f



Error message.

I get the following messages on my Dell precison m6600 since upgrading to Windows 10.

First this message pops up:

Intel Rapid Storage Technology
disk on port 3 - detected

Then this message follows in quick succession:

Intel Rapid Storage Technology
disk on port 3 - removed

Anyone have any idea what these messages mean?

Thank you! 
0
Larry
8/15/2016 11:32:06 PM
comp.sys.laptops 18140 articles. 0 followers. brianhubley001 (11) is leader. Post Follow

12 Replies
530 Views

Similar Articles

[PageSpeed] 33

On 16/08/16 00:32, Larry wrote:
> I get the following messages on my Dell precison m6600 since upgrading to Windows 10.
>
> First this message pops up:
>
> Intel Rapid Storage Technology
> disk on port 3 - detected
>
> Then this message follows in quick succession:
>
> Intel Rapid Storage Technology
> disk on port 3 - removed
>
> Anyone have any idea what these messages mean?
>
> Thank you!

Disk on port 3, in it's current configuration which was probably set for 
the previous OS, does not support Intel Rapid Storage Technology.

There are utilities to set this up (look on Dells support site), so that 
it behaves as a SSD cache for your spinning hard disk. If your machine 
without it isn't any different in performance, then you might want to 
physically remove it.

I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops, 
admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.

-- 
Adrian C
0
Adrian
8/18/2016 9:38:44 AM
Once upon a time on usenet Adrian Caspersz wrote:
> On 16/08/16 00:32, Larry wrote:
>> I get the following messages on my Dell precison m6600 since
>> upgrading to Windows 10. First this message pops up:
>>
>> Intel Rapid Storage Technology
>> disk on port 3 - detected
>>
>> Then this message follows in quick succession:
>>
>> Intel Rapid Storage Technology
>> disk on port 3 - removed
>>
>> Anyone have any idea what these messages mean?
>>
>> Thank you!
>
> Disk on port 3, in it's current configuration which was probably set
> for the previous OS, does not support Intel Rapid Storage Technology.
>
> There are utilities to set this up (look on Dells support site), so
> that it behaves as a SSD cache for your spinning hard disk. If your
> machine without it isn't any different in performance, then you might
> want to physically remove it.
>
> I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops,
> admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.

Please elaborate Adrian. I have an HP Envy dv6 with a 3rd gen i7, 16GB RAM 
and a FHD matte display that has one. It came with Win 8 and I installed Win 
7 and Intel Rapid Storage Technology - which seems to work but won't 
'accelerate' the only partition on the list - drive C:

I'd love to get it working with W7 as it's quite slow (5,400rpm HDD) 
compared with how responsive it was when 'accelerated' in W8. Do you know if 
Intel Rapid Storage Technology and SSD acceleration works with W7?
-- 
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy 
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) 


0
misfit
8/23/2016 1:04:41 PM
On 23/08/16 14:04, ~misfit~ wrote:
>>
>> I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops,
>> admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.
>
> Please elaborate Adrian. I have an HP Envy dv6 with a 3rd gen i7, 16GB RAM
> and a FHD matte display that has one. It came with Win 8 and I installed Win
> 7 and Intel Rapid Storage Technology - which seems to work but won't
> 'accelerate' the only partition on the list - drive C:
>
> I'd love to get it working with W7 as it's quite slow (5,400rpm HDD)
> compared with how responsive it was when 'accelerated' in W8. Do you know if
> Intel Rapid Storage Technology and SSD acceleration works with W7?
>

Do a search on HP's support website for the exact documents and 
supporting software for your machine, referred by part number, not 
series (i.e. dv6). Yes, Windows 7 is supported.

http://download.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/irst_user_guide.pdf

That link is a bit old, but goes into some detail how the RAID system is 
setup from the BIOS, and will require non-data safe mucking about with 
volumes and partitions.

Sorry, my experience is mostly getting rid of it!

-- 
Adrian C
0
Adrian
8/23/2016 6:33:21 PM
Once upon a time on usenet Adrian Caspersz wrote:
> On 23/08/16 14:04, ~misfit~ wrote:
>>>
>>> I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops,
>>> admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.
>>
>> Please elaborate Adrian. I have an HP Envy dv6 with a 3rd gen i7,
>> 16GB RAM and a FHD matte display that has one. It came with Win 8
>> and I installed Win 7 and Intel Rapid Storage Technology - which
>> seems to work but won't 'accelerate' the only partition on the list
>> - drive C: I'd love to get it working with W7 as it's quite slow 
>> (5,400rpm HDD)
>> compared with how responsive it was when 'accelerated' in W8. Do you
>> know if Intel Rapid Storage Technology and SSD acceleration works
>> with W7?
>
> Do a search on HP's support website for the exact documents and
> supporting software for your machine, referred by part number, not
> series (i.e. dv6). Yes, Windows 7 is supported.
>
> http://download.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/irst_user_guide.pdf
>
> That link is a bit old, but goes into some detail how the RAID system
> is setup from the BIOS, and will require non-data safe mucking about
> with volumes and partitions.
>
> Sorry, my experience is mostly getting rid of it!

Thanks Adrian, I'll check it out. Googling I got the inpression that W7 
wasn't supported on this machine, the HP forums show lots of people using W7 
drivers from similar HP machines. Also as I don't have a factory install I 
have to turn off the UEFI part of the boot process and run with a very basic 
BIOS that has very few options (and none regarding the SATA interface).

I'll read that Intel document and look further - the project has been on 
hold for a while and I'm still using my older machine for now (which has a 
Seagate "SSHD" with NAND on board).

Cheers,
-- 
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy 
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) 


0
misfit
8/24/2016 12:41:24 AM
Once upon a time on usenet ~misfit~ wrote:
> Once upon a time on usenet Adrian Caspersz wrote:
>> On 23/08/16 14:04, ~misfit~ wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops,
>>>> admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.
>>>
>>> Please elaborate Adrian. I have an HP Envy dv6 with a 3rd gen i7,
>>> 16GB RAM and a FHD matte display that has one. It came with Win 8
>>> and I installed Win 7 and Intel Rapid Storage Technology - which
>>> seems to work but won't 'accelerate' the only partition on the list
>>> - drive C: I'd love to get it working with W7 as it's quite slow
>>> (5,400rpm HDD)
>>> compared with how responsive it was when 'accelerated' in W8. Do you
>>> know if Intel Rapid Storage Technology and SSD acceleration works
>>> with W7?
>>
>> Do a search on HP's support website for the exact documents and
>> supporting software for your machine, referred by part number, not
>> series (i.e. dv6). Yes, Windows 7 is supported.
>>
>> http://download.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/irst_user_guide.pdf
>>
>> That link is a bit old, but goes into some detail how the RAID system
>> is setup from the BIOS, and will require non-data safe mucking about
>> with volumes and partitions.
>>
>> Sorry, my experience is mostly getting rid of it!
>
> Thanks Adrian, I'll check it out. Googling I got the inpression that
> W7 wasn't supported on this machine, the HP forums show lots of
> people using W7 drivers from similar HP machines. Also as I don't
> have a factory install I have to turn off the UEFI part of the boot
> process and run with a very basic BIOS that has very few options (and
> none regarding the SATA interface).
> I'll read that Intel document and look further - the project has been
> on hold for a while and I'm still using my older machine for now
> (which has a Seagate "SSHD" with NAND on board).

All sorted now - thanks!

When reading that Intel document I saw reference to NCQ and when I checked I 
found that the HDD I'd installed W7 on (intending to clone to a bigger disk 
if all went well) was an older SATA drive that didn't support NCQ. I just 
did a test-clone to a different disk which *does* support NCQ and now I can 
accelerate the drive* using Intel Rapid Storage Technology.

[*] I found it odd that I can only accelerate the whole drive rather than a 
partition. As this HDD is larger than the first one I fitted I made a second 
partition on it for data and that certainly doesn't need accelerating. I 
hope that the algorithms are smart enough to only accelerate frequently 
accessed data. The laptop can take a 12.5mm high HDD so I've been 
considering putting a 2TB HDD in there (one day - finances allowing) and, as 
the thing is so powerful using it ro replace both my 'everyday' highest-spec 
15" T60 ThinkPad *and* my desktop that I use for light gaming.

It's a shame that the Envy dv6 7215TX doesn't have a dock option as I almost 
always use my T60 in a dock with lots of stuff like printer and externel 
HDDs always connected via ports at the back. The Envy does have 3 x USB3 
ports but they're in places where I wouldn't want cables constantly 
connected. :-/  Oh well, that's what I get for being poor HDDand not being 
able to afford an Elitebook.

The Envy came to me as a repair / data recovery 'job', it had overheated, 
cooked it's RAM and HDD and the erstwhile owner was desperate to get her 
data back. I managed to recover the data before the HDD finally stopped 
spinning and she offered me the laptop in lieu of payment. I told her that, 
if she gave me a week or so to evaluate it and see if I can ressutect it I 
might be in a position to give her some money for it but she was happy for 
me to have it as she'd been quoted a lot more than it was worth to get her 
data back elsewhere.

I convinced her to not allow herself to be 'upsold' on a replacement as she 
was sold this powerful beast of a thing when all she wanted to do was light 
wordprocessing and browsing. As she used it on the go it's no wonder that it 
ingested so much dust that it choked itself (it didn't help that the factory 
default was 'fan always runs' in BIOS and up to 100% CPU / GPU on battery in 
Windows).

But I digress ...

Thanks for that document again, it prompted me to check if the HDD was 
NCQ-capable.
-- 
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy 
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) 


0
misfit
8/24/2016 4:16:37 AM
Once upon a time on usenet ~misfit~ wrote:
[snipped]
> All sorted now - thanks!
>
> When reading that Intel document I saw reference to NCQ and when I
> checked I found that the HDD I'd installed W7 on (intending to clone
> to a bigger disk if all went well) was an older SATA drive that
> didn't support NCQ. I just did a test-clone to a different disk which
> *does* support NCQ and now I can accelerate the drive* using Intel
> Rapid Storage Technology.

But it's never that bloody simple for me!

Today it won't boot and, on Googling the model of the HDD (HTS541616J9SA00) 
*and* "NCQ" I see numerous mentions of improperly implimented NCQ and page 
titles such as "One more Hitachi HDD to add to NCQ Blacklist".

Yesterday I just Googled the HDD model number, checked the spec sheet and 
saw it was claimed to support NCQ. I only hope that a clone copy of this HDD 
onto a better HDD will work as I deleted the partitions on the source HDD 
when all seemed to go well.

We can also add into the mix the stupidly-designed SATA-to-planar cable that 
this laptop uses is getting flakey - I had to re-seat it a few times 
yesterday (and tried again after errors).

http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03291169

The SATA connector was designed to be a universal connector that can handle 
multiple insertion cycles. I've had nothing but trouble with laptops that 
insist on having a connector between the HDD and planar over the years - 
you'd think they'd learn! This one is particularly fiddly and fragile.

Cross your fingers for me. I'll likely have to steal a HDD out of another 
working laptop to use so I'll need to do at least two clone cycles to see if 
I can finally get this thing running right.
-- 
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy 
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) 


0
misfit
8/25/2016 1:17:30 AM
Once upon a time on usenet ~misfit~ wrote:
> Once upon a time on usenet ~misfit~ wrote:
> [snipped]
>> All sorted now - thanks!
>>
>> When reading that Intel document I saw reference to NCQ and when I
>> checked I found that the HDD I'd installed W7 on (intending to clone
>> to a bigger disk if all went well) was an older SATA drive that
>> didn't support NCQ. I just did a test-clone to a different disk which
>> *does* support NCQ and now I can accelerate the drive* using Intel
>> Rapid Storage Technology.
>
> But it's never that bloody simple for me!
>
> Today it won't boot and, on Googling the model of the HDD
> (HTS541616J9SA00) *and* "NCQ" I see numerous mentions of improperly
> implimented NCQ and page titles such as "One more Hitachi HDD to add
> to NCQ Blacklist".
> Yesterday I just Googled the HDD model number, checked the spec sheet
> and saw it was claimed to support NCQ. I only hope that a clone copy
> of this HDD onto a better HDD will work as I deleted the partitions
> on the source HDD when all seemed to go well.
>
> We can also add into the mix the stupidly-designed SATA-to-planar
> cable that this laptop uses is getting flakey - I had to re-seat it a
> few times yesterday (and tried again after errors).
>
> http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03291169
>
> The SATA connector was designed to be a universal connector that can
> handle multiple insertion cycles. I've had nothing but trouble with
> laptops that insist on having a connector between the HDD and planar
> over the years - you'd think they'd learn! This one is particularly
> fiddly and fragile.
> Cross your fingers for me. I'll likely have to steal a HDD out of
> another working laptop to use so I'll need to do at least two clone
> cycles to see if I can finally get this thing running right.

Installing a 500 GB Seagate Momentus 7200.4 (which I took from my spare T60 
after cloning the OS partition onto the 160 GB Hitachi) fixed the problem. 
Now the SSD cache is working as designed. :-)
-- 
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy 
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) 


0
misfit
8/30/2016 3:10:35 AM
On 30/08/16 04:10, ~misfit~ wrote:
>> The SATA connector was designed to be a universal connector that can
>> handle multiple insertion cycles. I've had nothing but trouble with
>> laptops that insist on having a connector between the HDD and planar
>> over the years - you'd think they'd learn! This one is particularly
>> fiddly and fragile.
>> Cross your fingers for me. I'll likely have to steal a HDD out of
>> another working laptop to use so I'll need to do at least two clone
>> cycles to see if I can finally get this thing running right.
>
> Installing a 500 GB Seagate Momentus 7200.4 (which I took from my spare T60
> after cloning the OS partition onto the 160 GB Hitachi) fixed the problem.
> Now the SSD cache is working as designed. :-)
>

Congratulations ;)

-- 
Adrian C
0
Adrian
8/30/2016 8:20:53 PM
Once upon a time on usenet Adrian Caspersz wrote:
> On 30/08/16 04:10, ~misfit~ wrote:
>>> The SATA connector was designed to be a universal connector that can
>>> handle multiple insertion cycles. I've had nothing but trouble with
>>> laptops that insist on having a connector between the HDD and planar
>>> over the years - you'd think they'd learn! This one is particularly
>>> fiddly and fragile.
>>> Cross your fingers for me. I'll likely have to steal a HDD out of
>>> another working laptop to use so I'll need to do at least two clone
>>> cycles to see if I can finally get this thing running right.
>>
>> Installing a 500 GB Seagate Momentus 7200.4 (which I took from my
>> spare T60 after cloning the OS partition onto the 160 GB Hitachi)
>> fixed the problem. Now the SSD cache is working as designed. :-)
>>
>
> Congratulations ;)

Thanks Adrian. :-) It's always good when you get something to work the way 
it's designed to.
-- 
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy 
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) 


0
misfit
9/3/2016 12:01:04 AM
On Thursday, August 18, 2016 at 3:38:48 AM UTC-6, Adrian Caspersz wrote:
> On 16/08/16 00:32, Larry wrote:
> > I get the following messages on my Dell precison m6600 since upgrading to Windows 10.
> >
> > First this message pops up:
> >
> > Intel Rapid Storage Technology
> > disk on port 3 - detected
> >
> > Then this message follows in quick succession:
> >
> > Intel Rapid Storage Technology
> > disk on port 3 - removed
> >
> > Anyone have any idea what these messages mean?
> >
> > Thank you!
> 
> Disk on port 3, in it's current configuration which was probably set for 
> the previous OS, does not support Intel Rapid Storage Technology.
> 
> There are utilities to set this up (look on Dells support site), so that 
> it behaves as a SSD cache for your spinning hard disk. If your machine 
> without it isn't any different in performance, then you might want to 
> physically remove it.
> 
> I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops, 
> admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.
> 
> -- 
> Adrian C

Hi Adrian,

Thanks for your response.  Not sure I follow your second paragraph.  What and how would I remove?

Larry
0
Larry
9/11/2016 7:30:58 PM
On Thursday, August 18, 2016 at 3:38:48 AM UTC-6, Adrian Caspersz wrote:
> On 16/08/16 00:32, Larry wrote:
> > I get the following messages on my Dell precison m6600 since upgrading to Windows 10.
> >
> > First this message pops up:
> >
> > Intel Rapid Storage Technology
> > disk on port 3 - detected
> >
> > Then this message follows in quick succession:
> >
> > Intel Rapid Storage Technology
> > disk on port 3 - removed
> >
> > Anyone have any idea what these messages mean?
> >
> > Thank you!
> 
> Disk on port 3, in it's current configuration which was probably set for 
> the previous OS, does not support Intel Rapid Storage Technology.
> 
> There are utilities to set this up (look on Dells support site), so that 
> it behaves as a SSD cache for your spinning hard disk. If your machine 
> without it isn't any different in performance, then you might want to 
> physically remove it.
> 
> I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops, 
> admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.
> 
> -- 
> Adrian C

Hello Adrian,

Thank you for your response. I am not sure I follow your second paragraph. What would I physically remove?

Larry
0
Larry
9/11/2016 8:31:47 PM
Once upon a time on usenet Larry wrote:
> On Thursday, August 18, 2016 at 3:38:48 AM UTC-6, Adrian Caspersz
> wrote:
>> On 16/08/16 00:32, Larry wrote:
>>> I get the following messages on my Dell precison m6600 since
>>> upgrading to Windows 10.
>>>
>>> First this message pops up:
>>>
>>> Intel Rapid Storage Technology
>>> disk on port 3 - detected
>>>
>>> Then this message follows in quick succession:
>>>
>>> Intel Rapid Storage Technology
>>> disk on port 3 - removed
>>>
>>> Anyone have any idea what these messages mean?
>>>
>>> Thank you!
>>
>> Disk on port 3, in it's current configuration which was probably set
>> for the previous OS, does not support Intel Rapid Storage Technology.
>>
>> There are utilities to set this up (look on Dells support site), so
>> that it behaves as a SSD cache for your spinning hard disk. If your
>> machine without it isn't any different in performance, then you
>> might want to physically remove it.
>>
>> I've removed loads of these (small 32GB) SSDs from HP laptops,
>> admittedly a corporate OS build didn't support it.
>>
>> --
>> Adrian C
>
> Hello Adrian,
>
> Thank you for your response. I am not sure I follow your second
> paragraph. What would I physically remove?
>
> Larry

He's not suggesting that YOU physically remove anything. (They're buried 
deep in the guts of the thing.) He's saying HE removed them due to 
incompatabilities with the chosen OS.

I'd say your issue is down to your version of Intel Rapid Storage 
Technology. It probably needs updating to a version that plays nice with 
W10.
-- 
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long way when religious belief has a cozy 
little classification in the DSM*."
David Melville (in r.a.s.f1)
(*Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) 


0
misfit
9/12/2016 6:46:51 AM
Reply: