the HP consumer printers really do count ink drips, can anyone tell
> us where the sensor which does so is located?
>
> Anyone have a photo of this sensor? For *any* HP consumer printer?
> Or a diagram? Or a datasheet?
> Or an HP web page which says so?
>
> Orak Listalavostok 


0
Steve
9/19/2004 12:06:06 PM
In message <44d113e9.0409190315.71177817@posting.google.com>, Orak 
Listalavostok <oraklistal@yahoo.com> writes
>Brian Inglis <Brian.Inglis@SystematicSW.Invalid> wrote in message 
>news:<2j8qk0toltc5kdd5m1qctlgqq6s9d5c5f4@4ax.com>...
>> I sincerely doubt that the [consumer] printers have ... clocks, temp
>> sensors, or registers capable of counting ink drops at the rate they
>> are printed.
>
>If the HP consumer printers really do count ink drips, can anyone tell
>us where the sensor which does so is located?
>
>Anyone have a photo of this sensor? For *any* HP consumer printer?
>Or a diagram? Or a datasheet?
>Or an HP web page which says so?

Break open a cartridge and you'll see a resistive strip down the inside. 
When the cartridge is full there's low electrical resistance, when it's 
empty there's high resistance.

Anyone who gives this ink-drop counting urban myth should as themselves 
why, when you refill a cartridge, the ink indicator goes to max.

Or you can believe that there's a little man inside counting the ink 
drops and that the earth is flat :-)

-- 
Tony Morgan
http://www.camcord.info
0
9/19/2004 12:27:22 PM
You can press a combination of buttons on my HP 5550 and get a printout of how 
many times each colour has fired in total for a particular serial number 
cartridge.  My current #57 cartridge's yellow has fired 459,877,084 times, Cyan 
250,571,822, and Magenta 248,605,823.  Not a lot of use but it's there.


"Tony Morgan" <tonymorgan@xtreme.pipex.net> wrote in message 
news:KZH9iNCqsXTBFwWr@zen54488.dircon.co.uk...
> In message <44d113e9.0409190315.71177817@posting.google.com>, Orak 
> Listalavostok <oraklistal@yahoo.com> writes
>>Brian Inglis <Brian.Inglis@SystematicSW.Invalid> wrote in message 
>>news:<2j8qk0toltc5kdd5m1qctlgqq6s9d5c5f4@4ax.com>...
>>> I sincerely doubt that the [consumer] printers have ... clocks, temp
>>> sensors, or registers capable of counting ink drops at the rate they
>>> are printed.
>>
>>If the HP consumer printers really do count ink drips, can anyone tell
>>us where the sensor which does so is located?
>>
>>Anyone have a photo of this sensor? For *any* HP consumer printer?
>>Or a diagram? Or a datasheet?
>>Or an HP web page which says so?
>
> Break open a cartridge and you'll see a resistive strip down the inside. When 
> the cartridge is full there's low electrical resistance, when it's empty 
> there's high resistance.
>
> Anyone who gives this ink-drop counting urban myth should as themselves why, 
> when you refill a cartridge, the ink indicator goes to max.
>
> Or you can believe that there's a little man inside counting the ink drops and 
> that the earth is flat :-)
>
> -- 
> Tony Morgan
> http://www.camcord.info 


0
Steve
9/19/2004 1:58:30 PM
Could it be a binary value coded into some of the contacts on the cartridge.
For example all cartridges made in a months production have a number and the
next month the number increments by 1. 8 bits would give a range of 256
months or over 20 years.

"Robert A. Bonda" <bob_bonda@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:8e505c87.0409190345.1c7f5f74@posting.google.com...
> Brian Inglis <Brian.Inglis@SystematicSW.Invalid> wrote in message
news:<2j8qk0toltc5kdd5m1qctlgqq6s9d5c5f4@4ax.com>...
> > > HP printers that calculate ink usage typically count drops
> > > and may also apply correction factors based on storage time &
temperature.
>
> > Besides, who cares about warning levels ...
>
> The only problem I have is that my HP ink tanks expire before I'm done
> with them. I refill them using professional grade inks from the local
> printing ship (at about 5 US dollars for 250 ml of high-quality ink).
>
> My only problem is the final hp ink tank expiration date.
>
> I have to start all over with new HP ink cartridges (which have that
> lousy HP ink in them). Which means I have to again suffer through
> about 500 pages of spotty HP printing before I can go professional
> again with the better refill ink.
>
> So, the most important question I'd like answered by printing experts
> is:
>
> HOW (the heck) DOES HP STORE & COMPARE THE TWO DATES?
>
> Does HP store & compare the ink tank expire & current dates:
>   a) in the pc?
>   b) in the printer?
>   c) in the ink cartridge?
>
> Where is the current date & expiry date actually stored?
>
>     ------------- Bob Bonda --------------


0
petersra (2)
9/19/2004 2:22:11 PM
In message <414d9087$0$50931$65c69314@mercury.nildram.net>, Steve B 
<sbrads@nildramDOTcoDOTuk.?.invalid> writes
Snipped....

>You can press a combination of buttons on my HP 5550 and get a printout 
>of how many times each colour has fired in total for a particular 
>serial number cartridge.  My current #57 cartridge's yellow has fired 
>459,877,084 times, Cyan 250,571,822, and Magenta 248,605,823.  Not a 
>lot of use but it's there.

What happens to the count when you refill?

Though not relevant to HP printers, most current Epson cartridges have a 
chip in them that "counts", and to get a refilled cartridge to be 
usable, you have to reset the chip count with a 3rd-party unit.
-- 
Tony Morgan
http://www.camcord.info
0
9/19/2004 3:25:46 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 14:58:30 +0100, "Steve B"
<sbrads@nildramDOTcoDOTuk> wrote:
>  Each time a jet is fired, some logic level must be going from 0 to 1 to do it, 
> so you just use this same signal to advance a counter. 
> That's the way I would do it, anyway.
> 
> You can press a combination of buttons on my HP 5550 and get a printout of how 
> many times each colour has fired in total for a particular serial number 
> cartridge.  My current #57 cartridge's yellow has fired 459,877,084 times, Cyan 
> 250,571,822, and Magenta 248,605,823.  Not a lot of use but it's there.

SUMMARY:
Can someone post an Internet web page which shows me the procedure for
reviewing the ink dot count in the ubiquitous HP OJ d145?

Hi Steve,

Wow. That makes sense. Good points Steve!

I had very seriously doubted HP would put expensive sensors into
every consumer HP ink cartridge anyway - so this logic-count
hypothesis seems most worth of testing out.

How could we easily test SteveB's logic-count hypothesis?

One way, I propose, is we can create a text file with a hundred black
dots (i.e., periods). Then, each time that test file is printed, the
HP printer should advance the HP black ink count by something like 100
dots. Or, if it takes ten ink bubbles to generate 1 printed period,
then following SteveB's logc, we should see the ink dot count go up by
something like 1000 dots per page (10 for each period).

To count color dots seems a bit more complicated.
Does the HP printer count the dots separately for each color?
Or does the HP printer count any color bubble as one dot?

I'm guessing one way to tell could be to create 100 red periods  ( RGB
255/0/0 red) in Microsoft Word and then set 100 more blue periods (
RGB 0/0/255 blue) and see if the color dot count changes by 100 or by
200 per printed page.

I could test this hypothesis out if I knew how to see the total number
of dots printed in a Hewlett Packard Office Jet d145 all-in-one
printer.

Can someone post an Internet web page which shows me the procedure for
reviewing the ink dot count in the ubiquitous HP OJ d145?
0
9/19/2004 4:41:15 PM
On 19 Sep 2004 04:45:02 -0700, bob_bonda@yahoo.com (Robert A. Bonda)
wrote:
>Does HP store & compare the ink tank expire & current dates:
>  a) in the pc?
>  b) in the printer?
>  c) in the ink cartridge?
>
>Where is the current date & expiry date actually stored?

I do not know, but, here is a quote from INSIDE HP
 http://www.interex.org/insidehp/articles/insidehp02.04.03.html

End Around: Chicago Tribune reporter Jim Coates wrote that his HP
printer quit on him one day, telling him that the black ink cartridge
had expired. A spare ink cartridge yielded the same results. HP
support told Coates that the printer software reads a date code on
cartridges and blocks their use after a set length of time. He was
told the block could not be bypassed. But it can: "The best way to
defeat such a software scheme that uses a computer's internal clock to
enforce software copy protection or check expiration dates is to set
the computer to a past year when the days of the week for every month
fall on the same dates as this year," Coates wrote. "Do this and your
calendar continues to be accurate, and you fool the enforcers. The
pattern of dates associated with specific days usually rotates every
six or 11 years and always every 28 years. So, the 1997 calendar is
exactly like the 2003 calendar, and so is the 1975 one. Set your
clock/calendar to either year to fool the printer cartridge
expiration-date check."


0
9/19/2004 4:54:00 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 16:25:46 +0100, Tony Morgan
<tonymorgan@xtreme.pipex.net> wrote:
>What happens to the [HP ink drop] count when you refill?

If someone would  show me how to review the ink drop count for a
Hewlett Packard Office Jet d145, I would tell you that answer.

Without having run a test, I seriously doubt the HP ink drop count
changes when we refill an existing cartridge; but, it *might* change
when we replace the HP 14 cartridge with a new HP14 cartridge. 

Bob Headrick, can you show us how to check the number of ink drops
printed in an hp oj d145? Or at least point us to the web page which
shows this (I've long lost my original manual in my housing moves).
0
9/19/2004 5:10:37 PM
On Fri, 17 Sep 2004 22:35:50 -0700, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
wrote:
> The products that have separate ink and printheads enforce an 
> expiration date to avoid clogging a printhead with old ink.

