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PC Gaming Almost Dead -AGAIN- So................ PC Industry Consortium to announce 'PC Gaming Alliance' to save PC gaming

Takahashi: Gaming Alliance stumps for PC
By Dean Takahashi
Mercury News
 02/12/2008

The personal computer game industry has trailed behind its console
brethren in recent years as easy-to-play games on the Nintendo Wii or
online games on the Xbox 360 have stolen the excitement.

Companies with a vested interest in keeping the PC alive as a gaming
platform will soon announce a consortium dubbed the PC Gaming
Alliance. According to two people familiar with the effort, it will
include top industry players such as Intel, Microsoft, Nvidia and
Advanced Micro Devices as well as a number of computer companies.

I hope they succeed. Gamers need a strong gaming industry for the PC
because it delivers new gaming technologies to the market faster than
consoles, which are refreshed every five years or so. And the PC
industry needs gaming to keep it as a leading technology platform for
the future.

The companies are preparing the announcement in advance of next week's
Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. Part of the pitch is that
the industry group will keep the PC competitive with game consoles to
attract key game developers.

On the surface, things look grim for the PC. The market researcher NPD
Group quietly reported that PC game sales in 2000 were $910.7 million,
down 6 percent from a year earlier.

But behind those numbers lie the great hope of the PC industry. The
numbers don't include ad revenue associated with online gaming Web
sites, which offer "casual" games such as Poker or Scrabble to a wider
set of game players.

They also don't include revenue from monthly subscriptions to virtual
worlds known as "massively multiplayer online" games, or MMOs. Those
games include World of Warcraft, which has 10 million subscribers
worldwide, and are big hits in countries such as China and South
Korea. And the NPD numbers don't include digital distribution, or
sales of games downloaded to computers directly from Web sites such as
Valve's Steam.

"We believe that the PC gaming industry is strong when you look at
everything together," said Mike Morhaime, president of Blizzard
Entertainment, the publisher of the hottest selling PC game, World of
Warcraft, during the DICE Summit game conference in Las Vegas last
week.

NPD itself has begun tracking subscriptions to MMOs. The industry
consortium will focus on fixing problems that make the PC a less
desirable platform than consoles for playing games. Gamers, for
instance, never really know whether a game will run well on their
computers until they buy the game and install it on their machines at
home.

Microsoft, Intel and other players have been working on these
problems, namely with Microsoft's Games for Windows program launched
last year. But the consortium will coordinate and expand those efforts
to improve the experience of playing games on computers.

http://www.mercurynews.com/columns/ci_8238036
0
AirRaidJet (109)
2/12/2008 7:01:44 PM
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I have a good suggestion. Include in the OS, a certificate
enforcement that certifies a PC game as meeting sales
standards that anyone would agree to. Require any game
to complete inspection by a Certification Board which can
issue the Game Certification license:

1. The game is not an unfinished Beta like Gothic 3.
2. The game will assess its ability to run on the box
    where it is installed, and will adjust its settings
    accordingly ... or else, simply refuse to run on a
    substandard PC ... and refer the user to appropriate
    hardware. All games like this will have downloadable
    programs that can assess the PC before the game
    is purchased.
3. The game is not a piece of immoral garbage written
    by goons and idiots who have no sense of responsibility
    for what is accessed by children. Violation of these
    age-group standards should be a Federal Crime.
4. The game has no commercial trojans embedded in it.
5. The game is primarily stand-alone, and does not
    require MMO software of any kind. Online gaming
    which uses that game should be optional and access
    should be monitored for age-group violations.
6. The game has "artistic" value as judged by a jury
    of normal-thinking people who are not gamers.

johns
0
johns321 (699)
2/12/2008 7:44:05 PM
On Feb 12, 2:44 pm, johns <johns...@moscow.com> wrote:
> I have a good suggestion. Include in the OS, a certificate
> enforcement that certifies a PC game as meeting sales
> standards that anyone would agree to.

(criterion snipped)

The problem the PC now has is, once a genre is effectively done on a
console, it usually shows up with ever decreasing frequency on the
PC.  Consoles provide people less gaming headaches.  And these
headaches replace the high tech geek superiority that hardcore PC
gamers talk about.  Such gamers boast of the resolution and how fast
their CPU is.  Most normal people don't care at all about such things.

- Rich
0
2/12/2008 7:52:09 PM
I'll probably move to a console once the thing is
stable, and the games begin to mature. Right
now, I detest that kid stuff that is on the consoles.
I'll be interested in seeing Gothic 4 which
is coming to the consoles at the same time it
is coming to the PC. If G4 is anywhere near as
good as G3, and the environ holds up on a
console, I'll jump ship for sure, and have 2 game
machines sitting on my computer table. Frankly
I consider a console to be a add-on to my PC
anyway.

johns
0
johns321 (699)
2/12/2008 10:54:10 PM
On Feb 12, 4:54=A0pm, johns <johns...@moscow.com> wrote:
> I'll probably move to a console once the thing is
> stable, and the games begin to mature. Right
> now, I detest that kid stuff that is on the consoles.
> I'll be interested in seeing Gothic 4 which
> is coming to the consoles at the same time it
> is coming to the PC. If G4 is anywhere near as
> good as G3, and the environ holds up on a
> console, I'll jump ship for sure, and have 2 game
> machines sitting on my computer table. Frankly
> I consider a console to be a add-on to my PC
> anyway.
>
> johns

I have a good PC system, Q6600, 4Gb, 8800GTS, I play Wolfenstein ET
and Battlefield 2 with it, but it's mainly a PC that I just put a good
video card in, the gaming is an extra.

I have multiple consoles, JVC Xeye, 32X, Jaguar/CD, and 2 Xboxes
(original) I have no interest in the Wii, too kiddy, lame graphics.
The 360 sort of, but now with 3 HDTV's in the house, the PS3 looks the
most interesting to me, especially now that HD-DVD is about dead. No,
I'm not bashing the 360 or HD-DVD, just stating the obvious. I
actually prefer HD-DVD over BluRay only because I'm anti Sony, but
that won't stop me from buying a PS3 and BluRay discs now, well
probably sometime soon.

You can enjoy both consoles and PC games, there is room for
everything. I think some of the new games that let people play head to
head on the internet with a Console vs a PC, etc will help to keep
consoles and PC gamers going strong.
0
2/13/2008 2:17:21 AM
On Tue, 12 Feb 2008 11:44:05 -0800 (PST), johns <johns321@moscow.com>
wrote:

>I have a good suggestion. Include in the OS, a certificate
>enforcement that certifies a PC game as meeting sales
>standards that anyone would agree to. Require any game
>to complete inspection by a Certification Board which can
>issue the Game Certification license:

Including freeware and shareware games? I assume game makers would
have to pay for that "certificate enforcement" body some money for
checking their game?

Sorry, but that would effectively kill PC gaming. Games for
Windows-initiative is a good thing, but it should not be compulsory.

A couple of things that have always kept and are still keeping PC
gaming alive:

- As long as people are using PCs for work, studying, web surfing
etc., many of them also want to play something on them. Sometimes they
are happy with Minesweeper, sometimes they want something more and are
even ready to pay for it.

- As there are no licence fees and "certificate enforcement bodies"
that decide which games can be released for the system like there are
on consoles, there is a much lower limen for new developers to start
developing PC games compared to console games. Console companies have
tried to change this by introducing "developer's kits" also for home
users and competitions for console freeware games etc., but it will
never match the amount of people learning game development for PC as a
hobby.

Consoles come and go, and so do their development kits and any "indie
game communities" associated with them. Anyone still developing
anything for Playstation with Net Yaroze? ;)

PC gaming will not really die until people stop using PCs.

0
riku (849)
2/13/2008 9:40:52 AM
On Feb 12, 5:54 pm, johns <johns...@moscow.com> wrote:
> I'll probably move to a console once the thing is
> stable, and the games begin to mature. Right
> now, I detest that kid stuff that is on the consoles.
> I'll be interested in seeing Gothic 4 which
> is coming to the consoles at the same time it
> is coming to the PC. If G4 is anywhere near as
> good as G3, and the environ holds up on a
> console, I'll jump ship for sure, and have 2 game
> machines sitting on my computer table. Frankly
> I consider a console to be a add-on to my PC
> anyway.
>
> johns

What "kid stuff" are you talking about? There is very little "kiddie
fare" on the Xbox 360 and the Playstation 3.
0
natlee75 (198)
2/13/2008 10:18:50 PM
Reply: