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laptop to laptop copy???

What is the best software (cable) etc to copy the contents of one
laptop to another laptop??  I think it use to be "laplink" very
expensive avenue!!!   Or Bobs copier!  Is there a cheaper way
to do it.  Will laplink actually copy contents of an older laptop
such as Toshiba Satelite 20CDT to a newer laptops such as
a P4 Notepad with a 20gig HDD in it ????
              Joe


**********************************************************
* Ham KH6JF AARS/MARS ABM6JF QCWA WW2 VET WD RADIO SYSTEM*
* Army MARS PRECEDED by AARS (Army Amateur Radio System) * 
*       Hi State ARMY MARS COORDINATOR                   *
**********************************************************

0
jfenn (344)
8/25/2005 8:12:55 PM
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Joseph Fenn <jfenn@lava.net> writes:
> What is the best software (cable) etc to copy the contents of one
> laptop to another laptop??  I think it use to be "laplink" very
> expensive avenue!!!   Or Bobs copier!  Is there a cheaper way
> to do it.  Will laplink actually copy contents of an older laptop
> such as Toshiba Satelite 20CDT to a newer laptops such as
> a P4 Notepad with a 20gig HDD in it ????

Normally these days you'd use ethernet for something like that.
Copying that much data through a serial port would take forever.
0
phr.cx (5493)
8/25/2005 8:21:29 PM
On Thu, 25 Aug 2005 10:12:55 -1000, Joseph Fenn wrote:

> What is the best software (cable) etc to copy the contents of one
> laptop to another laptop??  I think it use to be "laplink" very
> expensive avenue!!!   Or Bobs copier!  Is there a cheaper way
> to do it.  

I don't know how you define "expensive," but a laplink cable shouldn't
really cost more than $30 at the very most.  Windows has the software for
a "direct cable connection" built right into it.

> Will laplink actually copy contents of an older laptop
> such as Toshiba Satelite 20CDT to a newer laptops such as
> a P4 Notepad with a 20gig HDD in it ????

It will allow you to copy your information over, provided that your new
"notepad" has a parallel port.  If not, and if your "20CDT" (never heard
of this model) has a USB port and is running Win98 or above, you can also
purchase USB data transfer cables which usually come with their own
software.

-dirk
0
8/25/2005 8:27:08 PM
Joe, you have to get a LOT more specific about what you want to do.  The 
best connection, for almost anything, is an Ethernet network, which you 
can make with just a crossover cable (or you can use two "normal" cables 
and a hub or switch).  But if you want to copy an installed, operating 
OS system from one laptop or hard drive to another, that's an entirely 
different matter.

Also, for many purposes, the best thing to do is to remove the drive 
from one computer and get an external USB to IDE adapter or case to 
install it (temporarily) on the other computer.  Since these are only 
about $10 to $30, it's cheap and fast.  See, for example,

http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=USB2IDE-N

[for a laptop, this can be used with a 2.5" to 3.5" IDE adapter for 
another $3 or so.  Or use something like:

http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=EC-2501U&cat=HDD

These are both just examples, there are hundreds of similar and related 
products.


Joseph Fenn wrote:
> What is the best software (cable) etc to copy the contents of one
> laptop to another laptop??  I think it use to be "laplink" very
> expensive avenue!!!   Or Bobs copier!  Is there a cheaper way
> to do it.  Will laplink actually copy contents of an older laptop
> such as Toshiba Satelite 20CDT to a newer laptops such as
> a P4 Notepad with a 20gig HDD in it ????
>              Joe
> 
> 
> **********************************************************
> * Ham KH6JF AARS/MARS ABM6JF QCWA WW2 VET WD RADIO SYSTEM*
> * Army MARS PRECEDED by AARS (Army Amateur Radio System) * *       Hi 
> State ARMY MARS COORDINATOR                   *
> **********************************************************
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
8/25/2005 8:30:06 PM
If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it 
doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove 
the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution similar to those mentioned 
in my previous post.