The HPOJD145 does have separate HP 14 ink & printheads.
This HP 14 ink in the Office Jet D145 does enforce an expiry date.
But, can the HP real expiry date be overcome?

Note: We're talking about the real, final, expiry date; not the two
false-expiration date which gets most users to replace the HP ink
cartridge sooner than it needs to be (as discussed previously).

For some ink cartridges, apparently the final expiry date *can* be
modified at the time of ink installation into the printer, e.g.:
http://makeashorterlink.com/?E3C0114E8 (the short url for):
http://www.interex.org/insidehp/articles/insidehp02.04.03.html
which contains (much abbreviated for this post) instructions:
 - Do not install the cartridge until you do the following.
 - There is an *.ini file (hpSomethingOrOther.ini) stored in the
   system directory (WINNT in NT and 2000) ... In it there is a
   parameter something like pencheck. It is set to 0100.
   Set it to 0000 in the file and save the file and REBOOT...
 - ... once you have replaced all your cartridges that have expiration
   dates burned into them (as they expire and they will) with ones
   that now read UNKNOWN ... you should not have any cartridge expire,
   ever again ...
 - if you load a new driver, make sure to reset the value in the INI
   file before you print anything or you will burn expiration dates
   into the chips and you will have to buy new factory virgin
   cartridges all over again...

Yet, for other inks, apparently, the HP expiry date can't be overcome:
http://www.alotofthings.com/inkjetinformation/TheNewInkJetMarketplace.htm
containing the (again, much abbreviated for this post) quote below"
"the HP #10 ink cartridges ... contain an internal chip that fails 16
months after the manufacture date.  This is regardless of whether or
not you have used the cartridge up or used it at all."

QUESTION:
For those who refill their HP 14 ink tanks with better ink, 
we need to determine if this HP14 / HPOJD145 expiry date *can* be
overcome. Do you know how HP stores & compares this expiry date?

We have to know first how it works before we can defeat it.
0
9/19/2004 5:42:29 PM
Agent Orange wrote:

> Hi Steve,
> 
> Wow. That makes sense. Good points Steve!
> 
> I had very seriously doubted HP would put expensive sensors into
> every consumer HP ink cartridge anyway - so this logic-count
> hypothesis seems most worth of testing out.
> 
> How could we easily test SteveB's logic-count hypothesis?
> 

Why test anything?  Steve has reported what his printer is reporting 
on ink usage and how it is done.  Bob H has responded to your post 
telling you they count drops.  Have printed similar reports on several 
of my HP printers as well.  Just need the secret code to reveal a lot 
of info about your printer.  This method of calc ink usage has been 
around for yrs.

When it come to HP printers, pay attention to what Bob H says.  He 
works at Corvallis div, the heart of HP inkjet cart. world.

Don't need no stinkn' test.

Mickey
0
9/19/2004 5:48:51 PM
Steve B wrote:
> You can press a combination of buttons on my HP 5550 and get a printout of how 
> many times each colour has fired in total for a particular serial number 
> cartridge.  My current #57 cartridge's yellow has fired 459,877,084 times, Cyan 
> 250,571,822, and Magenta 248,605,823.  Not a lot of use but it's there.
> 

What combo? I have same machine, and while the above would be 
interesting, what I really'd like to know is: Can I override the 14" 
paper length restriction?

What is the reason this type of printer has a restriction on length of 
paper anyhow? Er, width I do kinda see why it might have a limitation....

--
John McWilliams
0
jpmcw (1977)
9/19/2004 6:38:25 PM
Orak Listalavostok <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:44d113e9.0409190315.71177817@posting.google.com...
> Brian Inglis <Brian.Inglis@SystematicSW.Invalid> wrote

>> I sincerely doubt that the [consumer] printers have ...
>> clocks, temp sensors, or registers capable of
>> counting ink drops at the rate they are printed.

> If the HP consumer printers really do count ink drips, can
> anyone tell us where the sensor which does so is located?

Doesnt need a sensor when the printer commands the ink drops.
It can just keep track of what ink drop commands have been issued.

> Anyone have a photo of this sensor? For *any* HP consumer printer?
> Or a diagram? Or a datasheet?
> Or an HP web page which says so?


0
rod_speed (125)
9/19/2004 7:51:14 PM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 18:38:25 GMT in comp.periphs, John McWilliams
<jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote:

>Steve B wrote:
>> You can press a combination of buttons on my HP 5550 and get a printout of how 
>> many times each colour has fired in total for a particular serial number 
>> cartridge.  My current #57 cartridge's yellow has fired 459,877,084 times, Cyan 
>> 250,571,822, and Magenta 248,605,823.  Not a lot of use but it's there.
>> 
>
>What combo? I have same machine, and while the above would be 
>interesting, what I really'd like to know is: Can I override the 14" 
>paper length restriction?
>
>What is the reason this type of printer has a restriction on length of 
>paper anyhow? Er, width I do kinda see why it might have a limitation....

IIRC it also accepts banner paper, so 14" is just the biggest common
format accepted. 

-- 
Thanks. Take care, Brian Inglis 	Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Brian.Inglis@CSi.com 	(Brian[dot]Inglis{at}SystematicSW[dot]ab[dot]ca)
    fake address		use address above to reply
0
Brian.Inglis (314)
9/19/2004 7:53:29 PM
Without contesting what you say, there are people like myself who only
print ocassionally - for instance the cartridge in my HP930c was bought
and installed in 2000 - it is still going strong, never gums up, and
prints beautifully in B&W or colour.  Love my HPs

David - who remembers the Epson printer (600) he stupidly bought that
had to have the heads cleaned EVERY time he wanted to print - I kept it
for 3 weeks then gave it away (wouldn't sell the bloody thing)

Bob Headrick wrote:
> 
> "Agent Orange" <agentorange@arboral-systems.com> wrote in message
> news:ieplk053v0lv0qlm08j97eqatblq2hef2t@4ax.com...
> > Q: What is the significance of the date printed on the HP ink PACKAGE?
> >    SINGAPORE MAY 2003
> 
> As the box says, this is the "install by" date.  Exactly what this means
> depends on whether it is an integrated printhead vs. a separate ink supply, but
> in general if the box says "install by May 2003" it is not likely to be very
> good today sixteen months later.  If it is an integrated ink and printhead
> design (such as the #78 or #45) there is no "lockout" for old cartridges and
> you can try them, with possibly poor printing results.  The products that have
> separate ink and printheads do enforce an expiration date to avoid clogging a
> printhead with old ink. See:
> http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?objectID=bpa02069#N10087
> 
> Regards,
> Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
> MS MVP Printing/Imaging

-- 
If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made out of meat?
0
david1133 (4)
9/20/2004 12:44:41 AM
In message <414E27F3.4D7E8BCA@REMOVE-TO-REPLYoptusnet.com.au>, quietguy 
<david1133@REMOVE-TO-REPLYoptusnet.com.au> writes
>Without contesting what you say, there are people like myself who only 
>print ocassionally - for instance the cartridge in my HP930c was bought 
>and installed in 2000 - it is still going strong, never gums up, and 
>prints beautifully in B&W or colour.  Love my HPs

Interesting indeed. When my 990cxi locked me out and the ink levels not 
even being shown, I had a long dialogue both by e-mail and by phone with 
HP support.

After advising me to replace the ink cartridges (which I had already 
done) and directions to re-install the drivers (I was passed from one to 
another at HP as the support call was escalated) I was finally told that 
the only possible cause could be either dirty contacts on the cartridge 
receptacles, or a dislodged or loose ribbon cable connecting the print 
head to the PCB. No mention of an ink droplet counter, in fact the 
resistive strip that I've previously mentioned was described to me. In 
the event though I did clean the connecting pins in the cartridge 
receptacles, since I had to get some printing done with (by that time) 
some urgency, I went out and bought a Lexmark.

I do know that Epson printer cartridges do have a chip of the sort 
attributed to HP printers, and this is acknowledged by Epson and special 
chip resetting units are sold by a number of Ink Refill companies. But 
there's none of this for HP printers.

And the very fact that many thousands of HP printer owners refill 
without problems - with the ink status indication going up to maximum 
without any sort of resetting - indicates to me, at least, that this 
"ink-drop counting" on the HP is an urban myth. Perhaps caused by 
confusion with Epsons  who do have a similar system to that described 
here - and who admit it.

Of course the 990cxi could be different :-)
-- 
Tony Morgan
http://www.camcord.info
0
9/20/2004 2:00:06 AM
Printer on
Hold Power button down while also, in this order...
Press Cancel 4 times
Press Page Feed once
Release Power button.

You get a printout with '41-Tap (Dot Counts)' printed at the top.  It's 
coded......
Pen IDs:-
K=Black text #56
C=Colour #57
P=Photo #58

Counts:-
K=as above, #56
C=cyan in #57
M=magenta in #57
Y=yellow in #57
c=cyan in #58
m=magenta in #58
k=black in #58

I haven't worked out what Life/256, SS/256 or the Trigger data is yet.

PS
Another very handy test print is a 43-Tap, it tests every jet without using 
hardly any ink.





"John McWilliams" <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote in message 
news:Bmk3d.218772$Fg5.5033@attbi_s53...
> Steve B wrote:
>> You can press a combination of buttons on my HP 5550 and get a printout of 
>> how many times each colour has fired in total for a particular serial number 
>> cartridge.  My current #57 cartridge's yellow has fired 459,877,084 times, 
>> Cyan 250,571,822, and Magenta 248,605,823.  Not a lot of use but it's there.
>>
>
> What combo? I have same machine, and while the above would be interesting, 
> what I really'd like to know is: Can I override the 14" paper length 
> restriction?
>
> What is the reason this type of printer has a restriction on length of paper 
> anyhow? Er, width I do kinda see why it might have a limitation....
>
> --
> John McWilliams 


0
Steve
9/20/2004 7:49:14 AM
Brian Inglis wrote:

> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 18:38:25 GMT in comp.periphs, John McWilliams
> <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>What is the reason this type of printer has a restriction on length of 
>>paper anyhow? Er, width I do kinda see why it might have a limitation....
> 
> 
> IIRC it also accepts banner paper, so 14" is just the biggest common
> format accepted. 
> 
I'm not sure how to proceed, and maybe the drivers for the Mac are way 
different than for Windows, but I can set up custom paper size in PS 
(CS) and start printing on paper 4" x 23". It gets kicked out at 11 or 
so inches. There are no apparent choices in the HP print dialogue for 
that sized paper, nor can I see how to set up custom paper in the HP 
dialogues.

What I don't know about printing could fill several books! (And does.)

--
John McWilliams
0
jpmcw (1977)
9/20/2004 6:02:39 PM
On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 18:02:39 GMT in comp.periphs, John McWilliams
<jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote:

>Brian Inglis wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 18:38:25 GMT in comp.periphs, John McWilliams
>> <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>What is the reason this type of printer has a restriction on length of 
>>>paper anyhow? Er, width I do kinda see why it might have a limitation....
>> 
>> 
>> IIRC it also accepts banner paper, so 14" is just the biggest common
>> format accepted. 
>> 
>I'm not sure how to proceed, and maybe the drivers for the Mac are way 
>different than for Windows, but I can set up custom paper size in PS 
>(CS) and start printing on paper 4" x 23". It gets kicked out at 11 or 
>so inches. There are no apparent choices in the HP print dialogue for 
>that sized paper, nor can I see how to set up custom paper in the HP 
>dialogues.
>
>What I don't know about printing could fill several books! (And does.)

On Windows, if I select Paper Type 'Special Papers'/'hp banner paper',
setup autoselects Paper Size 'Banner [Letter (8.5 x 11 in.)]' and
shows a picture of numbered pages printed continuously over the folds.
This probably just suppresses feeding after registration of the first
page, printing a bunch of contiguous bands 203 x 265 mm @ 300 dpi. 

-- 
Thanks. Take care, Brian Inglis 	Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Brian.Inglis@CSi.com 	(Brian[dot]Inglis{at}SystematicSW[dot]ab[dot]ca)
    fake address		use address above to reply
0
Brian.Inglis (314)
9/22/2004 5:01:10 AM
Brian Inglis wrote:

> On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 18:02:39 GMT in comp.periphs, John McWilliams
> <jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote:
> 
> 
>>Brian Inglis wrote:
>>
>>
>>>On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 18:38:25 GMT in comp.periphs, John McWilliams
>>><jpmcw@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>>What is the reason this type of printer has a restriction on length of 
>>>>paper anyhow? Er, width I do kinda see why it might have a limitation....
>>>
>>>
>>>IIRC it also accepts banner paper, so 14" is just the biggest common
>>>format accepted. 
>>>
>>
>>I'm not sure how to proceed, and maybe the drivers for the Mac are way 
>>different than for Windows, but I can set up custom paper size in PS 
>>(CS) and start printing on paper 4" x 23". It gets kicked out at 11 or 
>>so inches. There are no apparent choices in the HP print dialogue for 
>>that sized paper, nor can I see how to set up custom paper in the HP 
>>dialogues.
>>
>>What I don't know about printing could fill several books! (And does.)
> 
> 
> On Windows, if I select Paper Type 'Special Papers'/'hp banner paper',
> setup autoselects Paper Size 'Banner [Letter (8.5 x 11 in.)]' and
> shows a picture of numbered pages printed continuously over the folds.
> This probably just suppresses feeding after registration of the first
> page, printing a bunch of contiguous bands 203 x 265 mm @ 300 dpi. 
> 

The only banner paper on my Printer Driver dialogue is under "US 
Letter", and choosing that doesn't print past 11" on my tests. It looks 
like it wants to print to the bottom of the paper and start in the top 
of (the next) 8.5 x 11 page, but since I have an 8.5 x 30" strip in, it 
just stops.

-- 
John McWilliams
0
jpmcw (1977)
9/22/2004 5:26:13 AM
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 10:48:51 -0700, Mickey <mickey@webster.com> wrote:
>Why test anything?  Steve has reported what his printer is reporting 
>on ink usage and how it is done.  Bob H has responded to your post 
>telling you they count drops.  Have printed similar reports on several 
>of my HP printers as well.  Just need the secret code to reveal a lot 
>of info about your printer.  This method of calc ink usage has been 
>around for yrs.
>When it come to HP printers, pay attention to what Bob H says.  He 
>works at Corvallis div, the heart of HP inkjet cart. world.

OK. Assuming all is correct as posted, that *still* leaves one
critical question.

How does HP actually store the final 4.5 year (from date of
manufacture) expiry date for an HP 14 ink cartridge?

(If someone has reliably answered that one, I missed it.)
0
9/22/2004 5:56:26 AM
I am curious about how well the ink carts for Thinkjets and Quietjets will
fare after 12 years in deep storage. I think the cart model number is
92261. I still have about 40 carts left. I do plan on using the Thinkjets
soon.

Being naturally miserly I do not want to toss them, even though I did not
get to use them up as planned so long ago. 


=-=
0
jdj (9)
10/2/2004 7:50:39 AM
"jdj" <jdj@now.here> wrote in message 
news:pan.2004.10.02.07.50.32.324032@now.here...
>I am curious about how well the ink carts for Thinkjets and Quietjets will
> fare after 12 years in deep storage. I think the cart model number is
> 92261. I still have about 40 carts left. I do plan on using the Thinkjets
> soon.

You have nothing to lose by trying them.  Depending on the storage conditions 
you may have more or less problems.  Possible issues include the ink becoming 
thicker (and more prone to clogging) due to vapor loss, and possible leaking 
due to delaminating of the printhead.  The first issue would be more prone in a 
hot dry environment, the second in a hot environment.  In either case, twelve 
years is a long time :-).

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP


0
bobh (178)
10/2/2004 3:21:15 PM
Hi Bob Headrick,
  What did I do wrong when I replaced my HP14 c5010d ink cartridge?
  I still get the message:
  "Supply expired. Replace color ink cartridge. Press enter to continue."

0. Long ago, I set my HP Office Jet d145 printer to stop counting
   pages printed because I religiously refill the 19ml HP14 C5010a 
   sponge-based color ink cartridge with high quality ink.

   Note: The steps to turn off the HPOJd145 "ink level indicator" from
http://www.alotofthings.com/supportforrefillers/resettingthehpC5010A5011A.html 
   a) Press both the keypad LEFT ARROW & RIGHT ARROW at the same time
   b) Release both the keypad LEFT ARROW & RIGHT ARROW at the same time
   c) Press the keypad 4, then the 5, then the 6 in sequence
   d) Wait for the prompt asking if you want to override the ink level gauge
   e) Press 1 for Yes.

1. An old HP14 color cartridge was in my HP d145 all-in-one printer
   for exactly 2.5 contiguous years, finally showing "5 days to 
   expire", "4 days to expire", "3 days to expire", etc. until 
   it "expired" last week.

   Note: There is no computer attached to this all-in-one printer /
         copier / fax (I use it as a home office color copier).

2. Based on instructions in comp.periphs.printers, I purchased 
   THREE new HP14 23ml hp5010d color cartridges giving me a 
   total of four HP #14 color ink cartridges, some 19 ml & others
   a full 23 ml due to HP marketing shenanigans (all are the exact
   same physical size, HP just fills the ink tank less or more).

   Note: The actual date on the cartridge is 2004/09/10, which then 
         calculates to a true expiration date of 2006/09/10. So, it
         still has years of life left (I refill it religiously).

3. THREE TIMES, I turned on the Hewlett Packard Office Jet d145
   printer; flipped the top open; removed the prior HP 14 cartridge; 
   installed the next HP14 cartridge; closed the top; then pressed 
   "Enter" to print the obligatory alignment marks; and then 
   shut down the HP OJ d145 printer.

   Note: I ran step 3 above THREE times; yet, when I placed the 
         refilled first (of four) HP14 color ink cartridges back 
         into the HP OfficeJet d145 printer, the LCD display still
         reports: "Supply expired. Replace color ink cartridge."

QUESTION:
   I have FOUR HP14 color ink cartridges (one of which had been in the 
   printer for a contiguous 2.5 years). What did I do wrong? 
   Why didn't adding THREE separate new cartridges erase the memory
   of the original 2.5-years contiguous service cartridge serial number?
0
mixatonia (3)
10/4/2004 4:12:45 AM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 22:20:36 -0700, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
wrote:
> HP printers that calculate ink usage typically count drops and may 
> also apply correction factors based on storage time, temperature 
> or other factors.


See HP's US patent 6,431,673 at
 http://www.uspto.gov/patft/index.html
the excerpt of which states:
 United States Patent  	 6,431,673
 Heim ,   et al. 	August 13, 2002
 Ink level gauging in inkjet printing
 Abstract
 The gauging method generally follows a drop count approach to ink 
 level gauging while making more precise the relationship between the 
 expelled-drop count and the weight of ink actually expelled, thereby 
 to provide more accurate ink level gauging. The printhead temperature
 is monitored as each swath of an image is printed. Moreover, 
 temperature variations that occur within each swath are noted so that
 the corresponding intra-swath variations in drop weight are factored 
 into the calculation of a net ink drop weight that more closely 
 approximates the drop weight actually ejected. The method also 
 factors in the effect that printing frequency has on drop weight.

 Inventors:  Heim; Rory A. (Corvallis, OR); 
             Castle; Steven T. (Philomath, OR)
 Assignee:    Hewlett-Packard Company (Palo Alto, CA)


0
10/4/2004 5:23:11 AM
On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 22:20:36 -0700, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
wrote:
> HP printers that calculate ink usage typically count drops ...

See also HP's US patent 6,431,670 at
 http://www.uspto.gov/patft/index.html
the excerpt of which states:
  United States Patent           6,431,670
  Schantz ,   et al.             August 13, 2002
  Ink level sensing method and apparatus
  Abstract
   An ink cartridge of a printer includes first and second electrodes
   on opposite sides of an ink reservoir. Level of ink in the 
   reservoir may be measured by applying a sense signal to the first 
   electrode, detecting a signal at the second electrode, extracting 
   DC content of the detected signal, and using the DC content to 
   determine the ink level.
  Inventors:  Schantz; Christopher A (Redwood City, CA); 
              Su; Wen-Li (Vancouver, WA)
  Assignee:  Hewlett-Packard Company (Palo Alto, CA)
  Appl. No.: 502360
  Filed:     February 14, 2000

And, see HP's US patent  6,431,672 at
 http://www.uspto.gov/patft/index.html
the excerpt of which states:
 United States Patent    6,431,672
 Ardito ,   et al.       August 13, 2002
 Ink container having dual capillary members with differing capillary
 pressures for precise ink level sensing
 Abstract
 A replaceable ink container for providing ink to a printhead of a  
 printing system. The ink container has a fluid outlet configured for
 connection with the printhead. The ink container includes an ink 
 reservoir having a first capillary member having a first capillary 
 pressure, and a second capillary member having a second capillary 
 pressure that is greater than the first capillary pressure such that 
 the second capillary member has a higher resistance to ink flow than 
 the first capillary member. An ink level sensor senses a low ink 
 condition of the ink reservoir. The ink level sensor includes a 
 C-shaped tube having first and second ports that fluidically 
 communicate with only the second capillary member. The first and 
 second capillary members abut one another at a capillary member 
 interface, and the first port is positioned immediately adjacent to 
 this capillary member interface. Placement of the first port 
 immediately adjacent to the capillary member interface minimizes the 
 ink level variation between an ink drained portion of the second 
 capillary member and an ink filled portion of the second capillary 
 member. A light detector detects when the C-shaped tube is free of 
 ink which defines the low ink condition of the ink reservoir.
 Inventors:     Ardito; Michael S. (Lebanon, OR); 
                Walker; Ray A. (Eugene, OR); 
                Thielman; Jeffrey L. (Corvallis, OR)
 Assignee:      Hewlett-Packard Company (Palo Alto, CA)

See HP's US patent 6,431,673 at
 http://www.uspto.gov/patft/index.html
the excerpt of which states:
 United States Patent  	 6,431,673
 Heim ,   et al. 	August 13, 2002
 Ink level gauging in inkjet printing
 Abstract
 The gauging method generally follows a drop count approach to ink 
 level gauging while making more precise the relationship between the 
 expelled-drop count and the weight of ink actually expelled, thereby 
 to provide more accurate ink level gauging. The printhead temperature
 is monitored as each swath of an image is printed. Moreover, 
 temperature variations that occur within each swath are noted so that
 the corresponding intra-swath variations in drop weight are factored 
 into the calculation of a net ink drop weight that more closely 
 approximates the drop weight actually ejected. The method also 
 factors in the effect that printing frequency has on drop weight.

 Inventors:  Heim; Rory A. (Corvallis, OR); 
             Castle; Steven T. (Philomath, OR)
 Assignee:    Hewlett-Packard Company (Palo Alto, CA)
0
10/4/2004 5:25:54 AM
On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 05:23:11 GMT, Wolfgang Franz
<wrfranz.nospam@pleasenospam.com> wrote:

>On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 22:20:36 -0700, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
>wrote:
>> HP printers that calculate ink usage typically count drops and may 
>> also apply correction factors based on storage time, temperature 
>> or other factors.

Specifically, what is claimed in the US patent is:

1. A method of determining the amount of ink ejected from the    
   printhead of an inkjet print cartridge that is controlled for 
   ejecting ink drops, the method comprising the steps of:
   - determining the number of ejected drops;
   - selecting an average drop weight;
   - multiplying the number of ejected drops by the average drop 
     weight to obtain a gross weight;
   - providing a frequency factor relating to the frequency with 
     which the drops are ejected; and
   - adjusting the gross weight by the frequency factor to arrive 
     at a net weight of the amount of ink ejected.

2. The method claim 1 including the step of adjusting the gross weight
   by a temperature factor corresponding to the temperature of the ink
   drops that are ejected.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the selecting step includes the step 
   of accounting for variations in the average drop weight caused by 
   the amount of use of the printhead.

4. The method of claim 1 including the step of storing on the 
   cartridge ink level information that is based upon the net weight 
   of the amount of ink ejected.

5. The method of claim 4 further including the steps of obtaining from
   the cartridge information that corresponds to the weight of the ink
   in the cartridge and calibrating a counter to relate increments of 
   the counter to an incremental amount of the weight of the ink.

6. The method of claim 4 including the step of altering the 
   information stored on the cartridge to account for ink that 
   evaporates from the cartridge.

7. The method of claim 1 wherein the printhead is controlled for 
   ejecting ink drops along a swath that is traversed by the printhead
   and that extends from one side of a print medium to another side of
   the medium, and wherein the method of claim 1 is carried out for 
   each of several discrete intervals of the swath.

8. The method of claim 7 wherein the number of drops ejected within an
   interval of the swath defines an interval drop density, the method 
   including the step of selecting the number of swath intervals in a 
   manner that results in the highest average interval drop density 
   considering all of the intervals in the swath.

9. The method of claim 7 including the step of determining for each 
   interval of the swath the average temperature of the printhead as 
   the printhead traverses the interval.

10. The method claim 7 wherein the providing step includes calculating
    for each interval a frequency with which the drops are ejected by 
    the printhead as the printhead traverses the interval.

11. A method of determining the amount of ink ejected from the 
   printhead of an inkjet print cartridge that is controlled for 
   ejecting ink drops as the printhead traverses a swath, the method 
   comprising the steps of:
   
   - determining the number of ejected drops in each of at 
     least two intervals of the swath;
   - selecting an average drop weight;
   - multiplying the number of ejected drops in each interval by 
     the average drop weight to obtain a gross weight for 
     each interval;
   - providing temperature factors relating to the temperature 
     of the printhead as the printhead traverses each interval,
     thereby to provide a temperature factor associated with 
     each interval; and
   - adjusting the obtained gross weights for each interval by the
     associated temperature factors and summing to arrive at a net
     weight of the amount of ink ejected within the swath.

12. The method of claim 11 including the steps of:

 - providing frequency factors relating to the frequency with which 
   the drops are ejected as the printhead traverses each interval, 
   thereby to provide a frequency factor associated with each
   interval; and
 - adjusting the obtained gross weights for each interval by the 
   associated frequency factors before summing to arrive at a net 
   weight of the amount of ink ejected within the swath.

13. The method of claim 11 including the step of establishing a number
   of swath intervals by determining the density of drops ejected by
the 
   printhead within the swath.

14. The method of claim 11 including:
    - accounting for ink depletion attributable to evaporation 
      from the cartridge; and then
    - recording the amount of ink remaining in the cartridge.

15. The method of claim 14 wherein the printhead operation heats the 
   printhead above ambient temperature and wherein the accounting step
   includes sensing the temperature of the printhead during a time 
   that the printhead is not operating so that the sensed temperature 
   will substantially match ambient temperature.

16. A method of calculating the weight of ink ejected by a printhead 
   of an inkjet print cartridge as the cartridge traverses a swath, 
   comprising the steps of:

   - dividing the swath into intervals;
   - determining for each interval the temperature of the printhead as
     the printhead traverses the interval;
   - calculating for each interval the weight of the ink ejected as a 
     function of the determined temperatures; and
   - summing the calculated weights.

17. The method of claim 16 wherein the calculating step for one of the
   intervals includes:
   - determining the number of drops ejected within that interval to 
     arrive at a gross weight of drops for that interval; and
   - adjusting that gross weight by a factor relating to the average 
     frequency with which the drops are ejected by the printhead 
     during that interval.

18. The method of claim 17 further comprising the step of adjusting 
   the gross weight of drops for that interval by a factor relating to
   the number of drops that had been ejected from the printhead before
   traversing the swath.

19. The method of claim 16 wherein the number of drops ejected in an 
   interval of the swath area defines a drop density, the method 
   including the step of selecting the number of swath intervals in a 
   manner that results in the highest average interval drop density 
   considering all of the intervals in the swath.

20. The method of claim 16 including the step of storing on the 
   cartridge information relating to the weight of ink ejected and to 
   an amount of ink lost by evaporation.

Description
TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to gauging the level of ink in an inkjet print
cartridge by precisely determining the amount of ink that is ejected
from a cartridge during printing.

BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An ink-jet printer typically includes one or more print cartridges
that contain ink. In some designs, the cartridge has discrete
reservoirs of more than one color of ink. Each reservoir is connected
by a conduit to a printhead that is mounted to the body of the
cartridge. The reservoir or supply of ink may be carried in the
cartridge or remote from the cartridge. When a remote supply is used,
the ink is delivered from the remote supply to the cartridge by a
flexible tube to fill an intermediate reservoir adjacent to the
printhead.

The cartridge is controlled for ejecting minute drops of ink from the
printhead to a printing medium, such as paper, that is advanced
through the printer. The ejection of the drops is controlled so that
the drops form recognizable images on the paper. The cartridge is
mounted to a carriage that scans across the medium as drops are
ejected.

One can consider the portion of the print medium that is traversed by
a printhead for receiving ink from the print head as a print swath.
Between carriage scans, the paper is advanced so that the next swath
of the image may be printed. Oftentimes, especially for color images,
the carriage is scanned more than once across the same swath. With
each such scan, a different combination of colors or droplet patterns
may be printed until the printed swath is complete.

With thermal-type inkjet printers the printhead includes several
resistors that are selectively driven (heated) with pulses of
electrical current. The heat from each driven resistor is sufficient
to form a vapor bubble in ink that fills an ink chamber that surrounds
the resistor. The rapid expansion of the vapor bubble ejects or
"fires" an ink drop through a nozzle that is associated with the ink
chamber. The chamber is refilled after each drop ejection with ink
that flows into the chamber through a channel that connects with the
conduit to the reservoir ink. Each printhead has numerous chambers and
nozzles.

It is important to properly gauge the amount of ink remaining in a
print cartridge. In this regard, it is best to replace a nearly empty
cartridge with a full or nearly full one before a large (in terms of
ink density) print operation is started. That is, print quality may
suffer if a print cartridge is replaced during a printing task. Also,
the printhead itself can fail and be damaged if it were operated (that
is, driven with current pulses) after the supply of ink was depleted
by an amount such that the ink chambers surrounding the resistors no
longer filled. This printhead-damaging situation is characterized as
"dry firing."

Given the importance of accurately gauging ink levels, there have been
provided in the past numerous attempts to monitor the amount of ink
remaining in a supply or reservoir. For example, an optical sensor may
be positioned near a transparent portion of an ink supply and
configured to produce a signal when the light transmissive
characteristics of that portion change in a manner that indicates the
supply is nearing empty. The signal is converted to a human
perceptible warning or notice ("Low-on-Ink" "Out-of-Ink," etc) for
indicating that the supply should be replaced.

However a low-on-ink or out-of-ink signal is produced, the printer is
usually controlled so that a small amount of ink is reserved in the
supply once an out-of-ink condition is reached. This reserve may be
enough to enable the printer to complete printing of a sheet (rather
than stopping during printing of a sheet) and "limp home" to a service
station carried in the printer. In any event, the reserve is large
enough to ensure that no printhead dry firing occurs.

In one approach to gauging the amount of ink remaining in a supply or
reservoir, the printer controller keeps track of the number of drops
fired from the printhead and periodically updates a memory structure
that initially reflects the amount of ink in a full cartridge. For
example, a new cartridge would be characterized at the time of
manufacture as having a given amount of ink, preferably measured in
units of weight. A printer controller is provided (as by associated
firmware) with this initial weight. As drops are fired, the printer
controller accumulates the drop count and converts that count to a
corresponding weight of expelled ink. This amount is subtracted from
the initial weight of ink in the cartridge, and an appropriate warning
signal is produced when the remaining weight is depleted by an amount
indicting the printer is low on ink or out of ink.

The present invention generally follows the "drop count" approach to
ink level gauging and is directed to a method of making more precise
the relationship between the expelled-drop count and the weight of ink
actually expelled, thereby to provide more accurate ink level gauging.

By making the gauging more precise, the amount of reserve ink (which
can be thought of as a safety factor) can be reduced, which leads to
less wasted ink when a user replaces a cartridge. An attendant
advantage to this is the production of more printed pages per
cartridge.

The present invention may be used to supplement other ink level
gauging approaches (such as the optical monitoring mentioned above),
or as a stand-alone technique for precisely monitoring the level of
ink in the cartridge.

The temperature of an operating printhead can vary considerably as a
swath is printed. This variation in temperature is primarily due to
the amount of ink that is printed (the print density) within the
swath. Thus, when a portion of an image requires lots of ink, the
printhead operating temperature will rise. As the printhead
temperature increases, the weight of each expelled drop (that is, the
"drop weight") also increases. Put another way, temperature changes
from a normal or set point printhead operating temperature will cause
changes in the drop weight that must be accounted for in gauging the
amount of remaining ink. Generally, as the temperature increases, the
drop weight increases.

As one aspect of the present invention, the printhead temperature is
monitored as each swath of the image is printed. Moreover, temperature
variations that occur within each swath are noted so that the
corresponding intra-swath variations in drop weight are factored into
the calculation of a "net" ink drop weight that more closely
approximates the drop weight actually ejected.

The method of the present invention also factors in the effect that
printing frequency has on drop weight. The printing frequency is the
rate with which inks drops are ejected and is measured in cycles, such
as hertz (Hz). Generally, the ejected drop weight decreases as the
printing frequency increases. As with temperature, printing frequency
may vary considerably during printing of a swath. The present
invention accounts for this intra-swath variation of printing
frequency.

At some printing frequencies the effects of temperature changes on
drop weight are much more pronounced than at other printing
frequencies. Conversely, drop weights may not vary significantly with
printing frequency changes within certain ranges of frequencies.
Consequently, it is contemplated that the method of the present
invention may, in some instances, account for only printhead
temperature changes or only frequency changes. Normally, however, both
temperature and frequency will be considered.

As another aspect of the present invention, the determination of
ejected drop weight also accounts for drop weight variations that are
attributable to normal use over the life of the printhead. That is, a
printhead has a useful life that may be measured in tens of millions
of ejected drops and, with other factors being equal, the average drop
weight tends to increase during the life of the printhead. The drop
weight variation over the life of the printhead is considered in the
present invention.

As another aspect of the present invention, the method maintains
information (preferably on the print cartridge) relating to the
difference between the initial weight of a full cartridge and the net
weight of the ink ejected from the cartridge. In other words, the ink
level or amount of remaining ink is maintained in memory and made
available for display to the user of the printer. This ink level is
also adjusted from time to time to account for ink depletion resulting
from evaporation.

The invention is primarily embodied in a printer control algorithm of
a printing system that includes mechanisms (processor, temperature
sensors, drop counters, display, etc) for efficiently performing the
algorithm so that ink level data is continuously and precisely gauged
and made available to the user.

Apparatus and methods for carrying out the invention are described in
detail. Other advantages and features of the present invention will
become clear upon review of the following portions of this
specification and the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a diagram for illustrating print cartridges traversing a
swath that is divided into a number of intervals to facilitate ink
level gauging in accordance with the method of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a printer system adapted for carrying out
the method of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a graph illustrating, for one type (color) of ink,
empirically derived relationships between printing frequency and drop
weight, and between printhead temperature and drop weight, which
relationships are used in carrying out the method of the present
invention.

FIGS. 4a and 4B provide a high-level flow diagram of the primary steps
of the method of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The diagram of FIG. 1 illustrates generally from above, a pair of
inkjet print cartridges C1 and C2 that are mounted to a carriage 20
for reciprocating translational motion across the width of a sheet of
print medium, such as paper 22. As the cartridges are moved,
printheads that are attached to them are operated for selectively
ejecting ink drops to form an image on the paper 22.

The scanning-type printer of interest here prints one swath at a time.
A swath 25 is illustrated in FIG. 1 as the region between the
imaginary, parallel dashed lines 24, 26. Thus, in this exemplary
embodiment, the cartridges C1, C2 are moved by the carriage 20 from
one side 28 of the paper 22 to the other side 30 as ink drops are
ejected from the printheads onto the swath 25.

One or more columns of minute nozzles are formed in the cartridge
printheads. The nozzles are oriented to extend in a direction parallel
to the dimension line 32. One or all of the nozzles in a column of
nozzles may be fired. That is, the resistor associated with that
particular nozzle is heated to eject an ink drop from the surrounding
ink chamber and through the nozzle. Thus, the dimension line 32
defines the swath width over which ink drops may be expelled as the
carriage traverses the medium.

The swath width 32 illustrated in FIG. 1 may also be characterized in
terms of the maximum number of nozzles extending across the width of
the swath, normal to the direction of carriage travel (arrow 34 in
FIG. 1). This characterization is useful for determining the printing
frequency as described more below. The total number of these
"swath-width nozzles" may vary from one model of print cartridge to
another.

For illustrative purposes, two separate cartridges C1, C2 are shown in
the figures. One cartridge, C1, is intended to represent a black-ink
cartridge. The other cartridge, C2, represents a three-compartment
cartridge that holds cyan, yellow, and magenta-colored ink. It will be
appreciated that the present invention may be carried out with a
single cartridge, or with more than two cartridges. For instance, some
color printers use four cartridges at a time, each cartridge carrying
a particular color of ink, such as black, cyan, yellow, and magenta.
In the present description, the term "cartridge" is intended to mean
any such device for storing liquid ink and for printing drops of the
ink to media. Also, the cartridges may be connected to remote sources
of ink that supplement the ink supply that is stored in each
cartridge.

For the purposes of this description, reference often will be made
primarily to one cartridge C1, with the understanding that, unless
otherwise stated, the particulars of the preferred embodiment
(temperature sensing etc) also apply to the other cartridge C2.

As illustrated in the block diagram of FIG. 2, the pertinent aspects
of a printer system for carrying out the present invention includes a
printer controller 40 that comprises a microprocessor 42 (and
associated conventional clock, registers, etc.) and memory 44. In this
embodiment, a computer 50 is connected to the printer and includes at
least a central processing unit 52, printer driver 54, and monitor 56.
Print data corresponding to an image to be printed is transmitted from
the computer 50 to the printer controller 40 in conventional fashion.
The microprocessor 42 processes the print data to produce raster data
that is stored in the printer memory 44.

The print data is transferred to printhead drivers 60 in segments for
conversion to current pulses that selectively drive the resistors in
the printheads to eject ink drops in accord with the print data. In
addition, the microprocessor 42 of the print controller drives a
carriage motor 62, and the ink drop ejection from the printhead
nozzles is coordinated with the scanning motion of the cartridges
across the swath 25.

In accordance with the present invention, each cartridge C1, C2 is
provided with a memory chip 66 that is preferably integrated on the
printhead. In one preferred embodiment, the memory chip includes
non-volatile RAM (NVRAM) and thus includes an EEPROM that may be read
and written to by the printer controller 40 as described more below.

Each cartridge memory chip 66 includes factory-recorded information,
such as cartridge type (model and/or ink color), weight of ink (i.e.,
for a new, full cartridge), date of manufacture, out-gassing or vapor
transmission rate, average ink drop weight when the printhead is new,
and a table or mathematical function that shows expected drop weight
changes over the life of the printhead. Part of the memory chip 66 has
two 8-bit counters for storing with the cartridge the changing ink
level data, as described more below.

The printer memory 44 includes firmware or ROM that stores tables or
mathematical functions relating, for a particular type of printhead,
variations in drop weight to changes in printhead temperature, and
relating variations in drop weight to changes in printing frequency.
The printhead type is read by the controller 40 from the memory chip
66 of an installed cartridge. Other information stored in the printer
memory may include, for various printhead types, the temperature set
point that is considered to be the normal operating temperature for
the printhead.

It will be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art that much
of the information stored in the printhead memory chip 66 can
alternatively be stored in the printer memory 44, or vice versa. At
least the printhead type is factory-recorded into the memory chip 66,
however, so that the printer controller can recognize the printhead
type once the cartridge is installed in the printer and thereafter
obtain from printer memory any of the above-summarized information
that is not otherwise carried in the memory chip.

Before turning to a detailed description of the preferred method of
the present invention, reference is made to FIG. 3, which is a graph
illustrating for one type (color) of ink empirically derived
relationships between printing frequency and ink drop weight, and
between printhead temperature and drop weight.

The plotted set of four lines in the upper part of the graph show, for
four different printhead temperatures, how ink drop weight varies for
a given average printing frequency. Thus, at a printing frequency of
10,000 Hz, the average drop weight of this ink will vary from about
4.2 nanograms (ng) if the printhead temperature is 40.degree. C. to
about 5.6 nanograms if the printhead temperature is 65.degree. C. The
lowest plotted curve dW/dT represents this variation in terms of
temperature. Thus, at the 10,000 Hz printing frequency, this ink drop
weight will change by about 0.057 ng for every one degree variation
from a set point temperature, which for this example is 45.degree. C.

Considering the upper four plotted lines along the length of the
graph's abscissa, one can see that above about 10,000 Hz printing
frequency the average drop weight for this ink gradually reduces as
the frequency increases. One can also note that at the high end of the
frequency range the four drop-weight curves converge such that the
effects of temperature differences are minimized.

The just discussed empirically derived relationships between printing
frequency and drop weight, and between printhead temperature and drop
weight, for all ink and printhead types, are preferably reduced to
look-up tables in the printer memory 44 and referred to in carrying
out the method described next.

In accordance with the present invention, ink level gauging of the
cartridges is carried out generally using the "drop count" approach
mentioned above, while making more precise the relationship between
the expelled-drop count and the weight of ink actually expelled. As
one aspect of this precision enhancement, a swath is divided (for
purposes of this method) into a number of intervals. Drop weight
estimates are made for the drops ejected in each interval using
temperature and printing frequency data pertaining to each interval.
The estimates for each interval are summed for the entire swath to
arrive at the overall weight of ink ejected from the print cartridge
to the swath. The stored record of the remaining ink in the cartridge
is then updated to reflect the depletion of ink and, when appropriate,
a low-on-ink or out-of-ink signal is generated for display to the
user.

With reference to the flow chart of FIGS. 4a and 4b, the routine or
method carried out under the control of the print controller 40 is
designated "Update Ink Level Gauge" 100. The routine is normally
carried out once a swath is completely printed, although it can be
called at other times as needed.

A first step 102 of the routine is to update ink level counters to
reflect evaporation loss. Depending on the characteristics of the
cartridge container (its vapor transmission rate) and other factors,
such as the humidity and temperature of the operating environment,
this step may be optional. Preferably, however, this update is
undertaken occasionally, such as once a day or once a week. The number
of days since the last such update (stored in printer memory 44 or
memory chip 66) is multiplied by a characteristic evaporation rate for
the printhead (read from the memory chip 66 for example) to arrive at
an amount of ink (measured in units of weight such as nanograms) lost
from evaporation. A temperature sensor in the printhead (described
below) is consulted while the printhead is not operating (and cooled
to ambient) to provide a signal representing the ambient temperature
for use in the evaporation-loss calculation.

As noted, part of the memory chip 66 is reserved for two 8-bit
counters for storing with the cartridge the changing ink level
information. In a preferred embodiment, the 8 bits of one counter are
calibrated for use as 8 increments or "ticks" of a course ink-level
gauge. For example, for a cartridge that holds 28 grams of ink
("filled weight"), the calibration of the course counter would be 28/8
or 3.5 grams per tick of the counter.

A fine-calibrated 8-bit counter in the memory chip 66 is calibrated by
dividing the filled weight by the number of counter ticks (2.sup.8).
In the 28-gram filled-weight example, this counter would be calibrated
to 28/(2.sup.8) grams per tick.

Another counter is preferably employed in the printer memory 44 and
calibrated for ultra-fine recording of changes in the ink level (i.e.,
weight). In this regard, a 32 bit ultra-fine counter is calibrated by
dividing the filled weight by the number of counter ticks (2.sup.32).
In the 28-gram filled-weight example, this counter would be calibrated
to 28/(2.sup.32) grams per tick.

The counters can be configured to count down from filled-weight values
or count up to record the amount of depleted ink (which is then
subtracted from the filled-weight amount to arrive at a remaining ink
amount or "level." In either case, whenever the ink level gauge (i.e.,
the content of the counters) is to be updated as called for by the
present invention, the ultra-fine counter is provided with the product
of the change in ink weight and the weight-per-tick calibration of
that counter. Each time the ultra-fine counter rolls over, the fine
counter is ticked, and each time the fine counter rolls over the
course counter is ticked.

Upon completion of any ink-level update step, the controller
microprocessor 42 checks the contents of these ink level counters,
compares the counter values with low-ink warning trigger levels, and
presents the result to the user by, for example changing a
multi-bar-type ink level gauge display 76 associated with the printer
system.

It is noteworthy here that ink level tracking is carried out for each
cartridge, and in the case of a color cartridge, such as cartridge C2,
the level of each ink color is also tracked in accordance with the
present invention. The printer memory includes an ultra-fine counter
for each cartridge's supply of ink. Also, the locations and
configurations of the above-described counters for recording these ink
levels are described in terms of a preferred embodiment, although it
is contemplated that any of a number of means can be employed for
recording and maintaining the changes in ink levels.

Returning to FIGS. 4a-b, the illustrated steps 104, 106, and 108 of
that figure concern the process of updating and average drop weight
value that is assigned to each printhead upon manufacture and is
preferably recorded in the printer memory 44 or in the memory chip 66
associated with that printhead. This average drop weight,
DW.sub.PHLIFE is an empirically derived value of the weight (for
example, 5 ng) of an average drop of the ink in a given cartridge when
fired at a given temperature (say, 45.degree. C.) and at a given
printing frequency (say, 10,000 Hz). The average drop weight, however,
varies over the life of a printhead. That is, a printhead has a useful
life that may be measured in tens of millions of ejected drops and,
with other factors being equal, the average drop weight tends to
increase during the life of the printhead.

In one preferred embodiment, the variation in drop weight attributable
to the use of the printhead is reduced to a look-up table that is
consulted by the printer controller each time a new power cycle to the
printer is initiated (step 104) or when a new cartridge is installed
(step 106). The printer memory 44 or printhead memory chip 66 carries
this table as well as a count of the total number of drops fired from
the printhead under consideration. The average drop weight
DW.sub.PHLIFE is then updated 108 (or merely retrieved 110 from memory
when updating is not called for).

The average drop weight DW.sub.PHLIFE is also adjusted for temperature
and printing frequency variations and employed in the calculation to
determine the weight of ink ejected from the cartridge as described
below. Preferably, this calculation is performed, and the ink level
counters (the counters hereafter sometimes collectively referred to as
the "ink level gauge," for convenience) are updated after every swath
is printed.

In accordance with the present invention, the print swath 25 (FIG. 1)
is divided into a number of intervals. Ink weight estimates are made
for the drops ejected in each interval using temperature and printing
frequency data pertaining to each interval. This swath intervals
approach provides a precise estimate of the weight of the ink expelled
in the entire swath.

A number of swath intervals are defined (step 112). In a preferred
embodiment where, for example, the print media is A4 sized paper, six
equal-width intervals may be defined, as illustrated in FIG. 1. The
intervals, designated "n" through "n-5," each have the same length
"d."

Alternatively, the number of swath intervals could be selected in a
manner that results in the highest average interval drop density
considering all of the intervals in the swath. To this end, the print
data could be scrutinized just before the swath is to be printed. A
number of different-sized intervals would be tried, and after each
trial the resulting average print density is determined. The interval
number trial that provided the greatest average print density is then
selected as the interval size.

It is noteworthy here that although the interval size or width "d" is
described as parallel to the carriage direction 34, it is contemplated
that the swath could also be divided into intervals across its width
perpendicular to dimension line 32, or both. In the preferred
embodiment of this invention, a predetermined number of uniform
intervals are used.

As noted, the ejected-drops weight estimates are made for the drops
ejected in each interval (step 114) and later summed for the swath.
Thus, the number of ejected drops are "counted" for each interval "n"
(step 116). That is, the printer controller 40 includes drop counters
72, 74 for maintaining count of the drops fired from respective
cartridges C1, C2. The drop counters 72, 74 do not actually count ink
drops. Rather, the microprocessor 42 directs to these counters a
stream of input pulses corresponding to the current pulses produced
for firing the printhead resistors. Since one current pulse to the
resistor produces one fired drop, the input to the drop counters
matches the number of drops actually fired. The variable DOT.sub.n
represents the number of drops fired for an interval.

The average printing frequency for each interval is also determined to
permit calculation of a factor for adjusting the average drop weight
to reflect the above-described variations in drop weight with
variations in printing frequency. This printing frequency PFREQ is
calculated as:

PFREQ=DOT.sub.n /(#NOZMAX*t.sub.d)

where #NOZMAX is the maximum number of nozzles extending across the
width of the swath ("swath width nozzles") and t.sub.d is the quotient
of the interval length "d" and velocity "V" of the carriage 20 as it
traverses the interval.

Once the printing frequency is determined for that interval, a look-up
table in the printer memory 44 is consulted to determine how the
average drop weight DW.sub.PHLIFE is to be adjusted to account for the
difference between a set point frequency for which the average drop
weight was originally determined and the actual printing frequency
just calculated for that interval. This adjustment is designated as a
frequency factor and assigned variable dW.sub.FREQ (step 118).

The average printhead temperature for each interval is also determined
for use in calculating the factor for adjusting the average drop
weight to reflect the above-described variations in drop weight with
variations in printhead temperature. This average temperature is
determined by the use of a temperature sensor 70 (see FIG. 2) that is
carried on the printhead. Any of a number of temperature sensors can
be used.

In one preferred embodiment, the sensor 70 is a thermal sense resistor
having a resistance that increases with temperature. The thermal sense
resistor is deposited on the printhead in the vicinity of the firing
resistors. The thermal sense resistor is intermittently connected with
a current source, and its resistance, gain adjusted, is measured by
the controller 40 and converted to a corresponding printhead
temperature. Preferably, the analog signal proportional to the
resistance of the thermal sense resistor 70 is converted to a digital
signal by an analog-to-digital converter that is also carried on the
printhead.

The temperature is sampled several times during the printing of the
interval and then averaged. This average temperature value is then
used to reference a look-up table in the controller memory 44 to
determine how the average drop weight DW.sub.PHLIFE is to be adjusted
to account for the difference between the set point temperature for
which the average drop weight was originally determined and the actual
temperature just sensed for that interval. This adjustment is
designated a temperature factor and assigned variable dW.sub.TEMP
(step 120).

The average drop weight DW.sub.INT for each interval is then
determined (steps 122, 124). This calculation can be expressed as:

DW.sub.INT =DOT.sub.N (DW.sub.PHLIFE +dW.sub.FREQ +dW.sub.TEMP).

It will be appreciated that by merely multiplying the number of fired
drops by an average drop weight will yield a "gross" weight of ink
ejected. The average drop weight DW.sub.INT calculated above
represents a refinement or "net" weight of ejected ink that accounts
for the frequency, temperature, and printhead life factors as
discussed earlier.

The average drop weight for the entire swath is then determined as the
sum of these values DW.sub.INT for all intervals (step 126). The ink
level counters (gauge) are then updated as described above (step 128).
The resulting ink level amount is displayed to the user via display 76
(FIG. 2).

In the event that any low-ink triggers or thresholds are crossed when
the ink level is updated (step 130), the gauge display is supplemented
with suitable visual and/or audible warnings that are produced by the
controller 40 (step 132). If an out-of-ink condition is reached,
printing is halted and the cartridge "limps home," as discussed above,
printing its reserve ink to complete the page or swath and reach a
service station in the printer.

With the enhanced accuracy provided by the ink level gauging of the
present invention, a printing system may accurately predict for a user
how many more pages may be printed for a given supply. To this end,
the printer controller records or otherwise statistically determines
the average ink usage per page. This information is compared with
(divided by) the ink level data in the updated counters to obtain an
estimate the number of pages that can be printed before changing the
present supply. This estimate is provided to the user as another
component of the ink level gauge display 76.

Having here described preferred embodiments of the present invention,
it is anticipated that suitable modifications may be made thereto by
individuals skilled in the art within the scope of the invention. For
example, it is contemplated that any of a number of ways could be used
to quantify the temperature or printing frequency factors described
above. Thus, it is intended that the term "factor" means any value
determined by any technique for the purpose of adjusting the average
drop weight to account for changes due to printhead temperature
fluctuations or to firing frequency changes.

The present algorithm would also be called upon when non-printing ink
ejection occurs, such as when ink is fired from the printhead to clear
nozzles while the cartridge is in the printer service station. Also,
the method could be employed with piezoelectric type printheads.
Moreover, it is contemplated that the printer system discussed above
could be part of a facsimile machine, plotter, or any other inkjet
recording device.

Thus, although preferred and alternative embodiments of the present
invention have been described, it will be appreciated by one of
ordinary skill in this art that the spirit and scope of the invention
is not limited to those embodiments, but extend to the various
modifications and equivalents as defined in the appended claims.

* * * * *
0
10/4/2004 5:34:32 AM
"Martin Mickston" <mixatonia@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:f2d9c659.0410032012.3d610680@posting.google.com...
> Hi Bob Headrick,
>  What did I do wrong when I replaced my HP14 c5010d ink cartridge?
>  I still get the message:
>  "Supply expired. Replace color ink cartridge. Press enter to continue."

Sounds like you have an expired ink supply. See: 
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpa02075&dlc=en&lang=en 
and 
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpa02074
>
> 0. Long ago, I set my HP Office Jet d145 printer to stop counting
>   pages printed [snip]

Sounds like your first problem.  The D145 uses seperate printheads; if you 
disable the low on ink indicators you are at risk of getting air in the 
"plumbing" or damaging the printheads.

> 2. Based on instructions in comp.periphs.printers, I purchased
>   THREE new HP14 23ml hp5010d color cartridges giving me a
>   total of four HP #14 color ink cartridges, [snip]

Second problem.  Someone gave advice based on a different printing system which 
had nothing to do with the D series.

>   Note: The actual date on the cartridge is 2004/09/10,

Third problem.  Generally the date on the cartrdige is the end of the warranty 
for the cartrdige.  If you bought cartridges with a date of 2004/09/10 they are 
well beyond the point a reputable retailer should offer them for sale.  See: 
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bua02014

> 3. THREE TIMES, I turned on the Hewlett Packard Office Jet d145
>   printer; flipped the top open; removed the prior HP 14 cartridge;
>   installed the next HP14 cartridge; closed the top; then pressed
>   "Enter" to print the obligatory alignment marks; and then
>   shut down the HP OJ d145 printer.

Fourth problem - you have now opened these cartrdiges and put them in a 
printer, starting the "in printer life" time for each.  They will not likely 
expire in 2.5 years as the pritner will assume they were put into service. 
Additionally, now that the ink supplies have been opened they are at risk of 
drying out prematurely.

>   Note: I ran step 3 above THREE times; yet, when I placed the
>         refilled first (of four) HP14 color ink cartridges back
>         into the HP OfficeJet d145 printer, the LCD display still
>         reports: "Supply expired. Replace color ink cartridge."

Not surprising.

> QUESTION:
>   I have FOUR HP14 color ink cartridges (one of which had been in the
>   printer for a contiguous 2.5 years). What did I do wrong?
>   Why didn't adding THREE separate new cartridges erase the memory
>   of the original 2.5-years contiguous service cartridge serial number?

Because the D series does not have a memory in the printer of only the last two 
cartridges, after which it "forgets" and defaults to thinking a cartridge is 
new.  There is a lot of misinformation in Usenet, where some folks speak with 
authority on items that they are uninformed or misinformed.

For your usage you probably bought the wrong printer, and would probably be 
happier with a printer with integrated printheads that you can inexpensively 
discard when they are beyond their service life.  Using unknown inks in a 
system with permanent or semi-permanent printheads puts you at risk of 
expensive printhead damage.

I really do not have more to add to this thread or the "8 days..." thread, and 
will not further respond in these threads.

- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP



0
bobh (178)
10/6/2004 2:33:19 AM
Bob Headrick wrote:
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpa02075&dlc=en&lang=en

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpa02074
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bua02014

Orak Listalavostok wrote:
> The unexplained HP engineering is why did three HP14 c5010a ink
> tanks (all of which were placed in service on the same date with
> all but one of which were immediately removed from service) report
> "COLOR INK OUT" (even when 2 of the 3 were full of HP OEM ink!)?

.... twas the night before Christmas ... my HP ink level sank ...
.... not a printer was printing ... nary one of 3 tanks ...

The good news:
- We're back printing beautifully (better than before) scores of prints
- Using (strangely) the original HP14 c5010a tri-color cartridge
- Which previously exhibited the correct "COLOR INK OUT" message!

The bad news:
- I have no idea what particular event "cleared" the HP "memory"

The lessons learned:
- Switching the three cartridges Dec 24 had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
- Filling the one empty cartridge also had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
- Removing the CR2032 3V CMOS battery had no immediate efect ...

The day after:
- Yet, about 12 hours later (on Christmas day)
- The completely full cartridge was removed ...
- And then replaced with the original empty cartridge ...

And it printed without error!
After subsequent refilling ... the original PRINTER INK OUT HP14
tri-color ink cartridge is printing beautifully vibrant photos even
after scores of sheets of paper (and multiple refills).

I guess it's the first Christmas present from HP to all of us.
I can't explain it; if you can - please do!

Orak Listalavostok

0
oraklistal (35)
12/26/2004 8:11:45 AM
My guess is that the CMOS battery has to be out for some time for a 
capacitor to discharge enough for the CMOS to clear properly.


"Orak Listalavostok" <oraklistal@yahoo.com> wrote in message 
news:1104048705.151458.249330@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Bob Headrick wrote:
> http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpa02075&dlc=en&lang=en
>
> http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpa02074
> http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bua02014
>
> Orak Listalavostok wrote:
>> The unexplained HP engineering is why did three HP14 c5010a ink
>> tanks (all of which were placed in service on the same date with
>> all but one of which were immediately removed from service) report
>> "COLOR INK OUT" (even when 2 of the 3 were full of HP OEM ink!)?
>
> ... twas the night before Christmas ... my HP ink level sank ...
> ... not a printer was printing ... nary one of 3 tanks ...
>
> The good news:
> - We're back printing beautifully (better than before) scores of prints
> - Using (strangely) the original HP14 c5010a tri-color cartridge
> - Which previously exhibited the correct "COLOR INK OUT" message!
>
> The bad news:
> - I have no idea what particular event "cleared" the HP "memory"
>
> The lessons learned:
> - Switching the three cartridges Dec 24 had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
> - Filling the one empty cartridge also had no effect on COLOR INK OUT
> - Removing the CR2032 3V CMOS battery had no immediate efect ...
>
> The day after:
> - Yet, about 12 hours later (on Christmas day)
> - The completely full cartridge was removed ...
> - And then replaced with the original empty cartridge ...
>
> And it printed without error!
> After subsequent refilling ... the original PRINTER INK OUT HP14
> tri-color ink cartridge is printing beautifully vibrant photos even
> after scores of sheets of paper (and multiple refills).
>
> I guess it's the first Christmas present from HP to all of us.
> I can't explain it; if you can - please do!
>
> Orak Listalavostok
> 


0
SteveB
12/26/2004 4:38:16 PM
In article <19-dnTxRrI1TdVPcRVn-vg@nildram.net>, SteveB wrote:
>My guess is that the CMOS battery has to be out for some time for a 
>capacitor to discharge enough for the CMOS to clear properly.

  Try this (with power off):  Short together the connections to the CMOS 
battery.  Computer motherboards often have a place to put on a jumper 
for doing this in case you added a password into your CMOS settings and 
forgot the password.

 - Don Klipstein (don@misty.com)
0
don259 (41)
12/27/2004 7:04:24 AM
In message <slrncsvcvo.bu1.don@manx.misty.com>, Don Klipstein 
<don@manx.misty.com> writes
>In article <19-dnTxRrI1TdVPcRVn-vg@nildram.net>, SteveB wrote:
>>My guess is that the CMOS battery has to be out for some time for a
>>capacitor to discharge enough for the CMOS to clear properly.
>
>  Try this (with power off):  Short together the connections to the CMOS
>battery.

Is this really a good idea ??


>  Computer motherboards often have a place to put on a jumper
>for doing this in case you added a password into your CMOS settings and
>forgot the password.

I thought they shorted the power pins of the CMOS chip which was 
supplied from the battery via a resistor ?


J/.
-- 
John Beardmore
0
wookie6 (27)
12/27/2004 9:16:14 AM
In article <slrncsvcvo.bu1.don@manx.misty.com>,
Don Klipstein <don@manx.misty.com> wrote:
>In article <19-dnTxRrI1TdVPcRVn-vg@nildram.net>, SteveB wrote:
>>My guess is that the CMOS battery has to be out for some time for a 
>>capacitor to discharge enough for the CMOS to clear properly.

>  Try this (with power off):

    Unplug power cable
    Remove CMOS battery

>                              Short together the connections to the CMOS 
>battery.  Computer motherboards often have a place to put on a jumper 
>for doing this in case you added a password into your CMOS settings and 
>forgot the password.

I think you left out a couple of steps there, Don.


Gary

-- 
Gary Heston  gheston@hiwaay.net 

"Sept. 11, 2001, already a day of immeasurable tragedy, cannot be
the day liberty perished in this country." Judge Gerald Tjoflat
0
gheston (73)
12/27/2004 4:09:00 PM
The idea of shorting the battery also put me on guard.  I believe your 
explanation is correct.

Art

John Beardmore wrote:

> In message <slrncsvcvo.bu1.don@manx.misty.com>, Don Klipstein 
> <don@manx.misty.com> writes
> 
>> In article <19-dnTxRrI1TdVPcRVn-vg@nildram.net>, SteveB wrote:
>>
>>> My guess is that the CMOS battery has to be out for some time for a
>>> capacitor to discharge enough for the CMOS to clear properly.
>>
>>
>>  Try this (with power off):  Short together the connections to the CMOS
>> battery.
> 
> 
> Is this really a good idea ??
> 
> 
>>  Computer motherboards often have a place to put on a jumper
>> for doing this in case you added a password into your CMOS settings and
>> forgot the password.
> 
> 
> I thought they shorted the power pins of the CMOS chip which was 
> supplied from the battery via a resistor ?
> 
> 
> J/.

0
artistic (9)
12/28/2004 1:50:52 PM
Reply:

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Hello My company is preparing to replace all our Dell SX270 SmallFormFactors. Because we use HP Proliant Servers I thought it would be a good idea to replace the Dell=92s with HP UltraSlim and/or SFF. Thus I started to look at current models, used models, refurbished models to get a feel on what HP offered new and old. I ended up reasonably confused. I have HP, HP Compaq, Proliant, Pavillion and so forth. To list a few I have HP DC7800, DC7900, HP 6200, HP Compaq 8200-8300 Elite, HP z220, HP Compaq 4000 and so forth. At least with Dell one can buy a SFF in one purchase area. With Hp the sales are generously scattered from one HP site to another HP site. I have no idea is HP and HP Compaq is one company? What I need to know so I can present to management should we consider buying be it used, refurbished, new for our business workstations HP or HP Compaq. I have studied the specs on all models and I see the progressive evolution. Xp to Vista to Windows 7 32 bit to 64 bit. The intel core, memory, sata drives. Let me know your thoughts. Thanks In article <2b0098dd-8393-4021-a90d-2a2d602ca84e@ih1g2000pbc.googlegroups.com>, Chuck McReynolds <ambcsc.archives@gmail.com> wrote: > I have no idea is HP and HP Compaq is one company? Compaq is a brand held by HP these days. -- May joy be yours all the days of your life! - Phina We are but a moment's sunlight, fading in the grass. - The Youngbloods Those who eat natural foods die...

FC3 : HP Printer Drivers For HP PSC 1610
Hi people , I have recently purchased a HP PSC-1610 all in one printer , scanner and copier and I have it installed on my Win 98 box and it works good. I also have a FC3 box connected to the Win 98 box and I want to use the HP printer from the FC3 as a networked printer and I am unsure about which driver to install on the FC3 box. The two drivers that I have downloaded are HPIJS HPLIP From the Linux Printing web page http://www.linuxprinting.org/ it says that the HPIJS is the one to use for basic printing functionality and the HPLIP is the driver for full functionality , IE ...

Win $6000 in HP Hardware, The HP Magic GiveAway contest
My website was selected in the 50's best blogs by HP and I am giving away a lot of HP products for just one person (spreading the HP magic): More info and the contest link http://erwin.ried.cl/?modo=visor&elemento=255 (sorry, is in spanish but you can use google translator) Official info about this Magic Giveaway: http://www.hp.com/go/winhpmagic2 "Avatar_e" <erwinried@gmail.com> wrote: > My website was selected in the 50's best blogs by HP and I am giving > away a lot of HP products for just one person (spreading the HP > magic): > > More info and...

Web resources about - Various HP printer ink expiration dates analyzed - comp.sys.hp.hardware

Expiration (options) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In finance, the expiration date of an option contract is the last date on which the holder of the option may exercise it according to its terms. ...

Facebook Sends Notifications To Users With Claimed Offers That Are Near Expiration
The tweaks to Facebook offers continue, with some users seeing notifications alerting them that offers they have claimed will expire soon. continued… ...

Fresh Pantry - Food Expiration Date List on the App Store on iTunes
Get Fresh Pantry - Food Expiration Date List on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.

netflix expiration - Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Explore catastrophegirl's photos on Flickr. catastrophegirl has uploaded 7090 photos to Flickr.

Expiration Date - YouTube
Engineer and Medic make an unsettling new discovery while experimenting with the teleporter. Meanwhile, Scout stops insulting Spy long enough ...

Critics pan Terminator: Genisys in first reviews as 'past its expiration date'
Terminator fans have had high hopes for the latest, fifth instalment in the science-fiction franchise. But now the early reviews of T5 are flowing ...

A good time to go: Baird leaves before election expiration
Baird did what a lot of his colleagues should do. He called his own retirement play.

Expiration date for CNOOC acquisition of Nexen postponed
Expiration date for CNOOC acquisition of Nexen postponed People's Daily Online Expiration date for CNOOC acquisition of Nexen postponed. ( ...

How key-based cache expiration works
... structures, like the one we’re using for Basecamp Next . Thankfully there’s a better way. A much better way. It’s called key-based cache expiration ...

OnePlus X pricing seemingly leaks as OnePlus 2 invite expiration is extended
OnePlus' next handset has been the subject of many a post in recent days and weeks. Dubbed the OnePlus X, one of the only things we've been unclear ...

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