f



What will universal healthcare be like? Just look at the VA

With national elections coming late next year, it is inevitable that the
topic of socialized medicine will again rear its ugly head. Much ado is
made about the 40,000,000 Americans who do not have health insurance,
which makes the fact that there are 260,000,000 Americans that do seem
insignificant. Of course the 40,000,000 figure likely includes many young
and healthy individuals with low risk of serious illness who don�t believe
that health insurance would be cost-effective. But that wouldn�t make a
good talking point. 

If one wants to know how a national health care system would operate, one
needs to merely look at the systems our government has in place. The most
prominent form of socialized medicine in our country is the Department of
Veterans Affairs. With 235,000 employees and a budget of more than $60
billion, the VA is the federal government�s second largest department,
second only to the Department of Defense. It�s purpose it to provide
benefits, disability payments, and health care to military members once
they�ve left the service. The medical care provided at VA facilities is
generally considered to be top notch. That is, if you can even get to see
a doctor at all. 

For those of us who have private health insurance, we can typically see a
doctor for any reason within a week or two, depending how busy that
doctor�s office is. Not so with VA health care, or any other socialized
health system for that matter. Private insurance yields considerable
flexibility and a range of choices. If health care is handed to the state,
you do it the state�s way on the state�s terms and that�s it. If its
one-size-fits-all plan doesn�t suit you, that�s too bad. 

The reason for the failure of socialized medicine (aside from the fact
that it is run by the government) is the notion that the laws of supply
and demand can be ignored. Proponents of socialized medicine knowingly or
unknowingly want to create a system of unlimited health care for all
Americans. Unfortunately, unlimited health care incurs unlimited costs.
Since a system that incurs unlimited costs is obviously impossible to
operate, rationing of supply is inevitable. Now we have scenarios in which
priorities are assigned, and people who have brain tumors that will kill
them in a year won�t be treated until the people with brain tumors that
will kill them in eleven months are cured. 

We can see evidence of this today in the Veterans Affairs health care
system. Patients sometimes have to wait months just to see a physician for
a non life-threatening condition. A backlog exists of 400,000 applications
and appeals for benefits, most of which are for veterans of previous wars.
This problem isn�t limited to the VA. In Canada, wait times to get into
hospitals can span weeks or months, including for simple procedures
(Compared with the US where wait times are generally dependent on
fulfilling medical requirements�such as no eating for a day or two). The
average wait time for treatment after seeing a general practitioner is a
little over 17 weeks. 

Inevitably, you will have people who simply support socialized medicine in
general, despite all its failing. They assert that everyone has a right to
cheap or free health care no matter how crappy it is. The problem is that
health care is not a right in the traditional sense of what a right is.
True rights relate to the individual, such as free speech or freedom of
religion. To exercise these rights, one does not have to coerce someone
else to do something against his or her will. With a socialized medical
system, one must coerce complete strangers into funding your actions. You
are forcing others to be your slave. 

Nationalizing health care, especially in the United States, would be a
disaster. The US government has shown an extraordinary propensity for
screwing up pretty much ANYTHING it gets involved in. Imagine yourself
dealing with the type of people at the IRS or DMV the next time you need
stitches. 

http://fraudwasteabuse.wordpress.com/2007/03/04/what-will-universal-healthcare-be-like/ 
0
deuteros (568)
3/5/2007 2:29:55 AM
comp.sys.mac.advocacy 34242 articles. 0 followers. Post Follow

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Deuteros <deuteros@xrs.net> wrote:

> With national elections coming late next year, it is inevitable that the
> topic of socialized medicine will again rear its ugly head. Much ado is
> made about the 40,000,000 Americans who do not have health insurance,
> which makes the fact that there are 260,000,000 Americans that do seem
> insignificant.

The figures I have heard are 36e6 w/o health insurance, and there are of
course, 300e6 people in the US, also counting mexicans.

> Of course the 40,000,000 figure likely includes many young and healthy
> individuals with low risk of serious illness who don't believe that health
> insurance would be cost-effective. But that wouldn't make a good talking
> point.

No, it wouldn't. Well, at least of you're a welfareist.

> 
> If one wants to know how a national health care system would operate, one
> needs to merely look at the systems our government has in place. The most
> prominent form of socialized medicine in our country is the Department of
> Veterans Affairs. With 235,000 employees and a budget of more than $60
> billion, the VA is the federal government's second largest department,
> second only to the Department of Defense. It's purpose it to provide
> benefits, disability payments, and health care to military members once
> they've left the service. The medical care provided at VA facilities is
> generally considered to be top notch. That is, if you can even get to see
> a doctor at all.
> 
> For those of us who have private health insurance, we can typically see a
> doctor for any reason within a week or two, depending how busy that
> doctor's office is. Not so with VA health care, or any other socialized
> health system for that matter. Private insurance yields considerable
> flexibility and a range of choices. If health care is handed to the state,
> you do it the state's way on the state's terms and that's it. If its
> one-size-fits-all plan doesn't suit you, that's too bad.

UH = national HMO.

I'm sure that those who pay for PPO today wuld be sad to be fitted into
that box.

> 
> The reason for the failure of socialized medicine (aside from the fact
> that it is run by the government) is the notion that the laws of supply
> and demand can be ignored. Proponents of socialized medicine knowingly or
> unknowingly want to create a system of unlimited health care for all
> Americans. Unfortunately, unlimited health care incurs unlimited costs.

Not quite. A queue or rate system is put in its place, look at Canada.

> Since a system that incurs unlimited costs is obviously impossible to
> operate, rationing of supply is inevitable.

Perhaps that is a bit exaggered. "free" healthcare won't make the cost
go towards infinity, but it will require strong management and
benchmarking of the system - constantly.

Since a government monopoly on providing healthcare means that laws of
supply and demand are set out of action, I am unsure if your entire
analysis is valid.

> Now we have scenarios in which priorities are assigned, and people who
> have brain tumors that will kill them in a year won't be treated until the
> people with brain tumors that will kill them in eleven months are cured.
> 
> We can see evidence of this today in the Veterans Affairs health care
> system. Patients sometimes have to wait months just to see a physician for
> a non life-threatening condition. A backlog exists of 400,000 applications
> and appeals for benefits, most of which are for veterans of previous wars.
> This problem isn't limited to the VA. In Canada, wait times to get into
> hospitals can span weeks or months, including for simple procedures
> (Compared with the US where wait times are generally dependent on
> fulfilling medical requirementsˆsuch as no eating for a day or two). The
> average wait time for treatment after seeing a general practitioner is a
> little over 17 weeks.

For some kinds of surgery and operation here in welfare-Denmark, you'll
have to wait up to 52 weeks. Granted, that is the extreme, but it shows
the horrow of the supposed wonders of universal healthcare compared to
the non-existent waits for private healthcare.

> 
> Inevitably, you will have people who simply support socialized medicine in
> general, despite all its failing. They assert that everyone has a right to
> cheap or free health care no matter how crappy it is.

The problem with the people who espose excessive positive rights is that
they forget to tell that they also bundle a number of excessive
obligations to those "rights". It's always that way, whether it is
"right to free healthcare" in the US anno 2007, or "right to a job" USSR
anno 1936.

> The problem is that health care is not a right in the traditional sense of
> what a right is. True rights relate to the individual, such as free speech
> or freedom of religion.

That is, negative rights.

But i agree.

> To exercise these rights, one does not have to coerce someone else to do
> something against his or her will. With a socialized medical system, one
> must coerce complete strangers into funding your actions. You are forcing
> others to be your slave.
> 

Some people don't see this as a problem. Well, until they are themselves
enslaved in some other way, and then they start bitching.

> Nationalizing health care, especially in the United States, would be a
> disaster.

Maybe. There is still the question of why US healthcare seems so bloody
expensive on paper (I'm told it's 2.5 times more expensive per capita
than, say, the UK). I forget if the expenses mentioned include the US
federal subsidies for medical research.

> The US government has shown an extraordinary propensity for screwing up
> pretty much ANYTHING it gets involved in.

Granted.

> Imagine yourself dealing with the type of people at the IRS or DMV the
> next time you need stitches.
> 
> http://fraudwasteabuse.wordpress.com/2007/03/04/what-will-universal-health
> care-be-like/

Or the BATF.

-- regards , Peter B. P. - http://titancity.com/blog ,
http://macplanet.dk

If guns kill, do pencils cause spelling errors?
0
peter21 (1082)
3/5/2007 2:55:26 AM
"Deuteros" <deuteros@xrs.net> wrote in message news:esfvb3$vko$1@news.onet.pl...
> With national elections coming late next year, it is inevitable that the
> topic of socialized medicine will again rear its ugly head. Much ado is
> made about the 40,000,000 Americans who do not have health insurance,
> which makes the fact that there are 260,000,000 Americans that do seem
> insignificant. Of course the 40,000,000 figure likely includes many young
> and healthy individuals with low risk of serious illness who don't believe
> that health insurance would be cost-effective. But that wouldn't make a
> good talking point.

To take the gravy early in life thus shooting the foot later is very Republican
indeed.

"We believe in science where the word of God agrees.
We believe in science that destroys our enimeeeees.
We know the end id coming and its coming with great hast.
And everything that we don't (ab)use will surely go to waste"

> If one wants to know how a national health care system would operate, one
> needs to merely look at the systems our government has in place.

OK.

> The most
> prominent form of socialized medicine in our country is the Department of
> Veterans Affairs.

Lie.  (but who didn't know that).  The most prominent is the Social Security
System and it has been solid as a rock for 100 years.

> With 235,000 employees and a budget of more than $60
> billion, the VA is the federal government's second largest department,
> second only to the Department of Defense. It's purpose it to provide
> benefits, disability payments, and health care to military members once
> they've left the service. The medical care provided at VA facilities is
> generally considered to be top notch. That is, if you can even get to see
> a doctor at all.

We are going to fix this pile of Republican malfeasance.

> For those of us who have private health insurance, we can typically see a
> doctor for any reason within a week or two, depending how busy that
> doctor's office is.

The young, the wealthy, and the healthy don't have a problem.... Do they?

> Not so with VA health care, or any other socialized
> health system for that matter. Private insurance yields considerable
> flexibility and a range of choices. If health care is handed to the state,
> you do it the state's way on the state's terms and that's it. If its
> one-size-fits-all plan doesn't suit you, that's too bad.

I think it quite telling that the comparison is being made between private
_insurance_ and government run _delivery_ systems.  But then, a fair
comparison wouldn't work for the right wing liars.

> The reason for the failure of socialized medicine (aside from the fact
> that it is run by the government) is the notion that the laws of supply
> and demand can be ignored.

Unfortunately for your supposed argument, no one will be throwing
themselves under a cross town bus so as to take advantage of the
big _SALE_ down at the hospital.  And regardless of the price of
health care people will still get sick.  Germs and viruses have little
respect for markets.

> Proponents of socialized medicine knowingly or
> unknowingly want to create a system of unlimited health care for all
> Americans.

Only left wing moonbats (the left wing reflections of Randites) would
want that.  I am on record as saying that pregnancy and child birth
should not be covered.  Those are CHOICES; not medical conditions.

> Unfortunately, unlimited health care incurs unlimited costs.

Lie.  The union of tax payers will only pay a certain amount.  Doctors
and hospitals will compete just as now.

> Since a system that incurs unlimited costs is obviously impossible to
> operate, rationing of supply is inevitable.

So if you lie about the basis then you can get away with all the lies
you want?

> Now we have scenarios in which
> priorities are assigned, and people who have brain tumors that will kill
> them in a year won't be treated until the people with brain tumors that
> will kill them in eleven months are cured.

And then the wicked witch of the north bit Santa on the leg.

> We can see evidence of this today in the Veterans Affairs health care
> system. Patients sometimes have to wait months just to see a physician for
> a non life-threatening condition. A backlog exists of 400,000 applications
> and appeals for benefits, most of which are for veterans of previous wars.

Thanks to the Republicans it has become a complete disaster.

> This problem isn't limited to the VA. In Canada, wait times to get into
> hospitals can span weeks or months, including for simple procedures

Yet they get in and they get fixed and they get it for a lot less that what
we pay.

> (Compared with the US where wait times are generally dependent on
> fulfilling medical requirements-such as no eating for a day or two). The
> average wait time for treatment after seeing a general practitioner is a
> little over 17 weeks.

This is, no doubt, from some cherry picked data on a particular
condition, or some other right wing distortion.

> Inevitably, you will have people who simply support socialized medicine in
> general, despite all its failing. They assert that everyone has a right to
> cheap or free health care no matter how crappy it is. The problem is that
> health care is not a right in the traditional sense of what a right is.
> True rights relate to the individual, such as free speech or freedom of
> religion. To exercise these rights, one does not have to coerce someone
> else to do something against his or her will. With a socialized medical
> system, one must coerce complete strangers into funding your actions. You
> are forcing others to be your slave.

Or, alternatively, you are forcing others to not gamble with YOUR
money.  Because when these chest beating liars get really ill, the
rest of us will have to pay for it; one way or another.

> Nationalizing health care, especially in the United States, would be a
> disaster.

What we currently have is a disaster.

> The US government has shown an extraordinary propensity for
> screwing up pretty much ANYTHING it gets involved in.

Actually, that propensity has been a more of a Republican malady
than a general one.

> Imagine yourself
> dealing with the type of people at the IRS or DMV the next time you need
> stitches.

Yet another lie comparing insurance to delivery.


> http://fraudwasteabuse.wordpress.com/2007/03/04/what-will-universal-healthcare-be-like/

Based on what I see here there is no reason to follow the link to more
Republican lies.

-- 
"I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers
of society but the people themselves; and
if we think them not enlightened enough to
exercise their control with a wholesome
discretion, the remedy is not to take it from
them, but to inform their discretion by
education." - Thomas Jefferson
http://GreaterVoice.org


0
mikcob (27)
3/10/2007 5:15:46 PM
The Trucker wrote:
> 
> Lie.  (but who didn't know that).  The most prominent is the Social Security
> System and it has been solid as a rock for 100 years.

Social Security came on line in 1937 under the FDR administration.

Make that 70 years. I was almost two years old when Social Security came 
online, so I am older than Social Security.

Bob Kolker
0
nowhere3 (558)
3/10/2007 5:27:38 PM
On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 12:27:38 -0500, Bob Kolker <nowhere@nowhere.com>
wrote:

>The Trucker wrote:
>> 
>> Lie.  (but who didn't know that).  The most prominent is the Social Security
>> System and it has been solid as a rock for 100 years.
>
>Social Security came on line in 1937 under the FDR administration.
>
>Make that 70 years. I was almost two years old when Social Security came 
>online, so I am older than Social Security.
>
>Bob Kolker

And Medicare began in 1965, and medical cost sky rocketed. The elderly
were no worse off with out Medicare. However the Medical Community
became wealthier. 

-- 
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

0
robpar (50)
3/10/2007 9:59:46 PM
"Robert" <robpar@netportusa.com> wrote in message 
news:vaa6v2dg6c7ft4pcjvdkqmfausfphpqo4t@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 10 Mar 2007 12:27:38 -0500, Bob Kolker <nowhere@nowhere.com>
> wrote:
>
>>The Trucker wrote:
>>>
>>> Lie.  (but who didn't know that).  The most prominent is the Social 
>>> Security
>>> System and it has been solid as a rock for 100 years.
>>
>>Social Security came on line in 1937 under the FDR administration.
>>
>>Make that 70 years. I was almost two years old when Social Security came
>>online, so I am older than Social Security.
>>
>>Bob Kolker
>
> And Medicare began in 1965, and medical cost sky rocketed. The elderly
> were no worse off with out Medicare. However the Medical Community
> became wealthier.
>
Bullhockey.
The life expectancy of Americans has been extended by medicare. Prior to 
medicare seniors often went without routine medical care, and certainly 
went without major life extending or quality of life enhancing surgeries 
common today.

And since Medicare is allowed to negotiate physician paymetns, unlike 
prescription paymetns, medicare pays below market rates for physician 
services. Doctors actually lose money serving medicare patients.

The rising costs of medical care int he UD are primarily the result of two 
factors --- tehnology and the profit motive, according to  A Johns Hopkins 
study. Twenty yersa ago a patient got an xray of runder $50, Today the same 
exam calls for a cat scan at $1000.

Technology has also made more medical problems correctabel. Knee 
relacements, for example. are now becoming common amonghe elederly, allowing 
them to  live normal lives instead of being wheelchair bound. But these 
surgeries are expensive.

And most urban and suburban regions of the US are now overserved by thee 
technologues, thanks to the profit motive.

30 years ago the doctor's office drew blood --- now yu go to a separate 
phlebotomy lab. Little specialist work is done in the clinic anymore ---  
doctors make more money running external labs.

Nuclear medicine labs dot the landscape. Specialists for all manner of 
organs have multiple offices, many only open one or tow days a wek. New 
hospitals are being built not becaue of a shortage of beds but because 20 
minutes is too long a drive.

Larry



> -- 
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
> 


0
larryhewi (69)
3/10/2007 11:00:46 PM
"Bob Kolker" <nowhere@nowhere.com> wrote in message 
news:55g849F24jltmU1@mid.individual.net...
> The Trucker wrote:
>>
>> Lie.  (but who didn't know that).  The most prominent is the Social Security
>> System and it has been solid as a rock for 100 years.
>
> Social Security came on line in 1937 under the FDR administration.
>
> Make that 70 years. I was almost two years old when Social Security came 
> online, so I am older than Social Security.
>


BFD!  I'd better retract everything I've ever said for my round up of the
span of the SS system (heavy sarcasm).  The SS system works very
well and will be quite solid when comprehensive health insurance is
instituted.  Medical care aside the SS system is pretty good so long
as one is able to acquire ownership of one's SMALL retirement
residence.  Reverse mortgages plus SS income are just fine so long
as one does not have medical problems.  I personally plan to do myself
in at the age of 83 should I live that long.

-- 
"I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers
of society but the people themselves; and
if we think them not enlightened enough to
exercise their control with a wholesome
discretion, the remedy is not to take it from
them, but to inform their discretion by
education." - Thomas Jefferson
http://GreaterVoice.org


0
mikcob (27)
3/11/2007 5:58:19 PM
Reply:

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by Martyn Williams and Tom Krazit, IDG News Service Consumers thinking about buying a new computer in 2005 might be better off putting off their purchase until 2006. With few major changes in PC hardware or software due over the next year, the PC of 2005 is likely to look awfully similar to the PC of today. Big changes aren't due until 2006, when the Longhorn operating system from Microsoft, 64-bit applications, and optical drives based on the Blu-ray Disc and HD-DVD formats will become available to the average user. Still, that doesn't mean there are no technologies worth looking out for if you do plan to upgrade in 2005. Chipping In: Intel and Advanced Micro Devices are expected to unveil dual-core chips -- which contain two processor cores on a single piece of silicon -- by the end of 2005, although they probably won't appear in mainstream PCs until well into 2006, says Stephen Baker, director of industry analysis at NPD Techworld in Reston, Virginia. Intel will likely boost the cache memory in its Pentium 4 processor and AMD is expected to increase the clock speed of its Athlon 64, but these changes will be incremental. A more substantial shift in processor performance, the move to 64-bit computing, probably also won't happen next year, even though Microsoft is expected to finally release a 64-bit version of Windows XP in early 2005. Bigger changes can be expected in chip sets, which handle the flow of communication be...

just what should a window probe look like?
I'm trying to find chapter and verse as to what a TCP zero window probe should look like. RFC 1122 just talks about it being done in the "standard way" and I have to confess that I get lost trying to read 793 :( rick jones -- oxymoron n, commuter in a gas-guzzling luxury SUV with an American flag these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway... :) feel free to post, OR email to raj in cup.hp.com but NOT BOTH... In article <i2mbc.2292$k35.2114@news.cpqcorp.net>, Rick Jones <foo@bar.baz.invalid> wrote: > I'm trying to find ch...

Microsoft JVM looks like it will return!
http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2004/apr04/04-02SunAgreementPR.asp - Mitch On Mon, 5 Apr 2004 18:05:26 -0400, "Michel Gallant" <neutron@NOSPAMistar.ca> wrote or quoted : >http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2004/apr04/04-02SunAgreementPR.asp that's a good thing. Wherever MS can do better than Sun, it will put pressure on Sun to improve. It was too bad to waste all the work MS did on their JVM. -- Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green. Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming. See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java G...

Just like Mac OS in 1992-95
http://technolog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/12/30/9828672-report-android-dominates-us-smartphone-market In article <qd8sf7l2mfdb09mkci0fr6bglfe3rmansc@4ax.com>, Tommy Troll <tom.elam@earthlink.net> wrote: > http://technolog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/12/30/9828672-report-android-dominat > es-us-smartphone-market Except of course, it isn't. I don't believe Apple was making the bulk of the profits in those years as they are now. Leaving relative couch change for the rest to battle over. "Lloyd" wrote in message news:lloydparsons-B6E3C8.15254330122011@news.eternal-september.org... In article <qd8sf7l2mfdb09mkci0fr6bglfe3rmansc@4ax.com>, Tommy Troll <tom.elam@earthlink.net> wrote: > http://technolog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/12/30/9828672-report-android-dominat > es-us-smartphone-market Hmmm- your POS browser broke the link - >Except of course, it isn't. >I don't believe Apple was making the bulk of the profits in those >years >as they are now. Leaving relative couch change for the rest to >battle >over. Only the indigent like you without any meaningful money equate billions in profits as "couch change". You really are a sad case. On Fri, 30 Dec 2011 15:25:43 -0600, Lloyd <lloydparsons@me.com> wrote: >In article <qd8sf7l2mfdb09mkci0fr6bglfe3rmansc@4ax.com>, > Tommy Troll <tom.elam@earthlink.net> wrote: ...

Make Clarion program look like a Mac
Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can make my program present more like a Mac. A client has requested this. Is there something that can be done with the visual styles, or is there a template? Eg make the drop down icon a blue background with an up and down arrow, the tabs blue and centred, the scrollbar blue with the up and down arrows at the bottom, etc? Thanks Hi Steven, Check our ksUI library http://klarisoft.com/KSNews_202.htm With this library you=D0=BA client will be able to change UI himself the wa= y he wants Leonid Chudakov chudakov@klarisoft.com ...

Behold, the font for my band will look like this...
....if only I could find a font that looked like this... Here is only a capital T. Note the exponential curves on the right and left of the top of the glyph. Has anyone ever seen anything like this? [Ignore letter fill. Letter shape is the only thing that's important. Heck, ignore letter shape, too. Just go with general impression and see if any font you've ever seen fits the bill...] http://www.robertks.com/t.gif For some ideas about what the full logo should look like, with a bunch of fonts that are close but no cigar, see http://www.robertks.com/fontcompare.php?font=%2Fhome%2Frob...

Guesses as to what the new iMac will look like.
I was asked by someone what I thought the new iMac would look like... well, it is just a guess and about 5-10 minutes of playing with images, but here it is: <http://tmp.gallopinginsanity.com/new_imac.jpg>. Of course, that is not a full aluminum enclosure, but that is so 2006... and the iPhone image was an easy one to find and manipulate. :) Oh, and before someone says I ripped off the idea - yeah, I think I saw something similar somewhere else, but I could not quickly find it when talking about guesses as to what it might look like. :) -- God made me an atheist - who are you to q...

What would a continuation comonad look like? (just being curios :P )
Seen some comonads (state , stream , IO , exceptions ) . dan.ms.chaos@gmail.com wrote: > Seen some comonads (state , stream , IO , exceptions ) . Every monad is based on a pair F and G of adjoint functors. To get the corresponding comonad, you just have to compose them the other way around. Example: For state, fix some type s, and set F a = (s, a) G b = s -> b Then G (F a) = s -> (s, a) is the state monad, and F (G b) = (s, s -> b) is the state comonad. For the continuation monad, the functors are F a = a -> o G b = b -> o for some fixed type...

What relying on Private Health Insurers will Look Like
The Des Moines Register March 5, 2007 Mandating private health insurance is misguided Taxpayer-financed health coverage is a better approach. By the Register Editorial Board It sounds simple enough: Get everyone insured by requiring them to purchase health insurance. So-called "individual mandates" are part of Massachusetts' plan to get all residents covered. They are included in a proposal by California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. In a recent conversation about health reform in Iowa, state Sen. Jack Hatch said he supports individual mandates because they inject "personal r...

Looks like Tiger will have Korn shell...yeah!
Hi Folks, Yeah, for old farts like me that spent years on SVR4 UNIX the inclusion of Korn shell is a good thing. I wonder what version will deliver...... JC Joseph Crowe <jcrowe@sensation.com> wrote: > Hi Folks, > Yeah, for old farts like me that spent years on SVR4 UNIX > the inclusion of Korn shell is a good thing. I wonder what > version will deliver...... Awesome! Well, young farts (24) like it too... I learned it in school and have used it since. Think I'm the only one at my job that does... others seem to prefer csh/tcsh (bah!). I was already plann...

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