Barry Watzman wrote:

> Joe, you have to get a LOT more specific about what you want to do.  The 
> best connection, for almost anything, is an Ethernet network, which you 
> can make with just a crossover cable (or you can use two "normal" cables 
> and a hub or switch).  But if you want to copy an installed, operating 
> OS system from one laptop or hard drive to another, that's an entirely 
> different matter.
> 
> Also, for many purposes, the best thing to do is to remove the drive 
> from one computer and get an external USB to IDE adapter or case to 
> install it (temporarily) on the other computer.  Since these are only 
> about $10 to $30, it's cheap and fast.  See, for example,
> 
> http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=USB2IDE-N
> 
> [for a laptop, this can be used with a 2.5" to 3.5" IDE adapter for 
> another $3 or so.  Or use something like:
> 
> http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=EC-2501U&cat=HDD
> 
> These are both just examples, there are hundreds of similar and related 
> products.
> 
> 
> Joseph Fenn wrote:
> 
>> What is the best software (cable) etc to copy the contents of one
>> laptop to another laptop??  I think it use to be "laplink" very
>> expensive avenue!!!   Or Bobs copier!  Is there a cheaper way
>> to do it.  Will laplink actually copy contents of an older laptop
>> such as Toshiba Satelite 20CDT to a newer laptops such as
>> a P4 Notepad with a 20gig HDD in it ????
>>              Joe
>>
>>
>> **********************************************************
>> * Ham KH6JF AARS/MARS ABM6JF QCWA WW2 VET WD RADIO SYSTEM*
>> * Army MARS PRECEDED by AARS (Army Amateur Radio System) * *       Hi 
>> State ARMY MARS COORDINATOR                   *
>> **********************************************************
>>
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
8/25/2005 8:32:06 PM
Another option is to remove the drive, use a 2.5" HDD to IDE adaptor to 
connect the laptops' HDD directly to an IDE port on a desktop.  This is an 
extremely rapid method of transfer, and works without using USB.  This same 
method can be used for creating an image of a laptop HDD in case of a HDD 
crash, with a utility such as Norton Ghost.
"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message 
news:430E2AC8.8020007@neo.rr.com...
> If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it 
> doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove 
> the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution 


0
8/26/2005 1:33:34 AM
On Fri, 26 Aug 2005, ArtFD wrote:

> Another option is to remove the drive, use a 2.5" HDD to IDE adaptor to
> connect the laptops' HDD directly to an IDE port on a desktop.  This is an
> extremely rapid method of transfer, and works without using USB.  This same
> method can be used for creating an image of a laptop HDD in case of a HDD
> crash, with a utility such as Norton Ghost.
> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:430E2AC8.8020007@neo.rr.com...
>> If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it
>> doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove
>> the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution

Sorry Art,
I dont have no desktop and only Ghost2002.  Had to order Ghost2003
and Ghost V9 by phone today.  They come together as a package.
They assured me on phone that V9 can handle XP/PRO but not my old
Ghost 2002.   I hate to start delving into the insides of a laptop.
Its a nightmare inside these things.   Even tho been a Ham for
70 years since highschool sophomore, at 85 I just cant hack it
any more.   I am beginning to detest Xp/pro as it cant find anything
on the epp printer port other than the printer.  Got a backpack
external cd rewriter there but xp/pro has'nt found out yet about that.
                      Joe/KH6JF

0
jfenn (344)
8/26/2005 5:49:40 AM
"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:430E2A50.2070005@neo.rr.com...
> Joe, you have to get a LOT more specific about what you want to do.  The
> best connection, for almost anything, is an Ethernet network, which you
> can make with just a crossover cable (or you can use two "normal" cables
> and a hub or switch).

If both PCs have Firewire ports, use them instead*.  Much faster and no
crossover cable required.

*Provided you have Win 98SE or Win2k or later.


0
8/26/2005 11:44:51 AM
"Joseph Fenn" <jfenn@lava.net> wrote in message
news:Pine.BSI.4.61.0508251942500.28631@malasada.lava.net...
>
I am beginning to detest Xp/pro as it cant find anything
> on the epp printer port other than the printer.  Got a backpack
> external cd rewriter there but xp/pro has'nt found out yet about that.
>

I don't think XP will work with drives on the parallel port without a
manufacturer specific driver.  Try searching the manufacturer's web site.
Plug the drive in and then check XP's hardware manager to see if it has
detected the drive but filed it under 'unknown devices'.


0
8/26/2005 11:48:33 AM
On Thu, 25 Aug 2005 19:49:40 -1000, Joseph Fenn <jfenn@lava.net>
wrote:

>I dont have no desktop and only Ghost2002.  Had to order Ghost2003
>and Ghost V9 by phone today.  They come together as a package.
>They assured me on phone that V9 can handle XP/PRO but not my old
>Ghost 2002.

