f



XGA208 with 832x624 Released

XGA208 or XGA206 Release 2008 for Windows 95/98/98SE adds a support for the
832x624 custom mode with 8/16-bpp at 72/75 Hz frame rates. This mode is also
available as a VESA mode to DOS applications under the redefined VESA modes
112h (832x624 8-bpp) and 113h (832x624 16-bpp).

Jan 18, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208.zip

832x624   72 Hz   46.5 kHz    45 Mhz PEL
832x624   75 Hz   49.1 kHz    48 Mhz PEL

75 Hz were achieved with slightly overclocking the card to 96 Mhz PEL rate
which is beyond the recommended 90 Mhz. Use this mode at you own risk.
Tests so far have indicated no any malfunction of the "blue chip" XGA-2.

Your XGA-2 monitor must support line rates of 46.5 kHz for 72 Hz resp. 49.1
kHz for 75 Hz 832x624 viewing pleasure.

As before, your eventual test reports will be appended to the history of the
driver.


0
UZnal
1/18/2008 12:33:37 PM
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> 832x624   72 Hz   46.5 kHz    45 Mhz PEL
> 832x624   75 Hz   49.1 kHz    48 Mhz PEL

To be precise, the 45/48 Mhz above are the 16-bit PEL rates. In terms of
dots, and a dot is 8 bits, the PEL (or Dot) rate becomes 90/96 Mhz. Register
Index 58 of the XGA-2 is programmed with the Dot rate, 90 or 96 Mhz in this
case. More correct would be then to state:

832x624   72 Hz   46.5 kHz    90 Mhz PEL Rate
832x624   75 Hz   49.1 kHz    96 Mhz PEL Rate

The Horizontal Total (HT) calculation uses the following corrected formula
not found in the techref:

HT = ROUND(  (PELRate * (8 / BitsPerPixel) ) / LineRate / 8 ) - 1

For 832x624 with 49.1 kHz line and 96 Mhz PEL rate we have:

HT = ROUND( ( 96000 * (8/16) ) / 49.1 / 8 ) - 1 = 121 = 79h

The XGA-2 starts counting from 0, so you have to subtract 1.


0
UZnal
1/18/2008 4:06:49 PM
Hi!

> XGA208 or XGA206 Release 2008 for Windows 95/98/98SE
> adds a support for the 832x624 custom mode with 8/16-bpp at
> 72/75 Hz frame rates.

Here is your first (public) test report. I set the new driver up on
"Defiant", a 9585-0XF. The XGA-2 in this system has a "whitecap" RAMDAC with
no heatsink.

The short story is that it works. My monitor claims a vertical refresh rate
of 76Hz instead of 75Hz. I selected 75. So far I have no noticed instability
from the XGA-2. The video image is very stable at both 8 and 16 bit color
depths.

William
--
Brought to you by an IBM PS/2 9585-0XF, "Defiant"
AMD 486-133/64MB/2GB S/N 23HN457


0
William
1/20/2008 8:34:31 PM
UZnal wrote:
> XGA208 or XGA206 Release 2008 for Windows 95/98/98SE adds a support for the
> 832x624 custom mode with 8/16-bpp at 72/75 Hz frame rates.
> 
> As before, your eventual test reports will be appended to the history of the
> driver.

Installation went without incident on the same Bermuda 77 platform as 
used for previous tests. Indeed, this computer likely has not been 
powered since the last round of testing. My Viewsonic VE170 flat panel 
did not like the new mode, but that was to be expected; flat panels are 
notoriously narrow-minded. I could not bring the horizontal size down to 
fit the monior @75 Hz.

A Sony 100GS Trinitron fared better, I was able to get a very reasonable 
picture with only slight nonlinearity at the edges @75 Hz. Screen paints 
in the AfterDark slideshow are quite snappy and look very nice. No sign 
of instability yet with the heatsinked XGA-2.

-Jim



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0
Jim
1/21/2008 3:49:48 AM
Jim Shorney wrote:

> No sign 
> of instability yet with the heatsinked XGA-2.

Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of 
operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not optimal.


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0
Jim
1/21/2008 3:56:17 AM
Hi Jim,
> Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of 
> operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not optimal.
     About 122 F for those of us being pulled kicking and screaming into 
metrics. Altough I like being weighed that way, I always feel a little 
chilly. And I always think I'm going way over the speed limit.
                      David
                      David@IBMMuseum.com 


0
David
1/21/2008 4:21:08 AM
My LCD wants 1440x900. Anything else is like liking LSD soaked 
stickers... The distortion is like cool.
0
Louis
1/21/2008 4:38:22 AM
> The short story is that it works. My monitor claims a vertical refresh
rate
> of 76Hz instead of 75Hz. I selected 75. So far I have no noticed
instability
> from the XGA-2. The video image is very stable at both 8 and 16 bit color
> depths.

Fine, but please take care to give the tested resolution and OS as well as
your subjective evaluation of the new mode. I appended your report to the
README and will wait for more test feedbacks before updating the download
package.

I let the blue chip XGA-2 in Mod. 77 run for about 6 hours, no any problems.



0
UZnal
1/21/2008 11:27:42 AM
> My LCD wants 1440x900. Anything else is like liking LSD soaked
> stickers... The distortion is like cool.

16 colors, perhaps interlaced, would drive it. How does an LCD respond to an
interlaced mode?


0
UZnal
1/21/2008 11:48:12 AM
> Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of
> operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not optimal.

Jim, can you measure with 800x600 at 75 Hz (45/90 Mhz PEL), that will give
us a number to compare?


0
UZnal
1/21/2008 12:14:10 PM
> Installation went without incident on the same Bermuda 77 platform as
> used for previous tests. Indeed, this computer likely has not been
> powered since the last round of testing. My Viewsonic VE170 flat panel
> did not like the new mode, but that was to be expected; flat panels are
> notoriously narrow-minded. I could not bring the horizontal size down to
> fit the monior @75 Hz.

I too had to correct the screen on the Eizo T56S. The horizontal lines were
too long, that indicates an overscan which can be eliminated with a lower
line rate. Eizo T56S easily allowed a nicely centered screen but I
understand that might not be possible with every monitor.

The Horizontal Total (HT) is on the limit but I can relax that and lower the
line rate to release a few cycles more. The exact timings are actually, as
William found out, for a 76 Hz frame rate. I will recalculate the mode
settings also for a 60 Hz refresh.

> A Sony 100GS Trinitron fared better, I was able to get a very reasonable
> picture with only slight nonlinearity at the edges @75 Hz. Screen paints
> in the AfterDark slideshow are quite snappy and look very nice. No sign
> of instability yet with the heatsinked XGA-2.

The mode must perform reasonably and equally well on a wide range of
monitors, so it is very important to have tests with different monitors. How
about the 72 Hz refresh, does the screen need any corrections?






0
UZnal
1/21/2008 3:31:39 PM
Maintenance Release

Added support for 832x624 at 60 Hz and lowered the line rate of the 75 Hz.

Jan 21, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208b.zip

832x624   60 Hz   39.3 kHz    41 Mhz PEL
832x624   72 Hz   46.5 kHz    45 Mhz PEL
832x624   75 Hz   48.5 kHz    48 Mhz PEL

Notice: A 60 Hz only implementation with a line rate of 39.2 kHz, intended
for LCD monitors, is in the file XGA2-60-392.VXD. Copy this file to XGA2.VXD
and only then install the driver if you are not able to select the refresh
rate or but want to test the 39.2 kHz line rate.

The zip file is suffixed with b (xga208b), i.e. maintenance B.

About XGA-208

XGA208 or XGA206 Release 2008 for Windows 95/98/98SE adds support for the
832x624 custom mode with 8/16-bpp at 60/72/75 Hz frame rates. This mode is
also available as a VESA mode to DOS applications under the redefined VESA
modes 112h (832x624 8-bpp) and 113h (832x624 16-bpp).




0
UZnal
1/21/2008 3:58:32 PM
> To be precise, the 45/48 Mhz above are the 16-bit PEL rates. In terms of
> dots, and a dot is 8 bits, the PEL (or Dot) rate becomes 90/96 Mhz.
Register
> Index 58 of the XGA-2 is programmed with the Dot rate, 90 or 96 Mhz in
this
> case.

For a mode setting where only the BPP changes, e.g. 800x600 with 8-bpp or
16-bpp, you *always program* the PEL rate of the 8-bpp and take care the
double PEL rate for 16-bpp not to exceed the 90 Mhz.


> The Horizontal Total (HT) calculation uses the following corrected formula
> not found in the techref:
>
> HT = ROUND(  (PELRate * (8 / BitsPerPixel) ) / LineRate / 8 ) - 1

Better use the formula below and keep in mind that at 16-bpp the XGA-2 will
internally double your PEL rate:

HT = ROUND( PELRate / LineRate / 8 ) - 1






0
UZnal
1/21/2008 4:15:34 PM
Hi!

> Fine, but please take care to give the tested resolution

832x624. I thought that was the only new resolution available? Did I
miss something? I used both the 72 and 75Hz vertical refresh modes.

Next up is the on-planar "ISA" XGA-2 that is on-planar in a 9533. I
expect it will work well there too. Your earlier enhanced driver works
fine on that system.

> and OS as well

Whoops. Windows 95 OSR 2.5.

> as your subjective evaluation of the new mode.

Hmm? I thought I did that already, in my earlier posting under this
thread?

The picture quality is great. I noticed no instability (vibrating,
dancing or otherwise misbehaving pixels) after running in the new mode
for several hours. My only complaint would be with my monitor, which
didn't have enough range in its adjustments to get every last bit of
the picture at 832x624 on the screen. I got nearly all of it to fit,
with only a very tiny slice of the right hand side being "cut off".

I had no problems during installation of the driver. I followed your
published instructions and it simply dropped into place immediately.

William
0
wm_walsh
1/21/2008 4:40:57 PM
Hi!

> 16 colors, perhaps interlaced, would drive it. How does an
> LCD respond to an interlaced mode?

Based on my tests, not at all well. A Samsung 15" SyncMaster and a
cheap AOC 17" panel both failed to sync up at all in "8514
mode" (1024x768, 43Hz interlaced).

If I remember correctly, the Samsung just flat out refused to come
online, complaining of an invalid signal. The AOC "tried" but couldn't
seem to "lock" onto the video signal. There were colored bars and
rolling lines on that screen.

William

0
wm_walsh
1/21/2008 4:43:45 PM
Hi!

> How about the 72 Hz refresh, does the screen need any
> corrections?

On the 72Hz mode, my monitor was much happier than with 75/76Hz.
Neither scan rate would allow me to get the whole image on the screen,
no matter how much I tweaked the controls.

I'm not sure what to make of this. My monitor is a very cheap
eMachines CRT, and I'm really impressed that it could sync up at all.

William
0
wm_walsh
1/21/2008 4:46:06 PM
Is there any pseudo hi-color modes that you can fake?

UZnal wrote:
>> My LCD wants 1440x900. Anything else is like liking LSD soaked
>> stickers... The distortion is like cool.
> 
> 16 colors, perhaps interlaced, would drive it. How does an LCD respond to an
> interlaced mode?
> 
> 
0
Louis
1/21/2008 8:04:29 PM
> Is there any pseudo hi-color modes that you can fake?

Some painting apps do that with color dithering patterns. The XGA-2 only
wants to know how many bits per pixel were requested, that is all.





0
UZnal
1/21/2008 10:14:21 PM
> On the 72Hz mode, my monitor was much happier than with 75/76Hz.
> Neither scan rate would allow me to get the whole image on the screen,
> no matter how much I tweaked the controls.

Try the B-release of today, it has more generous timings and gives 74.8 Hz.
I removed the 75/76 Hz timings. It makes no sense to squeeze every bit for a
Hz more.


> 832x624. I thought that was the only new resolution available? Did I
> miss something? I used both the 72 and 75Hz vertical refresh modes.

Yes, it is the only new one. But without a stated resolution, it would not
be later clear for the reader of the README which mode it was. BTW, the
first reports are already included in the B-release, at the end of README.


> Next up is the on-planar "ISA" XGA-2 that is on-planar in a 9533. I
> expect it will work well there too.

That would be certainly a very interesting case.

> My only complaint would be with my monitor, which
> didn't have enough range in its adjustments to get every last bit of
> the picture at 832x624 on the screen. I got nearly all of it to fit,
> with only a very tiny slice of the right hand side being "cut off".

How does the newly lowered rate of 74.8 Hz perform on it? You should test it
again, it should be better. Check also the new 60 Hz support.







0
UZnal
1/21/2008 10:15:09 PM
I used to have 32K color under WfW 3.11 and one of the clone video 
cards....

Would 32k color be possible, and if possible, would it do us any good?

UZnal wrote:
>> Is there any pseudo hi-color modes that you can fake?
> 
> Some painting apps do that with color dithering patterns. The XGA-2 only
> wants to know how many bits per pixel were requested, that is all.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
1/21/2008 11:16:16 PM
Hi!

Windows 95 OSR 2.5 is the test OS. The system is a PS/2 Model 9585-0XF. This
XGA-2 has a whitecap RAMDAC with no heatsink.

I saw no choice of 60Hz in 832x624 mode. "Optimal" (seemed to represent
72Hz?), 72Hz and 75Hz were the only choices given by Windows. (Dropping back
to 800x600, I did have a 60Hz choice.)

> Notice: A 60 Hz only implementation with a line rate of 39.2 kHz,
> intended for LCD monitors, is in the file XGA2-60-392.VXD. Copy
> this file to XGA2.VXD and only then install the driver if you are not
> able to select the refresh rate or but want to test the 39.2 kHz line
rate.

Ah, maybe that's why I didn't see it in the choices! I didn't try that
driver.

The vertical refresh rates were dead-on this time, at least as per my cheap
eMachines CRT, which still didn't quite like being run at 832x624. Apart
from the fact that the monitor's controls simply didn't have enough range to
bring the picture on to the screen, the brightness and stability were
excellent.

I was going to try my Bermuda Ultimedia, but the NEC Multisync made a fishy
smell when I turned it on. And I liked that monitor, too. :-(

William
--
Brought to you by an IBM PS/2 9585-0XF, "Defiant"
AMD 486-133/64MB/2GB S/N 23HN457




0
William
1/23/2008 3:05:14 AM
UZnal wrote:
>>Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of
>>operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not optimal.
> 
> 
> Jim, can you measure with 800x600 at 75 Hz (45/90 Mhz PEL), that will give
> us a number to compare?


Will get to that soon. News feeds have been down for a couple of days, 
so I'm behind the pack.


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0
Jim
1/23/2008 3:37:50 AM
UZnal wrote:

> I too had to correct the screen on the Eizo T56S. The horizontal lines were
> too long, that indicates an overscan which can be eliminated with a lower
> line rate. Eizo T56S easily allowed a nicely centered screen but I
> understand that might not be possible with every monitor.


I was not able to get a clean edge-to-edge image on the Sony. I had to 
back adjustments off so there was a little black space around the image. 
Not a big concern for me, I'm from the generation that still considers 
edge-to-edge to be something of a novelty.


> The mode must perform reasonably and equally well on a wide range of
> monitors, so it is very important to have tests with different monitors. How
> about the 72 Hz refresh, does the screen need any corrections?

Yes, but I can't recall specifics. I'll try to remember to check that 
again. ISTR that the flat panel behaved a bit better @72.

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0
Jim
1/23/2008 3:40:40 AM
UZnal wrote:
> Maintenance Release
> 
> Added support for 832x624 at 60 Hz and lowered the line rate of the 75 Hz.
> 
> Jan 21, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208b.zip


I'm thinking I will get to this tomorrow night.



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0
Jim
1/23/2008 3:42:36 AM
> I saw no choice of 60Hz in 832x624 mode. "Optimal" (seemed to represent
> 72Hz?), 72Hz and 75Hz were the only choices given by Windows.

Sorry, the INF file was missing the 60 Hz setting. Here is the updated INF
file with the package:

www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208b.zip

"Optimal" is for Windows the highest rate, 75 Hz in this case.


> > Notice: A 60 Hz only implementation with a line rate of 39.2 kHz,
> > intended for LCD monitors, is in the file XGA2-60-392.VXD. Copy
> > this file to XGA2.VXD and only then install the driver if you are not
> > able to select the refresh rate or but want to test the 39.2 kHz line
> rate.
>
> Ah, maybe that's why I didn't see it in the choices! I didn't try that
> driver.

No, this version will give only 60 Hz. There are no other frame rates.


> The vertical refresh rates were dead-on this time, at least as per my
cheap
> eMachines CRT, which still didn't quite like being run at 832x624.

Perhaps I should play again with the timings, but since they are "general
use" settings, some monitors might not be satisfied at all.



0
UZnal
1/23/2008 6:47:35 PM
On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 21:56:17 -0600, Jim Shorney wrote:

> Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of
> operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not
> optimal.

Anyone ever remove the stock heatsink and try active cooling on an
XGA2? Just a bit curious about what could be accomplished with Arctic
Silver 5 and a kick-ass HSF.

I know it's not our style here in MCA-land, but what the hell ...

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For email correspondence.

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0
Charles
1/24/2008 12:58:38 AM
I don't believe the issue with the XGA-2 RAMDAC is heat, but timing 
issues. Look at the fabled blue RAMDAC fading before 100MHz

Charles Lasitter wrote:
> On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 21:56:17 -0600, Jim Shorney wrote:
> 
>> Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of
>> operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not
>> optimal.
> 
> Anyone ever remove the stock heatsink and try active cooling on an
> XGA2? Just a bit curious about what could be accomplished with Arctic
> Silver 5 and a kick-ass HSF.
> 
> I know it's not our style here in MCA-land, but what the hell ...
> 
0
Louis
1/24/2008 1:28:13 AM
> I don't believe the issue with the XGA-2 RAMDAC is heat, but timing
> issues. Look at the fabled blue RAMDAC fading before 100MHz

The excessive 6 Mhz for those 75 Hz are an experiment. The 72 Hz are just as
good enough for comfortable display viewing and the PEL clock is within the
specified range. The language of the techref is "should not" and not "must
not". The max PEL rate per initial design is 120 Mhz.

For 1024x768, the 1024x768 clock (reg index 54) defining a divide ratio
(IIRC, of 2), must be also selected. First the programmable PEL clock (reg
index 58) is set and then the 1024x768 clock is selected. This is a
dependency I could not figure out how it affects the lower res modes.

I calculated the mode parameters for the IBM 9515 at 39.4 kHz (VGA) line
rate for 832x624 at 60 Hz. The display became erratic, it could not sync.
The monitor expects perhaps the VGA polarity? This can be set at the XGA-2.









0
UZnal
1/24/2008 6:25:38 PM
Hi!

> Anyone ever remove the stock heatsink

I am not sure how you could remove that thing without destroying the
RAMDAC or at least pulling it off the board. Whatever IBM used for
glue on these is very strong stuff.

Air flow in a PS/2 case is typically excellent, which is what I'd pick
any day of the week over many little fans in a system. (I despise
this. It seems that today's system designers are afraid to let a fan
do its job and move enough air to keep things cool...especially power
supply designers!)

I just replaced an Antec "True 550" watt (HA!) power supply for this
reason. After looking at the insides and seeing that its heatsinks
were way too hot to touch for several minutes after I'd turned it
off...yeah, I think it could output that kind of power. For about ten
minutes. Maybe. (And before you ask, yes the fans--two in the PSU!--
were running.)

Oh, sorry. I got a bit carried away.

Bearing the plentiful airflow concept in mind, a properly attached
passive heatsink should have no problem at all getting rid of heat
from the part it is attached to.

If it would happen to fit, I'd grab the heatsink from something like a
dead AGP card. Some of the earlier ones had very nice passive
heatsinks on them. I've been saving them for future projects.

William
0
wm_walsh
1/24/2008 8:15:53 PM
Well, then try to hit 120MHz PEL rate then. I'm not sure if hitting the 
wall would really accomplish anything that we haven't got so far. 
Revving the engine to redline when the gears aren't tall enough won't 
make things much faster.


UZnal wrote:
>> I don't believe the issue with the XGA-2 RAMDAC is heat, but timing
>> issues. Look at the fabled blue RAMDAC fading before 100MHz
> 
> The excessive 6 Mhz for those 75 Hz are an experiment. The 72 Hz are just as
> good enough for comfortable display viewing and the PEL clock is within the
> specified range. The language of the techref is "should not" and not "must
> not". The max PEL rate per initial design is 120 Mhz.
> 
> For 1024x768, the 1024x768 clock (reg index 54) defining a divide ratio
> (IIRC, of 2), must be also selected. First the programmable PEL clock (reg
> index 58) is set and then the 1024x768 clock is selected. This is a
> dependency I could not figure out how it affects the lower res modes.
> 
> I calculated the mode parameters for the IBM 9515 at 39.4 kHz (VGA) line
> rate for 832x624 at 60 Hz. The display became erratic, it could not sync.
> The monitor expects perhaps the VGA polarity? This can be set at the XGA-2.
0
Louis
1/24/2008 8:18:08 PM
William, if there was a good raison to apply massive kooling to the 
RAMDAC, I would rather do it to a white chip. If you have a board 
mounted heatsinked RAMDAC, then you have to deal with it.

For an XGA-2 adapter, white chip, what the hell good would an active 
heatsink do? Look kewl, but I fear little else.

Or is 1024x768x64k at 72Hz possible if heatsinked... (excessive 
absurdity intended)


wm_walsh@hotmail.com wrote:
> Hi!
> 
>> Anyone ever remove the stock heatsink
> 
> I am not sure how you could remove that thing without destroying the
> RAMDAC or at least pulling it off the board. Whatever IBM used for
> glue on these is very strong stuff.
> 
> Air flow in a PS/2 case is typically excellent, which is what I'd pick
> any day of the week over many little fans in a system. (I despise
> this. It seems that today's system designers are afraid to let a fan
> do its job and move enough air to keep things cool...especially power
> supply designers!)
> 
> I just replaced an Antec "True 550" watt (HA!) power supply for this
> reason. After looking at the insides and seeing that its heatsinks
> were way too hot to touch for several minutes after I'd turned it
> off...yeah, I think it could output that kind of power. For about ten
> minutes. Maybe. (And before you ask, yes the fans--two in the PSU!--
> were running.)
> 
> Oh, sorry. I got a bit carried away.
> 
> Bearing the plentiful airflow concept in mind, a properly attached
> passive heatsink should have no problem at all getting rid of heat
> from the part it is attached to.
> 
> If it would happen to fit, I'd grab the heatsink from something like a
> dead AGP card. Some of the earlier ones had very nice passive
> heatsinks on them. I've been saving them for future projects.
> 
> William
0
Louis
1/24/2008 8:23:43 PM
On Jan 24, 12:23 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> William, if there was a good raison to apply massive kooling to the
> RAMDAC, I would rather do it to a white chip. If you have a board
> mounted heatsinked RAMDAC, then you have to deal with it.
>
> For an XGA-2 adapter, white chip, what the hell good would an active
> heatsink do? Look kewl, but I fear little else.
>
> Or is 1024x768x64k at 72Hz possible if heatsinked... (excessive
> absurdity intended)
>

I have followed all this with some interest, though I'm not quite sure
I get the point (beyond maybe the S.H.I.T. factor, I guess).  My
philosophy toward PS/2 MADness is firmly along the lines of "within
optimum design parameters".  I mean, running e.g.  OS/2 on a PS/2 with
XGA-2 display adapter and 9517 or even 9515 display at 1024x768
resolution, 256 colors and 75 Hz refresh is a *magnificent* thing.
Why knock yourself silly wanting to wring 16-bit color out of
something that simply was never designed to do it.  (I never even got
the 64-crayon box as a kid.)  If I want 32-bit color and megapixel
resolution at 85 Hz refresh rate I can have that no problem any time I
want.  I just don't even think about trying it on vintage PS/2
hardware.  (No offense.)
0
Dan
1/24/2008 9:13:15 PM
Hi!

> William, if there was a good raison to apply massive kooling
> to the RAMDAC, I would rather do it to a white chip. If you
> have a board mounted heatsinked RAMDAC, then you have
> to deal with it.

As would I. I think the idea of cooling a non-heatsinked RAMDAC has
merit. Cooler components last longer and live happier lives. Something
to think about as the years drag on.

Then again, has anyone *ever* had an XGA-2 fail in the course of
normal operation? I haven't.

(Old video cards seem to last forever. Today's video cards have dismal
life spans. I've lost track of how many systems I've had lose their
AGP video adapter. Most of the time, I just replaced them with an old
PCI card of some kind. I just don't need the 3D graphics horsepower,
the heat, unreliability or the energy consumption. I find it absurd
that an ATI Radeon 9800 in a Power Mac G4 can actually draw enough
power that it needs a four pin Molex plug on the card AND that it can
make the +12V wires get slightly warm!)

Sorry, there I go again.

> Or is 1024x768x64k at 72Hz possible if heatsinked...
>(excessive absurdity intended)

Looking at the math involved would probably answer that question as
well as we can hope to have it answered. But you're going to need to
find a way to add memory to the card. I'm not going to rule it out.
Other video cards of the time have similar RAMDAC bandwidth (look at
the Cirrus Logic cards, with their 75 or 80MHz built in RAMDAC), so it
might be possible.

Can the MADness be wound up high enough to get some hardware hackers
out of the woodwork?

William
0
wm_walsh
1/24/2008 9:20:35 PM
On Jan 24, 1:20 pm, wm_wa...@hotmail.com wrote:

>
> ... I think the idea of cooling a non-heatsinked RAMDAC has
> merit. Cooler components last longer and live happier lives. Something
> to think about as the years drag on.
>
> Then again, has anyone *ever* had an XGA-2 fail in the course of
> normal operation? I haven't.
>
> (Old video cards seem to last forever... I just don't need the 3D graphics horsepower...

Not to hijack this thread for a shameless plug, but if anyone's
interested:

http://corvallis.craigslist.org/sys/545895619.html

If I was keeping it (and I might still), I'd probably go ahead and try
to register the application software (all indications are that it just
might work) and then get a nice Spaceball to go with it.

0
Dan
1/24/2008 9:47:04 PM
Hi!

> I have followed all this with some interest, though I'm not
> quite sure I get the point (beyond maybe the S.H.I.T.
> factor, I guess).

I think part of the point comes from the fact that all of us here are
at least slightly partial to Microchannel and the PS/2. And while the
PS/2 did sell very well in the business world, where IBM was still
very firmly entrenched, it still carries a certain stigma--being too
expensive, not offering enough performance for the price, being a very
proprietary and closed design--in the mind of the general public.
Perhaps these things were true, but only to varying extents.

Would I be reaching too much if I said that a lot of us who have the
good fortune (!!!!) to take in a few Microchannel machines and
experience the things that IBM did do right in these machines have
also felt at some point that their bad reputation was undeserved and
that something ought to be done about it?

Using these machines in productive work today carries a strong
message, and some people do notice, usually reacting with an "I didn't
know you could do that."

To my mind at least, just using the machines only goes so far. I can't
speak for other members of the group, but I want to push the envelope
with this hardware...to tap every last bit of potential that even IBM
didn't exploit. That--again to my way of thinking--will make an even
bigger impression on the general public and might serve to correct
some of the more misguided beliefs about our beloved boxen.

I'll admit that I don't really care what the general public thinks
about my PS/2 habit, despite what the above says. I will also admit
feeling a little offended when other people outside of this group
"knocked" the PS/2.

Wow...that was a mouthful and I *think* it reads like what I'm trying
to say.

> My philosophy toward PS/2 MADness is firmly along the
> lines of "within optimum design parameters".

What is optimum? If more can be done with the hardware that what was
generally available and supported, doesn't that move the "sweet spot"
a bit?

> Why knock yourself silly wanting to wring 16-bit color
> out of something that simply was never designed to
> do it.

The XGA-2 *was* in fact designed to do this and many other things. I
would liken it to an open canvas (with 1MB VRAM!). It is freely
programmable and so far as I know was officially billed as such.

What's interesting is how frustration with an unbelievably poorly
written Microsoft driver has brought UZ and the group to push the
hardware further--and find that it works well, even far beyond IBM's
own published specs.

I've had a lot of fun helping with the testing of this and other PS/2-
centric projects. This kind of thing has also created discussion to
help keep the group alive and vibrant.

I certainly don't ask any of my PS/2s to do everything. In fact, in a
strange way, I'd admit to enjoying the fact that there are limits. I'd
never take a PS/2 and put a modern motherboard in it, because I don't
think that is the right thing to do. I have newer computer hardware
for the "tough jobs" and know how to use it if need be.

William
0
wm_walsh
1/24/2008 9:47:47 PM
On Jan 24, 1:47 pm, wm_wa...@hotmail.com wrote:
> Hi!
>
> > I have followed all this with some interest, though I'm not
> > quite sure I get the point (beyond maybe the S.H.I.T.
> > factor, I guess).
>
> I think part of the point comes from the fact that all of us here are
> at least slightly partial to Microchannel and the PS/2. And while the
> PS/2 did sell very well in the business world, where IBM was still
> very firmly entrenched, it still carries a certain stigma--being too
> expensive, not offering enough performance for the price, being a very
> proprietary and closed design--in the mind of the general public.
> Perhaps these things were true, but only to varying extents.
>

I don't care how well it sold (except to the extent that it means more
spare parts for me now :-).  And General Public be danged!
"Stigma"?  ... for being expensive?  Heck, that's one of PS/2's finest
virtues, if you ask me.  They are extremely high quality machines of
relatively uncompromising design.  that someone else gets more MHz or
whatever from a cheaper machine does not sway my appreciation for the
IBM PS/2.


> Would I be reaching too much if I said that a lot of us who have the
> good fortune (!!!!) to take in a few Microchannel machines and
> experience the things that IBM did do right in these machines have
> also felt at some point that their bad reputation was undeserved and
> that something ought to be done about it?
>

Okay, sure - but do you think the answer is to *hot-rod* a Rolls-
Royce?

> Using these machines in productive work today carries a strong
> message, and some people do notice, usually reacting with an "I didn't
> know you could do that."
>

Well, not to diminish Computer Parlor Tricks, but you're partially
onto the answer here.  Show people that the *important* work that
computers do is hardcore data processing - not 3D video games with
Dolby Surround Sound, or "glassy" icons floating around, or Flash
animations of... um... uh...

No, the real value of computers is storing, retrieving and processing
data.  And most data of *real* value can be represented as text
strings and numbers, which doesn't need Windows Vista and GHz CPU's
and many Gigabytes of RAM and frickin' Terabytes of secondary storage
(what do you guys do with all that storage, anyway?)  The real
business requirements (not the requirements pulled out of the IT
salesman's bag of tricks) for just about any serious enterprise
*today* could be well met by some PS/2 9595 servers running OS/2, DB2,
Lotus Notes, etc., and a bunch of like 8556's and some 9590's for the
power users, and what the heck - throw in a mainframe host somewhere
if you really have to.  We can even give them a graphical web browser
and nice GUI interface and stuff like that, but that's not the whole
point.  Maybe they'll even get some actual work done.  Maybe their
desktops won't get pwned by script-kiddies.

And PS/2's doing this work *within their original design parameters*
could be relatively reliable and trouble-free.

> To my mind at least, just using the machines only goes so far. I can't
> speak for other members of the group, but I want to push the envelope
> with this hardware...to tap every last bit of potential that even IBM
> didn't exploit. That--again to my way of thinking--will make an even
> bigger impression on the general public and might serve to correct
> some of the more misguided beliefs about our beloved boxen.
>

Love them.  Abuse them.  Whatever.

You're *never* going to hot-rod a PS/2 enough to impress anyone with
sheer performance (though maybe someone will appreciate the S.H.I.T.
value).

> I'll admit that I don't really care what the general public thinks
> about my PS/2 habit, despite what the above says. I will also admit
> feeling a little offended when other people outside of this group
> "knocked" the PS/2.
>

Don't mind them - they just don't appreciate quality - or maybe
they've *misplaced* wherein lies the value of a quality machine.
(Hint:  It depends on what the machine was originally designed for and
intended to do and how well it does *that*)

> Wow...that was a mouthful and I *think* it reads like what I'm trying
> to say.
>

As always, I admire your gumption, and am honored to be your cyber
"acquaintance" :-)

> > My philosophy toward PS/2 MADness is firmly along the
> > lines of "within optimum design parameters".
>
> What is optimum? If more can be done with the hardware that what was
> generally available and supported, doesn't that move the "sweet spot"
> a bit?
>

The definition of "optimum* will have to wait for another post.

> > Why knock yourself silly wanting to wring 16-bit color
> > out of something that simply was never designed to
> > do it.
>
> The XGA-2 *was* in fact designed to do this and many other things. I
> would liken it to an open canvas (with 1MB VRAM!). It is freely
> programmable and so far as I know was officially billed as such.
>

Uh, yeah - my mistake.  The XGA-2 *will* do 16-bit color quite nicely,
but 640x480 just doesn't float my boat, so I almost always run mine at
1024x768 (it's more "optimum" for my particular data processing
requirements - YMMV.)

> What's interesting is how frustration with an unbelievably poorly
> written Microsoft driver has brought UZ and the group to push the
> hardware further--and find that it works well, even far beyond IBM's
> own published specs.
>

Aha, now we're getting somewhere.  Yes, sure - MicroSoft sucks the big
one.  We can all agree on that ;-)

> I've had a lot of fun helping with the testing of this and other PS/2-
> centric projects. This kind of thing has also created discussion to
> help keep the group alive and vibrant.
>

You make an enormous contribution to personal computer understanding
worldwide; and there are even greater things in store for you, William
- of that I am sure.

> I certainly don't ask any of my PS/2s to do everything. In fact, in a
> strange way, I'd admit to enjoying the fact that there are limits. I'd
> never take a PS/2 and put a modern motherboard in it, because I don't
> think that is the right thing to do. I have newer computer hardware
> for the "tough jobs" and know how to use it if need be.
>

I leave the last word for you, my friend.  I couldn't have said it
better myself.


0
Dan
1/25/2008 12:14:31 AM
Let us genuflect in the presence of microchannel.

IBM built things stodgy, but would continue to plow forward for years. 
William has pierced the veil of FUD and struck home. We seek to liberate 
the unrealized potential within our machines.

But the idea of a V10 in a Rolls-Royce is somewhat appealing...

Dan O wrote:
>> to tap every last bit of potential that even IBM didn't exploit. 
0
Louis
1/25/2008 1:00:38 AM
UZnal wrote:
>>Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of
>>operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not optimal.
> 
> 
> Jim, can you measure with 800x600 at 75 Hz (45/90 Mhz PEL), that will give
> us a number to compare?


50.6 C, 208b, 800x600 @75 HZ. No difference. The decimal point is best
ignored, the .3 difference is certianly a result of variables in the
testing environment. Measured with a cheapo Cen-Tech IR non-contact
thermometer from Harbor Freight.

If anyone is interested, my Micropolis 5.25 FH hard disk on this
computer happily runs at 67 C. Ouch.

Further testing with both monitors will continue as the rest of the week
unfolds.



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poster, and specifically may not be published in, or used by
    http://www.jlaforums.com

0
Jim
1/25/2008 3:12:51 AM
Charles Lasitter wrote:
> On Sun, 20 Jan 2008 21:56:17 -0600, Jim Shorney wrote:
> 
> 
>>Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of
>>operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not
>>optimal.
> 
> 
> Anyone ever remove the stock heatsink and try active cooling on an
> XGA2? Just a bit curious about what could be accomplished with Arctic
> Silver 5 and a kick-ass HSF.


50 C for silicon is not hot. More like balmy.


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0
Jim
1/25/2008 3:25:22 AM
On Jan 24, 5:00 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> Let us genuflect in the presence of microchannel.
>
> IBM built things stodgy, but would continue to plow forward for years.
> William has pierced the veil of FUD and struck home. We seek to liberate
> the unrealized potential within our machines.
>
> But the idea of a V10 in a Rolls-Royce is somewhat appealing...
>

Go for it.  Let me know when you're ready to race.

0
Dan
1/25/2008 4:43:19 AM
On Jan 24, 1:47 pm, wm_wa...@hotmail.com wrote:
> Hi!
>

>
> > My philosophy toward PS/2 MADness is firmly along the
> > lines of "within optimum design parameters".
>
> What is optimum? If more can be done with the hardware that what was
> generally available and supported, doesn't that move the "sweet spot"
> a bit?
>

"A bit"?  Yeah - possibly, but is that worth it (not counting the
S.H.I.T. value)?  You've got the idea.  Optimum is the sweet spot,
sure.  Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
it away from the sweet spot, though - into the tolerances and often
toward the edges of instability and unreliability.  Is that worth
making it work "a bit" better with Windows 9x?  Jeez.

It can be fun and satisfying, and that's okay.  UZ enjoys the
challenge and (maybe especially) the recognition.   and nothing wrong
with a little performance improvement for the Win9x fanboys.   It just
bugs me to see someone riding herd all the time for their own ego and
no real point.

Come on.  Windows 95?  Yeah, that's really moving the cause forward.
Right.

0
Dan
1/25/2008 4:58:11 AM
Hi!

> "Stigma"?  ... for being expensive?

There are some things that are hard to convey in text form only. My primary
focus was the "proprietary". On the surface it might have *looked* that way,
but a lot of big name hardware companies had plenty of MCA-compatible
products to choose from. There were a lot of options from IBM and many
others.

As far as the cost, well...the average person probably doesn't know or care.
I do agree, even if I think the original purchase price might have been a
tough pill to swallow.

> Okay, sure - but do you think the answer is to *hot-rod* a Rolls-
> Royce?

Not always, although I do tend to think that upgrades that don't ruin the
original essence of the machine and add something to the things it can do
are always nice. I try hard not to do anything I can't reverse to my PS/2s,
so that if there is a later owner, they will be able to take things in the
direction they'd like to go.

> Well, not to diminish Computer Parlor Tricks, but you're partially
> onto the answer here.  Show people that the *important* work that
> computers do is hardcore data processing - not 3D video games with
> Dolby Surround Sound, or "glassy" icons floating around, or Flash
> animations of... um... uh...

Bad movies that I uploaded to YouTube? ;-)

These things have their place, and I won't deny they are fun. But they
aren't what I mainly get out of computers. The nice 3D/AGP video cards I
have just don't get used for that, outside of something like Google Earth.
(I suspect that if hardware could talk, these cards would mention how lonely
their 3D features are.)

When I sit down to my computer, I have almost always *work* in mind. My work
just doesn't need a multi-GHz system with Vista.


> No, the real value of computers is storing, retrieving and processing
> data.  And most data of *real* value can be represented as text
> strings and numbers, which doesn't need Windows Vista and GHz CPU's
> and many Gigabytes of RAM and frickin' Terabytes of secondary storage

Exactly. One of the main things I sit and do on my PS/2s is create various
and sundry text documents. There's something about sitting next to (or on,
although I'm not sure I should admit to that!) a sturdy computer doing some
writing. I find the environment to be much less distracting, partally
because of hardware limits on what can and can't be done. A Model 53 works
great for typing, but taking it on the 'net isn't the best idea.

> (what do you guys do with all that storage, anyway?)

After many hard lessons, backups that I keep for some time. I have 500GB and
750GB Western Digital "My Book" hard disks attached to a Linksys NSLU2
storage link. Anything that can speak CIFS/SMB/Microsoft Windows Sharing can
use it, so that covers Windows, DOS, Linux, OS/2 and Mac OS X.

I didn't mind using tape as a backup medium, but for some reason I never did
the backups as often as I should. Disk is cheap and reliable enough.

> As always, I admire your gumption, and am honored to be your cyber
> "acquaintance" :-)

Not sure what to say, other than "thanks".

> Uh, yeah - my mistake.  The XGA-2 *will* do 16-bit color quite nicely,
> but 640x480 just doesn't float my boat

XGA-2 will give you 16-bit color at 800x600 as well.

That said, my NT-equipped PS/2s with XGA-2 do run at 1024x768. It works well
for the tasks I have in mind. The image is sharp and clear. Too many
applications (at least on Windows) seem to be ill behaved when running in a
palletized video mode, however. For whatever reason, the odd "color shift"
really distracts me.

William


0
William
1/25/2008 5:23:02 AM
Dan O wrote:

> Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
> it away from the sweet spot, though - into the tolerances and often
> toward the edges of instability and unreliability.  Is that worth
> making it work "a bit" better with Windows 9x?  Jeez.


FWIW, my hot-rodded Server 500 has been running 24/7 for probably 8+ 
years with no hardware reliability or instability problems. And I'm not 
real conscientious about cleaning the dust out of it, either.

Maybe the key point is it has never been touched by any version of 
Windows since in my possession.

IMO, it's very sweet.


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    http://www.jlaforums.com
0
Jim
1/25/2008 5:27:42 AM
Hi!

> Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
> it away from the sweet spot, though - into the tolerances and often
> toward the edges of instability and unreliability.  Is that worth
> making it work "a bit" better with Windows 9x?  Jeez.

I don't want to push things that far. I'm not out to run my hardware on the
thin edge of a disaster. If I didn't feel the hardware could do these things
while maintaining its reliability, I wouldn't do/use them. As it stands, the
hardware seems to be fine with it. I don't mind the improved functionality,
because it could give me the ability to do something good with the system
that I couldn't do before.

> Come on.  Windows 95?  Yeah, that's really moving the cause forward.
> Right.

Every little bit helps. There's no reason why the maintainer of a Linux/X
Windows XGA-2 driver couldn't take a look at what has been done over here
and make the same thing happen there.

William


0
William
1/25/2008 5:34:19 AM
On Jan 24, 9:34 pm, "William R. Walsh"
<newsgrou...@idontwantjunqueemail.walshcomptech.com> wrote:
> Hi!
>
> > Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
> > it away from the sweet spot, though - into the tolerances and often
> > toward the edges of instability and unreliability.  Is that worth
> > making it work "a bit" better with Windows 9x?  Jeez.
>
> I don't want to push things that far. I'm not out to run my hardware on the
> thin edge of a disaster. If I didn't feel the hardware could do these things
> while maintaining its reliability, I wouldn't do/use them. As it stands, the
> hardware seems to be fine with it. I don't mind the improved functionality,
> because it could give me the ability to do something good with the system
> that I couldn't do before.
>
> > Come on.  Windows 95?  Yeah, that's really moving the cause forward.
> > Right.
>
> Every little bit helps. There's no reason why the maintainer of a Linux/X
> Windows XGA-2 driver couldn't take a look at what has been done over here
> and make the same thing happen there.
>

Go for it.  Let me know when you're ready to race ;-)
0
Dan
1/25/2008 5:40:35 AM
On Jan 24, 9:27 pm, Jim Shorney <jshor...@inebraska.com> wrote:
> Dan O wrote:
> > Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
> > it away from the sweet spot, though - into the tolerances and often
> > toward the edges of instability and unreliability.  Is that worth
> > making it work "a bit" better with Windows 9x?  Jeez.
>
> FWIW, my hot-rodded Server 500 has been running 24/7 for probably 8+
> years with no hardware reliability or instability problems. And I'm not
> real conscientious about cleaning the dust out of it, either.
>

I have a hot-rodded 180 MHz 95 w/ 256 MB RAM and Cheetah RAID.  Hardly
ever touch it.  Which PS/2 do I use most?  A 9595-0LG with stock
486DX2-50 CPU.  It does what it's supposed to do beautifully.

> Maybe the key point is it has never been touched by any version of
> Windows since in my possession.
>
> IMO, it's very sweet.
>

Agreed - extremely so.  OTOH, I am quite satisfied with my S/500
running stock P90, 256 MB RAM, dual-Cheetahs, 780 watt PSU, 18x2GB
HDDs, Auto Lanstreamer, XGA-2, and Warp Server 4 Advanced.


0
Dan
1/25/2008 5:57:04 AM
On Jan 24, 9:57 pm, Dan O <danover...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Jan 24, 9:27 pm, Jim Shorney <jshor...@inebraska.com> wrote:
>
> > Dan O wrote:
> > > Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
> > > it away from the sweet spot...
>
> I have a hot-rodded 180 MHz 95 w/ 256 MB RAM and Cheetah RAID.  Hardly
> ever touch it.  Which PS/2 do I use most?  A 9595-0LG with stock
> 486DX2-50 CPU.  It does what it's supposed to do beautifully.
>

I might add (How are my stats here?  Am I catching up with Louis and
the Williams? :-)... I might add that while I have a 486DX4-100
Overdrive CPU laying around (not to mention a couple of 'M' Processor
Boards), I've never felt the need to upgrade the 0LG.


0
Dan
1/25/2008 6:11:11 AM
> But the idea of a V10 in a Rolls-Royce is somewhat appealing...

I can up that and stay within brand:

RR built the Merlin (V12 - Supercharger - Lots of hp) but never *in* a Rolls 
Royce.



0
JWR
1/25/2008 10:32:27 AM
Hi!

> Which PS/2 do I use most?  A 9595-0LG with stock
> 486DX2-50 CPU.  It does what it's supposed to do
> beautifully.

Absolutely. I have one of those at "The Roach Palace", along with a
9533. There was a 9585 "X" but I took it back home to test my Thomas-
Conrad TR adapter. It runs Windows 95 on the stock complex, full
height 5.25" Seagate 3GB hard disk (what it came with) and 32MB RAM. I
cracked the cover only to clean it.

I need no more. But I am using UZ's XGA-2 and SCSI drivers. Uptime and
reliability is excellent.

Back at "home", one of my most used systems is a 9553, again with
Win95 and Office 95. 2GB hard disk (because it didn't have one in it)
and 16MB RAM...again, it works very well. Uptime is excellent.

As far as "hardware hot-rodded machines" I only have one...a Server
95a with a P200 processor running at 180MHz. It isn't on all that much
because I don't need it that much.

William
0
wm_walsh
1/25/2008 5:38:05 PM
> Well, then try to hit 120MHz PEL rate then. I'm not sure if hitting the
> wall would really accomplish anything that we haven't got so far.
> Revving the engine to redline when the gears aren't tall enough won't
> make things much faster.

Speed, what speed? The PEL rate is the pixel volume to process. The higher
the volume, that is, more pixels, the slower some coprocessor operations
could be. The 120 Mhz are easy to hit with a very high resolution at 4-bpp.
This is then effectively 60 Mhz PEL with 8-bit dots where each dot contains
two pixels.

The speed at which the display buffer contents go to the monitor is not
affected by the PEL rate. The PEL rate is used to define the amount of 8-bit
dots that go each second to the monitor. On the monitor side, the line rate
defines the number of lines (scanlines) a monitor can process per second.
Varying the PEL rate (and thus the scanline width), the line rate and the
number of lines per frame, different resolutions and frame refresh rates are
obtained.

To really understand the PEL rate you have to consider the relations between
the PEL rate, line rate and the bpp. So, Louis, take a paper and pencil and
do some PEL arithmetics. You might eventually need some cheese.

FYI: Monitor ID 0635
ViewSonic 7
    1280x960, 62.0 Hz,  61.9 kHz, 106.00 Mhz PEL
    1280x1024, 58.3 Hz,  61.9 kHz, 106.00 Mhz PEL
    1360x1024, 59.2 Hz,  55.8 kHz, 106.00 Mhz PEL




0
UZnal
1/25/2008 6:17:52 PM
Hi Dan O,

> I have followed all this with some interest, though I'm not quite sure
> I get the point (beyond maybe the S.H.I.T. factor, I guess).

No, you really do not get the point. You may start understanding things by
reading the section "History of the Driver" in the README of XGA206 or
XGA208. The you could continue with the XGA-2 bible, the techref.

> My philosophy toward PS/2 MADness is firmly along the lines of "within
> optimum design parameters".  I mean, running e.g.  OS/2 on a PS/2 with
> XGA-2 display adapter and 9517 or even 9515 display at 1024x768
> resolution, 256 colors and 75 Hz refresh is a *magnificent* thing.

So, what are the "optimum design parameters" of the XGA-2? Those set out by
OS/2, the 8-bit OS/2 PM, the fixed-2-line-rate 9515 display or what else? I
would like very much to hear them from you.


> Why knock yourself silly wanting to wring 16-bit color out of
> something that simply was never designed to do it.  (I never even got
> the 64-crayon box as a kid.)

Perhaps you were a bad, bad boy; you "never even got the 64-crayon box as a
kid" and could not experience the joy of playing with so many colors. The
thing was designed to do so many things and so few of them were done. How
should I explain all this to you?


> If I want 32-bit color and megapixel
> resolution at 85 Hz refresh rate I can have that no problem any time I
> want.

Right, why "knock yourself silly" with a 50 cent card when you can have
megapixels for a dollar? Why think when you can import brains? Why cook when
you can buy? Why work when you can let money work? Why MCA? Why not PCI?

>  I just don't even think about trying it on vintage PS/2 hardware.

Perhaps you accept life as it is and seldom want to change things

> (No offense.)

No offense. You are simply offending yourself and I actually think you are a
nice man, albeit sometimes frustrated.

> Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
> it away from the sweet spot, though - into the tolerances and often
> toward the edges of instability and unreliability.  Is that worth
> making it work "a bit" better with Windows 9x?  Jeez.

You are experiencing work in progress live. Developing and testing has its
ups and down, it moves at times toward the edges of instability and
unreliability until things are fixed and everything stabilized.

The overclocked 75 Hz 832x264 mode is rock stable but the mode parameters
may not suit every monitor. I cannot understand the whine that is pouring
over those experimental +6 Mhz. I had not planned to include the 75 Hz mode
in the "official" XGA208 release, so all that scream really does not bother
me.

You have not participated in the testing of the XGA206-208/SPOCK206 etc., so
you cannot really know what the issues were. I can assure you that all of
the "officially" released drivers are within the recommended specs and only
sweeten the sweet spot.

> UZ enjoys the challenge and (maybe especially) the recognition.

Have I possibly missed your recognition? I certainly enjoy happy XGA206
users, that is the best recognition you can ever get here.

> Come on.  Windows 95?  Yeah, that's really moving the cause forward.
> Right.

Right, like it or not, it is Windows 9x that is moving the XGA-2 cause. If
you be so kind as to move your ass and find the source code of the XGA-2
OS/2 driver, I will gladly do it for OS/2 too. M$ was kind enough to include
the code in the Windows 9x DDK. What's so silly or wrong with that?








0
UZnal
1/25/2008 6:33:24 PM
> >>Heatsink temperature is 50.3 C (measured) after several minutes of
> >>operation. The cover is off the unit, so cooling is probably not
optimal.
> >
> > Jim, can you measure with 800x600 at 75 Hz (45/90 Mhz PEL), that will
give
> > us a number to compare?
>
> 50.6 C, 208b, 800x600 @75 HZ. No difference. The decimal point is best
> ignored, the .3 difference is certianly a result of variables in the
> testing environment. Measured with a cheapo Cen-Tech IR non-contact
> thermometer from Harbor Freight.

Thanks, Jim. That C should be good enough to cool down the hot topic.





0
UZnal
1/25/2008 6:34:09 PM
William R. Walsh wrote:

> Every little bit helps. There's no reason why the maintainer of a Linux/X
> Windows XGA-2 driver couldn't take a look at what has been done over here
> and make the same thing happen there.

That would also require that they take a look at the memory leaks, or 
whatever they are, that I have esperienced in the MCA Linux code which 
create X11 instability and crashes with graphically "busy" applications.


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0
Jim
1/26/2008 3:04:31 AM
Dan O wrote:

> I have a hot-rodded 180 MHz 95 w/ 256 MB RAM and Cheetah RAID.  Hardly
> ever touch it.  Which PS/2 do I use most?  A 9595-0LG with stock
> 486DX2-50 CPU.  It does what it's supposed to do beautifully.

I daresay my hot-rod S500 is "used" more than most computers. It 
continuously monitors the radio APRS frequency and the APRS-IS internet 
feed for APRS packets. It relays all incoming RF packets to APRS-IS, 
"decides" whether to digipeat RF packets back out to the RF channel 
based on a strict set of rules, and digipeats National Weather Service 
warning/watch/routine bullitens for this area from APRS-IS to local RF.

It's truly a multi-user system. It is also, by intent, "slower" than the 
other primary digipeater and IGate here, which helps cut donw on RF 
collisions and unecessary traffic. And also more stable than the IGate 
run under Windows, which goes down on a whim.... :)

Some stats:
http://www.db0anf.de/hamweb/aprsdb/showdata/NU0C-1/shdigiusers?sortdigiusers=ld
http://www.db0anf.de/hamweb/aprsdb/showdata/NU0C-15/shdigiusers?sortdigiusers=ld

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0
Jim
1/26/2008 3:12:36 AM
Hi UZnal,

You have taken portions from two separate posts - distinct in time and
context, deleted all the context, then picked them apart and attacked
me personally.

On Jan 25, 10:33 am, "UZnal" <unalz-at-mail333-dot-com> wrote:
> Hi Dan O,
>
> > I have followed all this with some interest, though I'm not quite sure
> > I get the point (beyond maybe the S.H.I.T. factor, I guess).
>
> No, you really do not get the point.

Right.  I don't get it.  That's what I said.  (Good for you - you got
*my* point :-)

> You may start understanding things by
> reading the section "History of the Driver" in the README of XGA206 or
> XGA208.

I begin to think that maybe I don't get it because I just don't run
Windows 9x on PS/2, and therefor have no interest in or reason to
download these packages or study their documentation.

> The you could continue with the XGA-2 bible, the techref.
>

This I might do - someday when my commitments of time to family, work,
and community are reduced, and I have more time to diddle with such
things.  (Of course I won't be using Win32 tools for the exercises,
though.)

> > My philosophy toward PS/2 MADness is firmly along the lines of "within
> > optimum design parameters".  I mean, running e.g.  OS/2 on a PS/2 with
> > XGA-2 display adapter and 9517 or even 9515 display at 1024x768
> > resolution, 256 colors and 75 Hz refresh is a *magnificent* thing.
>
> So, what are the "optimum design parameters" of the XGA-2? Those set out by
> OS/2, the 8-bit OS/2 PM, the fixed-2-line-rate 9515 display or what else? I
> would like very much to hear them from you.
>
> > Why knock yourself silly wanting to wring 16-bit color out of
> > something that simply was never designed to do it.  (I never even got
> > the 64-crayon box as a kid.)
>
> Perhaps you were a bad, bad boy; you "never even got the 64-crayon box as a
> kid" and could not experience the joy of playing with so many colors. The
> thing was designed to do so many things and so few of them were done. How
> should I explain all this to you?
>

Here is where the context that you snipped might reveal my point:

On Jan 24, 12:23 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> ... apply massive kooling...
> ... what the hell good...? Look kewl...
> Or is 1024x768x64k at 72Hz possible if heatsinked... (excessive
> absurdity intended)

IMO, even this wildly infeasible objective would not produce
significantly better results than the very nice and ergonomic
1024x768, 8bpp, and 75Hz refresh that I get from OS/2 *right-out-of-
the-box*.  That's what I was reacting to, and it made me think to
myself, "Gee whiz, what are they trying to do here?"

But I completely understand the lure of hacking for its own sake, and
William hit on a very lucid point with:  "This kind of thing has also
created discussion to help keep the group alive and vibrant."

So now I say, "Sorry.  Never mind.  Quite right.  Carry on.  Don't let
me stand in the way.  Have fun!"

> > If I want 32-bit color and megapixel
> > resolution at 85 Hz refresh rate I can have that no problem any time I
> > want.
>
> Right, why "knock yourself silly" with a 50 cent card when you can have
> megapixels for a dollar? Why think when you can import brains? Why cook when
> you can buy? Why work when you can let money work? Why MCA? Why not PCI?
>
> >  I just don't even think about trying it on vintage PS/2 hardware.
>

It has nothing to do with money (although the reason I never got the
big box of crayons had more to do with money than the fact that I was
a bad boy).  It's a matter of the right tool for the job.

> Perhaps you accept life as it is and seldom want to change things
>
> > (No offense.)
>
> No offense. You are simply offending yourself and I actually think you are a
> nice man, albeit sometimes frustrated.
>

Yeah, or perhaps I'm schizophrenic.  In any case, thanks ;-)

> > Hot-rodding what had been a good design almost always takes a
> > it away from the sweet spot, though - into the tolerances and often
> > toward the edges of instability and unreliability.  Is that worth
> > making it work "a bit" better with Windows 9x?  Jeez.
>
> You are experiencing work in progress live. Developing and testing has its
> ups and down, it moves at times toward the edges of instability and
> unreliability until things are fixed and everything stabilized.
>
> The overclocked 75 Hz 832x264 mode is rock stable but the mode parameters
> may not suit every monitor. I cannot understand the whine that is pouring
> over those experimental +6 Mhz. I had not planned to include the 75 Hz mode
> in the "official" XGA208 release, so all that scream really does not bother
> me.
>

Yeah, yeah - whatever.  You are probably right about this - except for
the fact that I am experiencing *none* of it.  I DON'T RUN WIN9x,
remember?

My fundamental understanding of modifying a design for improved
performance - and the usually inevitable effects on reliability - came
from motor racing experience as a youth.  I realize it's not quite the
same in this realm, but what can I say - I'm getting stodgy in my old
age ;-)

> You have not participated in the testing of the XGA206-208/SPOCK206 etc.

.... because I DON'T RUN WIN9x on PS/2, okay?

>... so
> you cannot really know what the issues were.

Right.  I acknowledge that maybe I don't get it because I DON'T CARE
ABOUT WIN9x on PS/2.

> > UZ enjoys the challenge and (maybe especially) the recognition.
>
> Have I possibly missed your recognition? I certainly enjoy happy XGA206
> users, that is the best recognition you can ever get here.
>

I recognize your achievements.  Moreover, I recognize your excitement
for programming (something that I know firsthand).  The product just
doesn't happen to float my particular boat.  Go ahead - have fun.

> > Come on.  Windows 95?  Yeah, that's really moving the cause forward.
> > Right.
>
> Right, like it or not, it is Windows 9x that is moving the XGA-2 cause.

Windows 9x was the crappiest excuse for an operating system there ever
was, and by at least some estimations, its once exceedingly dominant
installed base has since been surpassed by Linux - which until
recently suffered the tremendous disadvantage of being virtually
unavailable as pre-loaded OS.  The "cause" I referred to was William's
expressed desire to demonstrate the value of PS/2 systems to a wider
contemporary audience.  I just think there's a better way to achieve
this, which I enumerated in my reply to William and you conveniently
snipped.

> If
> you be so kind as to move your ass and find the source code of the XGA-2
> OS/2 driver, I will gladly do it for OS/2 too. M$ was kind enough to include
> the code in the Windows 9x DDK. What's so silly or wrong with that?

OS/2 already meets my requirements quite satisfactorily as-is.  So,
and with all due kindness, I won't be moving my ass for you on this -
okay?
0
Dan
1/26/2008 4:15:10 AM
Hi Dan O,

You base your discourse on wrong assumptions and I will take my time to
explain and clarify once again the state of affairs. I do this for all
readers who might share your disgust for Win9x and are keen to preserve the
imposed XGA-2 status quo: Enjoy freedom preach slavery?


> You have taken portions from two separate posts - distinct in time and
> context, deleted all the context, then picked them apart and attacked
> me personally.

There was no intended or implied personal attack in my reply. When you
qualify the people who enthusiastically support the driver development as
"Win9x fanboys", you behave as a "bad, bad boy". None of these people is to
my best knowledge a "Win9x fanboy" and none of them deserves to be derided
as such.

There was a fun and not a fan factor in going on with Windows 95. The driver
code, written completely in assembly language, was available for Windows 95
(see the DDK). As the native OS of the driver, Win9x was to show the least
resistance in reworking and testing the code. Our target was the XGA-2 and
not Win9x which performed so far very well as a development and testing
platform.

One can easily modify and port a C code to another platform. It is more
difficult to first translate an assembly language code to C. However, the
intention was not to port a driver but to implement first a 800x600 16-bit
color, with a 70 Hz frame rate or more. Eventually, 75 Hz were achieved
staying perfectly well within the recommended PEL rate specs.

The XGA-2 techref lists the available modes (pp. 3-217) but only those which
are matched to the capabilities of the IBM displays at that time. You will
not see any 800x600 mode there. And yet page 3-9 lists example resolutions
and 800x600, 64K, 60 Hz shows up there. (XGA-2 is called XGA-NI in the
techref).

OS/2 is not an XGA-2 guideline, as a business product it is concerned with
XGA/XGA-2 compatibility issues. The XGA-2 model allows freely programmable
video modes where the mode parameters and mode settings are externally
defined. The XGA-2 BIOS contains the VGA (and below) modes and the
132-column text mode.


> I begin to think that maybe I don't get it because I just don't run
> Windows 9x on PS/2, and therefor have no interest in or reason to
> download these packages or study their documentation.

Most of the best programming tools and documentations are available for and
on Windows. Many small companies prefer Linux not to pay license fees for
the OS and for the tools but working with better software development tools
improves the productivity of the developers.


> (Of course I won't be using Win32 tools for the exercises, though.)

DOS is best suited for eventual XGA-2 exercises.


> Here is where the context that you snipped might reveal my point:
>
> On Jan 24, 12:23 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> > Or is 1024x768x64k at 72Hz possible if heatsinked... (excessive
> > absurdity intended)
>
> IMO, even this wildly infeasible objective would not produce
> significantly better results than the very nice and ergonomic
> 1024x768, 8bpp, and 75Hz refresh that I get from OS/2 *right-out-of-
> the-box*.  That's what I was reacting to, and it made me think to
> myself, "Gee whiz, what are they trying to do here?"

Although Louis clearly says "excessive absurdity intended", it would be
feasible with more video memory. 4 MB of video RAM are within the "optimum
design parameters" of the XGA-2.


> Windows 9x was the crappiest excuse for an operating system there ever
> was, and by at least some estimations, its once exceedingly dominant
> installed base has since been surpassed by Linux - which until
> recently suffered the tremendous disadvantage of being virtually
> unavailable as pre-loaded OS.

You have apparently also missed the XGA206 porting discussion to Windows NT.
Win9x will continue to serve as an XGA-2 research and test platform.


> OS/2 already meets my requirements quite satisfactorily as-is.  So,
> and with all due kindness, I won't be moving my ass for you on this -
> okay?

I do not suppose you are the single lonely OS/2 user on this planet.
Ironically, it is the "Win9x fanboys", as you called them, who show the far
greater will and enthusiasm to explore, improve and promote the PS/2 cause.
Do you think it is just and fair to shout at these people?



0
UZnal
1/26/2008 2:01:57 PM
UZnal wrote:

> When you
> qualify the people who enthusiastically support the driver development as
> "Win9x fanboys", you behave as a "bad, bad boy". None of these people is to
> my best knowledge a "Win9x fanboy" and none of them deserves to be derided
> as such.


I'm hardly a Windoze fanboy. I use Windows when necessary. Most of my 
internet activities are done under OS/2. I spent hours trying to get the 
antenna steering to work under Linux for the Ashland ARISS operation, 
but had to resort to Windows in the end b/c the Linux daemon didn't like 
the Thinkpad parallel port. I avoid Windows when I can.


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0
Jim
1/26/2008 3:18:45 PM
On Jan 26, 6:01 am, "UZnal" <unalz-at-mail333-dot-com> wrote:
> Hi Dan O,
>
> You base your discourse on wrong assumptions and I will take my time to
> explain and clarify once again the state of affairs. I do this for all
> readers who might share your disgust for Win9x and are keen to preserve the
> imposed XGA-2 status quo: Enjoy freedom preach slavery?
>

Your very first point intentionally implies that I preach slavery.
Where I come from that's a personal attack.

> > You have taken portions from two separate posts - distinct in time and
> > context, deleted all the context, then picked them apart and attacked
> > me personally.
>
> There was no intended or implied personal attack in my reply. When you
> qualify the people who enthusiastically support the driver development as
> "Win9x fanboys", you behave as a "bad, bad boy". None of these people is to
> my best knowledge a "Win9x fanboy" and none of them deserves to be derided
> as such.
>

When I used the term "Win9x fanboys", I was not referring to anyone in
particular, but it may have been a bit over-the-top.  I'm sorry if
anyone took it personally.  I never intended any personal attack,
either.  I just get passionate in the heat of debate.

> There was a fun and not a fan factor in going on with Windows 95.
>

Sure, fine - quite right, carry on, go ahead, have fun.

>
> Although Louis clearly says "excessive absurdity intended", it would be
> feasible with more video memory. 4 MB of video RAM are within the "optimum
> design parameters" of the XGA-2.
>

Go for it.  Let me know when you're ready to race.

> > Windows 9x was the crappiest excuse for an operating system there ever
> > was, and by at least some estimations, its once exceedingly dominant
> > installed base has since been surpassed by Linux - which until
> > recently suffered the tremendous disadvantage of being virtually
> > unavailable as pre-loaded OS.
>
> You have apparently also missed the XGA206 porting discussion to Windows NT.
> Win9x will continue to serve as an XGA-2 research and test platform.
>

I didn't miss the discussion.  I just didn't take an active interest
(thankfully for you guys, eh? ;-)

> > OS/2 already meets my requirements quite satisfactorily as-is.  So,
> > and with all due kindness, I won't be moving my ass for you on this -
> > okay?
>
> I do not suppose you are the single lonely OS/2 user on this planet.
> Ironically, it is the "Win9x fanboys", as you called them, who show the far
> greater will and enthusiasm to explore, improve and promote the PS/2 cause.
> Do you think it is just and fair to shout at these people?

Look, I'm just expressing my view.  If by shouting you mean my brief,
short, intermittent, and sparing use of ALL CAPS to emphasize the fact
that I DON'T RUN WIN9x, well, in that instance I was only shouting at
you - you who seemed to assume that of course I must be using these
driver(s) and studying the documentation before questioning the very
objectives.

I'm no OS/2 fanboy, either, BTW.  I just happen to think that it goes
with PS/2 like jam and peanut butter.  I have probably twenty or so
MCA PS/2's.  I also have a closet full of OS/2 software from the same
period.  While I use the PS/2's for some things, they're mostly more
like museum artifacts at this point.  That doesn't mean that I can't
trot out a complete, enterprise grade, once-upon-a-time megabucks
client/server system and demonstrate its ability to meet real business
data processing requirements *even today*, and do so without all the
productivity sapping glop that has been foisted upon contemporary IT
by the likes of Microsoft, et al.  In fact, a substantial part of my
OS/2 collection is development tools and, especially, documentation.

But look, I do appreciate the benefits of exploration,
experimentation, etc.  We have things like the PODP200 upgrade and the
corrected SVGA/A - no thanks to stick-in-the-muds like me :-).  Now
you are doing long overdue experimentation with software.  Very good.
I was only questioning the perceived objective:  16-bit color.

Someday, when the kids are gone and other demands let up, I may dig
into the extensive OS/2 documentation in my collection and undertake
some client/server and maybe even systems development - for fun and to
give me something to do.

So I understand the fun and something to do aspect, now.  I just
didn't get it from the sole perspective of trying to wring 16-bit
color out of an XGA-2.  Then, when William argued that this could
enhance wider acceptance of PS/2, and I realized that this was solely
applicable to Windows 9x, I kind of freaked just a tiny bit.

In closing, for the umpteenth time:  I'm sorry.  I get it now (fun).
Carry on.  Quite right.  Don't let me stand in the way.  Have fun! :-)

0
Dan
1/26/2008 8:40:05 PM
So who will beat better XGA-2 out of the OS/2 drivers?
0
Louis
1/26/2008 8:51:00 PM
On Jan 26, 12:51 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> So who will beat better XGA-2 out of the OS/2 drivers?

When the kids are grown up and off to college, I have retired from
government service, and I'm too old to actively fight fires and
extricate passengers from car wrecks any more.  I love programming,
but can only do it most effectively when I can immerse myself in a
project for days on end without too much interruption.
0
Dan
1/26/2008 8:57:25 PM
Better to burn out, than fade away....

Ever think by the time everything is just perfect to code, everyone that 
MIGHT have used your efforts will have moved on to something else?

Dan O wrote:
> On Jan 26, 12:51 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
>> So who will beat better XGA-2 out of the OS/2 drivers?
> 
> When the kids are grown up and off to college, I have retired from
> government service, and I'm too old to actively fight fires and
> extricate passengers from car wrecks any more.  I love programming,
> but can only do it most effectively when I can immerse myself in a
> project for days on end without too much interruption.
0
Louis
1/26/2008 9:01:49 PM
On Jan 26, 1:01 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> Better to burn out, than fade away....
>
> Ever think by the time everything is just perfect to code, everyone that
> MIGHT have used your efforts will have moved on to something else?
>

Doesn't matter so much.  It will just be for something to do - fun -
you know :-)  If by some chance I developed anything useful, there
will always be someone fed up with being pushed to the bleeding edge
all the time by the money changers.  I'm more concerned that the
requisite brain cells may be gone by then, or that electricity as we
know it will be unavailable - that sort of thing.

And it's not like I have a choice.  Believe me, I have tried a couple
of times to resume the kind pf programming that I *so* very much got
off on before my life became what it is now.  In my particular case,
it just doesn't work at all.

Certainly I'll do what I can, though - okay?  I haven't forgotten what
The Tool did for me.

Peace.


> Dan O wrote:
> > On Jan 26, 12:51 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> >> So who will beat better XGA-2 out of the OS/2 drivers?
>
> > When the kids are grown up and off to college, I have retired from
> > government service, and I'm too old to actively fight fires and
> > extricate passengers from car wrecks any more.  I love programming,
> > but can only do it most effectively when I can immerse myself in a
> > project for days on end without too much interruption.

0
Dan
1/26/2008 9:16:14 PM
Hi!

System: 9595-0LG
OS: Windows 95 OSR 2.5
Monitor: IBM 2235-00N
XGA-2: Non-heatsinked white RAMDAC
XGA208: Latest available as of Jan-27-2008

Results: The monitor really does not quite "like" the 832x624 mode at either
72 or 75Hz vertical refresh. 60Hz has not been tested (yet). The image is
slightly off the screen at each side, and no amount of adjusting will get
all of it on the screen. Other than this, the image is stable and shows no
sign of RAMDAC-based flakiness. There is some foldover on the left side of
the screen.

I won't get into the other difficulties encountered with this test, like the
stuck floppy drive (no idea why), blown Netgear router (making a sick
hissing sound), and somehow suddenly misconfigured SMC NIC. At least I got
it all straightened out. Now for t he 9533 and a Dell Trinitron CRT. :-)

William


0
William
1/28/2008 3:12:45 AM
System: 9533-DB7
OS: Windows 95 OSR 2.5
Monitor: Dell Ultrascan 800HS Series
XGA-2: 9533 on-planar "ISA", white heatsinked RAMDAC
XGA208: Latest available as of Jan-27-2008

Results: The Dell monitor was more than happy to let me adjust it until the
picture was completely on the screen, although it was easier to do this at
75Hz vertical refresh. Between mode switches, a small amount of "snow"
appeared in the lower half of the screen while it was blacked out.

The image appeared to be absolutely stable, but the machine did lock up hard
one time. (Hi, Dan O!) Power cycling brought it up to a memory count, after
which it locked up. A second attempt at powering up didn't result in any
video. Believe it or not, I didn't think this test killed the video, so I
reseated the PCMCIA adapter and that brought the machine right around on the
third attempt. Subsequent booting into Windows 95 did not result in any
problems.

"Now you know..."

William


0
William
1/28/2008 3:51:52 AM
> System: 9595-0LG
> OS: Windows 95 OSR 2.5
> Monitor: IBM 2235-00N
> XGA-2: Non-heatsinked white RAMDAC
> XGA208: Latest available as of Jan-27-2008
>
> Results: The monitor really does not quite "like" the 832x624 mode at
either
> 72 or 75Hz vertical refresh. 60Hz has not been tested (yet). The image is
> slightly off the screen at each side, and no amount of adjusting will get
> all of it on the screen.

Thank you for the tests, I really must recalculate the mode settings and
provide a larger margin for the horizontal blanking (too short lines, the
reason for being off the screen). I will also remember not to adjust my
monitor, this Eizo is a quite tolerant monitor...;)

> Other than this, the image is stable and shows no
> sign of RAMDAC-based flakiness. There is some foldover on the left side of
> the screen.

The higher PEL rate concerns the Serializer and the CRT Controller, there
cannot be pixels amounting to more than 1 MB in the display buffer. At
832x624 some 10% of the display buffer remains unused, it could well be that
with a 100% completely full buffer, overclocking would not be possible at
all.



0
UZnal
1/28/2008 6:49:46 PM
> System: 9533-DB7
> OS: Windows 95 OSR 2.5
> Monitor: Dell Ultrascan 800HS Series
> XGA-2: 9533 on-planar "ISA", white heatsinked RAMDAC
> XGA208: Latest available as of Jan-27-2008
>
> Results: The Dell monitor was more than happy to let me adjust it until
the
> picture was completely on the screen, although it was easier to do this at
> 75Hz vertical refresh. Between mode switches, a small amount of "snow"
> appeared in the lower half of the screen while it was blacked out.

The snow could be a leftover from the sync, but I will create a new, more
generous set of timings. I am glad that the ISA XGA-2 passed the test.


> Believe it or not, I didn't think this test killed the video, so I
> reseated the PCMCIA adapter and that brought the machine right around on
the
> third attempt. Subsequent booting into Windows 95 did not result in any
> problems.

The real "abuse" experiences the blue XGA-2 here on the test machine, Mod.
77. It is quite resistant, when things go wrong, and they sometimes go
wrong, the screen remains black. The XGA-2 has apparently a very efficient
abuse protection scheme.

The funniest and artful bug is when the buffer pitch setting is wrong. Then
you see only thin traces of color all over the display area, like a cloud of
colorful arrows. A bug like an impressionistic painting...


0
UZnal
1/28/2008 7:00:09 PM
> At 832x624 some 10% of the display buffer remains unused

I correct, only 1% remains unused for display purposes.





0
UZnal
1/28/2008 9:02:50 PM
> > At 832x624

I created a new set of timings which look now quite well on an "unadjusted"
monitor, that is, without a need to adjust the picture. I reset the Eizo
T56S to the defaults to erase the stored settings, here are the latest
results:

90/45 Mhz PEL / 41.9 kHz line / 65.4 Hz
96/48 Mhz PEL / 44.7 kHz line / 69.5 Hz
98/49 Mhz PEL / 45.6 kHz line / 71.2 Hz

The safe spot is at 65 Hz unadjusted, that would become some 70 Hz adjusted.
By "adjusted" I mean a monitor which allows to better adjust the picture.
"Adjusted" allows to use tighter mode settings, this increases the line
rate, and hence, the frame rate.

In the package, the default driver could bet set to the conservative 65 Hz,
for the adventurous the higher PEL versions could be provided, or but vice
versa. When the card works, there is a video signal. And there is an
excellent signal so far at the 98 Mhz PEL rate, see above.







0
UZnal
1/29/2008 8:57:26 PM
> > At 832x624 some 10% of the display buffer remains unused
>
> I correct, only 1% remains unused for display purposes.

Those 10 KB are used to store some data in the offscreen (unused) video
memory, I suspect, 10 KB are not enough; select 832x624 16-bit colors, load
Paint and pretend to define a color. Do you see any cracks in the color
slider?






0
UZnal
2/5/2008 10:41:10 PM
> I suspect, 10 KB are not enough; select 832x624 16-bit colors

The bit block transfer (BLT, the brush is such a block), needs 8 lines but
only are 6 free. The brush is copied to a rectangular region in offscreen
memory, this is required by the XGA coprocessor.

I reduced the lines to 620 and all problems disappeared. I must see how the
absolute minimum of 622 lines (832x622) behaves. Consider the problem
solved.


Where have all the people gone?


0
UZnal
2/6/2008 6:00:21 PM
Is this supposed to be a 60s protest song? where have all the young men 
gone....

UZnal wrote:
> Where have all the people gone?
> 
> 
0
Louis
2/6/2008 6:10:51 PM
Hi!

> Where have all the people gone?

I've been sick, busy, etc. Would like to get back into it, but I'm in
a little deep right now with lots of other things.

William
0
wm_walsh
2/6/2008 8:34:52 PM
UZnal wrote:

> 
> Where have all the people gone?

Been a bit preoccupied with other S.H.I.T. Will resume testing presently.

Klatuu Barada Nikto....



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0
Jim
2/6/2008 11:11:30 PM
Jim Shorney wrote:

> 
> Klatuu Barada Nikto....
> 
> 
> 
"The Day the Earth Stood Still"???
0
Jim
2/6/2008 11:53:52 PM
On Feb 6, 1:10 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> Is this supposed to be a 60s protest song? where have all the young men
> gone....
>
> UZnal wrote:
> > Where have all the people gone?

Peter, Paul and Mary......

Great protesters of the war in Viet Nam.....but they made some goddamn
good music.......

CT the Audiophile
0
Tim
2/7/2008 12:46:59 AM
Jim Hall wrote:
> Jim Shorney wrote:
>>
>> Klaatu Barada Nikto....
>>
>>
> "The Day the Earth Stood Still"???



Just seeing who's awake.

You win (absolutely nothing).



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0
Jim
2/7/2008 3:12:57 AM
> >> Klaatu Barada Nikto....
> >>
> > "The Day the Earth Stood Still"???

.... As XGA-2 hit the 100 Hz barrier ...;)

I can announce it now, we have now 85 Hz and 100 Hz refresh rates for the
800x600 and 832x62x resolutions with 256 colors. They require a higher line
rate, some 64 kHz (100 Hz) and 54 kHz (85 Hz), which may not be supported by
some older monitors.

85 Hz and 100 Hz can be provided as options, the default (optimum) rate
could be set to 75 Hz for the monitors with the lower line rates. The higher
refresh is mostly a function of the line rate, the PEL rate is safe.

For 832x620 8-bit 256 colors, I performed more tests:

    1. The display is stable at exactly 99.4 Hz. These timings will be used.

    2. At 100.9 Hz thin sprite (cursor) traces occasionally appear as the
mouse is quickly moved. 100.9 Hz is a difference of 1 Mhz PEL over 99.4 Hz.

    3. At 110 Hz the sprite (hardware cursor) doubles, i.e. as if there were
two cursors moving in tandem, color defects appear on bitmap lines.

    4. At 120 Hz there was no video.

    5. The theoretical XGA-2 maximum for 832x620 is 130 Hz, not tested.

800x600 8-bit 256 colors can get over the 100 Hz safe limit, it would result
in about 102 Hz at 64.2 kHz line rate. 1024x768 256 colors can be possibly
driven at some 80 Hz on the same line rate.

Some of my test comments:

; ????: 90 Mhz / 84 kHz line / 130 Hz / 90 Mhz = 9958h (THEORY)
; FAIL: 86 Mhz / 80 kHz line / 120 Hz / 86 Mhz = 9558h (FAILS)
; Pass: 71 Mhz / 65.1 kHz line / 100.9 Hz / 71 Mhz = 8658h (sprite traces)
; Pass: 77 Mhz / 70.6 kHz line / 109.4 Hz / 77 Mhz = 8C58h (double sprite)
; Pass: 70 Mhz / 64.2 kHz line / 99.4 Hz / 70 Mhz = 8558h ** USE THIS
; Pass: 59 Mhz / 54.9 kHz line / 85.4 Hz / 59 Mhz = 7558h ** USE THIS
; Pass: 58 Mhz / 54.0 kHz line / 84.0 Hz / 58 Mhz = 7358h ** GOOD


Test team - Jim, William et al.:

Please wait for the 208c release, coming soon. All modes are being inspected
and revised not to require any monitor adjustment. They look fine on my
monitor but there certainly will be differences between the monitors. The
IBM 9515-optimized modes have been already integrated. The flashes of random
data on mode switching (XGA mode to VGA) were eliminated, there were also a
number of small corrections and fixes.

XGA208 can serve now as a very good and stable prototype to port to NT.




0
UZnal
2/7/2008 7:59:10 PM
Jim Shorney wrote
>
> Klatuu Barada Nikto....
>

I thought it was Klaatu ?
(Calling Occupants Of Interplanetary Craft)


0
JWR
2/7/2008 8:31:54 PM
I have my Model 90 sitting across the room from me.

I can test both XGA (1MB) and XGA-2.

UZnal wrote:
> XGA208 can serve now as a very good and stable prototype to port to NT.
0
Louis
2/7/2008 8:56:21 PM
JWR wrote:

> Jim Shorney wrote
> 
>>Klatuu Barada Nikto....
>>
> 
> I thought it was Klaatu ?
> (Calling Occupants Of Interplanetary Craft)


That would be the Earth spelling.



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0
Jim
2/8/2008 2:09:46 AM
On Feb 6, 10:00 am, "UZnal" <unalz-at-mail333-dot-com> wrote:
> ... problem
> solved.
>
> Where have all the people gone?

I've been over at rec.bicycles.tech  - Sure, it gets kind of... um,
spiky there, too - but as Monty Python might say, they're not dead
yet :-)

In fact, it's a ng with legs.  And I just got a new (old) Miyata 914
that appears to have spent its whole 18-year life in California where
bikes don't rust <bfg>  For those who don't know what a Miyata 914 is,
it was a top-of-the-line (consumer level) Japanese steel racing bike
built in 1989.  I had a model 112 (entry-level) back in the late '80s
that I loved soooooo much, only to have it stolen by crackheads.  Let
me tell you I am ecstatic to have a perfect fitting 914 in excellent
shape here in my living room for only $36 more than I paid for my 112
in ~'87

But youse guys probably don't much care about that s**t.  Sorry for
the OT.  Honest, I do love you guys, but this bike is darn near just
as good functionally (and way better character-wise) than anything you
can get at your Local Bike Shop today.  (Did I mention that it was
built in 1989 ;-)

But enough about bikes (which I suspect my garage will soon be filling
up with... er, already is beginning to... er, maybe already *is*...)

Of course my day job is still in IT, so I won't get totally lost right
away.  In fact, I got in about 30 minutes of gratuitous C hacking with
in the other day (even though this is not part of my specific job
duties).  It was pretty cool - and satisfying - rough and rusty at
first, but in no time flailing merrily at the good ol' Model M and
whipping code into submission by the seat of my frickin' pants and
documentation be d**ned.  Wheeeeeee! :-)

See you around.  I'll check back for sure when I need to fix the
batteries on my Cheetahs.

(Here's hoping my knee holds up.)

Respectfully,
Dan




0
Dan
2/8/2008 7:17:40 AM
On Feb 6, 4:46 pm, "Tim Knight/CT" <msgtkni...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Feb 6, 1:10 pm, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
>
> > Is this supposed to be a 60s protest song? where have all the young men
> > gone....
>
> > UZnal wrote:
> > > Where have all the people gone?
>
> Peter, Paul and Mary......
>
> Great protesters of the war in Viet Nam.....but they made some goddamn
> good music.......
>

No doubt about it (with help from Pete Seeger in that instance).  This
post really makes me want to clear space in the living room to drag
out the DQ-20's and play some LP's :-)

(Did I ever tell the story here about my daughter getting to sing with
Peter Yarrow?  No, I don't think so.  It's true!)

> CT the Audiophile

Hat's off.

0
Dan
2/8/2008 7:25:09 AM
On Feb 6, 10:10 am, Louis Ohland <ohl...@charter.net> wrote:
> Is this supposed to be a 60s protest song? where have all the young men
> gone....
>
> UZnal wrote:
> > Where have all the people gone?

I go down to speakers corner Im thunderstruck
They got free speech, tourists, police in trucks
Two men say theyre jesus one of them must be wrong
Theres a protest singer singing a protest song - he says
they wanna have a war to keep us on our knees
They wanna have a war to keep their factories
They wanna have a war to stop us buying japanese
They wanna have a war to stop industrial disease
Theyre pointing out the enemy to keep you deaf and blind
They wanna sap your energy incarcerate your mind
They give you rule brittania, gassy beer, page three
Two weeks in espana and sunday striptease
Meanwhile the first jesus says Id cure it soon
Abolish monday mornings and friday afternoons
The other ones on a hunger strike hes dying by degrees
How come jesus gets industrial disease
0
Dan
2/8/2008 7:25:35 AM
Dan,
I support you 100%, being that I am a retro bike nut.
Sounds like a goood collect. Enjoy.
When they say the simplest things in life are often the best, by that they 
mean bicycles.
Pete.

"Dan O" <danoverman@gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:359fe66e-ff0d-4f1d-8753-4dc03da501ff@d21g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> On Feb 6, 10:00 am, "UZnal" <unalz-at-mail333-dot-com> wrote:
>> ... problem
>> solved.
>>
>> Where have all the people gone?
>
> I've been over at rec.bicycles.tech  - Sure, it gets kind of... um,
> spiky there, too - but as Monty Python might say, they're not dead
> yet :-)
>
> In fact, it's a ng with legs.  And I just got a new (old) Miyata 914
> that appears to have spent its whole 18-year life in California where
> bikes don't rust <bfg>  For those who don't know what a Miyata 914 is,
> it was a top-of-the-line (consumer level) Japanese steel racing bike
> built in 1989.  I had a model 112 (entry-level) back in the late '80s
> that I loved soooooo much, only to have it stolen by crackheads.  Let
> me tell you I am ecstatic to have a perfect fitting 914 in excellent
> shape here in my living room for only $36 more than I paid for my 112
> in ~'87
>
> But youse guys probably don't much care about that s**t.  Sorry for
> the OT.  Honest, I do love you guys, but this bike is darn near just
> as good functionally (and way better character-wise) than anything you
> can get at your Local Bike Shop today.  (Did I mention that it was
> built in 1989 ;-)
>
> But enough about bikes (which I suspect my garage will soon be filling
> up with... er, already is beginning to... er, maybe already *is*...)
>
> Of course my day job is still in IT, so I won't get totally lost right
> away.  In fact, I got in about 30 minutes of gratuitous C hacking with
> in the other day (even though this is not part of my specific job
> duties).  It was pretty cool - and satisfying - rough and rusty at
> first, but in no time flailing merrily at the good ol' Model M and
> whipping code into submission by the seat of my frickin' pants and
> documentation be d**ned.  Wheeeeeee! :-)
>
> See you around.  I'll check back for sure when I need to fix the
> batteries on my Cheetahs.
>
> (Here's hoping my knee holds up.)
>
> Respectfully,
> Dan
>
>
>
> 


0
Pete
2/8/2008 10:42:51 AM
> I have my Model 90 sitting across the room from me.
>
> I can test both XGA (1MB) and XGA-2.

Now that the W9x VDD comes into a good final shape, the modes can be
directly transferred to the NT miniport. On the display driver side (XGA
DLL), most of the work is done, only a few parts wait to be completed.

Another fix, the black screen on W9x shutdown to DOS has been eliminated.

Any info on the common line rates of the LCD monitors? I assume, 39.4 kHz is
supported?

> > XGA208 can serve now as a very good and stable prototype to port to NT.



0
UZnal
2/8/2008 5:45:44 PM
Praytell, now that you've figured out how to handle the shutdown  to 
DOS, why did the original W9x driver need  MODE: CO80 or whatever to 
prompt the display to work?

UZnal wrote:
> Another fix, the black screen on W9x shutdown to DOS has been eliminated.
0
Louis
2/8/2008 6:29:49 PM
How will this miniport handle XGA and XGA-2 in the same system? I 
suppose that I will be finding out.

My "experience" with the M$ W95 driver and system was that W95 saw the 
planar XGA and refused to gracefully release the resources for it, 
thereby causing no end of trouble and yellow "!"

For those helping beta test UZnal's W9x port, does it play well on an 
XGA / XGA-2 system? Does it support multiple screens?

UZnal wrote:
>> I have my Model 90 sitting across the room from me.
>>
>> I can test both XGA (1MB) and XGA-2.
> 
> Now that the W9x VDD comes into a good final shape, the modes can be
> directly transferred to the NT miniport. On the display driver side (XGA
> DLL), most of the work is done, only a few parts wait to be completed.
> 
> Another fix, the black screen on W9x shutdown to DOS has been eliminated.
> 
> Any info on the common line rates of the LCD monitors? I assume, 39.4 kHz is
> supported?
> 
>>> XGA208 can serve now as a very good and stable prototype to port to NT.
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
2/8/2008 6:40:02 PM
> Praytell, now that you've figured out how to handle the shutdown  to
> DOS, why did the original W9x driver need  MODE: CO80 or whatever to
> prompt the display to work?

MODE CO80 selects an 80-lines color text mode, in doing so it changes to the
VGA mode, i.e. there is a reset involved. This was needed because the
original driver was leaving the card in an undefined state. There is a
defined procedure in the techref on how to leave an XGA mode and prepare the
card for VGA. When the card is ready to VGA, a VGA mode must be still
selected. This procedure was called from several parts in the M$ driver, it
was not at all clear WTF was in charge for the transition from XGA to VGA.
One part set the text mode, another parts did not.

I did not trace the calls, but this procedure must have been performed
twice: the first time, at disabling the driver (XGA to VGA, correct), and
the second time before system exit (XGA to VGA performed in VGA mode,
imagine this!). The M$ driver also lacked the palette portion in the
XGA-to-VGA procedure code.

The M$ driver hooks the system exit and this made me suspicous, so I
compared it with the other samples (ATI, Cirrus, S3). Then I removed the
system exit hook, and it worked. I re-enabled it but left there only the
procedure call to erase the display buffer. I will test further, I want to
completely eliminate the system exit hook

If the XGA display buffer is not erased on switching from XGA to VGA,
"flashes of random data" occur on mode switching. The techref advises to
clear the first 256 KB for going to VGA, but apparently it is cleaner when
the complete video memory is erased. This is done now.

BTW, it is easily possible to move the default to the 132-column mode
instead of the usual 80 columns text mode. The techref describes also a
procedure how to achieve it when the XGA BIOS lacks the 132-column mode
call. Moreover, I could attempt to detect the monitor ID without the BIOS
call (there is a techref procedure) to deny modes not suitable for the IBM
9515 monitor.

The new 960x720 mode @85 Hz looks very good on a 17" monitor.





0
UZnal
2/9/2008 6:22:11 PM
> How will this miniport handle XGA and XGA-2 in the same system? I
> suppose that I will be finding out.

The adapter in a slot has a higher priority over the planar video. If an XGA
or XGA-2 is first seen in a slot, the planar video will not be used. The
assumption it that the adapter in the slot upgrades the planar video.

> My "experience" with the M$ W95 driver and system was that W95 saw the
> planar XGA and refused to gracefully release the resources for it,
> thereby causing no end of trouble and yellow "!"

Because the M$ driver disabled the planar XGA when it found another adapter
in a slot. This condition can be removed, XGA adapters can coexist. Prepare
to test, however, only one adapter will drive the screen - for now.



0
UZnal
2/9/2008 6:59:48 PM
Hi!

> For those helping beta test UZnal's W9x port, does it play
> well on an XGA / XGA-2 system?

I had no problems with it. As best I could tell, the planar XGA-1 on
my "test bed" Model 90 simply went to "sleep" when an XGA-2 was put
into place. I might have had to correct Windows' misguided beliefs
about which display adapter was installed...

> Does it support multiple screens?

I don't think so.

William
0
wm_walsh
2/11/2008 2:51:04 PM
Another major fix:

4-bpp coprocessor operations enabled for the 16 colors modes - 800x600,
1024x768 and 1280x1024.

We have now a fast, coprocessor-supported 1280x1024 mode and it should be
possible to recalculate it to non-interlaced for an LCD. 16 colors are good
enough for text based work.



0
UZnal
2/18/2008 2:51:44 PM
> possible to recalculate it to non-interlaced for an LCD

Recalculation resulted in the following numbers, which must be tested and
verified, I have already created the mode timings, all *non-interlaced*:

120 Mhz / 74.2 kHz / 4 bpp 70 / 1280x1024 (VESA mode, 106h)
126 Mhz / 74.2 kHz / 4 bpp 70 / 1360x1024
120 Mhz / 74.2 kHz / 4 bpp 75 / 1280x960
  91 Mhz / 64.3 kHz / 8 bpp 75 / 1104x828

A word to the 120/126 Mhz PEL rates: Just as the 16-bpp halved the rate, the
4-bpp doubles the rate. Therefore, the effective 8-bit dot rate is 60/63 Mhz
with a PEL rate of 120/126 Mhz. For the techref, the max rate in the 4-bpp
case is 128 Mhz, it is the highest given programmable number.

FR Field  Division   Frequency Range
(binary)  Factor
0 0         4     16.25MHz to 32.00MHz in 0.25MHz increments
0 1         2     32.50MHz to 64.00MHz in 0.50MHz increments
1 0         1     65.00MHz to 128.00MHz in 1.00MHz increments
1 1         -     Reserved


While speaking only for this monitor, Eizo T56S, the new monitors are faster
than the older monitors. I observed that on the IBM 9515 which needs quite
"long" lines (extra spacing) and demands to be warmed up before switching
from XGA hi-res mode to DOS text mode (or but that is simply the age, the
idle time, the capacitors drying up?).

With faster monitors, higher line rates and "shorter" lines are possible,
that allows the refresh rate to be increased. Remember that the XGA-2
timings (DMQS files) are by now some 14 years old, it is time to update them
for the better monitors.

I also revised the existing XGA206 settings and converted them to
"unadjusted", i.e. they do not need any adjustment on the Eizo T56S,
however, they might need to be adjusted on other monitors.




0
UZnal
2/18/2008 8:53:06 PM
Hi!

> We have now a fast, coprocessor-supported 1280x1024
> mode and it should be possible to recalculate it
> to non-interlaced for an LCD. 16 colors are good
> enough for text based work.

I'll check it out here, although I may have to work a bit to find a
monitor that can sync up at that resolution.

William

0
wm_walsh
2/18/2008 8:53:44 PM
> > We have now a fast, coprocessor-supported 1280x1024
> > mode and it should be possible to recalculate it
> > to non-interlaced for an LCD.

This card is alive more than before, and I did not push either the PEL or
the line rate too high. Amazing what you can get out of it, this evening I
am indeed happy with the work:

70 Hz non-interlaced for 1280x1024 and 74 Hz non-interlaced for 1280x960 is
the result, here the impemented, tested and verified numbers:

1280x1024 4-bpp
    121 Mhz PEL / 73.6 kHz line / 70.1 Hz
    113 Mhz PEL / 68.8 kHz line / 65.4 Hz
    106 Mhz PEL / 58.1 kHz line / 53.1 Hz Interlaced (IBM 9517 timings)

1280x960 4-bpp
    121 Mhz PEL / 73.6 kHz line / 73.9 Hz
    113 Mhz PEL / 68.8 kHz line / 69.0 Hz

Two more modes will follow.

> I'll check it out here, although I may have to work a bit to find a
> monitor that can sync up at that resolution.

I tested the modes, a good hi-res monitor will be needed for the XGA208. How
about an LCD monitor, does it support the XGA208 line rates?


0
UZnal
2/19/2008 9:30:51 PM
UZnal wrote:

> This card is alive more than before, and I did not push either the PEL or
> the line rate too high. 


UZ, could you please re-post the link to the DL?

Thanks.

-Jim (the lazy American)

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0
Jim
2/20/2008 2:50:42 AM
> 1280x1024 4-bpp
>     121 Mhz PEL / 73.6 kHz line / 70.1 Hz
>     113 Mhz PEL / 68.8 kHz line / 65.4 Hz
>     106 Mhz PEL / 58.1 kHz line / 53.1 Hz Interlaced (IBM 9517 timings)
>
> 1280x960 4-bpp
>     121 Mhz PEL / 73.6 kHz line / 73.9 Hz
>     113 Mhz PEL / 68.8 kHz line / 69.0 Hz
>
> Two more modes will follow.

Here are the last two (for now), both modes are non-interlaced:

1104x828 8-bpp 256 colors
    96 Mhz PEL / 66.9 kHz line / 78.1 Hz
    93 Mhz PEL / 64.8 kHz line / 75.6 Hz
    90 Mhz PEL / 62.7 kHz line / 73.2 Hz

1360x1024 4-bpp 16 colors
    118 Mhz PEL / 67.8 kHz line / 63.9 Hz
    111 Mhz PEL / 63.8 kHz line / 60.1 Hz

I chose these modes because they were contained in the DMQS files. XGA208
covers now all DMQS modes.

My experiments showed that the PEL rate is rather sensitive to the total
pixel volume. The PEL rate can be safely overdriven at lower volume rates,
e.g. 832x620 or 1104x828, but 1360x1024 was not stable at 120 Mhz which is
below the possible 128 Mhz for the 4-bpp case. The test started good but
doubled after a few minutes the sprite, a clear sign to reduce the PEL rate.
The only problem I observed was the sprite (hardware cursor), everything
else was stable.

I must correct previous statement of mine, I thought I was testing with the
blue XGA-2 but it was the classic heatsinked XGA-2. I saw it as I inserted a
second XGA-2 in the machine. The driver now does not disable other XGA
cards. The XGA/XGA-2 in the lowest slot is selected as the "master" card.

The combination of two or more cards will be an interesting subject for
other experiments. I wonder if the XGA-2 designers thought and provided
facilities for joining the display buffers, so that a virtual composite
display operating on two or more monitors is created. The card operates
internally with a guard band, that is, pixel operations can overflow with no
ill effect: "The guardband allows the destination X and Y addresses to range
(-2048 to 6143)." (see trm3.pdf, pp, 3-100).







0
UZnal
2/20/2008 7:08:16 PM
> UZ, could you please re-post the link to the DL?

Jim, the DL version is old, the latest changes are not yet released. Here
the link in any case:

Jan 21, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208b.zip

The C-version is coming soon, there are no major tasks left but there are
some portions from the original M$ code awaiting a careful examination. In
particular, I want to assure myself that the code is coprocessor-compliant.



0
UZnal
2/20/2008 7:28:34 PM
UZnal wrote:

> The C-version is coming soon, there are no major tasks left but there are
> some portions from the original M$ code awaiting a careful examination. In
> particular, I want to assure myself that the code is coprocessor-compliant.

Ah, good. I can be lazy for a bit longer. IIRC I did some limited 
testing with B. Will wait for C before I get really crazy.

Would it drive a 6091? Naw, never mind, I would really have to stack 
things at precarious angles to test that without major reconstruction in 
C&C....

-Jim (or get a REEEALLY long VGA extension cable)

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0
Jim
2/21/2008 4:58:57 AM
> Would it drive a 6091?

Yes, it would. (30 minutes later)  We can dance. The Tool pointed me to the
6091 parameters. In terms of the line frequency more resolutions are
possible.

Feb 21, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208bc.zip

I prepared a preliminary C-release, named BC, so you can test your 6091.
Support is enabled for 60 Hz @ 63.35 kHz and 67 Hz @ 70.75 kHz. Select 60 or
65 Hz frame rate when you install the driver. Two utlities are also
provided, V132 switches to 132-column mode (in an on/off fashion), XGA2
dumps system info.

Verify that the installed monitor file enables the desired max resolution,
or else Windows may hide the hi-res modes. All other so far reported modes
can be also tested. To do this, select a suitable monitor, or one supporting
1600x1200. The file XGA208MON.TXT lists the modes and the parameters.

You may also try 960x720 @ 85 Hz, the line rate, 63.2 kHz, is close enough.
Look also at other modes and line rates close to those of 6091.

For 6091, I used the timings below. "1280 1306 1506 1760" are the horizontal
timings given in pixels. XGA-2 requires them in lines, divide by 8 to obtain
the value in lines (e.g. 1280/8 = 160, decrement and set to 159). 1306 is
where HSync starts, 1506 where HSync ends, 1760 is HTotal (so my guess).
Similarly for the vertical parameters, "1024 1027 1030 1056". 1027 is where
VSync starts, 1030 where VSync ends, and 1056 is VTotal.

For 70.75 kHz we have then 70750 kHz/1056 lines = 66.99 Hz, this required
120 Mhz PEL rate. For 60 Hz 63.35 kHz the PEL rate giving the exact number
of lines could not be matched, so I set it to 111 Mhz (would require 111.5
Mhz or so, but the step must be 1). BTW, the 60 Hz timings below are not
exactly correct, not all are integer divisible by 8, e.g. 1306 and 1506 are
XGA-2 faulty. I used 1304 and 1504. I would rather assume that both 60 and
67 Hz use equal timings where only the PEL rate differs, but let us first
see how well these timings fit.


# For IBM-Monitor 6091/19
# tested (without any warranty) by Sven Koelsch <s......gmx.de>

# 1280x1024 @ 60 Hz, 63.35 kHz IBM standard mode 2 from monitor spec
Modeline "IBM_mode_2" 111.50  1280 1306 1506 1760  1024 1027 1030
1056 -hsync -vsync

# 1280x1024 @ 67 Hz, 70.75 kHz IBM standard mode 3 from monitor spec
Modeline "IBM_mode_3" 120.00  1280 1312 1472 1696  1024 1027 1030
1056 -hsync -vsync



0
UZnal
2/21/2008 8:44:49 PM
> the 60 Hz timings below are not exactly correct

They were not. I looked closely at the timings in the Tool quotes and found
out how to derive the XGA-2 settings. Please test 6091 with the updated
CC-version:

Feb 22, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208cc.zip

1280x1024 is currently modified to test the IBM 6091-109 monitor. The mode
timings specific to IBM 6091 are identifiable through the refresh rate,
60/65/75:

    60 Hz: Mode 1 at 63.36 kHz @ 60 Hz
    65 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Sync on Green  !!!!!!
    75 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Separate Sync  **** DEFAULT

The 70 Hz setting selects the mode timings applicable to the usual multisync
monitors.


> # 1280x1024 @ 60 Hz, 63.35 kHz IBM standard mode 2 from monitor spec
> Modeline "IBM_mode_2" 111.50  1280 1306 1506 1760  1024 1027 1030
> 1056 -hsync -vsync

Numbers 2 and 3 corrected, requires 112 Mhz PEL:

"IBM_mode_2"  1280 1296 1496 1760 1024 1027 1030 1056 -hsync -vsync




0
UZnal
2/22/2008 2:25:58 PM
Hi!

> Would it drive a 6091? Naw, never mind, I would
> really have to stack things at precarious angles
> to test that without major reconstruction in
> C&C....

No excuses! :-)

I am going to *try* and dig out my huge NEC Multisync CRT. (This has
been buried so long I don't even remember the model #.) It isn't in
the best shape. It is probably the only monitor I have that will sync
up at these high resolutions.

William
0
wm_walsh
2/22/2008 3:32:57 PM
Hi!

> 65 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Sync on Green

Are you saying that the XGA-2 supports sync-on-green? Wow...I had no
idea!

William
0
wm_walsh
2/22/2008 3:34:56 PM
> I looked closely at the timings in the Tool

A short lesson in PEL arithmetics:

Louis has this table in the Tool which allowed me to calculate the 6091
parameters as required by the XGA-2. The card operates with PELs(dots) and
lines, therefore it was necessary to convert the H-timings (horizontal) to
dots. Correct me if I am wrong, or add comments, I arrived at this method
purely by a process of trial and error.

Let us select Modes 1 and 2 and see how the calculations are done. Note that
the timings are equal but the line rates differ. The reason will become
clear at the end of the lesson:


6019-019 Modes
                    Sync on     Sync on         Sync on     Separate
                    Green         Green            Green         Sync
                              1             2              3            3
H Line Frequency     63.36kHz    63.63kHz   70.75kHz     70.75kHz

H Active time        11.478us    11.478us   10.6667us    10.6667us
H Sync Width         1.794us     1.794us     1.3333us     1.3333us
H Front porch        0.235us     0.235us     0.2667us     0.1333us
H Back porch         2.275us     2.275us     1.8667us     2.000us


Follow these steps, the working resolution is 1280x1024:

1. Divide the given H-Resolution (1280), by 8 to obtain the number of dots

HDE (horizontal display enable)
= H-Resolution / 8
= 1280 / 8
= 160 dots

2. Divide 'H Active time' by the HDE to obtain the Dot time

Dot time
= H Active time / HDE
= 11.478 / 160
= 0.07174 us

3. Add all timings

HT  (horizontal total, time)
= H Active time + H Sync Width + H Front porch + H Back porch
= 11.478 + 1.794 + 0.235 + 2.275
= 15.782 us

4. Divide HT by the Dot time (obtained in step 2) and round the result

HT / Dot time
= 15.782 / 0.07174
= 219.9
= 220 dots

5. Divide H Sync Width by the Dot time and round the result

H Sync Width / Dot time
= 1.794 / 0.07174
= 25 dots

6. Divide H Front porch by the Dot time and round the result

H Front porch / Dot time
=  0.235 / 0.07174
= 3.27
= 3 dots

7. Add H Front porch to HDE (horizontal display enable) to obtain HSPS
(horizontal sync pulse start):

HSPS
= HDE + H Front porch
= 160 +3
= 163

8. Divide H Back porch by the Dot time and round the result

H Back porch / Dot time
= 2.275 / 0.07174
= 31.7
= 32

9. Subtract H Back porch from HT (horizontal total) to obtain HSPE
(horizontal sync pulse end), or add H Sync Width to HSPS (horizontal sync
pulse start). Compare both values, they should be equal.

HSPE
= HT - H Back porch
= 220 - 32
= 188

or

HSPE
= HSPS + H Sync Width
= 163 + 25
= 188

10. For XGA-2, decrement all calculated values

HT     = 219 = 220 - 1
HDE   = 159 = 160 - 1
HSPS = 162 = 163 - 1
HSPE = 187 = 188 - 1

11. For X11, multiply all calculated values by 8

HT     = 1760 = 220 * 8
HDE   = 1280 = 160 * 8
HSPS = 1304 = 163 * 8
HSPE = 1504 = 188 * 8


12. Calculate the necessary PEL rate, round the result, decrement for XGA-2
(Note: for these timings, the necesary PEL rate is 111.5 Mhz which cannot be
set on the XGA-2, hence, the two different line rates, 63.36 kHz and 63.63
kHz).

HT (for 63.36 kHz)
= PEL rate / line rate / 8
= 112 000 / 63.36 / 8
= 220.96
= 221  - 1
= 220 (failed, not equal to HT)

or

HT (for 63.63 kHz)
= PEL rate / line rate / 8
= 112 000 / 63.63 / 8
= 220.02
= 220 - 1
= 219 (success, equals to HT)

The PEL rate will be then 112 Mhz for a line rate of 63.63 kHz. That is all.






0
UZnal
2/22/2008 7:47:28 PM
> > 65 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Sync on Green
>
> Are you saying that the XGA-2 supports sync-on-green? Wow...I had no
> idea!

The only difference are two sync parameters (see the 6091 page in the Tool),
but inexplicably the picture differed too. The separate sync mode produced a
darker but crispier display. I test both modes on the VGA input of the
monitor, it has also separate BNC inputs. Both work with the XGA-2. So much
about the mode parameters, the rest is left to the tests.



0
UZnal
2/22/2008 7:59:40 PM
UZnal wrote:
>>Would it drive a 6091?
> 
> 
> Yes, it would. (30 minutes later)  We can dance. The Tool pointed me to the
> 6091 parameters. In terms of the line frequency more resolutions are
> possible.
> 
> Feb 21, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208bc.zip


Oh man, this is gonna hurt. That computer is three deep under a tack of 
computers and about 20 hard drives. Not to mention that there is barely 
room for me to *sit* at the command station where the 6091-19i is 
connected. Chaining three VGA extension cables together is starting to 
look good, although I hate to take the video hit from such a kluge...

Maybe tomorrow.



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0
Jim
2/23/2008 6:00:54 AM
> Oh man, this is gonna hurt.

Well, you get what you asked for, but take your time. I am not in a hurry, I
will be busy calculating more hires modes. XGA-2 has a setting to blank out
the Red and Blue DAC outputs, that means, auto-support for monochrome
monitors. Anyone with a true monochrome monitor to test? I got all shades of
green on my color monitor, a truly Martian experience. Even plain DOS turned
Martian.

6019-019: 1280x1024

Mode 1 6019-019 (60 Hz) ** TEST ** (may not sync up well)
Mode 2 6019-019 (60 Hz) ** TEST ** (should work)
Mode 3 6019-019 (67 Hz) ** TEST Sync Green ** (may not work)
Mode 3 6019-019 (67 Hz) ** TEST Separate Sync ** (should work)

6091-19i:  1280x1024

Mode 1 6091-19i (60 Hz) ** TEST **
Mode 2 6091-19i (60 Hz) ** TEST **
Mode 3 6091-19i (77 Hz) cannot be supported, a too high line rate.
Mode 4 6091-19i  (120 Hz) looks interlaced, will not be supported.


All other modes were reworked for "unadjusted", should be also tested.
Please check the monitor timings table, see the included XGA208MON.TXT.


0
UZnal
2/23/2008 12:20:09 PM
UZnal wrote:

> XGA-2 has a setting to blank out
> the Red and Blue DAC outputs, that means, auto-support for monochrome
> monitors. Anyone with a true monochrome monitor to test?


I'm probably going to regret this ... :) I've got a couple of the small 
IBM paper-white VGA, 8504-021. Bought them in unused condition at an 
auction years ago. They seem to support only the most basic mode set. I 
could stack one of those without too much hazard.


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0
Jim
2/23/2008 4:02:19 PM
Hi!

> Anyone with a true monochrome monitor to test?

How about an 8507? It is a monster of a thing, capable of 640x480 at 60Hz
and 1024x768 at 43Hz interlaced.

The video output is supposed to turn green like that. I was running a Model
57 some time ago with an 8503 attached to it. The 8503 died as I was
working, so I grabbed an 8513 as a replacement. Apparently the XGA-2 did not
reconsider the monitor type, and kept working as though it had a monochrome
display attached...so the video output was green until I rebooted.

William


0
William
2/24/2008 3:19:23 AM
> I'm probably going to regret this ... :) I've got a couple of the small
> IBM paper-white VGA, 8504-021. Bought them in unused condition at an
> auction years ago. They seem to support only the most basic mode set. I
> could stack one of those without too much hazard.

The easiest way is a small utility switching between the mono/color display
modes, without a special (mono) driver version. I need only to assemble a
few procedures from the existing utilities and add the DAC lines.

The utility will enable a green DOS prompt when in DOS with a color display,
also everything else will appear in green or in shades of green. The green
command line mode is pretty enjoyable, I liked it, and I am going to use it.

The setting is sticky, it remains until a soft or hard reset. The driver
currently ignores it and when the display is set to mono with the utility,
the driver will appear to work in a mono mode. I have not tested it yet, but
it must work from within DOS. Get the XGA-2 video I/O address and set a bit
in the Miscellaneous Control Reg (index 6Ch). Not supported on the XGA.

There are also some more things to explore in the Mainframe Interactive Mode
(MFI).



0
UZnal
2/24/2008 12:10:09 PM
How did the MXGA work?


UZnal wrote:
> The combination of two or more cards will be an interesting subject for
> other experiments. I wonder if the XGA-2 designers thought and provided
> facilities for joining the display buffers, so that a virtual composite
> display operating on two or more monitors is created. The card operates
> internally with a guard band, that is, pixel operations can overflow with no
> ill effect: "The guardband allows the destination X and Y addresses to range
> (-2048 to 6143)." (see trm3.pdf, pp, 3-100).
0
Louis
2/25/2008 12:48:54 AM
http://ftp.funet.fi/pub/os2/ibm/info/dsnews.93h
                                                                 ddextend

     +-------------------------------------------------------------+
     | Device Driver Will Extend OS/2 PM or Windows Desktop Across |
     | Multiple Displays                                           |
     +-------------------------------------------------------------+

IBM is developing a device driver that supports multiple XGA instances.
This device driver is an extension to the 32-bit Presentation Manager
(PM) and Seamless Windows XGA device drivers in OS/2 2.1, and in OS/2
2.0 plus Service Pak. A device driver to support Windows 3.1 is also
being developed.

Multiple XGA instances are combinations of XGA-1, XGA-2, and planar
XGA-1 or XGA-2 systems, with either the OS/2 PM desktop or a Windows 3.1
desktop split across multiple displays at the same resolution. Windows
applications running seamlessly on the OS/2 PM desktop will also be
permitted to run across multiple XGA instances. When the device driver
operates on a system that contains a mix of XGA-1 and XGA-2 hardware, it
always defaults to the resolution and color depth of the lowest common
denominator of XGA and display hardware available.

A maximum of eight instances of XGA will be supported in various
horizontal and vertical configurations, with the following
configurations allowed (horizontal x vertical):

   1x2, 1x3, 1x4, 1x5, 1x6, 1x7, 1x8,
   2x1, 3x1, 4x1, 5x1, 6x1, 7x1, 8x1,
   2x2, 2x3, 3x2, 2x4, 4x2.

The following resolutions and colors will be supported:

   64K colors: 640x480, 800x600, and 1024x768
   256 colors: 640x480, 800x600, 1024x768, 1104x828,
               1280x960*, 1280x1024*, and 1360x1024*
    16 colors: 1280x960, 1280x1024, and 1360x1024

* = requires an OEM 2 MB card option (see below)

In each case, the horizontal and vertical resolutions will be multiplied
by the number of XGAs installed and displays attached. For example, a
4x2 display configuration operating at 1104x828x256 colors will provide
an effective resolution of 4416x1656x256.

The DMQS function will be maintained in the multiple-instance XGA device
driver. The driver will interrogate the number of cards installed and
displays attached, and only those configurations that are valid will be
provided for user selection. In the Windows environment, an MXGA Setup
icon will appear in the Control Panel on the Windows Main Group.
User-friendly panels will allow selection of configuration, monitor
types, supported resolutions, and number of colors. In OS/2, an MXGA
icon will appear in the System Setup folder.

A dual-display ISA bus card containing two monitor connectors has
already been developed by an OEM manufacturer, and a Micro Channel card
is under development. Device drivers packaged with these cards will
operate only on systems that have at least one card present. These cards
will be available with either 1 MB or 2 MB per display.

Software for use with XGA-1 and XGA-2 cards will be made available
through a special-bid arrangement.

A full-function OS/2 PM driver with seamless windows support, as well as
a standalone Windows 3.1 device driver, will be available for
demonstration soon.


Louis Ohland wrote:
> How did the MXGA work?
> 
> 
> UZnal wrote:
>> The combination of two or more cards will be an interesting subject for
>> other experiments. I wonder if the XGA-2 designers thought and provided
>> facilities for joining the display buffers, so that a virtual composite
>> display operating on two or more monitors is created. The card operates
>> internally with a guard band, that is, pixel operations can overflow 
>> with no
>> ill effect: "The guardband allows the destination X and Y addresses to 
>> range
>> (-2048 to 6143)." (see trm3.pdf, pp, 3-100).
0
Louis
2/25/2008 12:51:11 AM
Hi!

>    64K colors: 640x480, 800x600, and 1024x768
> * = requires an OEM 2 MB card option (see below)

Might this be a reference to the mythical 2MB XGA-2?

William


0
William
2/25/2008 3:56:38 AM
I think it was an ISA card. Dunno fer sure.

William R. Walsh wrote:
> Hi!
> 
>>    64K colors: 640x480, 800x600, and 1024x768
>> * = requires an OEM 2 MB card option (see below)
> 
> Might this be a reference to the mythical 2MB XGA-2?
> 
> William
> 
> 
0
Louis
2/25/2008 8:06:12 PM
If one does not use the hardware sprite, but instead uses a software 
cursor, does that allow for one to drive the card harder?

UZnal wrote:
> My experiments showed that the PEL rate is rather sensitive to the total
> pixel volume. The PEL rate can be safely overdriven at lower volume rates,
> e.g. 832x620 or 1104x828, but 1360x1024 was not stable at 120 Mhz which is
> below the possible 128 Mhz for the 4-bpp case. The test started good but
> doubled after a few minutes the sprite, a clear sign to reduce the PEL rate.
> The only problem I observed was the sprite (hardware cursor), everything
> else was stable.
0
Louis
2/25/2008 8:45:56 PM
Hi William,

"William R. Walsh" <newsgroups1@idontwantjunqueemail.walshcomptech.com> 
schreef in bericht news:W%qwj.48551$9j6.10797@attbi_s22...
> Hi!
>
>>    64K colors: 640x480, 800x600, and 1024x768
>> * = requires an OEM 2 MB card option (see below)
>
> Might this be a reference to the mythical 2MB XGA-2?

As the text says :

* = requires an OEM 2 MB card option (see below)
(.....)
A dual-display ISA bus card containing two monitor connectors has
already been developed by an OEM manufacturer, and a Micro Channel card
is under development. (.....) These cards
will be available with either 1 MB or 2 MB per display.

It clearly states "OEM"-cards. And IMHO XGA(-2) never was OEM.
Maybe there were XGA(-2)-based OEM-cards. Others groupmembers may know more 
on that.

My interpretation of the text is, that the 256-color hi-res configurations 
were possible *only* using OEM-cards, i.e. XGA and/or XGA-2 at that point in 
time were not intended to be used for these configs.

The piece that makes me very curious is:
Software for use with XGA-1 and XGA-2 cards will be made available
through a special-bid arrangement.

I wonder if anyone ever did put in a "special-bid"?


>
> William
>
>

Jelte 


0
JWR
2/25/2008 9:15:13 PM
> The easiest way is a small utility switching between the mono/color
display
> modes, without a special (mono) driver version. I need only to assemble a
> few procedures from the existing utilities and add the DAC lines.

Feb 25, 2008: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip

Contains two DOS program files, run with -h for help on options. I tested
both on Mod. 77, both switch the display to mono, also on W9x. This allows
us not to install a mono W9x driver version but to test the mono mode with
these little programs.


XGA2MONO.EXE
Works in an on/off fashion: color to mono /  mono to color. In a system with
multiple XGA-2s, it will select the XGA-2 in the lowest numbered slot
amongst the slots which contain an XGA-2 card. Run with the option -i for
basic XGA-2 POS information.

XGA2.EXE
System/Video/XGA info tool with options to set the 132-column XGA mode and
switch the display to mono. Beside the sysinfo part, it also contains V132
and XGA2MONO which are separately available. The options to set the
132-column mode (132) and to switch the display to mono (mono) can be
combined with the sysinfo options but must be always given as the second
option. Run without options to restore the 80-column color text mode.

 -s     Print complete system information
 -v     Print video subsystem information
 -x     Print XGA subsystem information
132    Set 132-column XGA alphanumeric video mode 14h
mono  Set XGA-2 to monochrome display mode
[no option]    Restore 80-column color alphanumeric video mode


Example: "xga2 -s mono > mod77"  will print complete system info, switch to
mono and write the output to the file "mod77".




0
UZnal
2/25/2008 9:23:59 PM
> If one does not use the hardware sprite, but instead uses a software
> cursor, does that allow for one to drive the card harder?

I think so, but then the performance will suffer. A software cursor moves
slow.


0
UZnal
2/25/2008 9:53:26 PM
> > Might this be a reference to the mythical 2MB XGA-2?
> I think it was an ISA card. Dunno fer sure.

Radius comes to mind, they produced the XGA-2 ISA version. Actually, the
XGA-2 matrix is a simple thing when the OS plays with. A stacked config is
rather simple, because only the aperture, i.e. the display buffer window is
moved. The case where the horizontal resolution is doubled is unsolvable
unless GDI resp. the OS informs the driver to switch to the second display.


0
UZnal
2/25/2008 9:59:43 PM
Use the SWAG and posit the performance hit of a software cursor vs. a 
hardware cursor versus the results of driving the card.

Does using the software cursor with a hard driving mode outperform the 
more normal mode with a hardware cursor? Is there enough of a 
significant difference to make it worthwhile?

UZnal wrote:
>> If one does not use the hardware sprite, but instead uses a software
>> cursor, does that allow for one to drive the card harder?
> 
> I think so, but then the performance will suffer. A software cursor moves
> slow.
> 
> 
0
Louis
2/25/2008 11:18:03 PM
Hey, UZ....

What if the image was rotated 90 degrees? Now each card can be seen as 
"vertical"

UZnal wrote:
>>> Might this be a reference to the mythical 2MB XGA-2?
>> I think it was an ISA card. Dunno fer sure.
> 
> Radius comes to mind, they produced the XGA-2 ISA version. Actually, the
> XGA-2 matrix is a simple thing when the OS plays with. A stacked config is
> rather simple, because only the aperture, i.e. the display buffer window is
> moved. The case where the horizontal resolution is doubled is unsolvable
> unless GDI resp. the OS informs the driver to switch to the second display.
> 
> 
0
Louis
2/25/2008 11:39:21 PM
Er... Thinking on it, two separate displays using a rotated image might 
work, but trying to rotate the matrix across two cards to one display 
might not be so easy.

Louis Ohland wrote:
> Hey, UZ....
> 
> What if the image was rotated 90 degrees? Now each card can be seen as 
> "vertical"
> 
> UZnal wrote:
>>>> Might this be a reference to the mythical 2MB XGA-2?
>>> I think it was an ISA card. Dunno fer sure.
>>
>> Radius comes to mind, they produced the XGA-2 ISA version. Actually, the
>> XGA-2 matrix is a simple thing when the OS plays with. A stacked 
>> config is
>> rather simple, because only the aperture, i.e. the display buffer 
>> window is
>> moved. The case where the horizontal resolution is doubled is unsolvable
>> unless GDI resp. the OS informs the driver to switch to the second 
>> display.
>>
>>
0
Louis
2/25/2008 11:53:40 PM
> > How about an 8507?

Power on.

http://12.206.251.215/8507/part2/ (directory listing of pictures, 16-73KB in
size)

William


0
William
2/26/2008 5:45:23 AM
XGA-2 stands for eXtreme Graphics HiresmaniA with a PS/2.

It shows the following symptoms in XGA208 (* = new):

16 colors, 4-bpp:
    * 1440x1080
    * 1440x900  (wide screen!)
    * 1360x1024
    * 1280x1024
    * 1280x960
    * 1280x800  (wide screen!)
    1024x768
    800x600

256 colors, 8-bpp:
    * 1160x870
    * 1120x840
    * 1104x828
    * 1040x768
    1024x768
    * 960x720
    * 832x620
    800x600
    * 680x510
    640x480

64K colors, 16-bpp:
    * 832x620
    800x600
    * 680x510
    640x480




0
UZnal
2/26/2008 9:19:40 PM
> Does using the software cursor with a hard driving mode outperform the
> more normal mode with a hardware cursor? Is there enough of a
> significant difference to make it worthwhile?

The hardware cursor will outperform always. The hard driving mode gives you
a few Hz more refresh in the hires modes. The modes from 1280xXXXX upwards
are actually intended for LCD monitors (the frame rate is ~70 Hz and lower)
and the hard driving mode is not necessarily needed. In the 16 colors modes,
we cannot even speak of "hard" mode, it is driving below the limit anyway.

With high PEL volumes, e.g. 1280x1024, the card requires longer lines when
the line rate exceeds 70 kHz or so. "Longer" lines mean longer sync
intervals. The sprite artifacts are due to the coprocessor, apparently the
display portion of the card can keep up with the speed, but the coprocessor
cannot finish on time, or the time slice it gets becomes too small with high
line rates.

Longer lines mean higher PEL rates. At 1280x1024, IBM 6019 works with a line
length (HT, horiz total) of 212 and 120 Mhz PEL, whereas in the timings I
created, I used 118 Mhz PEL and HT of 204. I had to reduce the PEL to 116 to
remove the sprite effects, but I had initially a higher line rate than IBM
6019. The 6019 uses a very long HSYNC interval which shows up as a large
black stripe on the left of my monitor.



0
UZnal
2/26/2008 9:50:24 PM
>      +-------------------------------------------------------------+
>      | Device Driver Will Extend OS/2 PM or Windows Desktop Across |
>      | Multiple Displays                                           |
>      +-------------------------------------------------------------+

Sounds like a letter of intent from the time of the vaporware.


0
UZnal
2/26/2008 9:52:04 PM
> 16 colors, 4-bpp:

Added 1600x1200 @ 50.7 Hz for (LCD monitors), made possible by the full 128
MHz PEL rate. Works flawlessly, without sprite problems. However, apparently
only on "selected" XGA-2 cards. Only one out of these three cards passed the
test:

- The blue chip XGA-2 failed badly (font color in the display properties
turned blue when the mode was changed to 1600x1200, the sprite doubled).

- The dark brown PCB with a FRU number on it failed too, though it preserved
the font color but it kept the double sprite.

- The green PCB without a FRU number performed best, without any problems.
Amazing, this card seems to be the earliest (mid 1992) of all three.

We have a mistery to solve here.



0
UZnal
2/27/2008 8:00:50 PM
XGA208 Beta C-Release

Enables coprocessor support for graphics operations at 16-colors (4-bpp) and
supports higher resolutions up to 1600x1200. Currently, only W9x.

2008/02/28: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208c.zip

See the enclosed XGA208MON.TXT for information on monitor line rates,
refresh rates and supported resolutions. See INSTALL.TXT for installation
instructions.

Apparenty, we will need some time to collect and discuss the test reports.
This is the reason for not including now the README in the package, I will
include it at a later time. Since all modes have been reworked, I am mostly
interested if and how much you had to adjust your monitor.

If you select Mouse Trails or Color Cursor (W98SE), the hardware cursor will
be disabled. You can test 1600x1200 with or without a hardware cursor, also
do so with all other resolutions.

The XGA-2 utilities are here:

www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip



0
UZnal
2/28/2008 7:45:59 PM
> Apparenty, we will need some time to collect and discuss the test reports.

How do you do?






0
UZnal
3/9/2008 2:20:43 PM
UZnal wrote:
>>Apparenty, we will need some time to collect and discuss the test reports.
> 
> 
> How do you do?

Interesting question....

I've had a number of things on my plate the past couple of weeks that 
have not allowed me the time to do testing yet. I will make the time 
over the  next couple of days. I haven't forgotten.

-Jim



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0
Jim
3/9/2008 3:01:30 PM
> I've had a number of things on my plate the past couple of weeks that
> have not allowed me the time to do testing yet. I will make the time
> over the  next couple of days. I haven't forgotten.

Jim, I would like to know how the IBM 6019/6091 performs. From the rest of
the LCD-equipped gang, I would like to hear how well the hi-res modes work.

Meanwhile, I reworked the color pattern (the hatched brush) handling
algorithm and fixed a dirty bug coming from the original M$ code. The bug
may not show up in the M$ XGA driver, it comes up in a certain situation in
the presence of more modes and color depths which was not the case with M$
but well the case with XGA206. Steps to reproduce with XGA206 and with the
C-release of XGA208 (the upcoming D-release fixes it):

(1) Select a 256 color mode
(2) Select a pattern for the desktop background
(3) Open the Display Applet, select the Settings tab
(4) Drag the Display Applet to another position
(5) Bug: the background pattern is corrupted.
(6) To confirm, open Paint and double click on a color; you should see
corrupted patterns in the dithered colors.
(7) To fix the colors, move the resolution slider in the Display Applet and
bring it back to the original resolution, then click on OK.

This bug is due to the use of a global variable (scanline width) which
changed its value when Display/Settings was run: the driver is requested to
validate the modes but neglects to save the original value of the variable.
This value is used in the color pattern PixBLT when the patern is copied to
a rectangular offscreen area. Two lines of code, the push-pop pair fixed it
but it took much longer to figure and find out where the bug really was.

As to the new color pattern (hatched brush) handling algorithm, it was a
challenge. The problem is that, given a pattern, say 8x8 pixels, and an
arbitrary destinaton rectangle, you cannot directly fill the rectangle with
the pattern, you must align the source pattern with the destination.

Think about the problem first, I will post the solution later (hint: M$
needs 16 lines for the pattern alignment, XGA208 only 8).



0
UZnal
3/9/2008 7:57:55 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Jim, I would like to know how the IBM 6019/6091 performs. From the rest of
> the LCD-equipped gang, I would like to hear how well the hi-res modes work.

OK, I'll see what I can to do make it happen.




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0
Jim
3/10/2008 12:36:02 AM
XGA208 Beta D-Release

Final pre-release, contains fixes and code optimizations. Tested on a
system, Mod. 77/Bermuda, with two XGA-2s where the second XGA-2 remained
active, i.e. not disabled. Additional XGAs/XGA-2s will not be deactivated.

XGA208 enables coprocessor support for graphics operations at 16-colors
(4-bpp) and supports higher resolutions up to 1600x1200, currently only on
W9x.

2008/03/11: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208d.zip

See the enclosed XGA208MON.TXT for information on monitor line rates,
refresh rates and supported resolutions. See INSTALL.TXT for installation
instructions.

The XGA-2 utilities are here:

www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip



0
UZnal
3/11/2008 10:02:00 PM
UZnal wrote:
> XGA208 Beta D-Release

Ultimedia 77 is fired and primed. Can't stay up too late, but I'll get a 
start.



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0
Jim
3/12/2008 4:12:25 AM
UZnal wrote:
> XGA208 Beta D-Release

Sony Multiscan 100GS CRT (Trinitron) reset to defaults (no adjustment).

640x480
60 Hz - 3/8" gap at left, 1/4" top, 1/2" right w/slight pincushion, 1/4" 
bottom
72 Hz - 1/2" left, right, and bottom; 3/8" top. Slight pincushion.
75 Hz - 1/4" left. 3/8" right, 1/2" top, 3/8" bottom

680x510 75 Hz
1/4" top, left, and right

800x600
60 Hz - ~1/2" right, otherwise fills screen well
70 Hz - 1/2" left, 3/8" right.
72 Hz - same as 70 Hz
75 Hz - 7/16" left, 5/16" right
About 1/4" gap at top with slight bowing downward (monitor 
nonlinearity), 1/8" or less at bottom at all refresh rates.

832x620
60 Hz - 1/2" on both left and right
70 Hz - 1/2" on lefr, 3/8" on right
72 Hz - flush left, 1/4" on right, negligible gap with very slight 
foldover at top, anomalous "flicker" at top left when first few scan 
lines are light colored (border color of window moved to upper left 
corner of desktop). Probably a monitor glitch. Did not go back and check 
other modes for this phenomenon.

920x760 - flush right and bottom, 1-5/8" left, 5/8" top. To be expected.

1024x768
60 Hz - well centered, slight gap at left, 1/4" at top
70 Hz - 7/16" on left, 3/16" on right, 5/16" top

1040x768
1-1/4" left, 1/4" top, slight gap on right

1104x828
3/4" left, 1/4" top and right

1120x840
5/8" left, 1/4" top and right

1160x870
5/8" left, 1/4" top, negligible on right

1280x800
1/2" left, 1/4" top, negligible to 3/8" on right (slight keystoning)

1280x960
1/2" left, 1/4" top, slight keystoning on right as before

1280x1024
not supported by Sony monitor

All modes tested at deepest color depth supported. Bottom gap was 
negligible in all but 640x480. Monitor nonlinearities begin to show at 
both higher refresh rates and resolutions. Some of this could be 
adjusted out, but overall non-adjusted performance is very good.

More to follow as the week unfolds.

-Jim


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0
Jim
3/12/2008 5:25:49 AM
> > XGA208 Beta D-Release
>
> Sony Multiscan 100GS CRT (Trinitron) reset to defaults (no adjustment).

That is how the test should start. Jim, big thank you for the detailed
report, the results match approximately what I see on my monitor. I
intentionally left some room for eventual adjustments and monitor
differences.

> 640x480

This is the mode I did not touch. The results should be the same with 206.

> 680x510 75 Hz
> 1/4" top, left, and right

Looks fine, the timings are optimized for the IBM 9515 monitor.

> 800x600
> 832x620

256 colors and 64K colors use different timings, expect differences there.

> 920x760 - flush right and bottom, 1-5/8" left, 5/8" top. To be expected.

Timings with the 79.6 Hz frame rate are IBM 9515 optimized.

> 1040x768
> 1-1/4" left, 1/4" top, slight gap on right

Timings with the 75.2 Hz frame rate are IBM 9515 optimized.


> 1104x828
> 3/4" left, 1/4" top and right
>
> 1120x840
> 5/8" left, 1/4" top and right
>
> 1160x870
> 5/8" left, 1/4" top, negligible on right
>
> 1280x800
> 1/2" left, 1/4" top, negligible to 3/8" on right (slight keystoning)
>
> 1280x960
> 1/2" left, 1/4" top, slight keystoning on right as before

These behave as expected, I too get some of them. I am curious how they look
like on an LCD display.


> All modes tested at deepest color depth supported. Bottom gap was
> negligible in all but 640x480. Monitor nonlinearities begin to show at
> both higher refresh rates and resolutions. Some of this could be
> adjusted out, but overall non-adjusted performance is very good.

The quality of the non-adjusted performance is critical, and I am quite glad
you rate it as very good !

> More to follow as the week unfolds.



0
UZnal
3/12/2008 8:37:10 PM
UZnal wrote:

>>Sony Multiscan 100GS CRT (Trinitron) reset to defaults (no adjustment).
> 
> That is how the test should start.

Yes, I remembered that is what you asked for. Just got home from radio 
club, so probably no testing tonight.

-Jim



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0
Jim
3/13/2008 4:04:07 AM
I eliminated the programmable PEL clock setting and used the 1024x768 PEL
clock setting on the XGA-2 in 800x600 with 256 colors (8-bpp), i.e. to
simulate the XGA behaviour. Just a couple of lines, I had this mode already
with the 45 MHz PEL rate. It worked. Then I told the driver to treat the
XGA-2 as an XGA but the mode did not work, however, there are some init
differences.

Louis, it is up to you to confirm if it works on a true XGA:

2008/03/12: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208dx800.zip

Install the driver and select 1024x768 256 colors. After restarting, go to
the Display Applet and select 800x600, see and tell me what the XGA does.


0
UZnal
3/13/2008 8:53:51 PM
> I eliminated the programmable PEL clock setting and used the 1024x768 PEL
> clock setting on the XGA-2 in 800x600 with 256 colors (8-bpp), i.e. to
> simulate the XGA behaviour.

We should have 800x600 @70Hz and 832x620 @65 Hz with 256 colors, both
non-interlaced, on the XGA. I fixed the mish-mash, a leftover from the M$
code in the VDD, set firmly the adapter ID to XGA to let the driver and
XGA-2 work only with the XGA modes. This must be tested on a true XGA.

The built-in 1024x768 XGA PEL clock at 45 MHz PEL rate is sufficient to
drive the above modes. Porting the modes to the XGA was easy - eliminate the
programmable PEL clock setting, tell the card to use the 1024x768 clock, set
the display mode to non-interlaced and increase the HSYNC end pulse to
center the picture.

800x600 64K colors failed, it looks bad. If it works, it would mean that the
XGA is capable of 90 MHz PEL rates. 680x510 16-bpp could be possible.

> 2008/03/12: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208dx800.zip

Do not use it, update will follow in the afternoon. I must go now.


0
UZnal
3/14/2008 9:44:12 AM
Mmm there's something strange I noticed on my 9595 T4 with Win98SE and
blue XGA-2, using drivers v.208c and 208d (haven't tested previous
versions):

When the cursor is set to any other than the standard windows cursor,
it often disappears when moved over a *highlighted* icon in the
Windows Explorer.
If I recall correctly, any other colored/animated cursor is using the
software mode, so I'm not sure if it is an XGA driver issue. When I
set the standard plain black & white icon (hardware mode, right?), the
problem doesn't show up.

Maybe it could be a driver issue, maybe not. Maybe someone noticed the
same thing..?

Christian
0
Christian
3/14/2008 2:00:05 PM
Hi!

> When the cursor is set to any other than the
> standard windows cursor, it often disappears
> when moved over a *highlighted* icon in the
> Windows Explorer.

I haven't noticed this on any of my XGA-2 adapters with UZ's driver. I
normally use the extra large black mouse cursor on my systems.

I have noticed that sometimes the hourglass cursor sometimes loses its
top half. Moving the mouse "fixes" it.

With UZ's driver or the original Microsoft driver, tooltips (hold your
pointer over the system clock on the taskbar, or over an image with
ALT TEXT in IE) show up corrupted--usually as a series of black lines
with the yellow background color interspersed between them.

I'm having a lot of trouble getting together everything I need to test
the latest driver and its high resolution modes. It seems that every
Windows 95 and 98 CD I own is taking a vacation.

William
0
wm_walsh
3/14/2008 2:28:14 PM
XGA208 Beta D-X801 Release: XGA-ONLY

Supports non-interlaced 800x600 and 832x620 on the XGA display adapter. This
is a special test build to try and test the new XGA modes. The XGA-2 modes
are not available. This release can be installed over XGA208 with an XGA-2.

The driver will properly detect the adapter type but it will assume the type
to be XGA and work as if the adapter were an XGA. Video memory size checks
are skipped, the driver assumes that 1M is available. If you have an XGA
with 512K, you can still test 800x600 with 256 colors but you cannot test
832x620.

2008/03/14: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208dx801.zip

XGA208 introduces the following new and non-interlaced video modes to the
XGA display adapter (see also INSTALL.TXT):

Display      Colors    Monitor     Refresh
resolution   8-bpp     line rate   rate
-------------------------------------------
800x600*    256       42.8 kHz    69.0 Hz  NI
832x620      256       41.3 kHz    64.4 Hz  NI
640x480      256       56.1 kHz   107.0 Hz  NI

* = 800x600 with 64K colors fails but the mode can be seen. Select 640x480
64K colors (High Color), change to 800x600 High Color, test the mode but do
not set it. The mode serves to illustrate the 64K problem on the XGA.

960x720 with 256 colors is possible but only in interlaced mode (97 Hz). The
mode is not included in this release.








0
UZnal
3/14/2008 7:55:11 PM
> With UZ's driver or the original Microsoft driver, tooltips (hold your
> pointer over the system clock on the taskbar, or over an image with
> ALT TEXT in IE) show up corrupted--usually as a series of black lines
> with the yellow background color interspersed between them.

I will look at it, I remember seeing something similar but setting the
tooltips color to a solid color in the desktop settings fixed it. This
should be the case with 256 colors, where some colors can be dithered.







0
UZnal
3/14/2008 8:00:52 PM
> When the cursor is set to any other than the standard windows cursor,
> it often disappears when moved over a *highlighted* icon in the
> Windows Explorer.
> If I recall correctly, any other colored/animated cursor is using the
> software mode, so I'm not sure if it is an XGA driver issue.

Colored and animated cursors are software cursors, Windows moves them. Use
the XGA hardware cursor, which is monochrome, i.e. two colors. Also, a too
big cursor will become a software cursor.

> When I
> set the standard plain black & white icon (hardware mode, right?), the
> problem doesn't show up.

The plain black & white cursor is the hardware cursor.

> Maybe it could be a driver issue, maybe not. Maybe someone noticed the
> same thing..?

Problems with the b/w cursor are driver problems.


0
UZnal
3/14/2008 8:06:10 PM
Hi!

>www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208dx801.zip

And here's the test report, from a Model 90's planar XGA-1 adapter
with 1MB VRAM.

System configuration:
1 dead clock battery
Type 4 P66 complex
32MB RAM
Windows 98SE (with Spock-206 driving the SCSI adapter)
XGA-1 planar video with 1MB VRAM

> 800x600* =A0 =A0256 =A0 =A0 =A0 42.8 kHz =A0 =A069.0 Hz =A0NI

Works perfectly on a Compaq MV520 monitor. The image is exceptionally
sharp, bright and clear. (I remember your saying something about the
XGA-1 having a much more powerful signal output.) The picture needed
some adjustment, but the monitor's controls had more than enough range
to make the picture perfect.

> 832x620 =A0 =A0 =A0256 =A0 =A0 =A0 41.3 kHz =A0 =A064.4 Hz =A0NI

Again, absolutely perfect on the same Compaq monitor. Video is still
clear and sharp. Image adjustment was needed, but the monitor's
controls still had more than enough range to make things perfect.

> 640x480 =A0 =A0 =A0256 =A0 =A0 =A0 56.1 kHz =A0 107.0 Hz =A0NI

Didn't try this one.

> * =3D 800x600 with 64K colors fails but the mode can be
> seen.

The result is strange. It looks like the image is too fat, and that
lines of darkness (or darker video signal) have been inserted between
the video output. Windows reappeared, but the image was way off the
edge of the screen.

William
0
wm_walsh
3/15/2008 12:19:56 AM
> And here's the test report, from a Model 90's planar XGA-1 adapter
> with 1MB VRAM.

William, thank you for confirming the results. It must have been an exciting
experience to be the first, the very first, to run 800x600 on the XGA. I
could only simulate it on the XGA-2. As the image appeared for the first
time I do not think it was polite to greet it with "bastards ...!" ...;)

> > 800x600* 256 42.8 kHz 69.0 Hz NI
>
> Works perfectly on a Compaq MV520 monitor. The image is exceptionally
> sharp, bright and clear. (I remember your saying something about the
> XGA-1 having a much more powerful signal output.)

Indeed, this can be also observed on the earlier XGA-2s. The later blue chip
XGA-2 is not that bright and crisp. This also shows the improvement of the
image quality with the higher refresh rates.


> The picture needed
> some adjustment, but the monitor's controls had more than enough range
> to make the picture perfect.

It is perfectly centered and well adjusted on my monitor but apparently also
easily adjustable on other monitors.

> 832x620 256 41.3 kHz 64.4 Hz NI
>
> Again, absolutely perfect on the same Compaq monitor. Video is still
> clear and sharp. Image adjustment was needed, but the monitor's
> controls still had more than enough range to make things perfect.

This one almost overflows my screen without any adjustments.


> 640x480 256 56.1 kHz 107.0 Hz NI
>
> Didn't try this one.

Check the monitor specs before trying this one. 64K colors do not work at
107 Hz, they need the lower VGA line rate (31.5 kHz / 60 Hz). Here, I simply
set the clock to the 1024x768 clock, so it runs in fact with 45 MHz PEL.

> * = 800x600 with 64K colors fails but the mode can be
> seen.
>
> The result is strange. It looks like the image is too fat, and that
> lines of darkness (or darker video signal) have been inserted between
> the video output. Windows reappeared, but the image was way off the
> edge of the screen.

Do you mean the original image shifted? It did not happen here. At 64K, the
vertical resolution (600 lines) is correct but the horizontal fails. The
same effect is observed when 640x480 64K is run with the 1024x768 clock,
i.e. at 107 Hz.


I tested combinations of the reserved clock settings. According to the
techref, the divide ratio of the 1024x768 clock is 2, the bits are 01. When
this is set to the reserved 11, the ratio is 4, i.e. all is multiplied by 4.
This applies to all selected clocks - VGA 8-PEL or 9-PEL, 1024x768 and
132-columns text.

My monitor went black and reported 142 kHz and 174 Hz on trying 1024x768.
The figures are correct because the XGA 1024x768 runs at 35.5 kHz and 43.5
Hz interlaced (4 x 35.5 = 142 kHz, 4 x 43.5 = 174 Hz). The question is what
the possible use of a 4x multiplier could be. The rates are too high to be
usable on any monitor but they will be lower with very high resolutions.








0
UZnal
3/15/2008 1:03:47 PM
> XGA208 introduces the following new and non-interlaced video modes to the
> XGA display adapter (see also INSTALL.TXT):

Rewrite the books - we have now 66.0 Hz VGA 256/64K colors (XGA default is
60 Hz), and 70.0 Hz at 800x600 256/16 colors. Also, I managed to push
1024x768 a tiny bit higher, from 43.5 (87 Hz, XGA default) to 44.7 (89.4 Hz)
interlaced.

1024x768    256/16     35.5 kHz    44.7 Hz (89.4 Hz) Interlaced
800x600*    256/16     43.2 kHz    70.0 Hz NI
640x480     256/64K    32.4 kHz    66.0 Hz NI

Surprise, the XGA manages 1600x1200 (16 colors) with the 4x reserved clock
setting producing 71.3 Hz with a 87.7 kHz line rate, albeit with the typical
PEL failure. The display resolution is correct, the image is interwoven, or
painted over, with black vertical stripes but not corrupted otherwise.







0
UZnal
3/16/2008 3:24:29 PM
66.6?

UZnal wrote:
> Rewrite the books - we have now 66.0 Hz VGA 256/64K colors (XGA default is
> 60 Hz), and 70.0 Hz at 800x600 256/16 colors. Also, I managed to push
> 1024x768 a tiny bit higher, from 43.5 (87 Hz, XGA default) to 44.7 (89.4 Hz)
> interlaced.
0
Louis
3/16/2008 5:06:52 PM
Can you hazard a guess as to some of the reserved setting's function?

UZnal wrote:
>> XGA208 introduces the following new and non-interlaced video modes to the
>> XGA display adapter (see also INSTALL.TXT):
> 
> Rewrite the books - we have now 66.0 Hz VGA 256/64K colors (XGA default is
> 60 Hz), and 70.0 Hz at 800x600 256/16 colors. Also, I managed to push
> 1024x768 a tiny bit higher, from 43.5 (87 Hz, XGA default) to 44.7 (89.4 Hz)
> interlaced.
> 
> 1024x768    256/16     35.5 kHz    44.7 Hz (89.4 Hz) Interlaced
> 800x600*    256/16     43.2 kHz    70.0 Hz NI
> 640x480     256/64K    32.4 kHz    66.0 Hz NI
> 
> Surprise, the XGA manages 1600x1200 (16 colors) with the 4x reserved clock
> setting producing 71.3 Hz with a 87.7 kHz line rate, albeit with the typical
> PEL failure. The display resolution is correct, the image is interwoven, or
> painted over, with black vertical stripes but not corrupted otherwise.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
3/16/2008 5:12:03 PM
> 66.6?

Achievable but I have fixed it at exactly 66.0 Hz.

> Can you hazard a guess as to some of the reserved setting's function?

The max horizontal resolution of the XGA design is 4096 which is 4*1024. It
could be a provision for 32-bpp PELs where 4*1024 8-bpp = 1024 32-bpp. It
could be also a feature for a matrix of XGA cards where the combined display
resolution is high. In any case, the 4x setting alone works but the PEL is
fixed at 45 MHz, this is the problem.

Replacing the U45 oscillator (see the Tool, "U45 44.9 MHz  Pixelclock
1024x768, 43.5Hz I (8514/A) mode") should enable higher PEL rates. BTW, the
43.5 Hz I is a result of the mode timings, I achieved 44.7 Hz resp. 70 Hz at
800x600 with the same clock setting. Similarly for the VGA, it need not be
60 Hz, it is now 66 Hz.

The following excerpt from the techref below speaks of two supported
graphics mode timings. While the first paragraph does not limit the
resolutions ("it could be any other resolution"), the second paragraph
claims that "The XGA .... can display in two resolutions when in Extended
Graphics Modes".

Obviously, the XGA has been adjusted to and limited by the IBM monitor
timings available at that time. In fact, all resolutions able to utilize the
VGA and XGA PEL clocks, are supported and can be implemented.


(Display Connector- May 7th 1992 4-7)

Display Mode 4: Display Mode 4 is defined to be any other resolution. On the
IBM 8515 display is it used for 1024*768 43.5Hz Interlaced, however, it
could be any other resolution. This mode is not available using video BIOS,
but is used in Extended Graphics Modes. See "Extended Graphics Mode Display
Timing" on page 4-8.

The XGA Display Adapter/A or the XGA subsystem on the system board can
display in two resolutions when in Extended Graphics Modes:

640x480 Non-Interlaced
1024x768 Interlaced.

The Display timing for the 640x480 resolution is defined above in the "VGA
Mode Display Timing Set #1". No border is used.

The 1024x768 interlaced mode display timing information is provided below.
These are the only two display timings supported.

(Ed: "Display timing" is not the same as "display mode". The display timings
relate to the supported video signalling procedure (active, h/v sync,
blanking, front/back porch) whereas the display mode uses these signals to
define a resolution and color depth; in other words, the timing is the
protocol and the mode is the content.)






0
UZnal
3/16/2008 7:42:16 PM
UZnal, is 66.6 the same as 666?

But back to reality. I'd be more inclined to think of the matrix as 
being the reasonable explanation.

IF your drivers would support it, what value of U45 (44.9 MHz) should be 
used in order to give the XGA more flexibility? I'd say leave the one 
alone for VGA, because that's critical during the setup process.

UZnal wrote:
>> 66.6?
> 
> Achievable but I have fixed it at exactly 66.0 Hz.
> 
>> Can you hazard a guess as to some of the reserved setting's function?
> 
> The max horizontal resolution of the XGA design is 4096 which is 4*1024. It
> could be a provision for 32-bpp PELs where 4*1024 8-bpp = 1024 32-bpp. It
> could be also a feature for a matrix of XGA cards where the combined display
> resolution is high. In any case, the 4x setting alone works but the PEL is
> fixed at 45 MHz, this is the problem.
> 
> Replacing the U45 oscillator (see the Tool, "U45 44.9 MHz  Pixelclock
> 1024x768, 43.5Hz I (8514/A) mode") should enable higher PEL rates. BTW, the
> 43.5 Hz I is a result of the mode timings, I achieved 44.7 Hz resp. 70 Hz at
> 800x600 with the same clock setting. Similarly for the VGA, it need not be
> 60 Hz, it is now 66 Hz.
> 
> The following excerpt from the techref below speaks of two supported
> graphics mode timings. While the first paragraph does not limit the
> resolutions ("it could be any other resolution"), the second paragraph
> claims that "The XGA .... can display in two resolutions when in Extended
> Graphics Modes".
> 
> Obviously, the XGA has been adjusted to and limited by the IBM monitor
> timings available at that time. In fact, all resolutions able to utilize the
> VGA and XGA PEL clocks, are supported and can be implemented.
> 
> 
> (Display Connector- May 7th 1992 4-7)
> 
> Display Mode 4: Display Mode 4 is defined to be any other resolution. On the
> IBM 8515 display is it used for 1024*768 43.5Hz Interlaced, however, it
> could be any other resolution. This mode is not available using video BIOS,
> but is used in Extended Graphics Modes. See "Extended Graphics Mode Display
> Timing" on page 4-8.
> 
> The XGA Display Adapter/A or the XGA subsystem on the system board can
> display in two resolutions when in Extended Graphics Modes:
> 
> 640x480 Non-Interlaced
> 1024x768 Interlaced.
> 
> The Display timing for the 640x480 resolution is defined above in the "VGA
> Mode Display Timing Set #1". No border is used.
> 
> The 1024x768 interlaced mode display timing information is provided below.
> These are the only two display timings supported.
> 
> (Ed: "Display timing" is not the same as "display mode". The display timings
> relate to the supported video signalling procedure (active, h/v sync,
> blanking, front/back porch) whereas the display mode uses these signals to
> define a resolution and color depth; in other words, the timing is the
> protocol and the mode is the content.)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
3/16/2008 8:04:16 PM
Hi!

> It must have been an exciting experience to be
> the first, the very first, to run 800x600 on
> the XGA.

It certainly was! 800x600 is a nice middle ground to have, especially
when one's supply of 8507/8514/8515 monitors that work well with the
43Hz interlaced scan rate that's present at 1024x768 is limited.

It has been very stable so far. I left the system running over the
weekend, interrupting it periodically to do some work.

> This one almost overflows my screen without any
> adjustments.

The Compaq MV520 screen reacted the same way on both attempts. It
produced an initial image that was too small, positioned to the right
and a little on the tall side.

> Check the monitor specs before trying this one.

I think my monitor will handle it. At least it should not be harmed--
I've overdriven it a few times in the past and the only thing that
happened was an orderly shutdown to a blank screen with an amber power
light.

> Do you mean the original image shifted?

I am not sure how to describe it. Fortunately, I found my digital
camera and can take a picture of exactly what I saw.

Do you think there is a possibility for a working 800x600 mode with
64K colors on the XGA-1?

William
0
wm_walsh
3/17/2008 2:38:49 PM
> UZnal, is 66.6 the same as 666?

Because you complained, I brought it back to 64.7, about the same as 65.
I also added 960x720 @100.0 Hz interlaced (37.4 kHz) to the XGA.

As expected, the XGA managed 1120x840 4-bpp (16 colors) but the refresh is
very low, 35 Hz interlaced (i.e. 70 Hz I). Why was that expected? Because
this mode needs 90 Mhz but since it is a 4-bit PEL mode, it effectively
works with 45 MHz PEL rate, which the XGA clock can deliver.


> IF your drivers would support it, what value of U45 (44.9 MHz) should be
> used in order to give the XGA more flexibility? I'd say leave the one
> alone for VGA, because that's critical during the setup process.

The driver (and any other XGA driver) selects the 1024x768 clock not knowing
what PEL rate it delivers. A 90 MHz clock would enable 1024x768 @ 85 Hz
non-interlaced and 800x600 64K colors. But, there is the rub: the XGA clock
is tied to a low line rate, apparently 35.5 kHz for its famous interlaced
1024x768 mode.

I have not found out yet how to change the line rate, except for that 4x
multiplier. 4x is too high, 2x is still high but usable. What would happen
to the line rate if U45 was changed?



0
UZnal
3/17/2008 7:55:14 PM
Uh, I hope you know I was joking about the 66.6? Anyone that knows their 
Iron Maiden would know about The Number of the Beast...

UZnal wrote:
>> UZnal, is 66.6 the same as 666?
> 
> Because you complained, I brought it back to 64.7, about the same as 65.
> I also added 960x720 @100.0 Hz interlaced (37.4 kHz) to the XGA.
0
Louis
3/17/2008 8:25:11 PM
> It has been very stable so far. I left the system running over the
> weekend, interrupting it periodically to do some work.

Well, it will be forever stable ...;)

> > Check the monitor specs before trying this one.
>
> I think my monitor will handle it. At least it should not be harmed--
> I've overdriven it a few times in the past and the only thing that
> happened was an orderly shutdown to a blank screen with an amber power
> light.

I plan not to include it in the final release.

> Do you think there is a possibility for a working 800x600 mode with
> 64K colors on the XGA-1?

Not at the current state of affairs and hardware. There is a strong
possibility that upgrading the U45 (the 1024x768 graphics clock) to 90 MHz
will enable 800x600 64K colors. The XGA coprocessor should be able to work
at this rate.

Replace U45 and try 800x600 64K (no driver update is needed), if it shows up
correctly, the modification works.


0
UZnal
3/18/2008 12:03:22 PM
> But, there is the rub: the XGA clock is tied to a low line rate,
> apparently 35.5 kHz for its famous interlaced 1024x768 mode.

PEL confusion, this is not true (I must have been really distracted!).
Because the line rate is a function of the PEL clock and the horizontal
total. So, any better value of U45 will increase the line rate, in other
words, the change or the upgrade concerns only U45 ...!

The VGA 640x480 PEL clock U48 can be also changed to 31.5 MHz, this would
make it XGA-2/VGA compatible at 39.4 kHz. If then U45 becomes 86 MHz, you
can use your IBM 9515 monitor as an XGA monitor.

For 800x600 64K colors with a comfortable refresh rate, U45 must be 90 MHz.

I am now sure that the 4x setting applies to the PEL clock. If U45 is chosen
to be 22.25 MHz, this setting will make it 90 MHz.


> What would happen to the line rate if U45 was changed?

See above, the line rate will change.



0
UZnal
3/18/2008 12:06:03 PM
> Uh, I hope you know I was joking about the 66.6? Anyone that knows their
> Iron Maiden would know about The Number of the Beast...

I was joking too, I decided to give it more room for adjustments, purely
technical reasons, nothing else. You've got your 800x600 on the XGA and you
still did not run it ...??


0
UZnal
3/18/2008 12:18:13 PM
I'm sort of distracted. I have NT 4 on a 90. No desire at this time to 
set up another system.

UZnal wrote:
>> Uh, I hope you know I was joking about the 66.6? Anyone that knows their
>> Iron Maiden would know about The Number of the Beast...
> 
> I was joking too, I decided to give it more room for adjustments, purely
> technical reasons, nothing else. You've got your 800x600 on the XGA and you
> still did not run it ...??
> 
> 
0
Louis
3/18/2008 1:02:29 PM
> I'm sort of distracted. I have NT 4 on a 90. No desire at this time to
> set up another system.

Porting the display modes to NT is pretty easy. Only the miniport (.sys) is
modified and it can run with the NT display driver (.dll) until XGA208.DLL
is ready. I might do it when I am in the mood to do it.



0
UZnal
3/19/2008 9:38:57 AM
If you would be so kind, it would be nice if I could have an NT4 driver 
around April Fool's Day. Then I'll have two weeks to beat on it.

UZnal wrote:
>> I'm sort of distracted. I have NT 4 on a 90. No desire at this time to
>> set up another system.
> 
> Porting the display modes to NT is pretty easy. Only the miniport (.sys) is
> modified and it can run with the NT display driver (.dll) until XGA208.DLL
> is ready. I might do it when I am in the mood to do it.
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
3/19/2008 2:40:44 PM
The test system is a 9590 with 1MB XGA, plus I have a few XGA-2 lying 
about that could use a workout.

Louis Ohland wrote:
> If you would be so kind, it would be nice if I could have an NT4 driver 
> around April Fool's Day. Then I'll have two weeks to beat on it.
> 
> UZnal wrote:
>>> I'm sort of distracted. I have NT 4 on a 90. No desire at this time to
>>> set up another system.
>>
>> Porting the display modes to NT is pretty easy. Only the miniport 
>> (.sys) is
>> modified and it can run with the NT display driver (.dll) until 
>> XGA208.DLL
>> is ready. I might do it when I am in the mood to do it.
>>
>>
>>
0
Louis
3/19/2008 2:47:30 PM
XGA208 Beta E-Release: 64K colors on the XGA !!!
------------------------------------------------

Supports high color (16-bit) 64K colors on the XGA (!) with the 800x600 and
832x620 display modes. Due to the limitation of the XGA coprocessor to 8-bit
operations, these new 16-bpp XGA modes are not yet hardware accelerated.
These modes succeeded with a particular combination of the documented XGA
settings without any reserved bits.

XGA208 enables coprocessor support for graphics operations at 16 colors
(4-bit) and supports higher resolutions up to 1600x1200 with the XGA-2
display adapter, currently only on W9x.

XGA208 adds previously unavailable non-interlaced display modes for the XGA
display adapter such as 800x600 and 832x620 at 256 and 64K colors, and
960x720 interlaced at 256 colors.

2008/03/23: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208e.zip

See the enclosed XGA208MON.TXT for information on monitor line rates,
refresh rates and supported resolutions. See INSTALL.TXT for installation
instructions.

; XGA
; Higher refresh rates: VGA 65 Hz NI, 1024x768 45 Hz I
; New XGA video modes: (incl. non-VESA modes)
;
; 102h  XGA   800x600x4   Multisync (43.2 kHz, 70 Hz NI)
; 103h  XGA   800x600x8   Multisync (43.2 kHz, 70 Hz NI)
; 114h  XGA   800x600x16  Multisync (43.2 kHz, 70 Hz NI)
; 162h  XGA   832x620x8   Multisync (41.3 kHz, 65 Hz NI)
; 162h  XGA   832x620x16  Multisync (41.3 kHz, 65 Hz NI)
; 164h  XGA   960x720x8   Multisync (37.4 kHz, 50 Hz I)

The XGA-2 utilities are here:

www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip






0
UZnal
3/23/2008 7:16:17 PM
> Louis Ohland wrote:
> > If you would be so kind, it would be nice if I could have an NT4 driver
> > around April Fool's Day. Then I'll have two weeks to beat on it.

The 256 colors modes are worth foolling with. I have no hope for NT's DLL to
manage the 64K modes, it does not seem to know the 16-bpp coprocessor
operations. It would be a quite adequate celebration of the April Fool's
Day.






0
UZnal
3/24/2008 8:09:16 PM
Hi!

> Supports high color (16-bit) 64K colors on the
> XGA (!) with the 800x600 and 832x620 display
> modes.

Wow. Just absolutely wow. This is *wonderful* news.

I'll test tonight, most everything else can wait.

> Due to the limitation of the XGA coprocessor
> to 8-bit operations, these new 16-bpp XGA modes
> are not yet hardware accelerated.

Is that meant to say that they could be?

William
0
wm_walsh
3/24/2008 8:14:15 PM
TEST RESULTS

Model 90, Planar XGA-1, 1MB VRAM, Compaq MV520 monitor. Windows 98SE

Loaded the driver just maybe fifteen minutes ago, and kicked it up to 
832x620 at high color. The picture looked good, but I saw waviness in the 
picture that hadn't been there before. A few minutes later, I found the 
power supply for a set of speakers under the monitor. After moving that, the 
image was rock solid. ;-)

832x620 and 800x600 both produce very good images. The picture is both sharp 
and bright. No picture adjustment was required for 832x620, and only minimal 
adjustment was required for 800x600.

There is some speed difference between the two. 800x600 is faster, possibly 
because fewer pixels have to be pushed around...? Since the coprocessor does 
not support 16-bit color at greater than 640x480 on the XGA-1, does this 
mean it is operating as a dumb framebuffer?

Examples: (I recommend the first, it's a better picture.)
http://12.206.251.215/xga-1/highcolor1.jpg (1024x768, 89KB)
http://12.206.251.215/xga-1/highcolor2.jpg (1024x768, 55KB)

Originals: (BIG!)
http://12.206.251.215/storm5172005/DSC02807.JPG (1216x912, 530KB)
http://12.206.251.215/watertown/DSC02895.JPG (1216x912, 581KB)

The JPEG compression process cut down on some of the sharpness in the 
examples.

William 


0
William
3/25/2008 12:48:08 AM
Hi William,

> > Supports high color (16-bit) 64K colors on the
> > XGA (!) with the 800x600 and 832x620 display
> > modes.
>
> Wow. Just absolutely wow. This is *wonderful* news.

Yes, it is !!! Apparently, you were again the first to notice it....;)

The setting which enabled these modes was a kind of XGA Easter egg. It is a
combination of the 1024x768 clock + VGA scaling factor + 16-bit PEL size.
The PEL clock (45 MHz in this case) is doubled to 90 MHz - and this is what
I was looking for - but only when the PEL size is set to 16 bits.

By incident or accident, VCS doubles the selected clock (CS1/CS2) regardless
of the clock value and depending on the PEL size. The techref has, politely
said, an incomplete description of the VCS function. This nice side effect
could be a function of the two mode timings (VGA and 1024x768 XGA) natively
supported in the XGA. Hardwired or biostical, it does not matter at all for
us.


> I'll test tonight, most everything else can wait.
>
> > Due to the limitation of the XGA coprocessor
> > to 8-bit operations, these new 16-bpp XGA modes
> > are not yet hardware accelerated.
>
> Is that meant to say that they could be?

Yes, they could be accelerated and this is where the fun part starts:
performing 16-bit operations with an 8-bit coprocessor. The techref suggests
an approach and I surely attack this problem in the coming days and weeks as
time allows.





0
UZnal
3/25/2008 3:24:01 PM
> There is some speed difference between the two. 800x600 is faster,
possibly
> because fewer pixels have to be pushed around...? Since the coprocessor
does
> not support 16-bit color at greater than 640x480 on the XGA-1, does this
> mean it is operating as a dumb framebuffer?

The XGA coprocessor supports only 4 and 8 bit operations, 640x480 is handled
in the exactly same way as 800x600. 832x620 has of course more pixels and is
slower, 640x480 has fewer pixels and is faster.

The function of the coprocessor is a bit different. It sees only source and
destination bytes and performs operations on these bytes. The resulting
value of the destination byte(s) is interpreted as a color value by the
display logic, a separate component and not a part of the coprocessor.

Currently, in the 16-bit XGA color modes, the text out and BLT (bit block
transfer) operations are performed by the Win DIB engine. The cursor is a
hardware cursor.

Thank you for testing, I am collecting the test reports for the README.
There are not so many reports this time but it does not matter so much at
all. The 208 release is going to be the best of all times. I feel like a
detective working on the XGA case to find out those who could not or did not
want to do it right.


0
UZnal
3/25/2008 3:34:06 PM
Hi!

> Thank you for testing, I am collecting the test
> reports for the README.
> There are not so many reports this time

I suspect that a lot of XGA-1 boards and integrated chipsets have been
set aside (or discarded!) in favor of the XGA-2. Even if that's not
the case, finding with a complete 1MB of installed VRAM seems to be a
bit more of a challenge. I *think* that the Model 90 I've been doing
the testing on stands alone in my collection with regard to installed
VRAM.

I have kept my XGA-1 boards, although I haven't come across nearly as
many of those as I have XGA-2 cards.

(Oh, by the way...are there any other systems with XGA-1 on their
planars? Or is it only the Model 90?)

> The 208 release is going to be the best of
> all times.

This is simply amazing stuff. I'd like to cast a vote for an NT
driver, but to do all this on Win9x is great.

> I feel like a detective working on the XGA case
> to find out those who could not or did not
> want to do it right.

What I'm not so surprised to see is how Microsoft dropped the ball on
proper XGA-2 support. In all fairness, they did not do such a bad job
with XGA-1 support on the surface. Their XGA-1 driver covered all the
officially supported modes for XGA-1 chipsets that would be
appropriate for use under Windows. The real crime is the treatment and
handling of XGA-2 by M$.

I'm equally surprised at how much more capability you have squeezed
out of both XGA-1 and XGA-2. This practically begs the question--if
the chips are capable of these things, why didn't IBM ever make their
drivers equally capable?

(I suppose there is a partial answer for the XGA-2, as it is freely
programmable and exploring some of the more unusual color depths and
resolutions available at the time did not make sense.)

William
0
wm_walsh
3/25/2008 4:46:35 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Thank you for testing, I am collecting the test reports for the README.
> There are not so many reports this time but it does not matter so much at
> all. The 208 release is going to be the best of all times. I feel like a
> detective working on the XGA case to find out those who could not or did not
> want to do it right.

I've got LCD tests about 3/4 done. Then maybe 6091. It's been a busy month.


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Jim
3/25/2008 11:22:22 PM
UZnal wrote:

> That is how the test should start.


Phase two:

Same platform, Ultimedia Bermuda XGA-2, etc.

ViewSonic VE170 LCD flat panel, Autoadjust mode
("Perfect" defines AutoAdjust at mode change as producing fullscreen image)

640x480
60, 72, 75 Hz - perfect

680x510 75 Hz
7/16" gap on left, extends off screen somewhat on top. right, and bottom
Manual "autotune" bings left and right into alignment, top and bottom
still extend off screen. This monitor seems to have no manual vertical
size adjustment.

800x600
60 Hz - perfect
70 Hz - 9/16" gap at left, offscreen top and right, bottom OK.
Adjustable to proper position.
72 Hz - perfect
75 Hz - off-center 5/16" to left. Adjustable to proper position.

832x620
60 Hz - left, top, right perfect. Bottom off screen, unable to adjust.
Faint vertical banding noted in the image.
70 Hz - 9/16" band on left, top OK, right and bottom affscreen. Unable
to adjust vertical. Vertical banding is gone.
72 Hz - left and right OK, top and bottom off screen.

960x720
Image ony fills half of screen, fonts distorted, only top 75% of desktop
visible. Manual autotune stretched image to fullscreen, but large gap on
left. Still no bottom of desktop.

1024x768
60 Hz - 1/2" gap on left, offscreen right, top and bottom OK. Adjustable
horizontally, not vertically.
70 Hz - 7/16" gap on left, offscreen right, top and bottom OK.
Adjustable horizontally, not vertically.
NOTE: Interestingly enough, going back down to 1024x768 from 1040x768
produced a properly framed fullscreen image at both refresh rates.

1040x768
1 1/8" gap on left, 3/8" bottom, top and right off screen. Vertical
banding in image. Adjustable to fit top and right, still 5/8" gap at left.

1104x828
Roughly the upper left 1/4 of the screen was visible as a square box, 
left of center in the upper half of the screen on power-up in this mode, 
Forcing an auto-adjust produces an image that extended off the edge of 
the screen at left, top, and bottom, with about 1/4' gap at the right 
that has some "sparklies" in it. Was able to adjust the image to fit 
horizontally, but not vertically. Faint vertical banding in image.

1120x840
Able to adjust image to mostly fit, whith very slight extension off 
screen on left and small gaps the rest of the way around.

1160x870
Adjusted to fit horizontally, slight extension off screen vertically.

1280x960
Off screen enough in all directions to be annoying. Flesh tones 
horrrible. ;)

1280x1024
Not a percect fit, but close enough to be usable. 1/8" gap at right, 
very slight offscreen at left. Vertical surprisingly OK.

Looks like that about covers it. I undestand that some of these modes 
were never intended to actually work on the garden variety LCD or CRT, 
but I tried them all just for fun. With some modes, the monitor did not 
properly auto-adjust, even after multiple attempts, and manual 
intervention was needed.

This flat panel seems a bit quirky. So much for modern technology. Maybe
this is why all my "workhorse" monitors are still Trinitrons...


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0
Jim
3/27/2008 3:49:39 AM
UZnal wrote:

> Jim, I would like to know how the IBM 6019/6091 performs. From the rest of
> the LCD-equipped gang, I would like to hear how well the hi-res modes work.


6091-19i is a no-go. Complete loss of sync in both directions. I'm not 
seeing any way to set specifically 6091-19i frame rates. I get 71.7 KHz 
H, 68 Hz V on my LCD in 1280x1024, and that's all. No selections other 
than Adapter Default and Optimal in the display control panel. What am I 
missing?

I needed to run the big monster for a while anyway, he was getting a bit 
dusty. Awaiting further input....

-Jim


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Jim
3/28/2008 4:57:40 AM
> Phase two:
>
> Same platform, Ultimedia Bermuda XGA-2, etc.
>
> ViewSonic VE170 LCD flat panel, Autoadjust mode

Thank you, Jim. It's been a busy week, only now I can reply.


> 680x510 75 Hz
> 7/16" gap on left, extends off screen somewhat on top. right, and bottom
> Manual "autotune" bings left and right into alignment, top and bottom
> still extend off screen.

This mode could serve as an IBM 9515 monitor compliancy test...;)

> This monitor seems to have no manual vertical size adjustment.

That is bad.

> 960x720
> Image ony fills half of screen, fonts distorted, only top 75% of desktop
> visible. Manual autotune stretched image to fullscreen, but large gap on
> left. Still no bottom of desktop.

Again, the IBM 9515 mode. But the other refresh rates should work better.

> NOTE: Interestingly enough, going back down to 1024x768 from 1040x768
> produced a properly framed fullscreen image at both refresh rates.

The monitor: "I did it my way" ...;)

> Looks like that about covers it. I undestand that some of these modes
> were never intended to actually work on the garden variety LCD or CRT,
> but I tried them all just for fun. With some modes, the monitor did not
> properly auto-adjust, even after multiple attempts, and manual
> intervention was needed.

It would be impossible to please every monitor. The tests give us at least a
good impression what kind of problems may happen and how well they can be
solved.

> This flat panel seems a bit quirky. So much for modern technology. Maybe
> this is why all my "workhorse" monitors are still Trinitrons...

I would not trade my Eizo T56S Trinitron for anything else.



0
UZnal
3/28/2008 10:04:02 PM
> I suspect that a lot of XGA-1 boards and integrated chipsets have been
> set aside (or discarded!) in favor of the XGA-2. Even if that's not
> the case, finding with a complete 1MB of installed VRAM seems to be a
> bit more of a challenge.

I must face this challenge, because coding 8-bit operations on a 16-bit
capable coprocessor is not very wise. You simply cannot put it in an 8-bit
simulation mode or rely on the results.

> This is simply amazing stuff. I'd like to cast a vote for an NT
> driver, but to do all this on Win9x is great.

Win9x is the sandbox, the exploration lab. I am moving the XGA208 modes to
the NT miniport, and believe me, it would have been a nightmare without
having a tested and proven implementation.

> What I'm not so surprised to see is how Microsoft dropped the ball on
> proper XGA-2 support. In all fairness, they did not do such a bad job
> with XGA-1 support on the surface. Their XGA-1 driver covered all the
> officially supported modes for XGA-1 chipsets that would be
> appropriate for use under Windows.

Deep below the surface, they have done an ugly job. Seldom I have seen a
code written so thoughtlessly, you can feel how much the guy did not like
what he was doing.

> The real crime is the treatment and handling of XGA-2 by M$.

They did not have the coprocessor operations in the 16 colors (4-bpp) modes
either in the XGA or the XGA-2. XGA208 implemented them and enabled/supplied
the higher resolutions 16 colors modes.

> I'm equally surprised at how much more capability you have squeezed
> out of both XGA-1 and XGA-2. This practically begs the question--if
> the chips are capable of these things, why didn't IBM ever make their
> drivers equally capable?

Perhaps because IBM did not have the monitors with the needed frequencies to
sell, not a small fact to ignore. I think, IBM was focused on establishing
1024x768 XGA as a standard. The OS/2 PM has 256 colors, and imagine now, IBM
supplies a 800x600 64K colors mode where the PM operates in an 8-bit mode.
The real problem was insisting on the 256-colors OS/2 PM.

Probably only few people knew what the XGA could do more, and the whole
world was led to believe that the XGA can do only two XGA modes.


> (I suppose there is a partial answer for the XGA-2, as it is freely
> programmable and exploring some of the more unusual color depths and
> resolutions available at the time did not make sense.)

It would have made sense but it was too late by then. SVGA took off quickly.






0
UZnal
3/28/2008 10:31:53 PM
> 6091-19i is a no-go. Complete loss of sync in both directions. I'm not
> seeing any way to set specifically 6091-19i frame rates. I get 71.7 KHz
> H, 68 Hz V on my LCD in 1280x1024, and that's all. No selections other
> than Adapter Default and Optimal in the display control panel. What am I
> missing?

That is strange, you should get 4 refresh rates. The rate you need is coded
as 70 Hz. Do you test with the E-Release ? Did you change the monitor type
in Windows?
If nothing helps, comment out the line below in the XGA208.INF file, put a
semicolon in front of it (should look like the one below) and then
reinstall.

; HKR,DEFAULT,DDC,,1

At 1280x1024, the refresh rates serve to identify the attached monitor:
   - 75 Hz: Multisync monitor at 67 Hz
   - 70 Hz: IBM 6091/6019 Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Separate Sync
   - 65 Hz: Multisync monitor at 67 Hz
   - 60 Hz: IBM 9517 at 53 Hz interlaced.


> I needed to run the big monster for a while anyway, he was getting a bit
> dusty. Awaiting further input....

What you get is the first mode in the list, coded as 75 Hz. It runs at 71.6
kHz / 68 Hz but it is not what you need.




0
UZnal
3/28/2008 10:51:11 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Do you test with the E-Release ? 

Uh, E release? I must have missed that one. Stand by...


> Did you change the monitor type
> in Windows?

No 6091 in my Windows.

I'll be back.



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0
Jim
3/29/2008 2:39:56 AM
UZnal wrote:

> Do you test with the E-Release ? Did you change the monitor type
> in Windows?


More fun with the E relaease on the LCD.

1360x2024
Very slight offscreen vertical, 1/2" gap on left, right OK.

1440x900
Off screen top, bottom, and right, 1/2" gap on left

1440x1000
Perfect top, left, right; off screen on bottom enough to obscure taskbar.

1600x1200
Out of range

Back to 1280x1024...

> If nothing helps, comment out the line below in the XGA208.INF file, put a
> semicolon in front of it (should look like the one below) and then
> reinstall.
> 
> ; HKR,DEFAULT,DDC,,1
> 


No difference. I still have no refresh rate selections, and it still 
runs at 75 Hz. Do you have a monitor selection that works? I've tried 
SVGA 1600x1200 and IBM 6327.

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0
Jim
3/29/2008 5:29:52 AM
> No difference. I still have no refresh rate selections, and it still
> runs at 75 Hz. Do you have a monitor selection that works? I've tried
> SVGA 1600x1200 and IBM 6327.

Try this JS-only build, 1280x1024 is fixed to the 6091 mode you need:

70 Hz: IBM 6091/6019 Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Separate Sync

2008/03/29: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208js.zip

I test on a dev-version of W95, where refresh rates cannot be selected at
all. On W98, even when the refresh rate says "Optimal", the drop down box
shows a list of the available rates and allows selections.

Do you have the same problem with other resolutions? Did you touch the
registry before testing resp. after installing the driver? You could have a
wrong value for the mode in the registry. Below is the root key for the
display setting, you will probably have subkeys (0000, 0001 or so), look for
the MODES subkey, then 4 and 1280x1024.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Class\Display





0
UZnal
3/29/2008 6:18:45 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Do you have the same problem with other resolutions?

Resolutions that I noted the different refresh rates obviously allowed 
selection. Where I didn't note refresh rates, the only options that were 
available were Optimal and Adapter Default.

> Did you touch the
> registry before testing resp. after installing the driver?


I don't touch the registry unless absolutely necessary. In my book, it's 
sort of like spitting into the wind, tugging on Superman's cape, or 
pulling the mask off the Lone Ranger. A house of cards is nothing to 
trifle with.

Tried the js release. The LCD reports operation at 70.7 KHz, 67 Hz, but 
I still get only an unsynced white mishmash on the 6091-19i.

What next?

-Jim


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0
Jim
3/31/2008 4:41:05 AM
> Resolutions that I noted the different refresh rates obviously allowed
> selection. Where I didn't note refresh rates, the only options that were
> available were Optimal and Adapter Default.

Anyone else to confirm this erratic behaviour?

> Tried the js release. The LCD reports operation at 70.7 KHz, 67 Hz, but
> I still get only an unsynced white mishmash on the 6091-19i.

What about the monitor settings, was it set to Separate Sync ?

> What next?

Next comes NT with the XGA208 miniport, very soon, so I hope...;)




0
UZnal
3/31/2008 2:07:59 PM
> spitting into the wind, tugging on Superman's cape, or pulling the mask 
> off the Lone Ranger.
>
> -Jim

Croce?

>
>

Jelte. 


0
JWR
3/31/2008 6:24:51 PM
Hi!

> Anyone else to confirm this erratic behaviour?

I reported some "interesting" behavior from a Samsung 15" flat panel,
if that's the display technology being discussed. They were quick and
dirty, but I will redo them as soon as time allows.

I now have a 9517 in good working order. Would you want test results
from this screen?

> Next comes NT with the XGA208 miniport, very soon,
> so I hope...;)

Plenty of NT-equipped PS/2s are at the ready for testing. I've got two
95s (one with a GUP, but that will change) and two 9585s.

William
0
wm_walsh
3/31/2008 6:24:58 PM
Hi!

> > spitting into the wind, tugging on Superman's
> > cape, or pulling the mask off the Lone Ranger.
>
> > -Jim
>
> Croce?

You read my mind...

William
0
wm_walsh
3/31/2008 6:46:21 PM
Hi William,

<wm_walsh@hotmail.com> schreef in bericht 
news:e0410f00-2938-4ea5-abfd-def4e2cf95ef@2g2000hsn.googlegroups.com...
> Hi!
>
>> > spitting into the wind, tugging on Superman's
>> > cape, or pulling the mask off the Lone Ranger.
>>
>> > -Jim
>>
>> Croce?
>
> You read my mind...
>
> William

Read your mailbox (wct@...), there's more ;-)

Jelte 


0
JWR
3/31/2008 7:15:17 PM
Hi!

> Read your mailbox (wct@...), there's more ;-)

Well, yes, I certainly will. (I'm waaaay behind on e-mail right now!
Bobwatts(tm) and others are waiting. Hopefully I'll get there next...)

William
0
wm_walsh
3/31/2008 7:33:32 PM
> > Anyone else to confirm this erratic behaviour?
>
> I reported some "interesting" behavior from a Samsung 15" flat panel,
> if that's the display technology being discussed.

No, it is about not being able to see and select the refresh rates ar
1280x1024, possibly also in other modes.


> Plenty of NT-equipped PS/2s are at the ready for testing. I've got two
> 95s (one with a GUP, but that will change) and two 9585s.

Fine, I have just finished the miniport but I am too tired now to test.
Perhaps tomorrow, on Fool's Day.






0
UZnal
3/31/2008 9:06:24 PM
UZnal wrote:

> What about the monitor settings, was it set to Separate Sync ?


Can't see the back of the monitor very well without moving a bunch of 
stuff, but I have enough BNCs (5) plugged in for seperate sync.



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0
Jim
4/1/2008 2:12:24 AM
JWR wrote:
>>spitting into the wind, tugging on Superman's cape, or pulling the mask 
>>off the Lone Ranger.
>>
>>-Jim
> 
> 
> Croce?


Nice catch.

-Jim (don't mess around with me)


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0
Jim
4/1/2008 2:15:50 AM
And you didn't send a copy to the biggest fool of all. Me.

You don't care for me, do you?

UZnal wrote:
>>> Anyone else to confirm this erratic behaviour?
>> I reported some "interesting" behavior from a Samsung 15" flat panel,
>> if that's the display technology being discussed.
> 
> No, it is about not being able to see and select the refresh rates ar
> 1280x1024, possibly also in other modes.
> 
> 
>> Plenty of NT-equipped PS/2s are at the ready for testing. I've got two
>> 95s (one with a GUP, but that will change) and two 9585s.
> 
> Fine, I have just finished the miniport but I am too tired now to test.
> Perhaps tomorrow, on Fool's Day.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
4/1/2008 2:17:45 PM
Hi!

> Read your mailbox (wct@...), there's more ;-)

Thanks, I always wondered what the bezel that goes with an EE floppy
drive should look like.

I have a Model 57 with a 5.25" EE floppy drive installed that I will
try to get a picture of, since you mentioned not ever having seen one.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/1/2008 3:53:51 PM
> Can't see the back of the monitor very well without moving a bunch of
> stuff, but I have enough BNCs (5) plugged in for seperate sync.

Shouldn't the mode be manually selected with the mode switch? What is the
exact type of your monitor?

There is perhaps a type confusion on my side. For the record, the programmed
mode is the IBM 6019-019 Mode 3 Separate Sync at 70.75 kHz line rate for 67
Hz. This mode is NOT supported on the IBM 6091-19i, the mode requires there
81.32 kHz line rate for 77 Hz.

The earlier BC-release included Mode 1 and Mode 2 both with 63.63 kHz @ 60
Hz and supported by both monitors. I made a new JS2 build which sets
1280x1024 to Mode 1 resp. Mode 2. As I write this, I notice that both modes
use Sync on Green, the test will probably fail again. Another possibility is
to use Mode 4 on the 6091-19i, the mode timings are equal to Modes 1/2
although  there is something strange there too (interlaced?).

2008/04/01: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208js2.zip


The BC-release had the timings for the different sync types, although the
XGA does not support Sync on Green. For any case, it is here again:

2008/02/22:  www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208bc.zip

- 60 Hz: Mode 1 at 63.36 kHz @ 60 Hz -- (6019-019 and 6091-19i)
- 65 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Sync on Green -- (6019-019)
- 75 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Separate Sync -- (6019-019)

The 70 Hz setting selects the mode timings applicable
to the usual multisync monitors.



0
UZnal
4/1/2008 7:14:07 PM
> And you didn't send a copy to the biggest fool of all. Me.
>
> You don't care for me, do you?

Louis, please be patient, I sacrificed two NT installations in your name.
What can you ask for more? I managed to recover and repair the one on Mod.
9595 but only after I exercised first on Mod. 77, which I had to reinstall.

What did I learn? If you cannot repair with the repair option R in setup
because setup cannot find your NT installation, your disk with NT on it
needs first to be repaired. Setup becomes cleverer as it proceeds: I
pretended to install NT, it repaired the disk and told me to start again. I
did but then I selected repair R instead of Install. Voila, the repair
options came, I selected repair SYSTEM files and that was it.

Things to keep in mind: create a backup hardware profile, deactivate the XGA
in the backup profile. If you have installed Spock206, manually deactivate
the default M$ Spock. Both steps will give you a clean profile, VGA only.
You may need it when you start testing.

I have obviously neglected to deactivate the old Spock and could not use the
saved profile. Also, I was too impatient and did not bother to deactivate
the stock XGA driver in the saved profile.

Something else, the display driver (NT) and the miniport (XGA208)
communicate through a private structure. If I cannot guess it right, the
melange trick will not work. Actually, I should move the miniport first to
DOS (it is surprisingly simple to port an NT miniport to DOS), and test what
can be tested there, like detecting the card and setting the modes.





0
UZnal
4/1/2008 9:04:59 PM
Znal wrote:


> Shouldn't the mode be manually selected with the mode switch? What is the
> exact type of your monitor?

Just now finally foundt the switches. That little flip-down cover on the 
front wouldn't open until I said the right incantation.

It's a 6091-19i.


> I made a new JS2 build which sets
> 1280x1024 to Mode 1 resp. Mode 2.
> 
> The BC-release had the timings for the different sync types, although the
> XGA does not support Sync on Green. For any case, it is here again:
> 
> 2008/02/22:  www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208bc.zip

I'll have a look at them later if I get time. Bicycle repair is looming.

-Jim



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0
Jim
4/1/2008 10:09:48 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Shouldn't the mode be manually selected with the mode switch? What is the
> exact type of your monitor?

Mode switch doesn't seem to help much.

The devil is in the details. I foundt the magic key to reveal the 
refresh rates. In a fit of pique, I set the monitor type to Eizo T560i. 
Amazing. Gotta love that Windows. I wonder if I should go back and 
retest the higher modes on the LCD now...

> 2008/04/01: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208js2.zip

Almost works at 60 Hz, locked horizontally, vertical roll.


> The BC-release had the timings for the different sync types, although the
> XGA does not support Sync on Green. For any case, it is here again:
> 
> 2008/02/22:  www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208bc.zip
> 
> - 60 Hz: Mode 1 at 63.36 kHz @ 60 Hz -- (6019-019 and 6091-19i)

Almost works as above. Looks locked OK horizontally, but rolls 
vertically. Interestingly, it only fills the top half of the screen on 
the LCD.

> - 65 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Sync on Green -- (6019-019)
> - 75 Hz: Mode 3 at 70.75 kHz @ 67 Hz Separate Sync -- (6019-019)

These two do not work of course.



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0
Jim
4/3/2008 5:33:23 AM
> The devil is in the details. I foundt the magic key to reveal the
> refresh rates. In a fit of pique, I set the monitor type to Eizo T560i.
> Amazing. Gotta love that Windows. I wonder if I should go back and
> retest the higher modes on the LCD now...

Retesting would be of course fine. The monitor definition includes line rate
and frequency limitations, I would suggest to use Eizo F784, it has pretty
generous ranges:

[F784.Add]
HKR,"MODES\1600,1200",Mode1,,"31.5-102.0,55.0-160.0,+,+"


> > 2008/04/01: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208js2.zip
>
> Almost works at 60 Hz, locked horizontally, vertical roll.

> > - 60 Hz: Mode 1 at 63.36 kHz @ 60 Hz -- (6019-019 and 6091-19i)
>
> Almost works as above. Looks locked OK horizontally, but rolls
> vertically. Interestingly, it only fills the top half of the screen on
> the LCD.


So, t does not VSYNC properly. Timings can be varied but thsi is going to be
difficult without such a monitor here on site.



0
UZnal
4/3/2008 8:16:15 PM
> Something else, the display driver (NT) and the miniport (XGA208)
> communicate through a private structure. If I cannot guess it right

I did guess it right, so I think. There is light, display light coming from
the XGA208/NT miniport, this is the good news. The bad news is that the
whole picture is squeezed in 1/12th of the screen height, that is, 20 mm out
of 240 mm are visible (this is 64 pixels high, i.e. 1024x64 at 1024x768).

The mode settings are absolutely the same, banking enabled. It does not look
as a card/mode settings problem, since NT obviously assumes and works with
such a tiny screen height. There is something else there and it is not easy
to find what it is.

The visible stripe is on the top of the screen. I even managed to run a DOS
command prompt window there, with only 4 visible lines of output. I need to
find a command line utility dumping the display mode parameters to a file.

I use the LED panel display on Mod. 95 again as a monitor, it dumps the
miniport debug data. If you want to test a 64 pixels high display, tell me.



0
UZnal
4/3/2008 8:32:13 PM
UZnal wrote:

> So, t does not VSYNC properly. Timings can be varied but thsi is going to be
> difficult without such a monitor here on site.

I would send you one, but it's kind of big and heavy.... :)

That's why I don't move it much.


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0
Jim
4/4/2008 4:42:31 AM
Hi!

> I use the LED panel display on Mod. 95 again as a
> monitor, it dumps the miniport debug data. If
> you want to test a 64 pixels high display, tell
> me.

I certainly would be interested. If you'd like to, you can send
private e-mail to wct <atsign> walshcomptech <dot> com.

I am still trying to come up with a complete set of tests for all the
XGA-208 modes on Win9x and how they are represented on an LCD panel
(Samsung Syncmaster 710n). I got almost all of the way there and then
the hard disk conked out.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/4/2008 2:13:21 PM
XGA208/NT Miniport driver for Windows NT, Release A
----------------------------------------------------

I am really satisfied and happy with the result. The XGA208 Windows NT
miniport is finally there. The display driver will follow one day.

The XGA208 miniport driver XGA2.SYS works with the Windows NT display driver
XGA.DLL. You must have the Windows NT XGA display driver installed before
you replace the MS Windows NT XGA miniport driver with the XGA208/NT
miniport driver.

The XGA208 miniport driver enables 800x600 and 832x620 with 256 colors on
the XGA display adapter on Windows NT. The 800x600 and 832x620 64K colors
modes and the 16 colors high resolution modes, all natively supported by the
XGA208, are unfortunately filtered out by the NT XGA display driver.

Release A
2008/04/04: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208nta.zip

The NT installation procedure is similar to that of W9x, see INSTALL.TXT.
Follow the outlined procedure to avoid driver conflicts and problems:

- You must have the Windows NT XGA display driver installed before you
begin.
- Make an emergency repair disk with RDISK (enter RDISK)
- Go to Settings / Control Panel / System.
- Create a hardware test profile, e.g. "XGA208 Test Configuration"
- Boot NT with the created test profile
- Go to Settings / Control Panel / Devices
- Search for XGA, find it and click on HW-Profile
- DEACTIVATE it in the "XGA208 Test Configuration"

- Unzip the downloaded package.
- The miniport files must be in the directory XGA208NT
- Install the miniport, same procedure as on W9x, see INSTALL.TXT
- Do NOT restart your computer when you are prompted by NT.

- Go to Settings / Control Panel / Devices
- Search for XGA2, find it and click on HW-Profile
- DEACTIVATE it in all other profiles except for "XGA208 Test Configuration"

- Restart your computer
- Select "XGA208 Test Configuration" profile to boot NT
- The display will come in VGA mode
- Select the desired mode

Remember to always check the activation status of the XGA and XGA2 drivers
with the applet Devices.

XGA Notes:

The XGA208/NT miniport defines 6-bit DAC properties for the XGA display
adapter. Should the intensity of the picture become low, 8-bit DAC settings
are provided in XGA2_8BITDAC.SYS. Copy this file over XGA2.SYS and repeat
the installation.

The XGA Aperture must be enabled !

Either the 1MB or 4MB XGA video memory aperture must be enabled. The 4MB
aperture is enabled per default on PS/2 systems supporting more than 16MB of
system memory. To enable the 1MB aperture, use your reference disk.

The case where both apertures are disabled is implemented however not yet
tested. In this case, the XGA instance should be set to 6. This is a
temporary condition only for this release. The miniport enables banking for
the VGA256.DLL
display driver, assuming XGA instance 6. VGA256.DLL demands that scanlines
be stretched to 1024 bytes. This resuts in a limitation of the supported
modes to only 640x480 and 800x600 within 1MB of video memory.

To check the status of the 4MB aperture, you can use the XGA-2 utilities:

 www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip

Remember, if the apertures are disabled, the XGA Instance must be set to 6
!!!





0
UZnal
4/4/2008 9:09:43 PM
> > I use the LED panel display on Mod. 95 again as a
> > monitor, it dumps the miniport debug data. If
> > you want to test a 64 pixels high display, tell
> > me.

The display has now the full height.

> I certainly would be interested. If you'd like to, you can send
> private e-mail to wct <atsign> walshcomptech <dot> com.

I can include it in the next release, no problem. I had today a desaster,
the PSU of my Mod. 95 did not power on. I cannot test the final result with
the fixed miniport, I have no LED panel currently. I built the driver on
Mod. 77.

> I am still trying to come up with a complete set of tests for all the
> XGA-208 modes on Win9x and how they are represented on an LCD panel
> (Samsung Syncmaster 710n). I got almost all of the way there and then
> the hard disk conked out.

And today my PSU. I need the machine, the XGA208 display driver will not be
possible without it. So, how do I fix this Delta Electronics PSU..???


0
UZnal
4/4/2008 9:22:38 PM
Hi!

> The display has now the full height.

What was the problem?

> And today my PSU. I need the machine, the XGA208 display driver
> will not be possible without it. So, how do I fix this Delta Electronics
> PSU..???

I just don't know. I have yet to be successful, but I'll readily admit that
I just don't have the skills and determination.

I can help with two things, and one just might really be helpful. I sent a
dead 335 watt Delta supply to Sam Goldwasser (the author and maintainer of
the sci.electronics.repair FAQ). He looked into it and determined that the
TL494 IC was being told to shut down. I did not get much further than that
when he returned it to me. The supply is here, gathering dust. (Anybody care
to pick up the torch?)

The other thing: Although I am in the US, I have a few good working power
supplies, including an extra 335 watt unit. I would gladly donate it to the
cause, although at this moment I would need at least some of the shipping
cost to be covered. Things are tighter than I'd like right now in the
finance department.

William


0
William
4/5/2008 3:10:37 AM
UZnal wrote:
> XGA208/NT Miniport driver for Windows NT, Release A
> ----------------------------------------------------
> 
> I am really satisfied and happy with the result. The XGA208 Windows NT
> miniport is finally there. The display driver will follow one day.


Looks like it's time to drop an XGA2 in the 720.



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0
Jim
4/5/2008 3:13:17 AM
Jim Shorney wrote:


> Looks like it's time to drop an XGA2 in the 720.


XGA-2 is not supported in the 720.

Yeah, I know, I read the archives...

Bollocks.

It's all there in SC. SGVA subsytem is [Disabled], all the XGA-2 
settings are visible and tweakable. But the damn Cirrus won't let go.

This is most un-PS/2-like.

Guess I'll have to use the 95a downstairs. I don't really wandt to pull 
the Cornerstone card out of the Turbo-Y...

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0
Jim
4/5/2008 5:34:53 AM
William R. Walsh wrote:

> I sent a
> dead 335 watt Delta supply to Sam Goldwasser (the author and maintainer of
> the sci.electronics.repair FAQ). He looked into it and determined that the
> TL494 IC was being told to shut down.


I fixed a 95 PSU once. Had a shorted diode in the output side. That will 
definitely hold it shut down. Chances are that's not your problem, Sam 
should have been able to find that easily.


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0
Jim
4/5/2008 5:42:53 AM
> XGA-2 is not supported in the 720.

> It's all there in SC. SGVA subsytem is [Disabled], all the XGA-2
> settings are visible and tweakable. But the damn Cirrus won't let go.

The Cirrus is basicly a VGA card, I have just checked the Cirrus miniport
code, and it uses and claims the VGA address ranges and a few extra ports
not used by the XGA. Usually, the XGA takes over the planar VGA (Cirrus in
this case) when you connect the monitor cable to the XGA adapter. Perhaps it
is not even necessary to explicitly disable the Cirrus, as a VGA it should
be auto disabled by the XGA (writing 0 to port 3C3h disables the VGA, i.e.
the Cirrus).

I would in any case insert an XGA and boot to NT with a test profile. Then,
deactivate the Cirrus miniport service in Devices, reboot, NT should come in
plain VGA mode (35.5 kHz, 60 Hz). Let NT search for the XGA in Display
Configuration and see if it really finds and installs it. If not, just force
NT to install the XGA display driver. Do not forget to deactivate the XGA in
the original (Cirrus) profile, leave XGA activated only in the test profile.

Another option is to look at the registry and search for "XGA". For each
detected adapter, NT loads its miniport and the miniport inserts info in the
registry. The service will be loaded, if a driver requests it, in our case,
the XGA display driver. The servce may fail to load when the requested
access ranges are claimed by another device. Simply said, if there is a
string "XGA" in the registry, NT has seen it and there is a good chance that
it works.

> This is most un-PS/2-like.

The XGA2.EXE from the xga2util.zip (XGA-2 utilities) will give you a very
good summary of the XGA state. It should be run from plain DOS.


0
UZnal
4/5/2008 12:20:07 PM
> > So, t does not VSYNC properly. Timings can be varied but thsi is going
to be
> > difficult without such a monitor here on site.

> I would send you one, but it's kind of big and heavy.... :)

The monitor timings are adjusted for a quarter of a PEL rate. At the higher
PEL rates, the XGA allows only integral PEL values. This makes it difficult
to guess and set the proper timing values for this monitor. I can re-check
them if you have not yet moved away your monitor.




0
UZnal
4/5/2008 12:52:03 PM
> > The display has now the full height.
>
> What was the problem?

The problem was with bank switching. The bank switching code is a real hack,
employed both by W9x and NT. It is a piece of assembly language code at the
miniport side that is modified and copied to the display driver side for
performance reasons. Bank switching is actually not needed when the 1M/4M
aperture is enabled, so I disabled it and hard coded the register address
for Instance 6 to test when needed (it is needed only when the apertures are
disabled). This fixed the problem, and I am going to fix it for any XGA
instance.

For the display driver interface, "NT vs. W9x" is in fact "NT equals W9x".
Conceptually and technically, there are almost no differences, different are
the structures and a few details. NT is simpler, W9x requests the VESA
interface and is more complicated. If you know how to do a display driver on
W9x, you will have no problems doing it on NT.

> The other thing: Although I am in the US, I have a few good working power
> supplies, including an extra 335 watt unit. I would gladly donate it to
the
> cause, although at this moment I would need at least some of the shipping
> cost to be covered. Things are tighter than I'd like right now in the
> finance department.

Thank you for the offer. Let me first see if I can find one in a closer
location. I am also getting annoyed with my slow P60 complex. It is fast
enough to compile and produce but it is too slow with MS Visual C++ 6.0, so
I have to always work with two machines and transfer the code.




0
UZnal
4/5/2008 12:53:44 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Usually, the XGA takes over the planar VGA (Cirrus in
> this case) when you connect the monitor cable to the XGA adapter. Perhaps it
> is not even necessary to explicitly disable the Cirrus, as a VGA it should
> be auto disabled by the XGA (writing 0 to port 3C3h disables the VGA, i.e.
> the Cirrus).

Not it this case. I connected a SVGA monitor directly to the XGA2 port 
to remove my KVM switch from the equation, and it remains dark. The 
system powers up and boots on the (disabled) Cirrus.

Plugged the KVM/LCD back into the Cirrus so I can see what's going on, 
at least....

The XGA2 wandted to inhabit the same BIOS address as the Cirrus. The 
Cirrus is set at C0000 in pfee7.adf. I set the XGA2 to D0000 just for 
fun, no diff. Interestingly, SC did not declare any conflict with XGA2 
at C0000, it really thinks the Cirrus is disabled...

Begin Device 3 1 00 NoDMA
    NamedItem Prompt "SVGA Video Subsystem"
       choice "Enabled"     pos[8]=XXXXXXX0b
                            io 3b0h-3bbh 3c0h-3dfh
                            mem 0c0000h-0c7fffh
       choice "Disabled"    pos[8]=XXXXXXX1b



> I would in any case insert an XGA and boot to NT with a test profile. Then,
> deactivate the Cirrus miniport service in Devices, reboot, NT should come in
> plain VGA mode (35.5 kHz, 60 Hz). Let NT search for the XGA in Display
> Configuration and see if it really finds and installs it. If not, just force
> NT to install the XGA display driver. Do not forget to deactivate the XGA in
> the original (Cirrus) profile, leave XGA activated only in the test profile.

It sez it foundt an XGA compatible video adapter,the only available 
resolution is 640x480x256 at this point. I click the TEST button and I 
get a black screen with flashing cursor on the Cirrus-connected monitor 
and the monitor connected to the XGA2 remains dark. The Display Type 
reports xga compatible display adapter, chip type XGA2, memory size 512 
KB. XGA shows as "Started" in the Devices applet.

Lieing and saying "yes" to the test results on reboot in continued 
darkness on the XGA2 monitor, and permanent pretty blue final boot 
screen before the GUI kicks in on the Cirrus monitor. I fully expected 
that at this point, but I hadt to try.

Back in the CirrusSpace hardware profile. I see under "Devices" that XGA 
is marked SYSTEM but has not been started, Cirrus is marked as DISABLED. 
I did not do this. A reboot later and I have Cirrus back. ISTR that 
before I had 800x600x64k available with the Cirrus, but not anymore. 256 
only. Strange. Rebooting again. HiColor 640x480 Cirrus modes no longer 
work correctly. Fascinating.


> Another option is to look at the registry and search for "XGA".
> Simply said, if there is a
> string "XGA" in the registry, NT has seen it and there is a good chance that
> it works.

Yep, it's there.

> The XGA2.EXE from the xga2util.zip (XGA-2 utilities) will give you a very
> good summary of the XGA state. It should be run from plain DOS.

Run from a nekkid PC-DOS 7 session:

Video Functionality/State Information
-------------------------------------
    C000 - Segment to static functionality information
    502D - Offset to static functionality information
      03 - Active video mode
      80 - Character columns on screen (columns on screen)
    4096 - Length of regenerative buffer (in bytes)
    0000 - Starting address in regenerative buffer
       0 - Active display page
     3D4 - Display Controller address
      29 - Current setting of 3x8 register
      30 - Current setting of 3x9 register
      25 - Character lines on screen (rows on screen)
      16 - Scan lines per character (character height)
      08 - Display combination code (active)
      00 - Display combination code (alternative)
      16 - Colors supported for current video mode
       8 - Display pages supported for current video mode
     400 - Scan lines in current video mode
       0 - Primary character block
       0 - Secondary character block
      31 - Miscellaneous state information - 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
           Yes - All modes on all displays active
            No - Summing to grey shades active
            No - Monochrome display attached
            No - Mode setting default palette loading disabled
           Yes - Cursor emulation active
           Yes - Background intensity
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
      15 - Video Adapter Interface - 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
           Yes - BIOS supports AI information return
            No - AI driver required
           Yes - 16-bit VGA graphics present
           Yes - VGA attributes set
           Yes - 132-column mode supported
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
  256 KB - Video memory available

Checking for XGA DMQS BIOS interface
DMQS not supported

Slot   3 - 8FDA Instance 0
POS Data
--------------------------
     8FDA - Adapter ID
    XGA-2 - Adapter Type
        0 - Instance number
    D0000 - D1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
    D1C00 - D1C7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
     2100 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture
    32 MB - Video Memory Base Address (2000000h)
        7 - Video Arbitration Level
       On - Video Fairness


---------------------------------------------------------------
Runstream (R) XGA-2 System Information and Utilities, Rel. 1.06
Copyright (C) UnalZ, 2008.                 All rights reserved.


Yes, I see that the 4 MB aperture is disabled. This system has half a 
gig of RAM, it should automagically turn on, right? Is that TOO MUCH for 
XGA2 to cope with, or is the Cirrus hack obfuscating the true nature of 
XGA2? Of course, 1 MB aperture cannot be enabled without conflicts in SC.

Interesting technical speculation: ROM address space can be sequestered 
on, at least, a per-bus basis in the 720. Cirrus and XGA2 can both be 
set to C0000 with no conflict registered; the Cirrus shows as Disabled 
and XGA2 as fully configured in SC, yet the Cirrus BIOS is in full 
control and nothing collides or explodes.

Oh well, enough for now. Outside stuff to do today.

-Jim

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0
Jim
4/5/2008 6:49:22 PM
> Begin Device 3 1 00 NoDMA
>     NamedItem Prompt "SVGA Video Subsystem"
>        choice "Enabled"     pos[8]=XXXXXXX0b
>                             io 3b0h-3bbh 3c0h-3dfh
>                             mem 0c0000h-0c7fffh
>        choice "Disabled"    pos[8]=XXXXXXX1b

"Disabled" means the card does not respond to POS operations but it does
not, so I suppose, release the resources. Note that the SVGA claims and
holds the VGA resources, this could become a problem. With the XGA in the
system, a second VGA is added but there cannot be two VGAs. One card is
degraded to MDA (monochrome) mode.

> It sez it foundt an XGA compatible video adapter,the only available
> resolution is 640x480x256 at this point. I click the TEST button and I
> get a black screen with flashing cursor on the Cirrus-connected monitor
> and the monitor connected to the XGA2 remains dark. The Display Type
> reports xga compatible display adapter, chip type XGA2, memory size 512
> KB. XGA shows as "Started" in the Devices applet.

The VGA is disabled when the XGA enters an XGA mode. But if the SVGA holds
the resources, the XGA cannot claim the VGA access range, i.e. the VGA
ports, and could fail to load. Perhaps there is an error entry in the system
log ?

> Back in the CirrusSpace hardware profile. I see under "Devices" that XGA
> is marked SYSTEM but has not been started, Cirrus is marked as DISABLED.

The XGA miniport could have done it. In the standard procedure to enter an
XGA mode, the first operation is to disable the VGA.

> Video Functionality/State Information
> -------------------------------------
>            Yes - 132-column mode supported

Does the SVGA support 132-column modes?

> Slot   3 - 8FDA Instance 0
> POS Data
> --------------------------
>      8FDA - Adapter ID
>     XGA-2 - Adapter Type
>         0 - Instance number
>     D0000 - D1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
>     D1C00 - D1C7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
>      2100 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
> Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
> Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture

This is bad.

>     32 MB - Video Memory Base Address (2000000h)
>         7 - Video Arbitration Level
>        On - Video Fairness

The Video Memory Base Address is at a too low position. Look at the
addresses in my test machine, Mod. 77, with two XGA-2 cards (I test with two
installed cards to detect eventual conflicts and driver problems, none so
far):

Slot   1 - 8FDA Instance 6 (the main card, delivers the video)
POS Data
--------------------------
   XGA-2 - Adapter Type
       6 - Instance number
   C0000 - C1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
   C1F00 - C1F7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
    2160 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
 4056 MB - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture Base Address (FD800000h)
 4056 MB - Video Memory Base Address (FD800000h)

Slot   3 - 8FDA Instance 4
--------------------------
   XGA-2 - Adapter Type
       4 - Instance number
   C0000 - C1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
   C1E00 - C1E7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
    2140 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
 4048 MB - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture Base Address (FD000000h)
 4048 MB - Video Memory Base Address (FD000000h)

The XGA 4M aperture region occupies 4064 MB to 4032 MB address region (4064
= 8, 4060 = 7, 4056 = 6, 4052 = 5, 4048 = 4, 4044 = 3, 4040 = 2, 4036 = 1,
4032 = 0). If the 4M aperture were enabled on your card, it would be at the
4032 MB address (instance 0).


> Yes, I see that the 4 MB aperture is disabled. This system has half a
> gig of RAM, it should automagically turn on, right? Is that TOO MUCH for
> XGA2 to cope with, or is the Cirrus hack obfuscating the true nature of
> XGA2? Of course, 1 MB aperture cannot be enabled without conflicts in SC.

The inability to enable the 4MB aperture could indicate that the XGA 4MB
aperture region is either not available (one 4M region for each XGA
instance, 32MB total) or cannot be set. The XGA ADF does not have the
setting, the line below defines it as a fixed resource (in the ADF) but
normally SC and XGA BIOS set it:

FixedResources
    pos[2]=XXXXXXX1b


> Interesting technical speculation: ROM address space can be sequestered
> on, at least, a per-bus basis in the 720. Cirrus and XGA2 can both be
> set to C0000 with no conflict registered; the Cirrus shows as Disabled
> and XGA2 as fully configured in SC, yet the Cirrus BIOS is in full
> control and nothing collides or explodes.

I interpret it as the fact the Cirrus holds the VGA resources. If that is
correct, the XGA should provide mono video output under DOS.




0
UZnal
4/5/2008 7:57:39 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Perhaps there is an error entry in the system
> log ?


Nothing relating to XGA or Cirrus.


>>Video Functionality/State Information
>>-------------------------------------
>>           Yes - 132-column mode supported

I haven't a clue.


> This is bad.
> 
>>    32 MB - Video Memory Base Address (2000000h)
>>        7 - Video Arbitration Level
>>       On - Video Fairness

Changing to Instance 6 (default) moved it up to 56 MB. Still bad.


> I interpret it as the fact the Cirrus holds the VGA resources. If that is
> correct, the XGA should provide mono video output under DOS.


It does not. Neither XGA2 nor XGA2MONO produce an output on that screen.

What I was getting at was that two different ROMS, residing at the same 
base address and apparently both active, should produce a flaming system 
crash. This sort of thing must be prohibuted in hardware somehow.

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0
Jim
4/5/2008 11:18:45 PM
UZnal wrote:
> XGA208/NT Miniport driver for Windows NT, Release A
> ----------------------------------------------------
> 
> I am really satisfied and happy with the result. The XGA208 Windows NT
> miniport is finally there. The display driver will follow one day.


Some days it almost doesn't pay to get out of bed...

Giving up on the 720 for the moment, I moved on to the 95A.

After the initial test to make sure it was working OK, one of the drives 
in the array went DDD after I removed the stock short SVGA/A and 
installed the XGA2. No amount of persuasion brought it back. But, the 
system is back up and running with the array "critical". (Will the 
Passplay rebuild to the hot spare without user intervention, like the 
Cheetah in the 720 did?).

William, I haven't lost any data, as long as the remaining drives stay 
operational.... This isn't a critical machine anyway, although I'd like 
to keep the original OS/2 load that is still on the array.

Anyway....

System:
Server 95a (Array), 9595-3QT
90 MHz Pentium (unmodified)
80 MB ECC RAM
4 GB in one physical RAID5 array (6x 0662 1G narrow drives)
NT Server 4.0 SP6
Sony 100GS Trinitron monitor
White RAMDAC XGA2, no heatsink (it was the first one I found in the box...)

Oh, did I mention the CD drive is also TU? Thankfully, the LAN/A works 
fine and I was able to install the M$ XGA drivers.

Following UZ's instructions to the letter, installation of XGA208nt 
release A went without a hitch (about time something did, thanks UZ!). 
Immediatly after reboot, I was presented with a quite usable and 
well-centered display.

Performance seems good. A quick run-through of all modes listed revealed 
no major problems, although some modes were off-centered rightwards. 
I'll do more thorough testing later, it's time to knock off for the night.

Nicely done, UZ!

On a side note, I think I'm still using your 960 driver on the RAID 
array. When I tried to run the Netfinity RAID manager, it complaned that 
a DLL wouldn't load, then exited. Could this be a side effect of not 
using the IBM driver? This just now occured to me. The wimpy RAIDADMIN 
applet from the FWSR option disk still works fine.

-Jim


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0
Jim
4/6/2008 5:55:10 AM
UZnal schrieb:

> Let me first see if I can find one in a closer
> location.

Is N�rnberg, Germany close enough?
Contact me off-line. The Email address is valid.

Regards

Wolfgang
0
Wolfgang
4/6/2008 10:08:32 AM
> Is N�rnberg, Germany close enough?
> Contact me off-line. The Email address is valid.

Thank you, Wolfgang, it is close enough. I gave the PSU a warm water shower
and let it dry out for a few days. Let me first see how it will react to
this. I noted your email address.


0
UZnal
4/6/2008 11:45:42 AM
> After the initial test to make sure it was working OK, one of the drives
> in the array went DDD after I removed the stock short SVGA/A and
> installed the XGA2. No amount of persuasion brought it back.

XGA208 - the killer app ?? I wonder what is going on. For my machines I
could say that they do not run regularly. Perhaps this isnogud ?

> Performance seems good. A quick run-through of all modes listed revealed
> no major problems, although some modes were off-centered rightwards.
> I'll do more thorough testing later, it's time to knock off for the night.

The mode settings are unchanged, the same as on W9x.

> On a side note, I think I'm still using your 960 driver on the RAID
> array. When I tried to run the Netfinity RAID manager, it complaned that
> a DLL wouldn't load, then exited. Could this be a side effect of not
> using the IBM driver? This just now occured to me. The wimpy RAIDADMIN
> applet from the FWSR option disk still works fine.

This could be the case. Perhaps there is some private communication involved
there, I can look at it. I almost forgot that I did it, I must put it on
mcabase.



0
UZnal
4/6/2008 11:46:26 AM
> >
> >>    32 MB - Video Memory Base Address (2000000h)
> >>        7 - Video Arbitration Level
> >>       On - Video Fairness
>
> Changing to Instance 6 (default) moved it up to 56 MB. Still bad.

The video memory base address is correct. When the 4MB aperture is disabled,
the address is lowered by 4000, i.e. the range is 32 to 64.

Slot   3 - 8FDA Instance 6 (Mod. 70, XGA-2 adapter)
--------------------------
   XGA-2 - Adapter Type
       6 - Instance number
   C0000 - C1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
   C1F00 - C1F7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
    2160 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
   15 MB - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture Base Address (F00000h)
Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture
   56 MB - Video Memory Base Address (3800000h)

The planar XGA-2 on Mod. 57 has a different ROM range:

Slot   0 - 8FDA Instance 6 (Mod. 57, planar XGA-2)
--------------------------
       6 - Instance number
   DE000 - DFBFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
   DFF00 - DFF7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
    2160 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture
   56 MB - Video Memory Base Address (3800000h)

There is more you can do. Run the XGA2.EXE with the option -s for complete
system information (enter "xga2 -h" for the options). Go to the section
"Device Descriptor Table (DDT) Information", analyze the devices and look
for the XGA-2 resources. The text part below is from the Mod. 57 run:

[  2 ]  0003 - Device ID (**Ed: XGA-2 device)
           0 - Slot for device
           0 - Reserved
          02 - Implementation identifier of the device
          01 - Implementation revision level of the device
       [ ...... skipped ......]
        2160 - Starting address of first I/O block (**Ed: XGA-2 I/O Base
Address)
           0 - Starting address of second I/O block
           0 - Starting address of third I/O block
       DE000 - Start of first non-system memory block (**Ed: XGA ROM Range)
        8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block (**Ed: XGA ROM size)
           0 - Start of second non-system memory block
        0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block

You have to simply search the test for 2160 (instance 6 I/O) and the ROM
base address (DE000 in this example).

Browing through my dumps, I have found this one from Mod. 95, with enabled
4M aperture:

Slot   5 - 8FDA Instance 6 (Mod. 95)
--------------------------
   XGA-2 - Adapter Type
       6 - Instance number
   C0000 - C1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
   C1F00 - C1F7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
    2160 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
 4056 MB - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture Base Address (FD800000h)
 4056 MB - Video Memory Base Address (FD800000h)


Device Descriptor Table (DDT) Information
-----------------------------------------
          12 - Number of DDT entries
          31 - Size of one DDT entry

( 1)     003 - Device ID
    8FDA : 5 - Slot for device
           0 - Reserved
          02 - Implementation identifier of the device
          01 - Implementation revision level of the device
       [ ...... skipped ......]
        2160 - Starting address of first I/O block

( 2)     000 - Device ID
    8FDA : 5 - Slot for device
           0 - Reserved
       [ ...... skipped ......]
       C0000 - Start of first non-system memory block (**Ed: XGA ROM Range)
        8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block (**Ed: XGA ROM Size)
    FC000000 - Start of second non-system memory block (** 4M Aperture
Base )
    32768 KB - Size of second non-system memory block ( ** 32MB reserved)

 [ ...... skipped ......]

(12)     000 - Device ID
  Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            [ ...... skipped ......]
           6 - First interrupt
           0 - Second interrupt
           2 - First arbitration level
           0 - Second  arbitration level
            [ ...... skipped ......]
         3F0 - Starting address of first I/O block
           0 - Starting address of second I/O block
           0 - Starting address of third I/O block
    FFFE0000 - Start of first non-system memory block (** BIOS, I suppose)
      128 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
           0 - Start of second non-system memory block
        0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block

The ".....non-system memory block" lines for the other devices should give
hints if eventually the default 4MB aperture range of the XGA-2 is claimed
by the system or another device.

> What I was getting at was that two different ROMS, residing at the same
> base address and apparently both active, should produce a flaming system
> crash. This sort of thing must be prohibuted in hardware somehow.

The Device Descriptor Table (DDT) Information should enlighten, so I hope.




0
UZnal
4/6/2008 11:47:37 AM
> Slot   0 - 8FDA Instance 6 (Mod. 57, planar XGA-2)

Left without a W9x test machine  (Mod. 77 runs NT), I decided to move the
W9x hard disk to Mod. 57. This HD was in Mod. 77 before it was replaced with
the HD with NT4 on it.

We never before had XGA208/W9x reports from Mod. 57. The disk installation
was easy, the machine came with I9990030 complaining about IML but the
SysConfig option "Start Operating System" started and loaded W95. That was
indeed kind and friendly...;)


System Configuration Parameters
-------------------------------
System  PS/2 Model 57  486SLC (** Mod. 9557-DEB with 16 MB RAM)
  MCA - Microchannel bus implemented
   F8 - Model
   38 - Submodel
   04 - BIOS Revision Level
        BIOS Version date: 07/29/93
   A4 - CPU Type - 486SLC (** SLC3, 75 MHz)
   39 - CPU Stepping Level
 83AB - Keyboard ID - G-layout 101/102-key (IBM compatible)
  Yes - Diskette drive present
  Yes - Math coprocessor installed (** 387 SLC)
  Yes - Pointing device installed

Slot   0 - 8FDA Instance 6 (** planar XGA-2)
--------------------------
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture
   56 MB - Video Memory Base Address (3800000h)
 1024 KB - Amount of video memory available


W95 behaved quite well. XGA208 behaved exactly as before on Mod. 77. The
stress test passed up to 1440x1080. The double sprite showed up only at
1600x1200. I did not run the machine for very long, some 30 minutes or less.

The planar XGA-2 is really impressive, two adapter cards have already showed
weaknesses dealing with the lower high resolutions, i.e. 1440x1080 was too
demanding for them.

As it is seen above, both apertures are disabled. XGA208, W9x and the
coproressor access the video memory directly at the above address. I am
rather surprised that W9x did not complain after I disabled banking in
XGA208 (not per hardware but per mode info: return no banking and no VESA
banking stub).

I must test the no-banking  behaviour on NT, I feel misleaded by all these
DDK samples enabling banking at the VGA aperture. When you test XGA208 on
NT, you will notice that the display is quicker because banking is disabled
and all accesses are direct video memory accesses. I mean, I would like to
see XGA208/NT with disabled banking on Mod. 57 with disabled apertures.

One more pending test will be with the Radius XGA-2 (ISA bus). I would like
how it would respond to the hi-res-mania.









0
UZnal
4/6/2008 4:41:09 PM
UZnal wrote:

> XGA208 - the killer app ?? I wonder what is going on. For my machines I
> could say that they do not run regularly. Perhaps this isnogud ?

To be fair, this machine has had a balky drive since I acquired it. I 
was always able to get it running before, but this particular machine 
has seen little use. The last time it was powered up was to test your 
960 driver.

>>On a side note, I think I'm still using your 960 driver on the RAID
>>array. When I tried to run the Netfinity RAID manager, it complaned that
>>a DLL wouldn't load, then exited. Could this be a side effect of not
>>using the IBM driver? This just now occured to me. The wimpy RAIDADMIN
>>applet from the FWSR option disk still works fine.
> 
> 
> This could be the case. Perhaps there is some private communication involved
> there, I can look at it. I almost forgot that I did it, I must put it on
> mcabase.

I'll investigate further as time permits, I will try the IBM 960 driver 
and see if Netfinity behaves. I have left it running in case the 
Passplay decides it wants to take advantage of the hot spare drive. 
Otherwise, I suppose I'll have to remove the hot spare and "install" it 
in place of the DDD drive.


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0
Jim
4/6/2008 6:57:17 PM
UZnal wrote:

> There is more you can do. Run the XGA2.EXE with the option -s for complete
> system information (enter "xga2 -h" for the options). Go to the section
> "Device Descriptor Table (DDT) Information", analyze the devices and look
> for the XGA-2 resources. 

Dumping:

(The whole thing, since you know better what you are looking for)


System Configuration Parameters
-------------------------------
   MCA - Microchannel bus implemented
    F8 - Model
    FD - Submodel
    14 - BIOS Revision Level
         BIOS Version date: 05/22/97
    05 - CPU Type - Pentium
    0C - CPU Stepping Level
  83AB - Keyboard ID - G-layout 101/102-key (IBM compatible)
   Yes - Diskette drive present
     0 - Additional diskette drives present
   Yes - Math coprocessor installed
   Yes - Pointing device installed
     1 - Asynchronous communication ports
     1 - Parallel ports

*  76 - Feature Byte 1 [ 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0  ]
    No - System has dual-bus capability
   Yes - Microchannel bus implemented
   Yes - Extended BIOS data area allocated
    No - Wait for External Event function supported
   Yes - Keyboard intercept function available
   Yes - Real-time clock available
   Yes - Second 8259 interrupt controller present
    No - Fixed disk BIOS uses DMA channel 3

*  F6 - Feature Byte 2 [ 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0  ]
     0 - Reserved
   Yes - Data Streaming supported
   Yes - 8042 keyboard controller present
    No - Enable/Disable Processor functions supported
   Yes - Return Memory-Map Information function supported
   Yes - Return POS Data function supported
   Yes - Keyboard Functionality Determination function supported
         Yes - Return to default typematic rate/delay supported
          No - Turn on/off typematic supported
         Yes - Set typematic rate/delay supported
         Yes - Get current typematic rate/delay supported
         Yes - Keyboard ID supported
         Yes - 101-/102-key keyboard functions supported
         Yes - 122-key keyboard functions supported
           0 - Reserved
     1 - Reserved

*  B5 - Feature Byte 3 [ 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1  ]
   Yes - SCSI support in IML
    No - IML System
   Yes - Information panel installed
    No - SCSI subsystem supported on the system board
     1 - Reserved
     1 - Reserved
     0 - Reserved
     1 - Reserved

*  50 - Feature Byte 4 [ 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0  ]

*  2F - Feature Byte 5 [ 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1  ]
   Yes - Flash BIOS present

*  4A - Interrupt 4Bh Advanced Services [ 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0  ]
     0 - Reserved
   Yes - Generic SCSI CBIOS service supported
     0 - Reserved
   Yes - Interrupt 4Bh intercepted
     0 - Reserved
    No - Operating System supports DMA services
     1 - Reserved
     0 - Reserved

Video Functionality/State Information
-------------------------------------
    C000 - Segment to static functionality information
    502D - Offset to static functionality information
      03 - Active video mode
      80 - Character columns on screen (columns on screen)
    4096 - Length of regenerative buffer (in bytes)
    0000 - Starting address in regenerative buffer
       0 - Active display page
     3D4 - Display Controller address
      29 - Current setting of 3x8 register
      30 - Current setting of 3x9 register
      25 - Character lines on screen (rows on screen)
      16 - Scan lines per character (character height)
      08 - Display combination code (active)
      00 - Display combination code (alternative)
      16 - Colors supported for current video mode
       8 - Display pages supported for current video mode
     400 - Scan lines in current video mode
       0 - Primary character block
       0 - Secondary character block
      31 - Miscellaneous state information - 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
           Yes - All modes on all displays active
            No - Summing to grey shades active
            No - Monochrome display attached
            No - Mode setting default palette loading disabled
           Yes - Cursor emulation active
           Yes - Background intensity
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
      15 - Video Adapter Interface - 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
           Yes - BIOS supports AI information return
            No - AI driver required
           Yes - 16-bit VGA graphics present
           Yes - VGA attributes set
           Yes - 132-column mode supported
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
  256 KB - Video memory available

System Memory Map Information
-----------------------------
      15360 KB - Local memory between 1MB and 16MB
     507904 KB - Local memory between 16MB and 4GB
      15360 KB - System memory between 1MB and 16MB
     507904 KB - System memory between 16MB and 4GB
      15360 KB - Cacheable memory between 1MB and 16MB
     507904 KB - Cacheable memory between 16MB and 4GB
      15360 KB - Before the start of non-system memory between 1MB and 16MB
    3129344 KB - Before the start of non-system memory between 16MB and 4GB

Memory types:

      Local - Memory on the system board or memory that is not accessible
              from the channel. It can be system or non-system memory.

    Channel - Memory on adapters. It can be system or non-system memory.

     System - Memory that is managed and allocated by the primary OS.
              This memory is cached if the cache is enabled.

Non-system - Memory that is not managed and allocated by the primary OS.
              This memory includes memory-mapped I/O devices, adapter memory
              directly modifiable by the adapter and relocatable memory such
              as bank-switched and expanded-memory-specs (EMS) memory.
              This memory is not cached.

Device Descriptor Table (DDT) Information
-----------------------------------------
           23 - Number of DDT entries
           37 - Size of one DDT entry

( 1)     000 - Device ID
     0708 : 6 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
           10 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            5 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           24 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          130 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        DC000 - Start of first non-system memory block
        16 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            4 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 2)     000 - Device ID
     60E9 : 5 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
           11 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          140 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        C8000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           10 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 3)     003 - Device ID
     8FDA : 3 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           01 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            7 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           28 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
         2160 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           10 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 4)     000 - Device ID
     8FDA : 3 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            8 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        D0000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 5)     002 - Device ID
     8F82 : 2 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           03 - Implementation revision level of the device
           10 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            9 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           28 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
         3C00 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        CA000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           20 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 6)     002 - Device ID
     8F82 : 1 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           03 - Implementation revision level of the device
           14 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            8 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           28 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
         1C00 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        CC000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           20 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 7)     005 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           02 - Implementation revision level of the device
            7 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            8 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          3BC - Starting address of first I/O block
         1278 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            4 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
            6 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 8)     006 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           0A - Implementation revision level of the device
            4 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            F - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1
                Yes - First arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - Second arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          3F8 - Starting address of first I/O block
         4620 - Starting address of second I/O block
         83F8 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            8 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
            1 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            8 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

( 9)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            6 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            2 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           2C - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          3F0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     C0000000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     C3FFFC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            8 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(10)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     C7FFF800 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     CBFFF400 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(11)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     CFFFF000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     D3FFEC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(12)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     D7FFE800 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     DBFFE400 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(13)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     DFFFE000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     E3FFDC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(14)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     E7FFD800 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     EBFFD400 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(15)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     EFFFD000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     F3FFCC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(16)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     F7FFC800 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     FBFFC400 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(17)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     FFFFC000 - Start of first non-system memory block
        16 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(18)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           FF - Implementation identifier of the device
           FF - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(19)     088 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           04 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(20)     096 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           80 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(21)     104 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           03 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(22)     112 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           80 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(23)     312 - Device ID
     FFFF : 4 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
           15 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
         6100 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     BF800000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         1 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           80 - Reserved (# 28) - 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Planar Devices:
---------------
Planar  1: FEE7  Planar ID - PS/2 Model 8642 Server 720
Planar  2: ----  POS
Planar  3: 917C  Video
Planar  4: ----  POS
Planar  5: ----  SCSI 56/57
Planar  6: ----  POS
Planar  7: ----  SCSI 76/77/85
Planar  8: ----  POS

Slot Adapters:
---------------
Slot    1: 8F82
Slot    2: 8F82
Slot    3: 8FDA
Slot    4: ----
Slot    5: 60E9
Slot    6: 0708
Slot    7: ----
Slot    8: ----

( 5 ) Adapters found


Checking for XGA DMQS BIOS interface
DMQS not supported

Slot   3 - 8FDA Instance 6
POS Data
--------------------------
     8FDA - Adapter ID
    XGA-2 - Adapter Type
        6 - Instance number
    D0000 - D1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
    D1F00 - D1F7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
     2160 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture
    56 MB - Video Memory Base Address (3800000h)
        7 - Video Arbitration Level
       On - Video Fairness


---------------------------------------------------------------
Runstream (R) XGA-2 System Information and Utilities, Rel. 1.06
Copyright (C) UnalZ, 2008.                 All rights reserved.
---------------------------------------------------------------
Run with the option -h for help on command line options



This jumps out at me:

    No - System has dual-bus capability

WTF? This is a dual-bus system. Must be because it is different from the 
other dual-bus systems. Corollary.

I've always wondered about this particular 720. Others have reported no 
problems running PCI video cards in the system, but I have tried several 
different PCI video cards and cannot get NT to acknowledge anything but 
a generic VGA subsystem. I.E., no SVGA or HiColor modes. It has been 
most frustrating. There seems to be a bug somewhere. I do have another 
supposedly good planar I could put in there, but I'm not enthusiastic 
about that task. But this machine needs to be reworked anyway, I have 
some P200 CPU cards to put CPUs on and install, and a third RAID 
backplane also to install. I should gather up all the bits and allocate 
a weekend to it.





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0
Jim
4/6/2008 7:12:34 PM
UZnal wrote:

>>On a side note, I think I'm still using your 960 driver on the RAID
>>array. When I tried to run the Netfinity RAID manager, it complaned that
>>a DLL wouldn't load, then exited. Could this be a side effect of not
>>using the IBM driver? This just now occured to me. The wimpy RAIDADMIN
>>applet from the FWSR option disk still works fine.
> 
> 
> This could be the case. Perhaps there is some private communication involved
> there, I can look at it. I almost forgot that I did it, I must put it on
> mcabase.


Confirmed. Netfinity RAID Manager plays nice with IBM960NT. Not that 
it's much more informative than RAIDADMIN. I'm still waiting for the 
Passplay to rebuild to the hot spare...

-Jim


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0
Jim
4/7/2008 12:47:22 AM
> (The whole thing, since you know better what you are looking for)

While we are at it, I would like to have some more - the QUMC dump with the
Cirrus disabled and XGA-2 installed. The "Planar Video (b_5)" section shows
at the last bit of pos[0] if the planar video is disabled. If it is, it may
look like the following (Mod. 70 with XGA-2 and planar VGA):

Planar Video (b_5):
AdapterID   FFFF
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = 00 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  (** last bit 0 = planar VGA disabled)


SLOT 3 ---  IBM XGA-2 Display Adapter/A
AdapterID   8FDA
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 0000
102h    pos[0] = 0D : 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 (** last bit 1 = enabled)

QUMC (qumc155.zip) is on mcabase at the usual address.


Back to your system:

The planar, i.e. the system, reserves 16 non-system memory blocks of 64 MB
each. This is a total of 1GB, from the 3072 MB to the 4096 MB address
(decimals are easier to read):


> ( 9)     000 - Device ID
>    Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
>           3F0 - Starting address of first I/O block
>      C0000000 - Start of first non-system memory block (** 3072)
>      65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block (** += 3136)
>      C3FFFC00 - Start of second non-system memory block (** 3136)
>      65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block (** += 3200)

Mod. 95 has the same port 3F0 in the BIOS device section.

Device 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 skipped:

> (16)     000 - Device ID
>    Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
>      F7FFC800 - Start of first non-system memory block (** 3968)
>      65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block (** += 4032)
>      FBFFC400 - Start of second non-system memory block (** 4032)
>      65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block (** += 4096 )

Device (16) is the XGA-2 4MB aperture offending device, it claims the XGA-2
4 MB aperture range. This is the reason for the disabled 4 MB aperture. I am
going to eliminate the aperture condition from XGA208/NT so that nobody has
to worry about the state of the aperture. The video memory base address is
always there.

> (17)     000 - Device ID
>    Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
>      FFFFC000 - Start of first non-system memory block (** 4096)
>         16 KB - Size of first non-system memory block  (** += 5012)
>             0 - Start of second non-system memory block

Looks like the Cirrus BIOS range, the size (16 KB) is right.


> (23)     312 - Device ID
>      FFFF : 4 - Slot for device
>            15 - First interrupt
>          6100 - Starting address of first I/O block
>      BF800000 - Start of first non-system memory block (** 3064)
>          1 KB - Size of first non-system memory block (** += 3065)

Perhaps BIOS related, I/O port 6100.


> Planar Devices:
> ---------------
> Planar  1: FEE7  Planar ID - PS/2 Model 8642 Server 720
> Planar  2: ----  POS
> Planar  3: 917C  Video

Soooo, this Cirrus has the adapter ID of 917C, previously unknown? 917B is
known as the SVGA adapter. I must insert 917C in the adapter list, thank you
for this info.

> Planar  5: ----  SCSI 56/57

A placeholder for the planar SCSI Mod. 56/57

> Planar  7: ----  SCSI 76/77/85

A placeholder for the planar SCSI  Mod. 76/77/85

> Slot Adapters:
> ---------------
> Slot    1: 8F82  IBM SCSI-2 Fast/Wide Streaming-RAID Adapter/A
> Slot    2: 8F82  IBM SCSI-2 Fast/Wide Streaming-RAID Adapter/A
> Slot    3: 8FDA  IBM XGA-2 Display Adapter/A
> Slot    4: ----
> Slot    5: 60E9  IBM PS/2 SCSI-2 Adapter/A (Future Domain MCS700)
> Slot    6: 0708  BusTek BT-640A SCSI Host Adapter
> Slot    7: ----
> Slot    8: ----

Inserted the adapter descriptions.


> *  76 - Feature Byte 1 [ 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0  ]
>     No - System has dual-bus capability

> This jumps out at me:
>
>     No - System has dual-bus capability
>
> WTF? This is a dual-bus system. Must be because it is different from the
> other dual-bus systems. Corollary.

Perhaps the system is disguising its true nature ...;)

> I've always wondered about this particular 720. Others have reported no
> problems running PCI video cards in the system, but I have tried several
> different PCI video cards and cannot get NT to acknowledge anything but
> a generic VGA subsystem.

I suppose, the 16 64M address ranges are reserved for PCI cards. The S3
miniport driver mentions the following:

// IMPORTANT - As a rule we only map the actual amount of memory
// on the board, not the whole physical address space reported
// by PCI.  The reason for this is that mapping the memory takes
// up a lot of resources in the machine, which as quite scarce by
// default.  Mapping 64MEG of address space would actually always
// fail in machines that have 32MEG or even 64MEG of RAM.

NT was able to detect the XGA. I think the problem is with the
disable-resistant Cirrus. Apparently the XGA cannot disable the planar VGA
in the usual way. Perhaps the fact that the Cirrus identifies itself in the
planar POS as 917C (Planar  3: 917C) and the explicit reservation of VGA
ports in the planar ADF (...io 3b0h-3bbh 3c0h-3dfh) irritates the XGA.

In the 917B ADF, the SVGA Adapter does not claim any VGA resources. the
planar ADF for Mod. 80 does not do it in the presence of a planar VGA. A
possible test would be to exclude the VGA port range (precede with a
semicolon or delete the line) and change the corresponding planar section
to:

Begin Device 3 1 00 NoDMA
    NamedItem Prompt "SVGA Video Subsystem"
       choice "Enabled"     pos[8]=XXXXXXX0b
;;  io 3b0h-3bbh 3c0h-3dfh
                            mem 0c0000h-0c7fffh
       choice "Disabled"    pos[8]=XXXXXXX1b


BTW, the Cirrus support 132-column text modes. You may try it.

> most frustrating. There seems to be a bug somewhere. I do have another
> supposedly good planar I could put in there, but I'm not enthusiastic
> about that task.

The planar data is all right. If you wish, you can try W98SE on this
machine. just to see if the XGA-2 can be made to work. W98SE has perhaps the
better handling of the VGA because it allows port IO for the DOS apps, NT
does not.










0
UZnal
4/7/2008 12:37:42 PM
UZ, did you try futzing with the op panel switch?

http://www.gilanet.com/ohlandl/9595/9595_Power.html#Checking_Voltages
http://www.gilanet.com/ohlandl/9595/Op_Panel.html#Test_Switch

UZnal wrote:
>> Is N�rnberg, Germany close enough?
>> Contact me off-line. The Email address is valid.
> 
> Thank you, Wolfgang, it is close enough. I gave the PSU a warm water shower
> and let it dry out for a few days. Let me first see how it will react to
> this. I noted your email address.
> 
> 
0
Louis
4/7/2008 1:44:18 PM
> UZ, did you try futzing with the op panel switch?

No, let me first read the Tool.



0
UZnal
4/7/2008 1:51:45 PM
> The planar data is all right. If you wish, you can try W98SE on this
> machine. just to see if the XGA-2 can be made to work.

Oops, when the big (4M) XGA aperture is disabled, the video memory occupies
4M chunks in the 32 MB - 64 MB range. The exact address is defined by the
XGA instance, the higher the instance, the higher location has the 4M chunk.
It follows that the installed system memory should not eclipse the XGA video
memory range. The XGA will claim 4M for itself. I would say, at most 60 MB
in such a case when the XGA is set to instance 7.

I have somehow overlooked that the 720 has more than 64 MB installed. The
XGA cannot claim a 4M chunk in the 32-64 MB range. The card can be used in a
frame buffer mode with banking and a 64K window mapped to the VGA adress
A0000 without coprocessor operations. XGA208 release A expects the XGA
instance to be set to 6 in such a case, this requirement will be dropped in
the next release.





0
UZnal
4/8/2008 10:07:41 AM
UZnal wrote:
> 
> While we are at it, I would like to have some more - the QUMC dump with the
> Cirrus disabled and XGA-2 installed.

As you wish, Master UZnal-Wan. May the force be with you.


QUMC MicroChannel Adapter POS Query:
------------------------------------

SLOT 1 ---  IBM SCSI-2 Fast/Wide Streaming-RAID Adapter/A
AdapterID   8F82		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 0000
102h    pos[0] = 19 : 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1
103h    pos[1] = B8 : 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0
104h    pos[2] = C0 : 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
105h    pos[3] = C0 : 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

......   Interrupt Level
            Level E

......   BIOS Base Address
            CC000-0CDFFF

......   I/O Address
            1C00-1C1F

......   DMA Arbitration Level
            Level 8

......   Tower Configuration
            2 Towers

......   Micro Channel Streaming
            Enabled

......   INT 13 Support
            Enabled

SLOT 2 ---  IBM SCSI-2 Fast/Wide Streaming-RAID Adapter/A
AdapterID   8F82		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 0000
102h    pos[0] = D5 : 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1
103h    pos[1] = B9 : 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1
104h    pos[2] = C0 : 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
105h    pos[3] = C8 : 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

......   Interrupt Level
            Level A

......   BIOS Base Address
            CA000-0CBFFF

......   I/O Address
            3C00-3C1F

......   DMA Arbitration Level
            Level 9

......   Tower Configuration
            2 Towers

......   Micro Channel Streaming
            Enabled

......   INT 13 Support
            Enabled

SLOT 3 ---  IBM XGA-2 Display Adapter/A
AdapterID   8FDA		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 0000
102h    pos[0] = 8C : 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
103h    pos[1] = 3E : 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0
104h    pos[2] = 02 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
105h    pos[3] = C0 : 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

......   Video I/O Address
            Instance 6: 2160h - 216Fh

......   1 MB VRAM Aperture Base Address
            Disabled

......   Video Arbitration Level
            Arbitration level  7

......   Video Fairness
            Fairness On

SLOT 4 ---  Empty or not MCA, (ID = FFFF)

SLOT 5 ---  Future Domain MCS700 SCSI-2 Adapter (IBM Fast SCSI-2 Adapter/A)
AdapterID   60E9		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 0007
102h    pos[0] = 07 : 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1
103h    pos[1] = 00 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
104h    pos[2] = E9 : 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1
105h    pos[3] = 60 : 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

......   Adapter Memory Location
            Segment C800

......   Adapter I/O Location
            0140

......   Select Interrupt Line
            Interrupt 11 (Reserved)

......   BIOS Memory Enable
            BIOS Enabled

SLOT 6 ---  BusTek BT-640A SCSI Host Adapter
AdapterID   0708		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 3000
102h    pos[0] = E5 : 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1
103h    pos[1] = 01 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
104h    pos[2] = 00 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
105h    pos[3] = C5 : 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1

SLOT 7 ---  Empty or not MCA, (ID = FFFF)

SLOT 8 ---  Empty or not MCA, (ID = FFFF)

Probing (b_6):
AdapterID   FFFF		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = DB : 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1
103h    pos[1] = 00 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
104h    pos[2] = C0 : 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
105h    pos[3] = C0 : 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

Planar Video (b_5): (null)
AdapterID   917C		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = 01 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
104h    pos[2] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Probing (b_4):
AdapterID   FFFF		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
104h    pos[2] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Planar SCSI (b_3):
AdapterID   FFFF		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
104h    pos[2] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Probing (b_2):
AdapterID   FFFF		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
104h    pos[2] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Planar SCSI (b_1):
AdapterID   FFFF		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
104h    pos[2] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Probing (b_0):
AdapterID   FFFF		
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
104h    pos[2] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


PLANAR ---  PS/2 Model 8642 Server 720 Systemboard
PlanarID    FEE7
-------------------------------------
106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
102h    pos[0] = 9B : 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1
103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
104h    pos[2] = 62 : 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0
105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

32-Bit MCA  5 Slot(s)
32-Bit AVE  1 Slot(s)
32-Bit BVE  1 Slot(s)


------------------------------------------------------
Runstream (R) QUMC for DOS            Beta Rel. 01.55
Copyright (C) UnalZ, 2003, 2005.  All rights reserved.
------------------------------------------------------
QUMC MCABase: 1162 Adapter IDs  46 Planar IDs  41 ADFs


Bit of misinformation there at the end? According to the diagram in the 
Tool, the 720 planar does not have AVE or BVE slots. 7 slots total, all 
standard 32 bit MCA. 7 PCI slots nestled between, cowering before the 
glory. I believe this to be true, but I can verify.

-Jim



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0
Jim
4/9/2008 2:27:07 AM
> May the force be with you.

Amen.


> SLOT 3 ---  IBM XGA-2 Display Adapter/A
> AdapterID   8FDA
> -------------------------------------
> 106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 0000
> 102h    pos[0] = 8C : 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

Jim, the XGA-2 is DISABLED.


> Planar Video (b_5): (null)
> AdapterID   917C
> -------------------------------------
> 106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
> 102h    pos[0] = 01 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Jim, the Cirrus is ENABLED.

If you have obtained this dump with the XGA-2 seemingly enabled and Cirrus
disabled, as set in SC, the state has changed between the runs. The reason
is most likely as described in a previous posting. There is a system memory
installed where the XGA-2 maps its video memory when the 4M aperture is
disabled (32-64 MB range).

The theoretical possibility is to run the XGA-2 in 64KB banking or
framebuffer mode without coprocessor operations which is meaningless. I am
even not sure if the XGA-2 is enabled in this case, your dump shows that it
is not. I treat this case in the XGA208/NT miniport with an error "device
does not exists". The banking mode is simply not worth the trouble.

However, if the 4M aperture is disabled but the 32-64 MB video memory range
is accessible, as in Mod. 57 and all 16 or 32 MB machines, the miniport
tries to use the 4M range. I must test this on Mod. 57, all this is for
release B.


> PLANAR ---  PS/2 Model 8642 Server 720 Systemboard
> PlanarID    FEE7
> -------------------------------------
> 106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
> 102h    pos[0] = 9B : 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1
> 103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
> 104h    pos[2] = 62 : 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0
> 105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

There is some info there but decodable only with the planar ADF.

> 32-Bit MCA  5 Slot(s)
> 32-Bit AVE  1 Slot(s)
> 32-Bit BVE  1 Slot(s)

> Bit of misinformation there at the end? According to the diagram in the
> Tool, the 720 planar does not have AVE or BVE slots. 7 slots total, all
> standard 32 bit MCA. 7 PCI slots nestled between, cowering before the
> glory. I believe this to be true, but I can verify.

I agree, the slot info comes from a static table, it may not be correct. The
table must be edited and updated.









0
UZnal
4/9/2008 7:20:44 PM
UZnal wrote:

>>SLOT 3 ---  IBM XGA-2 Display Adapter/A
>>AdapterID   8FDA
>>-------------------------------------
>>106-7h  POS Subadress extension: 0000
>>102h    pos[0] = 8C : 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
> 
> 
> Jim, the XGA-2 is DISABLED.
> 
>>Planar Video (b_5): (null)
>>AdapterID   917C
>>-------------------------------------
>>106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
>>102h    pos[0] = 01 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
> 
> 
> Jim, the Cirrus is ENABLED.
> 
> If you have obtained this dump with the XGA-2 seemingly enabled and Cirrus
> disabled, as set in SC, the state has changed between the runs. The reason
> is most likely as described in a previous posting.


Nothing has changed. SC still claims that the Cirrus is disabled and the 
XGA2 is fully configured. I just confirmed that, and I have done no 
configuration (automatic or otherwise) since resetting back to instance 
6 some days ago.


> However, if the 4M aperture is disabled but the 32-64 MB video memory range
> is accessible, as in Mod. 57 and all 16 or 32 MB machines, the miniport
> tries to use the 4M range. I must test this on Mod. 57, all this is for
> release B.

I'm glad this excercise is providing some useful information, at least. :)


>>PLANAR ---  PS/2 Model 8642 Server 720 Systemboard
>>PlanarID    FEE7
>>-------------------------------------
>>106-7h  POS Subadress extension: FFFF
>>102h    pos[0] = 9B : 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1
>>103h    pos[1] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
>>104h    pos[2] = 62 : 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0
>>105h    pos[3] = FF : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
> 
> 
> There is some info there but decodable only with the planar ADF.


Easily enough provided if you want it.


-Jim




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0
Jim
4/10/2008 4:03:19 AM
> Nothing has changed. SC still claims that the Cirrus is disabled and the
> XGA2 is fully configured. I just confirmed that, and I have done no
> configuration (automatic or otherwise) since resetting back to instance
> 6 some days ago.

That is what I mean, the SC claim is invalidated by the facts. The XGA-2
leaves the SC as enabled and it disabled as you start again.

> I'm glad this excercise is providing some useful information, at least. :)

Yes, it does. There happens something strange, video memory addressing which
worked on W95 does not on NT in the case of Mod. 57 with disabled apertures.
I inserted the W95 and NT disks from Mod. 77 in Mod. 57 (16 MB RAM). Both
had no troubles coming up but I could not get the XGA208/NT to work in Mod.
57. The XGA-2 memory is at the 56 MB address. W95 has no problems accessing
it while NT is misbehaving.


> > There is some info there but decodable only with the planar ADF.
>
> Easily enough provided if you want it.

Please do, planar ADFs are always an interesting reading.


0
UZnal
4/10/2008 9:53:52 PM
UZnal wrote:

>>>There is some info there but decodable only with the planar ADF.
>>
>>Easily enough provided if you want it.
> 
> 
> Please do, planar ADFs are always an interesting reading.

Sendt to the email address in the header.



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0
Jim
4/11/2008 3:23:16 AM
> > UZ, did you try futzing with the op panel switch?

My television works again. I attribute the problem to a shaky connection on
the complex. The connector is well seated but not firm enough. Perhaps the
SCSI cable to the CDROM drives was pushed by the PSU, and this cable somehow
touched the cable from the complex to the LED panel board.

However, there could have been multiple problems. In any case, after washing
and drying the PSU and checking the cable connections, it worked. It took me
several trials to figure out the loose connection. I tightened it but it
needs a fool-proof fix.








0
UZnal
4/11/2008 2:10:01 PM
UZ, I use the braided cables and take pains to route them in the clips 
on top of the case, then down by the front card guide, then down to the 
drives.

Using ribbon cables makes things more demanding.

Seating complexi on the 95 is a delicate mix of brute force and 
precision. Precision is required to properly align the complex into the 
guides in the DASD structure and the back of the case. The complex must 
fitfully into the slot, or one can shear off some SMD logic from the 
lower edge (oops...).

Then you need to cram the complex into the slot so it seats. The easiest 
weg is if the 95 is on it's side. Like the 90. But if it's upright, it 
requires three hands... Even if you can get the blue levers to the 
seated position does not mean the complex is happy. When you seat the 
complex, you can feel it going home. Then you can seat the blue levers.

UZnal wrote:
>>> UZ, did you try futzing with the op panel switch?
> 
> My television works again. I attribute the problem to a shaky connection on
> the complex. The connector is well seated but not firm enough. Perhaps the
> SCSI cable to the CDROM drives was pushed by the PSU, and this cable somehow
> touched the cable from the complex to the LED panel board.
> 
> However, there could have been multiple problems. In any case, after washing
> and drying the PSU and checking the cable connections, it worked. It took me
> several trials to figure out the loose connection. I tightened it but it
> needs a fool-proof fix.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
4/11/2008 2:24:54 PM
Hi Louis, �nal,

"Louis Ohland" <ohland@charter.net> schreef in bericht 
news:XwKLj.13$Q96.10@newsfe07.lga...
> UZ, I use the braided cables and take pains to route them in the clips on 
> top of the case, then down by the front card guide, then down to the 
> drives.
>
> Using ribbon cables makes things more demanding.
>
> Seating complexi on the 95 is a delicate mix of brute force and precision. 
> Precision is required to properly align the complex into the guides in the 
> DASD structure and the back of the case. The complex must fitfully into 
> the slot, or one can shear off some SMD logic from the lower edge 
> (oops...).

From the pcinfo.exe (ps.tips H20859); I guess it is valid for all complexi 
;-)

           Type 1 and 2 processor board, component side

                   push here to reseat the board.*
                                |
   "blue lever---> _____________V______________ <---"blue lever"
               ____|                          |____
              |             ______________   ____  | location of
    Intel***  | ___        |______________| |____|<---EPROM
 processor---->|   |        cache connector**      | Type 1, U36
              ||___|                               | or U44
              |    __               __             | Type 2, U16
              |____||_____|_________||______|______|

 * The 20 & 25 MHz sx processor boards have no cache connector.
Notes:
*********************** IMPORTANT *****************************
Results of previous problem determination have shown that the
processor board is often not fully seated after being removed
and reinserted.  This may cause intermittent  and difficult to
diagnose system failures.

The "blue levers" located on the top corners of the processor
board are for removal of the board only!  Do not attempt to
reinstall the processor by using the levers.  The correct
method is as follows:

 Center the board into the slot carefully aligning the levers
 with the side rails.  Place the heel of the hand in the center
 of the card edge and "firmly" force the board all of the way
 into the connector slot.  (approximately 17-22lbs of force is
 required to fully seat the board.)
****************************************************************



>
> Then you need to cram the complex into the slot so it seats. The easiest 
> weg is if the 95 is on it's side. Like the 90. But if it's upright, it 
> requires three hands... Even if you can get the blue levers to the seated 
> position does not mean the complex is happy. When you seat the complex, 
> you can feel it going home. Then you can seat the blue levers.
>
> UZnal wrote:
>>>> UZ, did you try futzing with the op panel switch?
>>
>> My television works again. I attribute the problem to a shaky connection 
>> on
>> the complex. The connector is well seated but not firm enough. Perhaps 
>> the
>> SCSI cable to the CDROM drives was pushed by the PSU, and this cable 
>> somehow
>> touched the cable from the complex to the LED panel board.
>>
>> However, there could have been multiple problems. In any case, after 
>> washing
>> and drying the PSU and checking the cable connections, it worked. It took 
>> me
>> several trials to figure out the loose connection. I tightened it but it
>> needs a fool-proof fix.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> 

0
JWR
4/11/2008 3:47:21 PM
> Sendt to the email address in the header.

Thank you. The line "uc000:0 L 1c00" in DEBUG lists the XGA-2 BIOS when the
ROM is located at C000. I had a quick look at the 3600 lines of code and I
was lucky. I hit the locations where the adapter is checking for other
adapters and disabling them, here is the list without a claim of
completeness:

90EE = IBM SVGA Display Adapter
90EF = IBM Display Adapter
90FD = IBM Planar VGA/LCD Adapter
(Ed: All 90xx adapters are checked)

ECCF = ??  ( ECCE = IBM Display Adapter 1.10)
ECFF = IBM 5250 Emulation Adapter
EDAF = IBM P70 Plasma Display controller
EFD8 = DBCS Display Adapter/J
EFFD = IBM VGA Adapter
FFFF = planar VGA when in system setup
(Ed: 8FDA and 8FDB for XGA-2 resp. XGA are also checked)

The ECCF entry is interesting because we know of only ECCE = IBM Display
Adapter 1.10. This entry must be something similar to it.

When it does not query and check installed display adapters, it does a lot
of VGA I/O. I have not traced exactly what the BIOS does to the cards it
does not know, it needs more time to look at the code.




0
UZnal
4/11/2008 7:51:20 PM
> UZ, I use the braided cables and take pains to route them in the clips
> on top of the case, then down by the front card guide, then down to the
> drives.

The Corvette cable takes exactly the same path. But I have also a Spock for
the two CDROM and CDWRT drives, and both almost lean their backs to the
inner side of the PSU, the Spock cable gets pushed by the PSU and either the
cable or the free connector touch that cable on the complex.

Above and behind the PSU is the P60 (with the FPU bug) complex firmly
seated. The socket for the cable connecting the complex with the op panel
faces downwards, so the cable connector also faces downwards. When the
connection is shaky (the socket is large) even a light touch is apparently
enough to cause troubles. I suppose, it is the heat. It is warm there and
the copper extends, it does not firmly grasp the pins. I should reverse the
cable and use the other (colder) end which was so far on the op panel.

> requires three hands... Even if you can get the blue levers to the
> seated position does not mean the complex is happy. When you seat the
> complex, you can feel it going home. Then you can seat the blue levers.

I know, but this time it was the cable on the complex. Touch it and it
swings, quite suspect. I inserted a quality wooden tooth stick with a very
sharp tip sidewards in the connector, imagine. I just wanted quickly to
prove the concept and watch again my television.

BTW, I liked very much the idea of washing the PSU. I am going to repeat the
procedure for those of the other machines when it is cleaning time.



0
UZnal
4/11/2008 8:42:14 PM
> > Sendt to the email address in the header.

The planar ADF that defines the 64MB memory ranges as FixedResources. These
are the same addresses that appear in the Device sections in the XGA2 dump.
The device descriptions are empty and should be the reserved ranges for the
PCI cards, hence, they can be eliminated in absence of a PCI card.


AdapterId 0FEE7h
AdapterName "Built In Features"
NumBytes 29

FixedResources
(.... skipped ..........)

mem 0c0000000h - 0c3fffbffh     ( 9) 000 - Device ID
    0c3fffc00h - 0c7fff7ffh
    0c7fff800h - 0cbfff3ffh     (10) 000 - Device ID
    0cbfff400h - 0cfffefffh
    0cffff000h - 0d3ffebffh     (11) 000 - Device ID
    0d3ffec00h - 0d7ffe7ffh
    0d7ffe800h - 0dbffe3ffh     (12) 000 - Device ID
    0dbffe400h - 0dfffdfffh
    0dfffe000h - 0e3ffdbffh     (13) 000 - Device ID
    0e3ffdc00h - 0e7ffd7ffh
    0e7ffd800h - 0ebffd3ffh     (14) 000 - Device ID
    0ebffd400h - 0efffcfffh
    0efffd000h - 0f3ffcbffh     (15) 000 - Device ID
    0f3ffcc00h - 0f7ffc7ffh
    0f7ffc800h - 0fbffc3ffh     (16) 000 - Device ID (** Aperture offending)
    0fbffc400h - 0ffffbfffh
    0ffffc000h - 0ffffffffh     (17) 000 - Device ID (** Cirrus BIOS ?)


For example, (16) Device includes the same memory blocks as above:


(16)     000 - Device ID (** XGA-2 4M Aperture offending)
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
   (... skipped.....)
     F7FFC800 - Start of first non-system memory block    (** 3968)
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block   (** += 4032)
     FBFFC400 - Start of second non-system memory block   (** 4032)
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block   (** += 4096 )


Commenting out the second and third line, counted  backwards from the end,
may actually enable the XGA-2. The Cirrus must be of course set to disabled
in SC. The mem section in the planar ADF should look like this, note the
semicolons:

mem 0c0000000h - 0c3fffbffh
    0c3fffc00h - 0c7fff7ffh
    0c7fff800h - 0cbfff3ffh
    0cbfff400h - 0cfffefffh
    0cffff000h - 0d3ffebffh
    0d3ffec00h - 0d7ffe7ffh
    0d7ffe800h - 0dbffe3ffh
    0dbffe400h - 0dfffdfffh
    0dfffe000h - 0e3ffdbffh
    0e3ffdc00h - 0e7ffd7ffh
    0e7ffd800h - 0ebffd3ffh
    0ebffd400h - 0efffcfffh
    0efffd000h - 0f3ffcbffh
    0f3ffcc00h - 0f7ffc7ffh
 ;;   0f7ffc800h - 0fbffc3ffh
 ;;   0fbffc400h - 0ffffbfffh
    0ffffc000h - 0ffffffffh

I have modified the planar ADF on Mod. 77 and had no problems. Just make a
backup copy of the original, edit the test copy to put the semicolons and
run the refdisk. Boot to DOS, run XGA2.EXE and look at the aperture status.
If the mod does not work, restore the original planar ADF and reconfig. I
worked only with diskettes.




0
UZnal
4/12/2008 1:32:35 PM
I've not had troubles with the serial data link socket. You must be 
violent over there.

If swapping ends still leaves you with a loose connection, be like Moses 
parting the Red Sea, and bend the pins slightly outward. This will give 
more resistance to pulling the connector out.

UZnal wrote:
>> UZ, I use the braided cables and take pains to route them in the clips
>> on top of the case, then down by the front card guide, then down to the
>> drives.
> 
> The Corvette cable takes exactly the same path. But I have also a Spock for
> the two CDROM and CDWRT drives, and both almost lean their backs to the
> inner side of the PSU, the Spock cable gets pushed by the PSU and either the
> cable or the free connector touch that cable on the complex.
> 
> Above and behind the PSU is the P60 (with the FPU bug) complex firmly
> seated. The socket for the cable connecting the complex with the op panel
> faces downwards, so the cable connector also faces downwards. When the
> connection is shaky (the socket is large) even a light touch is apparently
> enough to cause troubles. I suppose, it is the heat. It is warm there and
> the copper extends, it does not firmly grasp the pins. I should reverse the
> cable and use the other (colder) end which was so far on the op panel.
> 
>> requires three hands... Even if you can get the blue levers to the
>> seated position does not mean the complex is happy. When you seat the
>> complex, you can feel it going home. Then you can seat the blue levers.
> 
> I know, but this time it was the cable on the complex. Touch it and it
> swings, quite suspect. I inserted a quality wooden tooth stick with a very
> sharp tip sidewards in the connector, imagine. I just wanted quickly to
> prove the concept and watch again my television.
> 
> BTW, I liked very much the idea of washing the PSU. I am going to repeat the
> procedure for those of the other machines when it is cleaning time.
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
4/12/2008 1:37:39 PM
Louis Ohland wrote:

> If swapping ends still leaves you with a loose connection, be like Moses 
> parting the Red Sea, and bend the pins slightly outward. This will give 
> more resistance to pulling the connector out.

Or secure the end of the cable with a small drop of hot melt glue.


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0
Jim
4/12/2008 1:40:42 PM
Hot melt? How easy will that stuff come off?

Jim Shorney wrote:
> Louis Ohland wrote:
> 
>> If swapping ends still leaves you with a loose connection, be like 
>> Moses parting the Red Sea, and bend the pins slightly outward. This 
>> will give more resistance to pulling the connector out.
> 
> Or secure the end of the cable with a small drop of hot melt glue.
> 
> 
0
Louis
4/12/2008 1:54:24 PM
> >> If swapping ends still leaves you with a loose connection, be like
> >> Moses parting the Red Sea, and bend the pins slightly outward.

I will leave the tooth stick in until it fails again. I know the previous
history of this machine, it was on a 24x7x365xYears duty in a quite warm
room before I saved it.












0
UZnal
4/12/2008 2:23:27 PM
Must have got flaming hot to make it widen the socket.

Did you dust off the side wall fan?

UZnal wrote:
>>>> If swapping ends still leaves you with a loose connection, be like
>>>> Moses parting the Red Sea, and bend the pins slightly outward.
> 
> I will leave the tooth stick in until it fails again. I know the previous
> history of this machine, it was on a 24x7x365xYears duty in a quite warm
> room before I saved it.
0
Louis
4/12/2008 2:46:06 PM
XGA208/NT Miniport Release B.
Fly Gagarin, fly.

The 4M video memory aperture must be enabled. It is auto enabled in a 32-bit
slot in a 32-bit system. The case where only the 1M aperture is enabled,
although implemented, is not yet tested. When both apertures are disabled,
the driver will not load. The adapter can be set now to any instance.

Release B
2008/04/12: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208ntb.zip

The driver package includes a "television" version of the XGA208 miniport
driver. It can be used on PS/2 Mod. 95 with a LED display panel. The driver
will output status messages to the panel. To use this version, make first a
backup copy of the XGA2.SYS and then copy XGA2.LED to XGA2.SYS.

See INSTALL.TXT and read XGA208MON.TXT. Follow the outlined procedure to
avoid problems.

I would like to thank Jim Shorney for testing the driver and confirming the
results. I thank the audience for the valuable attention and discussions.

I plan no further releases of the XGA208/NT miniport. Time is better spent
on more important matters.


Some TV messages

QAVM = Query Available Video Modes
Q#VM = Query Number of Available Video Modes
SETM = Set video mode
Mxxxx = Number of video mode to set
BNKS = Get Bank Select Code
UPAL = Set 256 colors (user) palette
MAPM = Map video memory
UMAP = Unmap video memory
MCPR = Map Coprocessor I/O Registers
*RST  = Reset
 CLS   = Clear screen
0xxx   = The number of the I/O control code
UNK? = Unsupported I/O code (like get monitor color capabilities, optional)
etc.





















0
UZnal
4/12/2008 8:57:52 PM
> Did you dust off the side wall fan?

I removed it long time ago, but the connector is near the PSU and should get
some fresh air. Actually, this was a good example of what else can go wrong
and make you think the PSU were dead.

Most often problems have simple solutions.





0
UZnal
4/12/2008 9:04:36 PM
Louis Ohland wrote:
> Hot melt? How easy will that stuff come off?


A small dab is easily severed with an Xacto knife. A miniscule dab is 
easily broken with finger pressure. A huge blob can be melted away with 
a heat gun.


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0
Jim
4/12/2008 9:12:58 PM
Hi!

Well, I guess I should hurry up and get a machine configured. My first
choice may not have a LED display, although I can try to arrange that
if you need to see what comes up. Let's see where I put that power
supply...

> I plan no further releases of the XGA208/NT miniport. Time is better
> spent on more important matters.

Does this mean no high color support? If it does, I'm sorry to hear
that.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/13/2008 1:22:51 AM
Hi!

Test results, at long last. I had to find my security Torx bit set, pop open 
the PSU and see why it had stopped working. A power outage blew the internal 
fuse. Popped another one in and the 285 watt supply started right up again. 
(Did you hear that, Delta?)

9585-0X0 ("kitchen-tool")
S/N 23AA009
XGA-2 with white RAMDAC, no heatsink
Quantum Maverick 540S hard disk
32MB RAM
Soldered 486SX-33 CPU
Goldstar 1460DL 14" SVGA monitor (nothing to write home about, very minimal 
multi-scan support--in other words, it does 640x480 at 60Hz, 800x600 at 
56Hz--though 60Hz will work--and 1024x768 at 43Hz Interlaced)
This system has only 32-bit slots in it.

After following the directions to install the driver and make the hardware 
profiles, Windows NT was restarted with the new profile and driver in 
effect. Windows NT booted up, and the monitor's power LED turned orange 
shortly after the "blue startup screen" disappeared, which it had not done 
before. I was afraid that the card had gone into a mode that the monitor 
simply could not display.

This did not end up being the case. The monitor came on after a short delay 
and the Windows NT login screen appeared. It should be noted that the system 
came up in 640x480 but with 256 colors instead of 16. The Thomas-Conrad 
TC4046 clicked into the ring and I logged on. The Windows NT display panel 
appeared with a dialog stating that a new graphics driver had been 
installed.

I tried to get at some of the higher resolution modes, but the only scan 
rate I am allowed to select is the 75Hz one. This will not work with my 
monitor, so I will have to select another one for further testing. I did try 
to enter these modes, but the video was broken up and rolling on the screen 
since it cannot sync at high refresh rates.

William (hoping for high/true color) 


0
William
4/13/2008 2:20:02 AM
UZnal wrote:
> XGA208/NT Miniport Release B.
> Fly Gagarin, fly.


It flies. Installation was without problems, as usual. The LED panel 
mode seems to take a hit on performance - there are long pauses of black 
screen between mode changes. Maybe because I have the ps2panel driver 
installed also? Reverting to the non-panel version of XGA2.SYS 
eliminates the pauses.

The image is stable and well centered. This machine (Server 95a Array 
model, P-90 processor) had been running continuously since installation 
of the previous version of XGA208/NT, and no problems had been noted. 
The Display Type panel indicates XGA-2, Instance 6 Slot 5, 1 MB RAM, 4 
MB aperture enabled.

However, I only see 8-BPP colro modes in the list of supported modes and 
in the selection drop-down. Documentation indicates that 16-BPP is 
available. UZ, where are my missing bits?

Haven't tried to hack the 720 yet. That's for another evening.

-Jim



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0
Jim
4/13/2008 4:12:40 AM
> > XGA208/NT Miniport Release B.
> > Fly Gagarin, fly.

April 12, 1961 (or was it 1962..?).

> It flies. Installation was without problems, as usual. The LED panel
> mode seems to take a hit on performance - there are long pauses of black
> screen between mode changes. Maybe because I have the ps2panel driver
> installed also? Reverting to the non-panel version of XGA2.SYS
> eliminates the pauses.

The LED panel version inserts a 0.5 sec delay after each message, otherwise
the
messages fly like Gagarin. I tried this once on each message of the Spock
TV, it took ages for NT to load. It was the moment of truth, you realize
what a blessing a fast hard disk is.


> The image is stable and well centered. This machine (Server 95a Array
> model, P-90 processor) had been running continuously since installation
> of the previous version of XGA208/NT, and no problems had been noted.
> The Display Type panel indicates XGA-2, Instance 6 Slot 5, 1 MB RAM, 4
> MB aperture enabled.

The same config as on my Server 95. The info is helpful when multiple XGA
cards are installed, so you know which one - always the one in the lowest
numbered slot - drives the display. The registry will list more devices
under XGA2 when multiple adapters are installed and you can fetch the config
info for each adapter .

> However, I only see 8-BPP colro modes in the list of supported modes and
> in the selection drop-down. Documentation indicates that 16-BPP is
> available. UZ, where are my missing bits?

True, the miniport (XGA2.SYS) supplies the modes but the M$ display driver
(XGA.DLL) selects only the 8-bpp modes and rejects all others. Since we are
only the miniport driver - the part of the display driver package which
interfaces to the hardware, inits the adapter and sets the display modes -
the final choice and handling of the graphics operations is the decision of
the M$ display driver.

It is exactly for this reason that it makes not much sense to play with the
miniport. It is wiser to devote time and resources to a new, more
intelligent and faster display driver. Simply said, what we have here is a
cross-breed solution in the transition to a full scale XGA208 NT display
driver.

> Haven't tried to hack the 720 yet. That's for another evening.

The 720 case makes me really curios.



0
UZnal
4/13/2008 5:53:09 PM
> A small dab is easily severed with an Xacto knife. A miniscule dab is
> easily broken with finger pressure. A huge blob can be melted away with
> a heat gun.

I had to open it again today. I swapped the cable ends but I also suspect
the on/off switch or don't-know-what-else. It took a while to power on after
the switch was pressed. This was in the afternoon and I backed up the
important data. A moment ago, no lights again.





0
UZnal
4/13/2008 6:22:47 PM
> After following the directions to install the driver and make the hardware
> profiles, Windows NT was restarted with the new profile and driver in
> effect. Windows NT booted up, and the monitor's power LED turned orange
> shortly after the "blue startup screen" disappeared, which it had not done
> before. I was afraid that the card had gone into a mode that the monitor
> simply could not display.

Nothing to worry about, NT issues the reset request and the card re-enters
VGA mode. The new mode is not immediately set and the card cuts off the
video signal. This behaviour is expected.


> This did not end up being the case. The monitor came on after a short
delay
> and the Windows NT login screen appeared. It should be noted that the
system
> came up in 640x480 but with 256 colors instead of 16.

The default NT VGA driver uses 16 colors. BTW, once you have set up your
profiles and set the device activation/deactivation status, you do not need
to repeat it on every new install.

> I tried to get at some of the higher resolution modes, but the only scan
> rate I am allowed to select is the 75Hz one.

Do you mean, you do not see more than one refresh rate? What do you see when
you "`List all modes" ?

> William (hoping for high/true color)

I hope too but hope alone is not enough. There are cases I cannot test. For
example, I still do not know what result the 6-bit DAC settings for the XGA
produces. I set it to 8 bits in the B release.

The B release does NOT require the instance 6 setting any more, the card can
be set to any instance.



0
UZnal
4/13/2008 6:31:29 PM
UZnal wrote:

>>>XGA208/NT Miniport Release B.
> The LED panel version inserts a 0.5 sec delay after each message, otherwise
> the
> messages fly like Gagarin.


Ah, that explains that, then.


> True, the miniport (XGA2.SYS) supplies the modes but the M$ display driver
> (XGA.DLL) selects only the 8-bpp modes and rejects all others.


Yes, I remember now that you said that. Maybe a note is needed in the 
doc file that 16-BPP modes are not yet supported in NT.


> Simply said, what we have here is a
> cross-breed solution in the transition to a full scale XGA208 NT display
> driver.

I hope you are going to be working on that at some point? :)


> The 720 case makes me really curios.

Maybe later this evening. Depends on how the evening unfolds here.

-Jim



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0
Jim
4/13/2008 10:40:38 PM
Hi!

> The default NT VGA driver uses 16 colors.

I got 256, so maybe you were referring to the 640x480, which is what my 
system did start up in.

> BTW, once you have set up your profiles and set the device
> activation/deactivation status, you do not need to repeat it on every
> new install.

Okay. That will be good to know.

> Do you mean, you do not see more than one refresh rate?

Further testing seems to show that only some modes are affected. I was able 
to get a 1024x768 mode at 60Hz. 800x600 (and many of the others) will not 
budge from 75Hz vertical refresh. If I attempt to change this, the 
resolution slider jumps back to 640x480.

> What do you see when you "`List all modes" ?

640x480, 256 colors 60/72/75
640x510, 256 colors 75
800x600, 256 colors 75/85/95/100 (are the last two interlaced?)
832x620, 256 colors 75/85/95/100
960x720, 256 colors 80/82/85/95
1024x768, 256 colors 60/70/75/85
1040x768, 256 colors 75/85
1104x828, 256 colors 72/75/78
1120x840, 256 colors 70/75
1160x870, 256 colors 60/70
1280x800, 256 colors 75

That's everything I saw. I'll have to find a more capable monitor to try 
them. I could easily push the Goldstar so far beyond what it can handle that 
it isn't even funny.

> I hope too but hope alone is not enough. There are cases I cannot
> test.

If I have the hardware, I will be happy to test about anything. Let me know 
if you have something in mind.

William 


0
William
4/13/2008 11:25:13 PM
Hi!

More results.

I dug out the Monster Monitor--a NEC MultiSync XE21. This thing is a huge 
unit. Upon powering up the 9585-0X0, I got an 8602 POST error. I didn't find 
anything wrong with the mouse, so I soft-restarted from the ref partition 
and all was well once again.

NT came up, the Token Ring adapter inserted into the network and I logged 
on. Once my desktop had loaded, the NT Display Control Panel came up and 
told me that the currently selected display resolution was invalid. 
Hmmm...does the new XGA-208NT probe the monitor or use DMQS?

....and now the results (several minutes later)...

All modes result in a usable, stable picture. The monitor's controls have 
more than enough range to get a nice centered desktop on every resolution 
and every scan rate. I've always thought highly of NEC monitors, and while 
this one is showing its age, it does a nice job.

The on-screen menuing system has an option to display what resolution the 
montor is running at. It knows the regular resolutions (640x480, 800x600, 
1024x768, 1280x1024 and probably 1600x1200. The intermediate resolutions 
offered by XGA-208 on NT seem to confuse this display. In some cases 
(1040x768 and up) the built in diagnostic display reports a resolution of 
1024x768 with a (!) next to it.

I am curious--is there any support for using an attached 8514/8515 (1024x768 
43Hz interlaced) display with XGA-208? I may have to move the 9517 in here 
for some more testing...

William 


0
William
4/14/2008 12:03:59 AM
> Yes, I remember now that you said that. Maybe a note is needed in the
> doc file that 16-BPP modes are not yet supported in NT.

I should provide an NT mode table for the final release. There could be a
few more fixes until then.


> > Simply said, what we have here is a
> > cross-breed solution in the transition to a full scale XGA208 NT display
> > driver.
>
> I hope you are going to be working on that at some point? :)

I have started working on it a year ago, so I have the init and entry part.
I wanted to have first a complete, finalized W9x version to make it easy to
port. For this, I had to go back to XGA206 and review/revise the coprocessor
operations. The 4-bpp operations and the 800x600 256/64K modes on the XGA
succeeded, new high-res modes were created, the NT miniport was written. All
this and the increased knowledge about the XGA (I had to learn a lot of
things) allows me now to focus on the NT display driver and quickly proceed
with it. It is too late to give up ..;)

My principle is "before you do something, know what you do". A lot of
developers ignore this simple truth and end up in a mess (or in an endless
loop of talk...) In this regard, the W9x versions were the ideal case to
learn to know what to do. NT has a bigger video framework and a novice can
easily crash under its complexity when they see it for the first time.
Conceptually, however, it is an upgraded, a better formalized version of
that on W9x.









0
UZnal
4/14/2008 5:45:01 PM
> Further testing seems to show that only some modes are affected. I was
able
> to get a 1024x768 mode at 60Hz. 800x600 (and many of the others) will not
> budge from 75Hz vertical refresh. If I attempt to change this, the
> resolution slider jumps back to 640x480.

When the XGA2 miniport is loaded, you should be actually able to select all
modes, unless there is something aese (monitor description?) which prevents
this. I have not experienced this case.

> > What do you see when you "`List all modes" ?
>
> 640x480, 256 colors 60/72/75
> 640x510, 256 colors 75
> 800x600, 256 colors 75/85/95/100 (are the last two interlaced?)

No, all 800x600 modes are non-interlaced.

> 832x620, 256 colors 75/85/95/100
> 960x720, 256 colors 80/82/85/95
> 1024x768, 256 colors 60/70/75/85
> 1040x768, 256 colors 75/85
> 1104x828, 256 colors 72/75/78
> 1120x840, 256 colors 70/75
> 1160x870, 256 colors 60/70
> 1280x800, 256 colors 75

These are the XGA208 modes, the list is correct. Theoretically, you should
be able to click on a mode in the list to select and test it.

> If I have the hardware, I will be happy to test about anything. Let me
know
> if you have something in mind.

If you still have release A, I would like to know how the XGA colors are
(not XGA-2, only XGA). The default version uses a 6-bit DAC setting, the
other version uses an 8-bit DAC setting. You must copy xga2_8bitDAC.sys
XGA2.SYS.





0
UZnal
4/14/2008 5:47:26 PM
> Hmmm...does the new XGA-208NT probe the monitor or use DMQS?

No, it does not. But the card itself always probes the monitor and computes
the monitor ID. This ID cannot be retrieved on NT through the XGA BIOS DMQS
call because of the NT video miniport limitations. The miniport cannot pass
a memory buffer to a BIOS call but the DMQS call needs such a buffer to copy
the info into it.

> I am curious--is there any support for using an attached 8514/8515
(1024x768
> 43Hz interlaced) display with XGA-208? I may have to move the 9517 in here
> for some more testing...

There is an interlaced 1024x768 support only for the XGA, not for the XGA-2.
So, you must test it with an XGA.








0
UZnal
4/14/2008 5:48:39 PM
UZnal wrote:

> My principle is "before you do something, know what you do". A lot of
> developers ignore this simple truth and end up in a mess (or in an endless
> loop of talk...) In this regard, the W9x versions were the ideal case to
> learn to know what to do. NT has a bigger video framework and a novice can
> easily crash under its complexity when they see it for the first time.
> Conceptually, however, it is an upgraded, a better formalized version of
> that on W9x.


I am in awe of your skills, sir.

720 hack is in progress, stand by...



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0
Jim
4/15/2008 1:25:24 AM
UZnal wrote:
>>>Sendt to the email address in the header.
> 
> 
> The planar ADF that defines the 64MB memory ranges as FixedResources. These
> are the same addresses that appear in the Device sections in the XGA2 dump.
> The device descriptions are empty and should be the reserved ranges for the
> PCI cards, hence, they can be eliminated in absence of a PCI card.
> 
> Commenting out the second and third line, counted  backwards from the end,
> may actually enable the XGA-2. The Cirrus must be of course set to disabled
> in SC. The mem section in the planar ADF should look like this, note the
> semicolons:
> 
> mem 0c0000000h - 0c3fffbffh
>     0c3fffc00h - 0c7fff7ffh
>     0c7fff800h - 0cbfff3ffh
>     0cbfff400h - 0cfffefffh
>     0cffff000h - 0d3ffebffh
>     0d3ffec00h - 0d7ffe7ffh
>     0d7ffe800h - 0dbffe3ffh
>     0dbffe400h - 0dfffdfffh
>     0dfffe000h - 0e3ffdbffh
>     0e3ffdc00h - 0e7ffd7ffh
>     0e7ffd800h - 0ebffd3ffh
>     0ebffd400h - 0efffcfffh
>     0efffd000h - 0f3ffcbffh
>     0f3ffcc00h - 0f7ffc7ffh
>  ;;   0f7ffc800h - 0fbffc3ffh
>  ;;   0fbffc400h - 0ffffbfffh
>     0ffffc000h - 0ffffffffh


Rebooting now.

Ooops. After the periods march across the screen, thus it appears to be 
an NT generated errror:

NMI: Processor 0 interrupt indication is 0
NMI: Memory board 0 fault status is 0
NMI: Memory board 1 fault status is 0
NMI: I/O Bus bridge interrrupt indication is 0

*** Hardware Malfunction

Call your hardware vendor for support

*** The system has halted ***

Clever beastie, this 720. Not that easy to outfox it.

Restored the unmodified ADF and all is back to normal, such as it is.

I guess I can pull that XGA-2 and stick it in the 95a as a second XGA-2. 
That should be fun.

-Jim


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0
Jim
4/15/2008 1:51:48 AM
Hi!

> When the XGA2 miniport is loaded, you should be actually able to
> select all modes, unless there is something aese (monitor description?)
> which prevents this. I have not experienced this case.

I can select all the resolutions, and they work great. It's selecting scan
rates that is a bit more restrictive. The XGA-2 do everything that is listed
when the "List All Modes" button is clicked. Selecting anything
(resolution+scan rate combo) outside of that list will force the resolution
slider back to 640x480 at 60Hz.

> > 800x600, 256 colors 75/85/95/100 (are the last two interlaced?)
> No, all 800x600 modes are non-interlaced.

Wow. I didn't know XGA-2 would do that.

> If you still have release A, I would like to know how the XGA colors
> are (not XGA-2, only XGA).

I'm not sure how I'd know if I had release A. The bits have been flying
around here, and things have undoubtedly become a little mixed up. The only
XGA-1 setup I have going is running on a 9590 under Windows 98. Whatever
release of XGA-208 I used with the XGA-1 made it possible to run 800x600 at
high color with 1MB installed VRAM.

On the other hand, I do have some old XGA-208 ZIP files over on the Model
85...

William


0
William
4/15/2008 2:50:25 AM
Hi!

> When the XGA2 miniport is loaded, you should be actually able to select
all
> modes, unless there is something aese (monitor description?) which
prevents
> this. I have not experienced this case.

Oh, I forgot. I don't see any place within Windows NT to tell it what
monitor type I am using. If Windows NT has the ability to be told what kind
of monitor I have, I do not know it.

I always thought that NT operated around a "guess and check"
principle--where you set resolution, color depth, and scan rate. Then you
hit the test button and answer yes or no when asked if you saw what was
expected.

William


0
William
4/15/2008 2:52:53 AM
> Oh, I forgot. I don't see any place within Windows NT to tell it what
> monitor type I am using. If Windows NT has the ability to be told what
kind
> of monitor I have, I do not know it.

Neither do I. But I saw somewhere an internal reference to a monitor file, I
just forgot where that was. The file was something like vga.*, you may [dir
/s vga.*] the WINNT directory and see what comes out, and check the
contents.

> I always thought that NT operated around a "guess and check"
> principle--where you set resolution, color depth, and scan rate. Then you
> hit the test button and answer yes or no when asked if you saw what was
> expected.

That is the way it works.


0
UZnal
4/15/2008 2:15:01 PM
> Rebooting now.
>
> Ooops. After the periods march across the screen, thus it appears to be
> an NT generated errror:
>
> NMI: Processor 0 interrupt indication is 0
> NMI: Memory board 0 fault status is 0
> NMI: Memory board 1 fault status is 0
> NMI: I/O Bus bridge interrrupt indication is 0

Did you pull out an XGA2 dump on DOS before going to NT? It would have told
us what the sys status was after the mod.

> Clever beastie, this 720. Not that easy to outfox it.

You proved it...;)

> Restored the unmodified ADF and all is back to normal, such as it is.

These are nice, friendly machines.

> I guess I can pull that XGA-2 and stick it in the 95a as a second XGA-2.
> That should be fun.

I have some terrible things in mind for a double, or better, triple
XGA/XGA-2 config.



0
UZnal
4/15/2008 2:31:12 PM
> I can select all the resolutions, and they work great. It's selecting scan
> rates that is a bit more restrictive. The XGA-2 do everything that is
listed
> when the "List All Modes" button is clicked. Selecting anything
> (resolution+scan rate combo) outside of that list will force the
resolution
> slider back to 640x480 at 60Hz.

Ooof, that is really strange. Usually, NT matches the selected refresh rate
to a resolution. I have really no idea what is going on there.

> > > 800x600, 256 colors 75/85/95/100 (are the last two interlaced?)
> > No, all 800x600 modes are non-interlaced.
>
> Wow. I didn't know XGA-2 would do that.

Even 120 Hz are possible at 800x600 8-bpp. BTW, I slightly corrected the 95
Hz
and 100 Hz modes for both W9x/NT. I saw some sync artifacts on my monitor.

> > If you still have release A, I would like to know how the XGA colors
> > are (not XGA-2, only XGA).
>
> I'm not sure how I'd know if I had release A. The bits have been flying
> around here, and things have undoubtedly become a little mixed up. The
only
> XGA-1 setup I have going is running on a 9590 under Windows 98.

OK, leave it then as it is. We need this setup too.





0
UZnal
4/15/2008 2:32:36 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Did you pull out an XGA2 dump on DOS before going to NT? It would have told
> us what the sys status was after the mod.

No, but I'll do that later.


> I have some terrible things in mind for a double, or better, triple
> XGA/XGA-2 config.

Once we're done toruturing the 720, I'll pull the card and put it in the 
95a. Let evil ride....


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0
Jim
4/15/2008 8:58:24 PM
UZnal wrote:

> Did you pull out an XGA2 dump on DOS before going to NT? It would have told
> us what the sys status was after the mod.

System Configuration Parameters
-------------------------------
   MCA - Microchannel bus implemented
    F8 - Model
    FD - Submodel
    14 - BIOS Revision Level
         BIOS Version date: 05/22/97
    05 - CPU Type - Pentium
    0C - CPU Stepping Level
  83AB - Keyboard ID - G-layout 101/102-key (IBM compatible)
   Yes - Diskette drive present
     0 - Additional diskette drives present
   Yes - Math coprocessor installed
   Yes - Pointing device installed
     1 - Asynchronous communication ports
     1 - Parallel ports

*  76 - Feature Byte 1 [ 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0  ]
    No - System has dual-bus capability
   Yes - Microchannel bus implemented
   Yes - Extended BIOS data area allocated
    No - Wait for External Event function supported
   Yes - Keyboard intercept function available
   Yes - Real-time clock available
   Yes - Second 8259 interrupt controller present
    No - Fixed disk BIOS uses DMA channel 3

*  F6 - Feature Byte 2 [ 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0  ]
     0 - Reserved
   Yes - Data Streaming supported
   Yes - 8042 keyboard controller present
    No - Enable/Disable Processor functions supported
   Yes - Return Memory-Map Information function supported
   Yes - Return POS Data function supported
   Yes - Keyboard Functionality Determination function supported
         Yes - Return to default typematic rate/delay supported
          No - Turn on/off typematic supported
         Yes - Set typematic rate/delay supported
         Yes - Get current typematic rate/delay supported
         Yes - Keyboard ID supported
         Yes - 101-/102-key keyboard functions supported
         Yes - 122-key keyboard functions supported
           0 - Reserved
     1 - Reserved

*  B5 - Feature Byte 3 [ 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1  ]
   Yes - SCSI support in IML
    No - IML System
   Yes - Information panel installed
    No - SCSI subsystem supported on the system board
     1 - Reserved
     1 - Reserved
     0 - Reserved
     1 - Reserved

*  50 - Feature Byte 4 [ 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0  ]

*  2F - Feature Byte 5 [ 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1  ]
   Yes - Flash BIOS present

*  4A - Interrupt 4Bh Advanced Services [ 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0  ]
     0 - Reserved
   Yes - Generic SCSI CBIOS service supported
     0 - Reserved
   Yes - Interrupt 4Bh intercepted
     0 - Reserved
    No - Operating System supports DMA services
     1 - Reserved
     0 - Reserved

Video Functionality/State Information
-------------------------------------
    C000 - Segment to static functionality information
    502D - Offset to static functionality information
      03 - Active video mode
      80 - Character columns on screen (columns on screen)
    4096 - Length of regenerative buffer (in bytes)
    0000 - Starting address in regenerative buffer
       0 - Active display page
     3D4 - Display Controller address
      29 - Current setting of 3x8 register
      30 - Current setting of 3x9 register
      25 - Character lines on screen (rows on screen)
      16 - Scan lines per character (character height)
      08 - Display combination code (active)
      00 - Display combination code (alternative)
      16 - Colors supported for current video mode
       8 - Display pages supported for current video mode
     400 - Scan lines in current video mode
       0 - Primary character block
       0 - Secondary character block
      31 - Miscellaneous state information - 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
           Yes - All modes on all displays active
            No - Summing to grey shades active
            No - Monochrome display attached
            No - Mode setting default palette loading disabled
           Yes - Cursor emulation active
           Yes - Background intensity
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
      15 - Video Adapter Interface - 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
           Yes - BIOS supports AI information return
            No - AI driver required
           Yes - 16-bit VGA graphics present
           Yes - VGA attributes set
           Yes - 132-column mode supported
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
             0 - Reserved
  256 KB - Video memory available

System Memory Map Information
-----------------------------
      15360 KB - Local memory between 1MB and 16MB
     507904 KB - Local memory between 16MB and 4GB
      15360 KB - System memory between 1MB and 16MB
     507904 KB - System memory between 16MB and 4GB
      15360 KB - Cacheable memory between 1MB and 16MB
     507904 KB - Cacheable memory between 16MB and 4GB
      15360 KB - Before the start of non-system memory between 1MB and 16MB
    3129344 KB - Before the start of non-system memory between 16MB and 4GB

Memory types:

      Local - Memory on the system board or memory that is not accessible
              from the channel. It can be system or non-system memory.

    Channel - Memory on adapters. It can be system or non-system memory.

     System - Memory that is managed and allocated by the primary OS.
              This memory is cached if the cache is enabled.

Non-system - Memory that is not managed and allocated by the primary OS.
              This memory includes memory-mapped I/O devices, adapter memory
              directly modifiable by the adapter and relocatable memory such
              as bank-switched and expanded-memory-specs (EMS) memory.
              This memory is not cached.

Device Descriptor Table (DDT) Information
-----------------------------------------
           23 - Number of DDT entries
           37 - Size of one DDT entry

( 1)     000 - Device ID
     0708 : 6 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
           10 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            5 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           24 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          130 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        DC000 - Start of first non-system memory block
        16 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            4 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 2)     000 - Device ID
     60E9 : 5 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
           11 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          140 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        C8000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           10 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 3)     003 - Device ID
     8FDA : 3 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           01 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            7 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           28 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
         2160 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           10 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 4)     000 - Device ID
     8FDA : 3 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            8 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        D0000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 5)     002 - Device ID
     8F82 : 2 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           03 - Implementation revision level of the device
           10 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            9 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           28 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
         3C00 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        CA000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           20 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 6)     002 - Device ID
     8F82 : 1 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           03 - Implementation revision level of the device
           14 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            8 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           28 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
         1C00 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
        CC000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         8 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           20 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 7)     005 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           02 - Implementation revision level of the device
            7 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            8 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          3BC - Starting address of first I/O block
         1278 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            4 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
            6 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

( 8)     006 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           0A - Implementation revision level of the device
            4 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            F - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1
                Yes - First arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - Second arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          3F8 - Starting address of first I/O block
         4620 - Starting address of second I/O block
         83F8 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            8 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
            1 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            8 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

( 9)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            6 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            2 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           2C - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                Yes - DMA channel required
                Yes - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                Yes - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
          3F0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     C0000000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     C3FFFC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            8 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(10)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     C7FFF800 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     CBFFF400 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(11)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     CFFFF000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     D3FFEC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(12)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     D7FFE800 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     DBFFE400 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(13)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     DFFFE000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     E3FFDC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(14)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     E7FFD800 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     EBFFD400 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(15)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     EFFFD000 - Start of first non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
     F3FFCC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(16)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     FFFFC000 - Start of first non-system memory block
        16 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(17)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           FF - Implementation identifier of the device
           FF - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(18)     088 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           04 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(19)     096 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           80 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(20)     104 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           03 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(21)     112 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           06 - Implementation identifier of the device
           80 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(22)     000 - Device ID
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
            0 - Reserved
           00 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
            0 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
           80 - Readable DDT Indicators - 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  1 - Reserved
            0 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
            0 - Start of first non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
            0 - Reserved (# 28) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(23)     312 - Device ID
     FFFF : 4 - Slot for device
            0 - Reserved
           02 - Implementation identifier of the device
           00 - Implementation revision level of the device
           15 - First interrupt
            0 - Second interrupt
            0 - First arbitration level
            0 - Second  arbitration level
            0 - Reserved DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Readable DDT Indicators - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
                 No - First arbitration level can be shared
                 No - Second arbitration level can be shared
                 No - DMA channel required
                 No - Address limited
                 No - RS-422 serial interface type
                 No - First arbitration level exists
                 No - Second arbitration level exists
                  0 - Reserved
            1 - Reserved - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
         6100 - Starting address of first I/O block
            0 - Starting address of second I/O block
            0 - Starting address of third I/O block
     FF800000 - Start of first non-system memory block
         1 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
            0 - Start of second non-system memory block
         0 KB - Size of second non-system memory block
           80 - Reserved (# 28) - 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 29) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
            0 - Reserved (# 30) - 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Planar Devices:
---------------
Planar  1: FEE7  Planar ID - PS/2 Model 8642 Server 720
Planar  2: ----  POS
Planar  3: 917C  Video
Planar  4: ----  POS
Planar  5: ----  SCSI 56/57
Planar  6: ----  POS
Planar  7: ----  SCSI 76/77/85
Planar  8: ----  POS

Slot Adapters:
---------------
Slot    1: 8F82
Slot    2: 8F82
Slot    3: 8FDA
Slot    4: ----
Slot    5: 60E9
Slot    6: 0708
Slot    7: ----
Slot    8: ----

( 5 ) Adapters found


Checking for XGA DMQS BIOS interface
DMQS not supported

Slot   3 - 8FDA Instance 6
POS Data
--------------------------
     8FDA - Adapter ID
    XGA-2 - Adapter Type
        6 - Instance number
    D0000 - D1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
    D1F00 - D1F7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)
     2160 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture
    56 MB - Video Memory Base Address (3800000h)
        7 - Video Arbitration Level
       On - Video Fairness


---------------------------------------------------------------
Runstream (R) XGA-2 System Information and Utilities, Rel. 1.06
Copyright (C) UnalZ, 2008.                 All rights reserved.
---------------------------------------------------------------
Run with the option -h for help on command line options


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0
Jim
4/16/2008 1:02:09 AM
> System Configuration Parameters
> -------------------------------

> (15)     000 - Device ID
>    Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)
>      EFFFD000 - Start of first non-system memory block
>      65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block
>      F3FFCC00 - Start of second non-system memory block
>      65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block

SysConfig has accepted the changes. Before the modification (16) followed
with the config below. This entry is now gone, (16) is occupied by the
Cirrus BIOS.

-- first dump --
(16)     000 - Device ID (** Aperture offending)
   Planar : 0 - Slot for device (on system board)

     F7FFC800 - Start of first non-system memory block    (** 3968)
     65535 KB - Size of first non-system memory block   (** += 4032)
     FBFFC400 - Start of second non-system memory block   (** 4032)
     65535 KB - Size of second non-system memory block   (** += 4096 )

(Ed: The above memory ranges are free after the modification)

-- second dump --
> (16)     000 - Device ID (** Cirrus BIOS)
>      FFFFC000 - Start of first non-system memory block
>         16 KB - Size of first non-system memory block



> Slot   3 - 8FDA Instance 6
> POS Data
> --------------------------
>      8FDA - Adapter ID
>     XGA-2 - Adapter Type
>         6 - Instance number
>     D0000 - D1BFF : XGA ROM Range (7 KB)
>     D1F00 - D1F7F : XGA Coprocessor Register Range (128 bytes)

The usual C0000 range for the Instance 6 is used by the Cirrus and the XGA-2
displaces its BIOS address, this is OK.

>      2160 - Video I/O Base Address (Display Controller)
> Disabled - 1 MB Video Memory Aperture
> Disabled - 4 MB Video Memory Aperture

This could mean the XGA-2 is disabled, i.e. its BIOS cannot or will not
disable the Cirrus. The 4M aperture range was freed with the modification.
If it was the XGA-2 BIOS, it is the Cirrus adapter ID 917C which is not
listed there. The adapter ID is the problem, so it seems.

>     56 MB - Video Memory Base Address (3800000h)

This is the address the coprocessor is supplied with. In the XGA
architecture, you can supply the coprocessor with any other address, it need
not be the video memory address of the card where the coprocessor resides.

The memory can have the Intel (4321) or Motorola byte order (1234). So, when
you write something to it using the Intel ordering, you can read it back in
the Motorola ordering. A pretty unorthodox way to convert files, any kind of
files.



0
UZnal
4/16/2008 12:24:27 PM
UZnal wrote:

> 
> This is the address the coprocessor is supplied with. In the XGA
> architecture, you can supply the coprocessor with any other address, it need
> not be the video memory address of the card where the coprocessor resides.


So at this point it's probably safe to say that XGA-2 is _definitely not 
supported in the Server 720.



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Jim
4/17/2008 4:48:33 AM
> So at this point it's probably safe to say that XGA-2 is _definitely not
> supported in the Server 720.

A lot of things are possible on MCA. The Server 720, positioned as an
enterprise class server, would not need an XGA at all - such an argument is
understandable. However, I cannot yet say if it is definitely not possible
to run it on the 720. It could be possible by some other means, like
patching the XGA BIOS or devising other experiments.

I should pull out the Radius XGA-2 BIOS (ISA bus) to see what is in there,
but the card is not installed at this time.






0
UZnal
4/17/2008 1:16:47 PM
Hi!

> Ooof, that is really strange. Usually, NT matches the selected
> refresh rate to a resolution. I have really no idea what is going
> on there.

That appears to be exactly what is happening. If I were to pick one of
the refresh rates that was not available at 640x480, the resolution
slider would jump up to the next resolution where it is available.

60Hz vertical refresh is available in only a few modes with your
driver running. Not that this is a really a problem...it was only
causing trouble for a monitor that was far too limited in the first
place to be testing XGA-208. This has been rectified--I now have an
NEC Multisync XE21 hooked up to the 9585 (!!!) and that monitor should
be able to handle anything the XGA-2 could ever put out.

If you have the bandwidth (and aren't opposed to Flash (hello Dan O!),
you might want to watch this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPKbbUhjb-4

I put out a video in the hopes of explaining what XGA is, and what
XGA-206/208 could do for anyone running XGA-1 or XGA-2 on Windows. (I
hope you do not mind my doing this. It was not an attempt to "steal"
any credit for the driver or anything like that. If you'd rather I
remove it, then I will.)

> OK, leave it then as it is. We need this setup too.

I will keep it around, although I may be removing the planar soon. It
has some crud on the pins coming out of the XGA-1 RAMDAC. It works,
but I suspect everyone will be happier with a clean planar. The system
needs a new clock battery as well. It is losing vast quantities of
time when shut off.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/17/2008 3:43:50 PM
> That appears to be exactly what is happening. If I were to pick one of
> the refresh rates that was not available at 640x480, the resolution
> slider would jump up to the next resolution where it is available.

Fine, this is the expected behaviour and everything is all right then.

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPKbbUhjb-4
>
> I put out a video in the hopes of explaining what XGA is, and what
> XGA-206/208 could do for anyone running XGA-1 or XGA-2 on Windows. (I
> hope you do not mind my doing this. It was not an attempt to "steal"
> any credit for the driver or anything like that. If you'd rather I
> remove it, then I will.)

Well done, William, I enjoyed it. It feels like a TV report coming right
from the scene, a fresh, first hand account and a nice demo. Feel free to do
anything you want to do to. And, of course you and all testers do deserve
credits for testing, because testing is a part of the development process.

I am about to complete both READMEs (W9x/NT) and I have already included the
test reports. You have the most reports on the W9x case, not counting the
latest video report ...;)

There are no more inaccuracies in your video report than in the usual TV
news:

- The PEL (RAMDAC) value of the XGA-2 depends on the color depth, or the
bits per pixel value. The techref assumes values in units of 8-bits PEL
(8-bpp). In this case, it is safe to say the recommendation is 90 MHz. In
practice some 96/98 MHz, as the tests showed, are safely usable. An increase
in the color depth, decreases the programmed PEL rate, and vice versa, a
decrease in the color depth, increases the PEL rate. This means, 16-bpp or
64K colors modes use max 45/48 MHz and 4-bpp or 16 colors modes can use up
to 128 MHz, the programmable max on the XGA-2. In plain numbers, the max
XGA-2 PEL rate is 128 MHz and it may not be achieved by all XGA-2 chipsets.
(It makes no sense to allow to program the XGA-2 up to 128 MHz and then
limit the value to 90 MHz, so one must really think and interpret what this
condition means and when it does apply).

- XGA208 provides for the first time 800x600 and 832x620 at 256/64K colors
on the XGA. No other driver, AFAIK, was able to achieve these so far.

- The number of hi-res modes on the XGA-2 is remarkable, no other driver or
DMQS file provides so many alternatives in terms of resolution and refresh
rate. We have 60 (!) resolution/refresh rate combinations on the XGA-2 and
12 on the XGA.

- XGA208 uses coprocessor operations for the 4-bpp or 16 colors modes, the
M$ driver did not. This feature actually made the hi-res modes highly
usable.

- Eventual software bugs are of course never to be excluded. To my
knowledge, XGA208 has no any known bugs (it is the job of the testers to
find one). The driver mastered Microsoft's Display Compatibility Test
without errors.

- The Beta status is an insurance against maintenance claims and means "work
in progress" which it really is.



0
UZnal
4/18/2008 10:48:10 AM
Don't quit your day job.

wm_walsh@hotmail.com wrote:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPKbbUhjb-4
0
Louis
4/18/2008 8:18:20 PM
Hi!

> Don't quit your day job.

I am not about to consider that. ;-) Sheesh, everyone's a critic.

I make the videos because I have *fun* making them. I do try to make
them "good" but that is highly subjective.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/19/2008 9:23:10 PM
UZnal wrote:
>> So at this point it's probably safe to say that XGA-2 is _definitely not
>> supported in the Server 720.
> 
> A lot of things are possible on MCA.

Posting from the 760E again, the OS/2 box took another dump. It's time I 
  dug through the pile and replaced that dodgy hard disk. Looking for a 
4-Gigish narrow SCSI, but I could make do with one of my FW drives and a 
converter.

Anyway, I  pulled the XGA-2 from the 720 this afternoon and plugged it 
in to the 95A. She fired right up and 208nt recognized that the system 
has two XGA-2 adapters with no fuss. Couldn't figure out how to get an 
image on the second monitor, however. The system was running from the 
primary adapter at instance 6.

Back in 720 land again, I reinstalled the Diamond Stealth PCI video card 
and tried it again. Still could not get NT to admit that it has anything 
but a generic VGA adapter installed. But the system (and NT) was 
definitely running on the Diamond Stealth card.

Since this thing likes Cirrus so much, I decided to put in a reworked 
Cirrus SVGA/A from our friend the Baddog. Configured fine, NT found a 
Cirrus adapter and gave me 800x600x64k - on the planar video adapter. I 
can't seem to get it to fire from the SVGA/A in an MCA slot, no matter 
what I try.

For the life of me, I can't seem to get this machine to operate properly 
from a video card in an expansion slot. Oh well, at least the planar 
video doesn't seem to flicker at 800x600.

-Jim


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0
Dr
4/20/2008 12:35:51 AM
> Anyway, I  pulled the XGA-2 from the 720 this afternoon and plugged it
> in to the 95A. She fired right up and 208nt recognized that the system
> has two XGA-2 adapters with no fuss. Couldn't figure out how to get an
> image on the second monitor, however. The system was running from the
> primary adapter at instance 6.

This behaviour is expected, there will be no image from the second card.

(*) Only the display driver can get an image from the second card. The
miniport decides actually to let NT connect a new miniport instance to the
other card in asking NT to query for other adapters it supports. XGA208 does
so currently but let us see what combinations will be possible under the new
display driver.

> Back in 720 land again, I reinstalled the Diamond Stealth PCI video card
> and tried it again. Still could not get NT to admit that it has anything
> but a generic VGA adapter installed. But the system (and NT) was
> definitely running on the Diamond Stealth card.

The Diamond Stealth PCI supplies the video and NT claims it were a VGA? What
happens when you disable the Cirrus device (system applet Devices) and try
to load/install the Diamond Stealth PCI drivers?

> Since this thing likes Cirrus so much, I decided to put in a reworked
> Cirrus SVGA/A from our friend the Baddog. Configured fine, NT found a
> Cirrus adapter and gave me 800x600x64k - on the planar video adapter. I
> can't seem to get it to fire from the SVGA/A in an MCA slot, no matter
> what I try.

See above the (*) note. The Cirrus miniport detects both Cirrus cards and
decides to run on the planar Cirrus. The Cirrus miniport code is contained
in the DDK. To try a second, non-Cirrus card, the Cirrus
miniport/driver/service must be explicitly disabled. If you try this,
remember to work with a test profile. Once you are able to install the new
card/driver, remember to check the activation status in the hardware
profiles.

> For the life of me, I can't seem to get this machine to operate properly
> from a video card in an expansion slot. Oh well, at least the planar
> video doesn't seem to flicker at 800x600.

One possible experiment would be to let the XGA208 miniport disable the
planar (Cirrus) video (also let the modified Cirrus miniport driver fail)
and enable the XGA-2. The question is how an XGA-2 behaves when it is
enabled on the fly, would it be properly initialized in such a case?



0
UZnal
4/20/2008 1:11:34 PM
UZnal wrote:
> 
> The Diamond Stealth PCI supplies the video and NT claims it were a VGA? What
> happens when you disable the Cirrus device (system applet Devices) and try
> to load/install the Diamond Stealth PCI drivers?

Tried that. My idea was to use the tricks I learned in experimenting 
with 208nt to try to get the PCI card to work. NT starts up and declares 
that it has found a VGA adapter.

> See above the (*) note. The Cirrus miniport detects both Cirrus cards and
> decides to run on the planar Cirrus. The Cirrus miniport code is contained
> in the DDK. To try a second, non-Cirrus card, the Cirrus
> miniport/driver/service must be explicitly disabled. If you try this,
> remember to work with a test profile. Once you are able to install the new
> card/driver, remember to check the activation status in the hardware
> profiles.

Had tried this previously with at least three different PCI cards, 
Diamond, ATI, and can't remember the rest. Same result each time, even 
after installing vendor provided drivers and disabling Cirrus, N insists 
that it has only a generic 16-color VGA adapter. Not pretty. I learned 
the hard way NOT to disable vgastart and vgasave.


> One possible experiment would be to let the XGA208 miniport disable the
> planar (Cirrus) video (also let the modified Cirrus miniport driver fail)
> and enable the XGA-2. The question is how an XGA-2 behaves when it is
> enabled on the fly, would it be properly initialized in such a case?

Without the 4MB aperture? Seems pointless.

-Jim


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Dr
4/20/2008 5:38:40 PM
> Had tried this previously with at least three different PCI cards,
> Diamond, ATI, and can't remember the rest. Same result each time, even
> after installing vendor provided drivers and disabling Cirrus, N insists
> that it has only a generic 16-color VGA adapter. Not pretty. I learned
> the hard way NOT to disable vgastart and vgasave.

No, do not not disable any of the standard VGA services, you might be left
without video at all. What else can I suggest? Perhaps to run QUMC (Cirrus
disabled?) and XGA2 with the Diamond PCI in (resource allocated?) to see
what the device list says?

> Without the 4MB aperture? Seems pointless.

Indeed, NT will not treat it as an XGA at all. I will ty to change this, in
fact, I have tried it already but could not continue the experiment. Just
when I needed it the 95 TV decided not to power on. When I tell the miniport
to treat the aperture as disabled, NT crashes with an unhandled kernel
exception in WIN32K.SYS.

(Goes under the desk) Oooh, I pushed now the button very slowly and heard a
fan noise. It should be the switch, shouldn't it? It is a six pins switch,
three pins on a side. I could wire a 2-pins external switch to this pin and
that pin, this should be possible, I think? Or, do I necessarily need a
6-pins switch?



0
UZnal
4/20/2008 7:13:23 PM
UZnal wrote:

> (Goes under the desk) Oooh, I pushed now the button very slowly and heard a
> fan noise. It should be the switch, shouldn't it? It is a six pins switch,
> three pins on a side. I could wire a 2-pins external switch to this pin and
> that pin, this should be possible, I think? Or, do I necessarily need a
> 6-pins switch?

IIRC, the switch is used only as a SPST normally open. The information 
is on the Ardent Tool.

http://www.gilanet.com/Ohlandl/9595/9595_Power.html#Quickee_Op_Panel_Check

So yes, you could use an external switch with only 2 pins. On some 
versions, only half the switch may be used. Easier, in this case, is to 
first try jumping across to the unused half of the switch.

Viee with monospaced font

    |  | <-Normally open contact
    |  | <-Common
    |  | <-Normally closed contact

   |    |
   |____|  <- pushbutton

Front of computer

Jumper normally open pin across horizontally to it's twin on the other 
side. Likewise, the common pin.

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Jim
4/20/2008 9:27:25 PM
Hi!

> (Goes under the desk) Oooh, I pushed now the button very slowly
> and heard a fan noise. It should be the switch, shouldn't it?

Do you have a front panel with a hard disk indicator?

If not, your front panel has a second, identical switch that can be
removed and pressed into service.

Louis writes about it in greater detail:
http://www.gilanet.com/ohlandl/9595/9595_Power.html#Quickee_Op_Panel_Check

Some PSUs also have a test button. I've seen it on the AcBel Polytech
285 watt unit and the 400 watt Delta. The 329.1 (!) and 335 watt units
do not have it.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/20/2008 9:35:02 PM
Hi!

> - The Beta status is an insurance against maintenance claims and
> means "work in progress" which it really is.

I think I found something last night. I sat down in front of the testbed 
9585 to do some work that involved a full-screen command prompt. After 
issuing an ALT-ENTER to direct the command prompt window to go full screen, 
I was greeted by a "the video device fail to initialize for fullscreen mode" 
message. The command prompt remained in windowed mode.

William 


0
William
4/20/2008 9:52:41 PM
William R. Walsh wrote:

> I think I found something last night. I sat down in front of the testbed 
> 9585 to do some work that involved a full-screen command prompt. After 
> issuing an ALT-ENTER to direct the command prompt window to go full screen, 
> I was greeted by a "the video device fail to initialize for fullscreen mode" 
> message. The command prompt remained in windowed mode.


Confirmed. The dual XGA-2 95a exhibits the exact same behavior. Nice 
catch, Wild Bill.

When will the video be out?

-Jim


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Dr
4/21/2008 3:19:34 AM
Hi!

> When will the video be out?

I doubt I'll be making a video for something that simple and easily
demonstrated.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/21/2008 4:25:54 AM
> So yes, you could use an external switch with only 2 pins. On some
> versions, only half the switch may be used. Easier, in this case, is to
> first try jumping across to the unused half of the switch.

Thank you, Dr. Jim.





0
UZnal
4/21/2008 10:02:18 AM
> Do you have a front panel with a hard disk indicator?

Yes, I have.

> If not, your front panel has a second, identical switch that can be
> removed and pressed into service.

There is only a placeholder for it. It will be quicker to try first the
external switch, I want to exactly know if it is the switch.





0
UZnal
4/21/2008 10:05:16 AM
> I think I found something last night. I sat down in front of the testbed
> 9585 to do some work that involved a full-screen command prompt. After
> issuing an ALT-ENTER to direct the command prompt window to go full
screen,
> I was greeted by a "the video device fail to initialize for fullscreen
mode"
> message. The command prompt remained in windowed mode.

This has to do with the VGA emulation, usually a characteristics of the SVGA
adapters. You should be greeted with the same message when you run the M$
XGA driver on NT. The DDK notes follow:

The SVGA case:

 "...Self-declared "VGA-compatible" miniport drivers are set up to configure
themselves in the registry with VgaCompatible set to one (TRUE).
VGA-compatible miniport drivers have the following features:

- Such a miniport driver, usually of an SVGA adapter, is based on the
system-supplied VGA miniport driver, with code modified to support
adapter-specific features. The system-supplied VGA display drivers use the
kernel-mode support provided by VGA-compatible miniport drivers, so the
developer of a new miniport for a VGA-compatible adapter need not write a
new display driver.

- Such a miniport driver both provides support for full-screen MS-DOS�
applications to do I/O directly to the adapter registers and also functions
as a video validator to prevent such an application from issuing any
sequence of instructions that would hang the machine."


The XGA (and S3) miniports are not VGA-compatible, they are configured with
VgaCompatible set to FALSE.

// Miniports for cards such as an S3 or XGA that have an XGA on the board
// but do not implement the VGA functionality will run with the VGA
// miniport loaded and should therefore claim all the resources shared
// with the VGA as shareable.

The XGA case:

 "....Miniport drivers that are set up to configure themselves in the
registry with VgaCompatible set to zero (FALSE) have the following features:

- Such a miniport driver provides no special support for full-screen MS-DOS
applications in x86-based machines. Instead, it is loaded along with a
system-supplied VGA (or, possibly, with a VGA-compatible SVGA) miniport
driver, which provides this support for full-screen MS-DOS applications.

- In most cases, such a miniport driver either is written for an adapter
that has no VGA compatibility mode or for an accelerator that works
independently of the VGA."


One reason is that the XGA/XGA-2 cannot simultaneously run VGA and XGA
modes. The 640x480 VGA resolution display mode on the XGA is in fact an XGA
mode, not a native VGA mode. The fullscreen DOS modes are VGA text modes and
not XGA modes.

The W9x case is different, there W9x resp. XGA208 traps the VGA ports. The
card eventually leaves an XGA mode and enters an Interrupt 10 VGA mode.
However, the request comes from W9x and not from the display driver. W9x
implements the VESA interface, that is, the drivers are requested to comply
with it. Therefore, XGA208 on W9x implements the VESA extensions (remember
XGAVESA), and (DOS) apps can use the VESA interface to obtain display mode
info or set a supported mode.

The VESA and non-VESA (custom XGA/XGA-2) mode numbers are included in the
xga208mon.txt file. For example, 832x620 64K colors has the mode number
163h.







0
UZnal
4/21/2008 10:06:22 AM
Hi!

> > Do you have a front panel with a hard disk indicator?
>
> Yes, I have.

That panel does not have the second switch. This only applies to the
earlier systems that didn't have a hard disk indicator LED.

> I want to exactly know if it is the switch.

I would pull the board and try jumpering the contacts, although it
already sounds like the switch is faulty.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/21/2008 3:00:57 PM
Hi!

> This has to do with the VGA emulation, usually
> a characteristics of the SVGA adapters. You
> should be greeted with the same message when
> you run the M$ XGA driver on NT.

I will definitely check to be sure, but I know I've run a full screen
command prompt under Windows NT on MCA hardware. The video may have
been coming from a Cirrus card, so that will have to be ruled out.

In about an hour (when I'm near that machine again) I will switch my
hardware profile back to the M$ driver and try it.

William
0
wm_walsh
4/21/2008 3:59:53 PM
> It will be quicker to try first the external switch

Quicker, yes, lucky with the switch, no. I spotted a tiny 6-pin switch,
wired it, soldered the two leads, it worked. But the switch itself turned
out to be a non-sticky one, it switches on only for the duration of a quick
push. So far, the PSU responds to the momentarily on/off, so I conclude a
better switch is what I need. Well, at least the PSU seems to be alive and
full of energy.









0
UZnal
4/21/2008 7:00:09 PM
wm_walsh@hotmail.com wrote:

>> When will the video be out?
> 
> I doubt I'll be making a video for something that simple and easily
> demonstrated.


Ummm....

William, that was a joke.



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0
Dr
4/22/2008 4:49:52 AM
Hi!

> This has to do with the VGA emulation, usually a characteristics of
> the SVGA adapters. You should be greeted with the same message
> when you run the M$ XGA driver on NT.

After getting the M$ XGA driver to come back to life (five reboots 
later--just changing the hardware profile back to the original config didn't 
work!) I tested this.

In short, I can get a fullscreen command prompt without incident using the 
original M$ XGA driver. Switching back and forth is no problem.

I am definitely running an XGA video mode when in the Windows GUI. 
(1104x828, 69Hz vertical refresh).

William 


0
William
4/23/2008 3:10:19 AM
Hi!

> William, that was a joke.

Noted. :-)

William 


0
William
4/23/2008 3:22:50 AM
> After getting the M$ XGA driver to come back to life (five reboots
> later--just changing the hardware profile back to the original config
didn't
> work!) I tested this.

I have no problems switching between the profiles. XGA resp. XGA2 is set to
Deactivated, according to the profile, and startable by the System.

> In short, I can get a fullscreen command prompt without incident using the
> original M$ XGA driver. Switching back and forth is no problem.

I had a case where I could not get the fullscreen prompt, it must have been
either on Mod. 57 or 77 with the two XGA-2 cards, or but I had a different
configuration. However, you are right and I am wrong, the M$ XGA driver does
support fullscreen mode. One cannot obviously always trust the NT DDK notes.

Whether the fullscreen mode is a missing XGA208 miniport feature or not (it
is not a bug), is another question. According to the NT DDK, the VDM control
codes, i.e. (fullscreen) operations need not be supported by the miniport:

// IOCTL_VIDEO_ENABLE_VDM                       Non-Modal    Private(1)
// IOCTL_VIDEO_DISABLE_VDM                      Non-Modal    Private(1)
// IOCTL_VIDEO_REGISTER_VDM                     Non-Modal    Private(1)

// (1) Private means the IOCTL is completely implemented within the port
driver
//  and the miniport does not need to support it.

FYI, there are Required, Optional and Private IO control codes resp.
operations. Non-Modal above means regardless of the display mode. The
....._VDM control codes manage the fullscreen mode, that is, the Virtual Dos
Machine.

I may come back to this problem when the XGA208 display driver begins to
show signs of life, the miniport will have to be adapted for it.



0
UZnal
4/23/2008 11:14:52 AM
XGA208 Display Driver for Windows 9x
------------------------------------
FINAL Release. Finita la comedia.

XGA208 enables coprocessor support for graphics operations at 16-colors
(4-bpp) and supports higher resolutions up to 1600x1200 on the XGA-2 display
adapter.

XGA208 introduces for the first time 256 and 64K colors display modes on the
XGA display adapter at 800x600 and 832x620 screen resolutions.

2008/04/28: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208.zip

See the enclosed README.TXT for information on monitor line rates, refresh
rates, supported screen resolutions, message exchanges and user test
reports. See INSTALL.TXT for the driver installation instructions.

I would like to thank William R. Walsh and Jim Shorney for testing the
driver, validating the display modes and the enthusiastic support. Special
thanks to all who participated in the discussion with constructive
suggestions and opinions through public postings and private mails.

The XGA-2 system info utilities are available at:

www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip





0
UZnal
4/28/2008 1:12:02 PM
William can now test with the '92 "BAKE" version of the XGA/1MB card. 
Can't you, William?

He can test multi-head with at least two XGA/1MB as well...

UZnal wrote:
> XGA208 Display Driver for Windows 9x
> ------------------------------------
> FINAL Release. Finita la comedia.
> 
> XGA208 enables coprocessor support for graphics operations at 16-colors
> (4-bpp) and supports higher resolutions up to 1600x1200 on the XGA-2 display
> adapter.
> 
> XGA208 introduces for the first time 256 and 64K colors display modes on the
> XGA display adapter at 800x600 and 832x620 screen resolutions.
> 
> 2008/04/28: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208.zip
> 
> See the enclosed README.TXT for information on monitor line rates, refresh
> rates, supported screen resolutions, message exchanges and user test
> reports. See INSTALL.TXT for the driver installation instructions.
> 
> I would like to thank William R. Walsh and Jim Shorney for testing the
> driver, validating the display modes and the enthusiastic support. Special
> thanks to all who participated in the discussion with constructive
> suggestions and opinions through public postings and private mails.
> 
> The XGA-2 system info utilities are available at:
> 
> www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
0
Louis
4/28/2008 1:24:27 PM
William can test the P75 XGA external monitor support, since he has two 
of my P75, one that I know works. Can't you, William?

Louis Ohland wrote:
> William can now test with the '92 "BAKE" version of the XGA/1MB card. 
> Can't you, William?
> 
> He can test multi-head with at least two XGA/1MB as well...
> 
> UZnal wrote:
>> XGA208 Display Driver for Windows 9x
>> ------------------------------------
>> FINAL Release. Finita la comedia.
>>
>> XGA208 enables coprocessor support for graphics operations at 16-colors
>> (4-bpp) and supports higher resolutions up to 1600x1200 on the XGA-2 
>> display
>> adapter.
>>
>> XGA208 introduces for the first time 256 and 64K colors display modes 
>> on the
>> XGA display adapter at 800x600 and 832x620 screen resolutions.
>>
>> 2008/04/28: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208.zip
>>
>> See the enclosed README.TXT for information on monitor line rates, 
>> refresh
>> rates, supported screen resolutions, message exchanges and user test
>> reports. See INSTALL.TXT for the driver installation instructions.
>>
>> I would like to thank William R. Walsh and Jim Shorney for testing the
>> driver, validating the display modes and the enthusiastic support. 
>> Special
>> thanks to all who participated in the discussion with constructive
>> suggestions and opinions through public postings and private mails.
>>
>> The XGA-2 system info utilities are available at:
>>
>> www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga2util.zip
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
0
Louis
4/28/2008 1:25:59 PM
Hi!

> William can now test with the '92 "BAKE" version
> of the XGA/1MB card.

We will see what happens.

> Can't you, William?

What, did you think I didn't make it home?

William
0
wm_walsh
4/28/2008 1:31:46 PM
On Apr 28, 6:12 am, "UZnal" <unalz-at-mail333-dot-com> wrote:
> XGA208 Display Driver for Windows 9x
> ------------------------------------
> FINAL Release. Finita la comedia.
>

....

>
> Special
> thanks to all who participated in the discussion with constructive
> suggestions and opinions through public postings and private mails.
>

(Earlier, somebody said:

> Where have all the people gone?

I've been over at rec.bicycles.tech  - Sure, it gets kind of... um,
spiky there, too - but as Monty Python might say, they're not dead
yet :-)

.... and just to show you guys an amusing taste of how Major League it
is over there:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.bicycles.tech/msg/c2bf4592710d768b

Cheers,
Dan :-)

0
Dan
5/9/2008 6:14:56 PM
Hi!

> (link snipped)

An "opportunistic inflammatory conversationalist"? Now that's a heck
of a phrase to call someone! ;-)

(Does it have anything to do with Transfat Asian Plastic Junk
Trinkets(tm), by any chance?)

There is at least one good point in the post you referenced. I don't
take Usenet too seriously any more (give or take a little bit of
seriousness either way). I'm not sure things are so dire as to say for
"fun and games only" however. It must depend on the group.

Which brings me to my second point. I'm glad to have this group the
way it is. I hope I'm overstepping anything when I say that we're all
relatively civil here, and that most of the posts are helpful/polite/
useful in nature. I've been glad this group has managed to stay
active, too.

William
0
wm_walsh
5/9/2008 8:44:09 PM
> > Special
> > thanks to all who participated in the discussion with constructive
> > suggestions and opinions through public postings and private mails.

For all contributions of a certain kind I have only a very special kick in
the ass to offer.

> (Earlier, somebody said:
>
> > Where have all the people gone?

Heh, this was three months ago. What now, the weekend crisis again?


0
UZnal
5/10/2008 2:26:31 PM
UZnal wrote:

> For all contributions of a certain kind I have only a very special kick in
> the ass to offer.

It's rare that any of my hobbies actually protects me from physical 
violence.... :)


> Heh, this was three months ago. What now, the weekend crisis again?


My weekend crisis currently consist of budgeting my time between a 
backlog of radio repairs and a refresher course in OS/2 crash recovery. 
Somwhere in there I need to work in getting the lawn mowed.

Thanks again for the masterful work on the drivers. I can't speak for 
others, of course, but when it comes to our PS/2 machines, patience is a 
virtue that must be learned.

-Jim


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0
Jim
5/10/2008 3:09:14 PM
XGA208 MCABase Website Update
---------------------------------

XGA208 is officially present on PS2/MCABase now, it has its own page. I used
the opportunity to update more bits and bytes, the changes are very visible.
It was indeed a lot of work in the last two days:

www.members.aon.at/mcabase/xga208.htm

The XGA208 Windows NT Video Miniport Driver is present on the site with the
known release B which now includes the README.TXT containing  the user test
reports and message exchanges.

2008/04/28: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208ntb.zip

I would like to express my best thanks to Jim Shorney and William R. Walsh
for their invaluable work in testing the Windows NT miniport driver and
validating the display modes.

And last but not least, the long deserving acknowledgement:

Very special thanks to Peter Wendt for providing the IBM XGA Technical
Reference without which the XGA206/208 development would have been virtually
impossible.



0
UZnal
5/10/2008 8:47:26 PM
> My weekend crisis currently consist of budgeting my time between a
> backlog of radio repairs and a refresher course in OS/2 crash recovery.
> Somwhere in there I need to work in getting the lawn mowed.

As to the SCSI disk problem, I can think of the case where the disk contains
a hidden PS/2 system partition. In such a case, a host controller other than
Spock or Corvette could fail to correctly report the disk size. The READ
CAPACITY command of Spock/Corvette, which is a specific command with a
specific non-SCSI-2 structure, must be used by the OS driver. This is what
Spock206 does.

If there is no reference partition on the disk, any other controller should
be able to drive the disk, in theory at least.

As to HPFS, I am using the Warp Server HPFS module which is a bit different
for the plain HPFS provided with OS/2. The Warp Server HPFS is written in
assembly language and has the better functionality incl. networking, whereas
the plain OS/2 HPFS is written in C.

> Thanks again for the masterful work on the drivers. I can't speak for
> others, of course, but when it comes to our PS/2 machines, patience is a
> virtue that must be learned.

XGA208 is indeed very well done, I am quite satisfied with it. I hope I can
find the needed time (and patience as you rightly note) to finish the NT
display driver part. There are more projects waiting in the queue, so much
to do and so little time.


0
UZnal
5/10/2008 9:19:00 PM
Hi �nal !

> XGA208 MCABase Website Update
> ---------------------------------
> 
> XGA208 is officially present on PS2/MCABase now, it has its own page. I used
> the opportunity to update more bits and bytes, the changes are very visible.
> It was indeed a lot of work in the last two days:
> 
> www.members.aon.at/mcabase/xga208.htm
> 
> The XGA208 Windows NT Video Miniport Driver is present on the site with the
> known release B which now includes the README.TXT containing  the user test
> reports and message exchanges.
> 
> 2008/04/28: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208ntb.zip

Looks much-promising.
Guess I'll remove the short SVGA from the Server 85 and install a XGA2 
there as well. Even if it were just out of curiosity. It is my last 
surviving NT machine.

> 
> I would like to express my best thanks to Jim Shorney and William R. Walsh
> for their invaluable work in testing the Windows NT miniport driver and
> validating the display modes.
> 
> And last but not least, the long deserving acknowledgement:
> 
> Very special thanks to Peter Wendt for providing the IBM XGA Technical
> Reference without which the XGA206/208 development would have been virtually
> impossible.

Ah. Thanks for the flowers. It's mothers day, isn't it ?

Want to know the story how I got it ?

It is a short one.
We had a technical training at the IBM in Frankfurt in about mid-1992 or 
around. Trainers brought a lot stuff in there and large piles of 
diskettes and papers. Among them was a diskette with the AFP files for 
the named reference manual. They forgot it when they cleared the room 
after the training in one machine. I found it, kept it and printed out 
the manual a few days later in the workshop when I tested an IBM 3816 
AFP laserprinter ... as an "official testrun under load".
No one ever complained.

;-)

-- 
Very friendly greetings from Peter in Germany
http://members.aol.com/mcapage0/mcaindex.htm

*** Reply to: peterwendt@aol.com only ! ***
0
Peter
5/11/2008 12:38:36 PM
> > 2008/04/28: www.members.aon.at/mcabase/pub/files/xga208ntb.zip
>
> Looks much-promising.

I should have also added that the XGA NT driver rejects all modes with 16
colors, what is left are the 256 colors modes below, IIRC, 1280x800. Not
very funny, but there is nothing the miniport can do.


> Ah. Thanks for the flowers. It's mothers day, isn't it ?

(Yes, mother, I saw today the Sunday papers and promptly called you.) Well,
I finished the Win9x part and learned what I wanted to learn. It is now time
to apply and port this knowledge, and it is the right time to thank all
people who contributed to the project.


> We had a technical training at the IBM in Frankfurt in about mid-1992 or
> around. Trainers brought a lot stuff in there and large piles of
> diskettes and papers. Among them was a diskette with the AFP files for
> the named reference manual. They forgot it when they cleared the room
> after the training in one machine.

What a lucky strike... The Hand of God, I would almost say.




0
UZnal
5/11/2008 5:49:59 PM
Reply:

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http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=120064993053 End time: Dec-21-06 00:32:30 PST (4 days 11 hours) Ships to: Worldwide Item location: BERTONE MOTORS, CINCINNATI, OHIO, United States No affiliation "picture may not be actual item exactly; but is of and will be a PS2 microchannel modem; picture may not be exact card, I have several to sell and they are not the same, specs are within that stated" -- Jelte ...

IBM announced newest release of product including "IBM COBOL for Windows"
This week, IBM announced the latest release of the *ONLY* product that they now sell that include a currently supported version of "IBM COBOL for Windows". See: http://www-01.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/0/897/ENUS209-380/ENUS209-380.PDF It appears (but I haven't seen the details) that there are new installation options that will allow a user to better "tailor" which features of RDz they want installed. NOTE WELL: This does NOT mean that there are options for only BUYING those features that you want to use. If you are a shop that *only* wants COBOL (not PL/I...

[News] [OSS] IBM Releases Open Source ALM Platform, Apollo Beta Released as Open Source
IBM Jazzes up Eclipse ,----[ Quote ] | IBM expanding its backing for Eclipse with the release of an open source | application lifecycle management (ALM) platform serving its Rational tools. `---- http://www.regdeveloper.co.uk/2007/06/11/ibm_eclipse_jazz/ Adobe's Apollo platform, now called AIR, goes beta ,----[ Quote ] | Adobe will not make the code for Flex 3 available with an open-source | license on Monday. But by the time the product is released in the | second half of this year, the code will be available for free | under an open-source license. It will also introduce a govern...

Auctions (2): Three IBM PS2 Graphics Adapters 8514/A *AND* IBM MicroChannel 4869 External 5-1/4" Disk Drive (360K)
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=270123874305 Starting bid: US $0.99 End time: May-31-07 16:43:43 PDT (6 days 3 hours) Ships to: United States Item location: Surprise, Arizona, United States IBM PS/2 MicroChannel CAD Workstation Graphics Cards Model 8514/A listing is for a quantity of three shipped for a single price Also by same seller : http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=270123854097 Starting bid: US $0.99 End time: May-31-07 15:51:52 PDT (6 days 3 hours) Includes the drive sled, the MCA adapter card and ribbon cables for ins...

What source is IBM releasing?
In the Inquirer - The NY Times is reporting that IBM will open up the source code of their speech recognition engine, and donate such code, worth $10 million greenbacks in development cost, to two open source groups, the Apache Software Foundation and the Eclipse project, each receiving different chunks of code. http://www.theinquirer.net/?article=18420 Is this ViaVoice or C&C? With models data or without? J <nothanks@nospam.net> wrote in message news:<TIj2d.204063$Fg5.114167@attbi_s53>... > In the Inquirer - The NY Times is reporting that IBM will open up ...

A new hardware release
Who says the Acorn marketplace suffers from a lack of new hardware? http://www.sprow.co.uk/bbc/masternet.htm (and electrically it should fit in A3xx/A4xx machines too) Theo On 13 Jul 2009 15:01:25 +0100 (BST) Theo Markettos <theom+news@chiark.greenend.org.uk> wrote: > Who says the Acorn marketplace suffers from a lack of new hardware? > > http://www.sprow.co.uk/bbc/masternet.htm > > (and electrically it should fit in A3xx/A4xx machines too) I like this sentence; "Despite its robustness the majority of other computer vendors eventually adopted the Ethernet stan...

IBM PS2 8530
Hello everyone I have Ibm ps2 8530 i8086 (8mhz i think?) and my problem is hard drive. Hard drive is dead! I do not know what to do, I can not find another to replace it. What should I do, whether it can build up a larger and newer disk? My old drive is: WDI 325Q 72x7568 Please help! Thanks "Nano" <adriano.uvodic@st.t-com.hr> wrote in message news:j9im4c$7nk$1@ss408.t-com.hr... > I have Ibm ps2 8530 i8086 (8mhz i think?) and my problem is hard drive. > Hard drive is dead! > I do not know what to do, I can not find another to replace it. > What should I do If you cannot afford to buy a new HD you must seek a free used drive through local computer clubs. (Supposing your PC runs at 8 MHz suggests you are not currently a member of such a club.) -- Don Phillipson Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada) First, location, location, location.... Where are you? City/State or province... Tried ebuy? On 11/11/2011 02:24 AM, Nano wrote: > Hello everyone > > I have Ibm ps2 8530 i8086 (8mhz i think?) and my problem is hard drive. > Hard drive is dead! > I do not know what to do, I can not find another to replace it. > What should I do, whether it can build up a larger and newer disk? > My old drive is: > WDI 325Q > 72x7568 > Please help! > Thanks > > Wow, those ebuy prices are... enthusiastic. Chances are that some of us have spares, but... where are you?...

IBM Release Migration Book
Direct download link http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/pdfs/sg246380.pdf ...

IBM Java 5 released!
Fore more information, visit http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/java/jdk/index.html ...

hw releases
Does anyone know for sure if the Solaris 8 h/w releases are compatible with all hardware supported by the previous Solaris 8 releases? I've seen a posting suggesting some drivers are actually removed but sun support tell me 08/03 has all the previous releases rolled in - they didn't sound to sure though... thanks ~lloyd Lloyd wrote: > Does anyone know for sure if the Solaris 8 h/w releases are compatible > with all hardware supported by the previous Solaris 8 releases? I've > seen a posting suggesting some drivers are actually removed but sun > support tell me 08/03...

IBM PS2 FAQ anyone?
http://www.computercraft.com/docs/ps2htm.shtml no affiliation Moussa -- The information contained in this post is copyright of the poster, and may not be published or used by others. Hi Moussa, > http://www.computercraft.com/docs/ps2htm.shtml > is V4.0 here is V5.5a http://ps-2.kev009.com:8081/ohlandl/FAQ/FAQ_55a.html -- Jelte, Admirer of the letter of IBM with blue Ishiki On Sun, 1 May 2011 10:23:17 +0200, JWR wrote: > Hi Moussa, > >> http://www.computercraft.com/docs/ps2htm.shtml >> > > is V4.0 > > here is V5.5a > http://ps-2.kev009.com:8081/ohlandl/FAQ/FAQ_55a.html too sexy to expose it on the net/NG maybe once a month? :-) or Louis 2 strict ?!:-) Moussa -- The information contained in this post is copyright of the poster, and may not be published or used by others. ...

IBM releases more OS2 updates
Al Savage Jun 19, 1:10 am Newsgroups: comp.os.os2.misc, comp.os.os2.apps Subject: Re: IBM Releases More OS/2 Updates... On Sun, 12 Jun 2005 17:00:05 UTC, "dja...@hotclub.fr" wrote: >> His book, "Unsafe at Any Speed" has withstood the test >> of time rather well as a seminal work on auto >> safety and an industry running without restraint. > Yes . . . and know. Some very questionable physics were displayed in > that book. That aside, much of it was on-point. >> Except for a few howlers, his conclusions wrt the ...

What are files Z80.SYS, Z80CCP.SYS and PRMTVPVT.SYS for?
Had a good Christmas this weekend? I came across diskettes with "Mailmerge 3.0 and Calcstar version 1.45 for CP/M 8080", that seem to be for a Dec Rainbow machine. Besides a Mailmerge overlay and the Calcstar files, some CP/M and some CP/M-86 files, there are three files on the diskettes that I never have heard of before: Z80.SYS, Z80CCP.SYS and PRMTVPVT.SYS. There are no ASCII texts in PRMTVPVT.SYS. The only ASCII text in Z80.SYS (at the end of the file) is "EI SPHLDI XCHGPCHLXTHLRET HLT CMC STC CMA DAA RAR RAL RRC RLC NOP CPI ORI XRI ANI SBI IN SUI OUT ACI ADI CALLJMP LDA...

Lots of PS2 hardware for sale
For instance: Model 9595-ALG with Pentium 60 CPU card Model 77i Lots of of MCA card e.g. Etherlink III MCA Etherlink/MC 32 various token Other adapters Look at http://picasaweb.google.nl/debink/PS2Hardware for pictures Make a nice offer and it's yours Located in the Netherlands near Amsterdam Three can Spock, a 3c529-TP, a DDS-2 drive, a 3c527, an Auto TR 16/4, an H complex. How many "other adapters"? BTW, I'm across the pond. I am NOT jetting over to pick it up... debink@gmail.com wrote: > For instance: > > Model 9595-ALG with Pentium 60 CPU card > Model 77i > Lots of of MCA card > e.g. Etherlink III MCA > Etherlink/MC 32 > various token > Other adapters > > Look at http://picasaweb.google.nl/debink/PS2Hardware > for pictures > > Make a nice offer and it's yours > > Located in the Netherlands near Amsterdam ...

Web resources about - XGA208 with 832x624 Released - comp.sys.ibm.ps2.hardware

Lists of films released by Disney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License ;additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the ...

Independent Horror Movie To Be Released Via Facebook Game?
There are movies , and there are Facebook games , and there are even Facebook games based on movies . And now, thanks to Cardiff, U.K.-based ...

Senator Reid has been released from the... - Senator Harry Reid - Facebook
Senator Reid has been released from the hospital and is back at home with his wife, Landra. As previously stated, he went to the hospital as ...

How is the Facebook Redesign Affecting Social Games? October Gaming Charts Released
... attention now to social games. How has the Facebook redesign affected the top game developers on Facebook? Inside Social Games has just released ...

faroo_p2p: 1000x Faster Spelling Correction: Source Code released http://t.co/oY18ohyd #faroo #search ...
faroo_p2p: 1000x Faster Spelling Correction: Source Code released http://t.co/oY18ohyd #faroo #search #algorithm

→ 5by5 Radio app released
Nice app to listen to our shows live, and buying it is a great way to support 5by5. We discussed its features and design decisions in the last ...

Lil Wayne Released From Hospital After Sizzurp Overdose - ENTV
Lil Wayne has just been released from the hospital just days after Overdosing on Sizzurp or Texas Tea. He was put into a medically induced coma ...

Men arrested in London attack on Emiratis released - The National
Metropolitan Police in the UK said the men will return on bail in June and be reinterviewed.

Mark DeFriest: Prison escape artist ‘Houdini’ could be released
“IF I was a rapist or murderer they would let me out. But I’m the idiot who made them look like idiots.”

Baby born after pregnant mother killed in Hobart crash released from hospital in good health
A baby has been released from hospital in good health after his heavily pregnant mother was killed in a Hobart car crash just before he was born. ...

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