I hate to break the news to you,  but Ghost 2002 will work with XP
Pro,  as will older Ghost 7 (corporate) releases.  I imaged over 600
systems with Ghost 7.0 and they all had XP Pro on them.  The older
versions will not support USB or Firewire (without your own drivers).
They all will work with a network, and many will work across a serial
port and IIRC,  2002 will work across the parallel port.  Both Ghost
2002 and 2003 require a "DOS" boot and do not run under Win32 (native
XP).  Ghost 2003 makes this a bit easier than Ghost 2002,  and IIRC,
Ghost 2003 can read & write image files on an NTFS volume.
0
jbloomfi (55)
8/27/2005 12:28:02 AM
Certainly that will work, and 2 years ago would have been the preferred 
choice.  But these days, with entire laptop IDE drive USB cases selling 
for as little as under $10, and with software like Ghost, Drive Image, 
Acronis, etc., fully supporting USB drives, it is just MUCH easier to 
use an external USB 2 case (actually, you don't need the entire case, 
just the tiny adapter card and cable).


ArtFD wrote:
> Another option is to remove the drive, use a 2.5" HDD to IDE adaptor to 
> connect the laptops' HDD directly to an IDE port on a desktop.  This is an 
> extremely rapid method of transfer, and works without using USB.  This same 
> method can be used for creating an image of a laptop HDD in case of a HDD 
> crash, with a utility such as Norton Ghost.
> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message 
> news:430E2AC8.8020007@neo.rr.com...
> 
>>If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it 
>>doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove 
>>the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution 
> 
> 
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
8/27/2005 1:29:07 AM
 From a speed perspective, USB 2 and Firewire are virtually 
indistinguishable in a single device application.


Ye Electric Fanne Clubbe wrote:

> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:430E2A50.2070005@neo.rr.com...
> 
>>Joe, you have to get a LOT more specific about what you want to do.  The
>>best connection, for almost anything, is an Ethernet network, which you
>>can make with just a crossover cable (or you can use two "normal" cables
>>and a hub or switch).
> 
> 
> If both PCs have Firewire ports, use them instead*.  Much faster and no
> crossover cable required.
> 
> *Provided you have Win 98SE or Win2k or later.
> 
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
8/27/2005 1:32:11 AM
Speed of backup is important to me.   I have used Norton 2003  to back up an
installed Toshiba A35 laptop HDD to an external USB HDD, then burned the 
image
files to a DVD that the A35 can later read.   To make this possible, I had 
to create a DOS boot disk
with USB drivers for DOS that I cobbled together after Googling around.
When the external floppy DD booted the Ghost/OS, the USB HDD drive was 
recognized just fine,
but it took (as I recall) several hours to create the Ghost backup files.  I
also need to back up several other old Toshiba laptops (1605, 435, 405), and
find it easiest to remove the HDD's and snap them into a desktop, Ghost 2003
backs them up in minutes over the IDE interface & I'm on my way.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com>
Newsgroups: comp.sys.laptops
Sent: Friday, 26 August 2005 21:29
Subject: Re: laptop to laptop copy???


> Certainly that will work, and 2 years ago would have been the preferred 
> choice.  But these days, with entire laptop IDE drive USB cases selling 
> for as little as under $10, and with software like Ghost, Drive Image, 
> Acronis, etc., fully supporting USB drives, it is just MUCH easier to use 
> an external USB 2 case (actually, you don't need the entire case, just the 
> tiny adapter card and cable).
>
>
> ArtFD wrote:
>> Another option is to remove the drive, use a 2.5" HDD to IDE adaptor to 
>> connect the laptops' HDD directly to an IDE port on a desktop.  This is 
>> an extremely rapid method of transfer, and works without using USB.  This 
>> same method can be used for creating an image of a laptop HDD in case of 
>> a HDD crash, with a utility such as Norton Ghost.
>> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message 
>> news:430E2AC8.8020007@neo.rr.com...
>>
>>>If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it 
>>>doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove 
>>>the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution
>>
>> 


0
8/27/2005 6:30:07 AM
     My local Goodwill store sells used desktop computers that would do the 
job I have described for about $20 each, exclusive of keyboard and monitor. 
Those items sell together for about another $10 at the same store.
     My Ghost 2003 documentation warns about trying to clone a HDD for use 
on a machine with different hardware, the files and operating system may all 
be copied fine, but the new machine may still not boot if the old machine's 
parameters aren't a good match.    When you use Ghost, you will still need 
some kind of access to another HDD partition to store the image files on. 
If you have enough space on your existing HDD, I suppose you could 
re-partition it to create a new partition for the Ghost image files.  If you 
don't do that, it sounds like your only alternatives would be to send the 
image files over an Ethernet TCP/IP link or over the laptop's parallel port. 
You shouldn't have to worry about XP not finding stuff on your parallet 
port, because Ghost basically works outside of the XP system, and is an 
operating system in its own right.   I don't know if Ghost can access your 
CD rewriter over a parallel port, I guess you will find out shortly.
    There is a web page with some info about Ghost 2003 here: 
http://www.gmayor.com/Norton_Ghost.htm#Top
"Joseph Fenn" <jfenn@lava.net> wrote in message 
news:Pine.BSI.4.61.0508251942500.28631@malasada.lava.net...
>
> On Fri, 26 Aug 2005, ArtFD wrote:
>
>> Another option is to remove the drive, use a 2.5" HDD to IDE adaptor to
>> connect the laptops' HDD directly to an IDE port on a desktop.  This is 
>> an
>> extremely rapid method of transfer, and works without using USB.  This 
>> same
>> method can be used for creating an image of a laptop HDD in case of a HDD
>> crash, with a utility such as Norton Ghost.
>> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
>> news:430E2AC8.8020007@neo.rr.com...
>>> If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it
>>> doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove
>>> the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution
>
> Sorry Art,
> I dont have no desktop and only Ghost2002.  Had to order Ghost2003
> and Ghost V9 by phone today.  They come together as a package.
> They assured me on phone that V9 can handle XP/PRO but not my old
> Ghost 2002.   I hate to start delving into the insides of a laptop.
> Its a nightmare inside these things.   Even tho been a Ham for
> 70 years since highschool sophomore, at 85 I just cant hack it
> any more.   I am beginning to detest Xp/pro as it cant find anything
> on the epp printer port other than the printer.  Got a backpack
> external cd rewriter there but xp/pro has'nt found out yet about that.
>                      Joe/KH6JF
> 


0
8/27/2005 6:56:58 AM
ArtFD <adembinski@hotmail.com> wrote:
: Speed of backup is important to me.   I have used Norton 2003  to back up an
: installed Toshiba A35 laptop HDD to an external USB HDD, then burned the 
: image
: files to a DVD that the A35 can later read.   To make this possible, I had 
: to create a DOS boot disk
: with USB drivers for DOS that I cobbled together after Googling around.
: When the external floppy DD booted the Ghost/OS, the USB HDD drive was 
: recognized just fine,
: but it took (as I recall) several hours to create the Ghost backup files.  I
: also need to back up several other old Toshiba laptops (1605, 435, 405), and
: find it easiest to remove the HDD's and snap them into a desktop, Ghost 2003
: backs them up in minutes over the IDE interface & I'm on my way.

Fast backups are important to me, too.  That's why I use True Image
from Acronis.  It makes backup images fairly quickly (even if its estimates
for time to create the images seems very inaccurate), and its rescue
CD (which I've booted on numerous computers) seems to have drivers for 
all the hardware I've tried it on, so I don't need to go to the
trouble of making a DOS boot disk to have it recognize my external CD
burner or my external hard drives.

I'd be surprised if the latest versions of Ghost don't have the same
sort of drivers built into its version of a rescue CD.

Andrew

: ----- Original Message ----- 
: From: "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com>
: Newsgroups: comp.sys.laptops
: Sent: Friday, 26 August 2005 21:29
: Subject: Re: laptop to laptop copy???


: > Certainly that will work, and 2 years ago would have been the preferred 
: > choice.  But these days, with entire laptop IDE drive USB cases selling 
: > for as little as under $10, and with software like Ghost, Drive Image, 
: > Acronis, etc., fully supporting USB drives, it is just MUCH easier to use 
: > an external USB 2 case (actually, you don't need the entire case, just the 
: > tiny adapter card and cable).
: >
: >
: > ArtFD wrote:
: >> Another option is to remove the drive, use a 2.5" HDD to IDE adaptor to 
: >> connect the laptops' HDD directly to an IDE port on a desktop.  This is 
: >> an extremely rapid method of transfer, and works without using USB.  This 
: >> same method can be used for creating an image of a laptop HDD in case of 
: >> a HDD crash, with a utility such as Norton Ghost.
: >> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message 
: >> news:430E2AC8.8020007@neo.rr.com...
: >>
: >>>If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it 
: >>>doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove 
: >>>the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution
: >>
: >> 



-- 

Andrew
--
----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
*******************************************************************
 ----> http://www.bizave.com  <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
 ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
*******************************************************************

0
8/27/2005 6:43:33 PM
USB 2.0 is FAR faster than any laptop hard drive.  Now if you tried USB 
1, that is another story, and not all USB to IDE adapters can keep up, 
but with the right hardware, you won't sacrifice speed using USB 2.


ArtFD wrote:

> Speed of backup is important to me.   I have used Norton 2003  to back up an
> installed Toshiba A35 laptop HDD to an external USB HDD, then burned the 
> image
> files to a DVD that the A35 can later read.   To make this possible, I had 
> to create a DOS boot disk
> with USB drivers for DOS that I cobbled together after Googling around.
> When the external floppy DD booted the Ghost/OS, the USB HDD drive was 
> recognized just fine,
> but it took (as I recall) several hours to create the Ghost backup files.  I
> also need to back up several other old Toshiba laptops (1605, 435, 405), and
> find it easiest to remove the HDD's and snap them into a desktop, Ghost 2003
> backs them up in minutes over the IDE interface & I'm on my way.
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com>
> Newsgroups: comp.sys.laptops
> Sent: Friday, 26 August 2005 21:29
> Subject: Re: laptop to laptop copy???
> 
> 
> 
>>Certainly that will work, and 2 years ago would have been the preferred 
>>choice.  But these days, with entire laptop IDE drive USB cases selling 
>>for as little as under $10, and with software like Ghost, Drive Image, 
>>Acronis, etc., fully supporting USB drives, it is just MUCH easier to use 
>>an external USB 2 case (actually, you don't need the entire case, just the 
>>tiny adapter card and cable).
>>
>>
>>ArtFD wrote:
>>
>>>Another option is to remove the drive, use a 2.5" HDD to IDE adaptor to 
>>>connect the laptops' HDD directly to an IDE port on a desktop.  This is 
>>>an extremely rapid method of transfer, and works without using USB.  This 
>>>same method can be used for creating an image of a laptop HDD in case of 
>>>a HDD crash, with a utility such as Norton Ghost.
>>>"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message 
>>>news:430E2AC8.8020007@neo.rr.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>>If the computer is a 420CDT, which I think it might be, it's so old it 
>>>>doesn't have USB or cardbus.  In that case, the best option is to remove 
>>>>the drive and use one a USB to IDE solution
>>>
>>>
> 
> 
0
WatzmanNOSPAM (5711)
8/31/2005 1:06:09 AM
"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:430FC29F.1030806@neo.rr.com...
> From a speed perspective, USB 2 and Firewire are virtually
> indistinguishable in a single device application.
>

Cobblers.  If you time the two side by side, you will find that Firewire is
between 25% and 35% faster.

There are 2 reasons for this.  First, although USB2 is rated at 480 Mb/s,
this is in one direction only at any one time.  Housekeeping swallows much
of the bandwidth.  Firewire is 400 Mb/s is both directions simultaneously at
the same time.  This is down to Firewire's dual data bus against the USB
single bus.

The second reason is that USB2 still requires considerable processor support
to make it all work.  Firewire, once started can operate with virtualy no
support from the procesor.


0
9/1/2005 8:38:06 AM
On Thu, 1 Sep 2005 09:38:06 +0100, "Ye Electric Fanne Clubbe"
<ian.shorrocks@baeherclothessystems.com> wrote:

:>
:>"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
:>news:430FC29F.1030806@neo.rr.com...
:>> From a speed perspective, USB 2 and Firewire are virtually
:>> indistinguishable in a single device application.
:>>
:>
:>Cobblers.  If you time the two side by side, you will find that Firewire is
:>between 25% and 35% faster.
:>
:>There are 2 reasons for this.  First, although USB2 is rated at 480 Mb/s,
:>this is in one direction only at any one time.  Housekeeping swallows much
:>of the bandwidth.  Firewire is 400 Mb/s is both directions simultaneously at
:>the same time.  This is down to Firewire's dual data bus against the USB
:>single bus.
:>
:>The second reason is that USB2 still requires considerable processor support
:>to make it all work.  Firewire, once started can operate with virtualy no
:>support from the procesor.
:>

Yep, sort of like the difference between IDE and SCSI.

me/2
0
me
9/2/2005 4:29:07 AM
Reply: