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Installing a new harddrive in a Macbook

Hello Folks:

I will be helping a friend install a new hard drive in her Macbook.
From what I understand her hard drive of 60 GB is completely shot.

- she says she has the operating system CD
- she has purchased this computer in 2006
- it is a 1.83 MHz Macbook that has Intel Core Duo the

What would be the procedure for replacing the hard drive in this
computer?  I have quite at the experience with PCs, but have not done
much with Macs recently.

Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive.  I told her that Apple
probably uses third party hard drives these days.  Is this the case?
Does it matter which brand she uses?  (I understand that there are
some physical limitations as to which hard drive would fit: thickness
has to be less than 9.5 millimeters or less.)

Thanks!

Deguza

(I am using voice recognition software, there may be grammar/
vocabulary mistakes in my posting.)
0
Kompu
10/12/2009 7:17:45 AM
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Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Hello Folks:
> 
> I will be helping a friend install a new hard drive in her Macbook.
> From what I understand her hard drive of 60 GB is completely shot.
> 
> - she says she has the operating system CD
> - she has purchased this computer in 2006
> - it is a 1.83 MHz Macbook that has Intel Core Duo the
> 
> What would be the procedure for replacing the hard drive in this
> computer?  I have quite at the experience with PCs, but have not done
> much with Macs recently.

Apple has a document describing the procedure in detail:

<http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf>

> Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive.  I told her that Apple
> probably uses third party hard drives these days.  Is this the case?

Yes. Apple doesn't even seem to follow any particular brand - I've seen
many variations. They tend to label the drives with an Apple logo, but
I've never had problems installing a generic third party drive in a Mac
in the last decade.

> Does it matter which brand she uses?  (I understand that there are
> some physical limitations as to which hard drive would fit: thickness
> has to be less than 9.5 millimeters or less.)

No, it doesn't matter which brand.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson
10/12/2009 12:00:54 PM
In article 
<cbc0498a-4f2e-433a-8836-398e94b7bec0@z3g2000prd.googlegroups.com>,
 Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive.  I told her that Apple
> probably uses third party hard drives these days.  Is this the case?
> Does it matter which brand she uses?

There has never been such a thing as an "Apple hard drive".

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
10/12/2009 3:15:01 PM
On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 11:15:01 -0400, Jolly Roger wrote
(in article <jollyroger-0A5811.10150112102009@news.individual.net>):

> In article 
> <cbc0498a-4f2e-433a-8836-398e94b7bec0@z3g2000prd.googlegroups.com>,
>  Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive.  I told her that Apple
>> probably uses third party hard drives these days.  Is this the case?
>> Does it matter which brand she uses?

Stay away from Western Digital, the WD drives I have around here tend to die 
shortly after the far too short warranty dies. My Seagate drives have longer 
warranties, and usually hold together even after the warranty expires. I'm 
not buying any more WD drives.

YMMV.

> 
> There has never been such a thing as an "Apple hard drive".
> 
> 

There used to be drives from Western Digital and other vendors which had big 
black Apples on them, but I've not seen one of those since I ripped one out 
of my old beige G3 and replaced it with a newer, larger, faster drive.

-- 
email to oshea dot j dot j at gmail dot com.

0
J
10/12/2009 3:46:26 PM
In article <jollyroger-0A5811.10150112102009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> There has never been such a thing as an "Apple hard drive".

there most certainly have been, from having custom firmware to having
custom a connection interface.
0
nospam
10/12/2009 3:59:45 PM
In article <121020091159453972%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
 nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-0A5811.10150112102009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
> 
> > There has never been such a thing as an "Apple hard drive".
> 
> there most certainly have been, from having custom firmware to having
> custom a connection interface.

A hard drive with custom firmware isn't an "Apple hard drive" in my 
mind. 

And which model Macs required such a drive?

Macs haven't had Apple-specific hard drive requirements for decades - of 
that I am sure.

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
10/12/2009 10:32:56 PM
In article <havj0s12tfl@news5.newsguy.com>,
 J.J. O'Shea <try.not.to@but.see.sig> wrote:

> On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 11:15:01 -0400, Jolly Roger wrote
> (in article <jollyroger-0A5811.10150112102009@news.individual.net>):
> 
> > In article 
> > <cbc0498a-4f2e-433a-8836-398e94b7bec0@z3g2000prd.googlegroups.com>,
> >  Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > 
> >> Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive.  I told her that Apple
> >> probably uses third party hard drives these days.  Is this the case?
> >> Does it matter which brand she uses?
> 
> Stay away from Western Digital, the WD drives I have around here tend to die 
> shortly after the far too short warranty dies. My Seagate drives have longer 
> warranties, and usually hold together even after the warranty expires. I'm 
> not buying any more WD drives.

This is definitely my experience as well. Western Digital puts out crap 
that dies way too fast. Often right around the time the warranty expires 
or just after.

Seagate drive, on the other hand, last much longer, in general, in my 
experience.

> There used to be drives from Western Digital and other vendors which had big 
> black Apples on them, but I've not seen one of those since I ripped one out 
> of my old beige G3 and replaced it with a newer, larger, faster drive.

Yes, but (a) would you call that an Apple hard drive, and (b) was it 
even required back then?

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
10/12/2009 10:34:59 PM
In article <jollyroger-678F06.17345912102009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> This is definitely my experience as well. Western Digital puts out crap 
> that dies way too fast. Often right around the time the warranty expires 
> or just after.
> 
> Seagate drive, on the other hand, last much longer, in general, in my 
> experience.

except for that firmware issue seagate had a year or so ago...

i've had good luck with ibm/hitachi, but there were the infamous 75gxp
drive failures that spawned a class action lawsuit. i have several
western digital drive that work fine and one that failed. i have a
couple of seagates that work fine and a couple that failed, one of
which failed in such a way that the mac would not boot until it was
disconnected (and it was the one that came with the machine).

everyone is going to have a horror story for every brand of drive, as
well as glowing reports for a different brand. the truth is, all drives
will fail at some point and it's best to plan for it with proper
backups.
0
nospam
10/12/2009 10:54:22 PM
In article <jollyroger-173290.17325612102009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> > > There has never been such a thing as an "Apple hard drive".
> > 
> > there most certainly have been, from having custom firmware to having
> > custom a connection interface.
> 
> A hard drive with custom firmware isn't an "Apple hard drive" in my 
> mind. 

what would you call it then? a non-apple drive in old macs required
third party software to format it and on occasion might not even work
at all (i have a couple of those). 

apple also shipped a/ux on an 80 meg hard drive, way back when.

> And which model Macs required such a drive?

the mac portable had a custom hard drive made by connor with a ribbon
connector coming out the back. it was made specifically for that
computer, and no other drive would work. 

> Macs haven't had Apple-specific hard drive requirements for decades - of 
> that I am sure.

true, which means that there were apple hard drives.
0
nospam
10/12/2009 10:54:25 PM
In article <121020091854250742%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
 nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-173290.17325612102009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
> 
> > > > There has never been such a thing as an "Apple hard drive".
> > > 
> > > there most certainly have been, from having custom firmware to having
> > > custom a connection interface.
> > 
> > A hard drive with custom firmware isn't an "Apple hard drive" in my 
> > mind. 
> 
> what would you call it then? a non-apple drive in old macs required
> third party software to format it and on occasion might not even work
> at all (i have a couple of those). 

I used third-party drives with my older Macs and it never stopped me. I 
guess this is a case of YMMV though.

> apple also shipped a/ux on an 80 meg hard drive, way back when.
> 
> > And which model Macs required such a drive?
> 
> the mac portable had a custom hard drive made by connor with a ribbon
> connector coming out the back. it was made specifically for that
> computer, and no other drive would work. 

That's interesting, but certainly not something most people would need 
to be concerned with these days. 

> > Macs haven't had Apple-specific hard drive requirements for decades - of 
> > that I am sure.
> 
> true, which means that there were apple hard drives.

Yes, that's true. Yet even though that was decades ago, people still 
somehow think Macs need Apple hard drives.

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
10/12/2009 11:17:32 PM
In article <121020091854220566%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
 nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-678F06.17345912102009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
> 
> > This is definitely my experience as well. Western Digital puts out crap 
> > that dies way too fast. Often right around the time the warranty expires 
> > or just after.
> > 
> > Seagate drive, on the other hand, last much longer, in general, in my 
> > experience.
> 
> except for that firmware issue seagate had a year or so ago...

That was a minor, insignificant glitch in comparison with the more 
common Western Digital failures I've encountered. I've had several 
Western Digital drives go bad right around warranty expiration, and 
subsequently get thrown away as a result. I've learned my lesson the 
hard way.

Only *once* has a Seagate drive of mine gone South before the warranty 
expired. This was one with bad firmware, and Seagate replaced it with no 
fuss. The replacement and all other Seagates I own are all still going 
strong.

> i've had good luck with ibm/hitachi, but there were the infamous 75gxp
> drive failures that spawned a class action lawsuit. i have several
> western digital drive that work fine and one that failed. i have a
> couple of seagates that work fine and a couple that failed, one of
> which failed in such a way that the mac would not boot until it was
> disconnected (and it was the one that came with the machine).

All hard drives fail. It's *when* they fail, and how *commonly* they 
fail that matters to me. Again, Western Digital drives tend to fail 
faster in my experience. So I won't recommend them.

> everyone is going to have a horror story for every brand of drive, as
> well as glowing reports for a different brand. the truth is, all drives
> will fail at some point and it's best to plan for it with proper
> backups.

That's great advice, but whether or not a hard drive will *ever* fail 
doesn't really play into the equation of which brands I purchase. Of 
course they will all fail eventually.

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
10/12/2009 11:22:35 PM
In article <jollyroger-9FF098.18223512102009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> > > Seagate drive, on the other hand, last much longer, in general, in my 
> > > experience.
> > 
> > except for that firmware issue seagate had a year or so ago...
> 
> That was a minor, insignificant glitch in comparison with the more 
> common Western Digital failures I've encountered.

it was hardly minor for the people who lost data. it was also a fuckup
on seagate's part and that wasn't the only problem seagate had:

<http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-9823370-37.html>

  Retrodata, a U.K. data recovery firm, reported earlier this year that
  certain 2.5-inch Seagate drives used in MacBooks had a manufacturing
  flaw that causes the drive heads to scratch the surface of the drive
  and cause major problems.

> I've had several 
> Western Digital drives go bad right around warranty expiration, and 
> subsequently get thrown away as a result. I've learned my lesson the 
> hard way.

i've had a few wd drives fail too. big deal. i've had failures with all
brands. all drives are going to fail, and probably when it is going to
cause the most problems. even if your preferred brand is clearly
better, you could end up with a drive from a bad batch. sometimes you
get a lemon. the drive manufacturers make *millions* of drives and
assessing the quality based on buying only a few drives is flawed. 

even with the ibm 75gxp debacle, not everyone had problems. as i
recall, it was mostly drives from one particular factory. if you lucked
out and had a drive from a different factory it was a great drive.
0
nospam
10/13/2009 3:04:25 AM
In article <121020092304255848%nospam@nospam.invalid>,
 nospam <nospam@nospam.invalid> wrote:

> In article <jollyroger-9FF098.18223512102009@news.individual.net>,
> Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:
> 
> > > > Seagate drive, on the other hand, last much longer, in general, in my 
> > > > experience.
> > > 
> > > except for that firmware issue seagate had a year or so ago...
> > 
> > That was a minor, insignificant glitch in comparison with the more 
> > common Western Digital failures I've encountered.
> 
> it was hardly minor for the people who lost data. it was also a fuckup
> on seagate's part and that wasn't the only problem seagate had:
> 
> <http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-9823370-37.html>
> 
>   Retrodata, a U.K. data recovery firm, reported earlier this year that
>   certain 2.5-inch Seagate drives used in MacBooks had a manufacturing
>   flaw that causes the drive heads to scratch the surface of the drive
>   and cause major problems.

Stop taking things I say out of context just for the sake of argument. 
I'm really bored with it. Feel free to have the last word, if it means 
that much to you.

-- 
Send responses to the relevant news group rather than email to me.
E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM
filter. Due to Google's refusal to prevent spammers from posting
messages through their servers, I often ignore posts from Google
Groups. Use a real news client if you want me to see your posts.

JR
0
Jolly
10/13/2009 4:02:18 AM
In article <jollyroger-E5D053.23021712102009@news.individual.net>,
Jolly Roger <jollyroger@pobox.com> wrote:

> Stop taking things I say out of context just for the sake of argument. 

i'm not.

> I'm really bored with it. Feel free to have the last word, if it means 
> that much to you.

it doesn't.
0
nospam
10/13/2009 4:32:05 AM
In article <1j7i2jn.1444o5nashx2zN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>,
 dempson@actrix.gen.nz (David Empson) wrote:

> Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > Hello Folks:
> > 
> > I will be helping a friend install a new hard drive in her Macbook.
> > From what I understand her hard drive of 60 GB is completely shot.
> > 
> > - she says she has the operating system CD
> > - she has purchased this computer in 2006
> > - it is a 1.83 MHz Macbook that has Intel Core Duo the
> > 
> > What would be the procedure for replacing the hard drive in this
> > computer?  I have quite at the experience with PCs, but have not done
> > much with Macs recently.
> 
> Apple has a document describing the procedure in detail:
> 
> <http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf>

Google for docs and videos also - I found a couple of step-by-step
guides for changing the drive in a G4 iBook (which persuaded me to
pay someone else to do it! Hopefully, the MacBook is not as 
complicated...)

> 
> > Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive.  I told her that Apple
> > probably uses third party hard drives these days.  Is this the case?
> 
> Yes. Apple doesn't even seem to follow any particular brand - I've seen
> many variations. They tend to label the drives with an Apple logo, but
> I've never had problems installing a generic third party drive in a Mac
> in the last decade.

Agreed.
0
David
10/13/2009 1:16:23 PM
David Stone <no.email@domain.invalid> wrote:

> In article <1j7i2jn.1444o5nashx2zN%dempson@actrix.gen.nz>,
>  dempson@actrix.gen.nz (David Empson) wrote:
> 
> > Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > 
> > > Hello Folks:
> > > 
> > > I will be helping a friend install a new hard drive in her Macbook.
> > > From what I understand her hard drive of 60 GB is completely shot.
> > > 
> > > - she says she has the operating system CD
> > > - she has purchased this computer in 2006
> > > - it is a 1.83 MHz Macbook that has Intel Core Duo the
> > > 
> > > What would be the procedure for replacing the hard drive in this
> > > computer?  I have quite at the experience with PCs, but have not done
> > > much with Macs recently.
> > 
> > Apple has a document describing the procedure in detail:
> > 
> > <http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf>
> 
> Google for docs and videos also - I found a couple of step-by-step
> guides for changing the drive in a G4 iBook (which persuaded me to
> pay someone else to do it! Hopefully, the MacBook is not as 
> complicated...)

The MacBook is orders of magnitude easier than an iBook. For starters,
Apple publically documents the procedure, which they didn't do for the
iBook (it was only documented for service technicians).

The MacBook can be summarised (from memory) as: turn off, remove
battery, remove three screws and one bracket, slide out hard drive.

The iBook is a major exercise, involving 20+ screws of various types,
levering the case open, and dismantling much of the computer.

-- 
David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz
0
dempson
10/13/2009 2:25:49 PM
In article 
<cbc0498a-4f2e-433a-8836-398e94b7bec0@z3g2000prd.googlegroups.com>,
 Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:

> 
> Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive.  I told her that Apple
> probably uses third party hard drives these days.  Is this the case?
> Does it matter which brand she uses?  (I understand that there are
> some physical limitations as to which hard drive would fit: thickness
> has to be less than 9.5 millimeters or less.)
> 


In the old SCSI days, Apple had its own ROMs on their hard drives, which 
were made for them by Quantum or Seagate or IBM. You needed third party 
drivers to get non-Apple (ie a drive without an Apple logo on the 
sticker) drives to work. These days they don't do that. Any brand hard 
drive will work as long as it is the right size and interface.

You can get a 2.5 inch SATA 9.5mm 500 Gig Hard drive for $150.

Instructions: 

http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Repair/MacBook-Core-Duo-Hard-Drive-Replacemen
t/282/1
0
Rob
10/14/2009 6:06:38 PM
In article <makuribu-61565B.14063814102009@news.primus.ca>,
 Rob McCleave <makuribu@yahoo.com> wrote:

> You can get a 2.5 inch SATA 9.5mm 500 Gig Hard drive for $150.

Try $90 to $100 for 5400 RPM, $120 for 7200RPM at NewEgg.

Greg B.

-- 
Actual e-mail address is gregbuchner and I'm located at gmail.com
0
Greg
10/14/2009 8:21:13 PM
In article <null-6493A0.15211314102009@free.teranews.com>,
 Greg Buchner <null@none.invalid> wrote:

> In article <makuribu-61565B.14063814102009@news.primus.ca>,
>  Rob McCleave <makuribu@yahoo.com> wrote:
> 
> > You can get a 2.5 inch SATA 9.5mm 500 Gig Hard drive for $150.
> 
> Try $90 to $100 for 5400 RPM, $120 for 7200RPM at NewEgg.
> 
> Greg B.

Or $70 at Walmart

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=11017051&sourceid=25
873048060588083885#ProductDetail
0
Rob
10/15/2009 11:39:13 AM
Hello All:

Thanks for all of you who wrote and gave suggestions and links.
Internet is a great resource, but you folks are the ones who should
really be appreciated.

The installation of the new hard drive was relatively easy.  We had to
buy a No. 8 torx screwdriver and a No. 0 Phillips driver.

When inserting the new hard drive back into the housing, the two
rubber strips on the sides got dislodged.  No matter what we did they
would roll out towards the bottom and prevent the hard drive from
engaging with the connectors of the computer.

With screwdrivers we tried to hold in place the rubber strips, they
got in the way of the hard drive, preventing us from inserting it in
place.  Tried putting the rubber strips on the sides of the hard
drive, this did not work.  Put the rubber strips back in the housing
carefully, and then slightly lubricated the tips of the protruding
screws on the hard drive, this did not work either.

We finally took the rubber strips off, cut too small strips from a
rubber band and wedged them on the two sides of the hard drive, just
around the edges as a temporary stopgap measure.

Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in place?

What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer without
the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber bands at
the very edges?

Deguza

(Using voice recognition program, there may be grammar and vocabulary
errors in my posting.)

On Oct 12, 12:17=A0am, Kompu Kid <deg...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Hello Folks:
>
> I will be helping a friend install a new hard drive in her Macbook.
> From what I understand her hard drive of 60 GB is completely shot.
>
> - she says she has the operating system CD
> - she has purchased this computer in 2006
> - it is a 1.83 MHz Macbook that has Intel Core Duo the
>
> What would be the procedure for replacing the hard drive in this
> computer? =A0I have quite at the experience with PCs, but have not done
> much with Macs recently.
>
> Also, she says she wants an "Apple" hard drive. =A0I told her that Apple
> probably uses third party hard drives these days. =A0Is this the case?
> Does it matter which brand she uses? =A0(I understand that there are
> some physical limitations as to which hard drive would fit: thickness
> has to be less than 9.5 millimeters or less.)
>
> Thanks!
>
> Deguza
>
> (I am using voice recognition software, there may be grammar/
> vocabulary mistakes in my posting.)

0
Kompu
10/15/2009 7:22:07 PM
Kompu Kid wrote:

> When inserting the new hard drive back into the housing, the two
> rubber strips on the sides got dislodged.

> Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in place?

There's a .pdf^1 which describes them as recessed rubber rails.  Maybe
they got out of their recess, which .pdf pic looks like the drive is
inside a 'receptacle' -- so the recesses for the rubber rails would be
on the sides 'down in that hole'.

> What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer without
> the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber bands at
> the very edges?

I would imagine that the shocks to the hdd would be increased to an
unknown degree -- either significantly or insignificantly.


^1 MacBook (13-inch) - Hard Drive Replacement Instructions
http://manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf



-- 
Mike Easter

0
Mike
10/15/2009 8:08:05 PM
On Oct 15, 1:08=A0pm, "Mike Easter" <Mi...@ster.invalid> wrote:
> Kompu Kid wrote:
> > When inserting the new hard drive back into the housing, the two
> > rubber strips on the sides got dislodged.
> > Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in place?
>
> There's a .pdf^1 which describes them as recessed rubber rails. =A0Maybe
> they got out of their recess, which .pdf pic looks like the drive is
> inside a 'receptacle' -- so the recesses for the rubber rails would be
> on the sides 'down in that hole'.
>
> > What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer without
> > the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber bands at
> > the very edges?
>
> I would imagine that the shocks to the hdd would be increased to an
> unknown degree -- either significantly or insignificantly.
>
> ^1 MacBook (13-inch) - Hard Drive Replacement Instructionshttp://manuals.=
info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf
>
> --
> Mike Easter

We did observe what the structure of the rubber rails and the housing,
and did indeed see the receptacle. There are also holes on the side of
the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubber
rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seated
properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were to
no avail.

If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel to
hold these rubber rail in place...

Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and expose
the hard drive housing. We could not make out the structure of the
computer around that area. We were also a bit hesitant. Who knows what
other issues we would run into when we take the casing out.

Deguza



0
Kompu
10/15/2009 10:19:40 PM
Kompu Kid wrote:
> "Mike Easter"
>> Kompu Kid wrote:

>>> Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in
place?
>>
>> recessed rubber rails.

>> I would imagine that the shocks to the hdd would be increased to an
>> unknown degree -- either significantly or insignificantly.

> There are also holes on the side of
> the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubber
> rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seated
> properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were to
> no avail.
>
> If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel to
> hold these rubber rail in place...

I think I would prefer slippery plastic strips barely thicker than
plastic electrical tape but without the adhesive somehow temporarily
applied thru' out the length of the rubber rail.  I guess those little
rubber protrusions are supposed to keep the rubber rail from being
pulled out of its recess slot by the friction of the drive sliding in
tightly.

With the plastic strip in place, the hdd would hopefully not be exerting
any traction/friction/stiction force to dislodge the rubber rail strips.
Then the plastic strips would be withdrawn after the back end of the hdd
is seated.

This is the kind of question I'll bet a mac repair tech has encountered
before.  I haven't looked around yet for a mac webforum.

> Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and expose
> the hard drive housing.

Never having disassembled a macbook, I don't know, but I suspect that
even disassembled, the hdd's recess/cranny is a 'closed' compartment.



-- 
Mike Easter

0
Mike
10/15/2009 10:34:44 PM
 Kompu Kid <deguza@hotmail.com> wrote:

>We finally took the rubber strips off, cut too small strips from a
>rubber band and wedged them on the two sides of the hard drive, just
>around the edges as a temporary stopgap measure.

>Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in place?

Duct tape :) at the corners that you insert the HD into it's
receptacle?

Also while this may seem far fetched, you might put the HD in the
freezer overnight, it won't shrink the rubber but it will the HD.
which you might be able to slide into it's holder.

It's that or use a blow torch to heat the receptacle, increasing it's
size so the HD will slide in - the error of this approach should be
obvious :)

I don't know what the drive looks like so I'm posting blind.

>What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer without
>the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber bands at
>the very edges?

I would imagine the rubber strips are there for vibration dampening,
The bands would work, the strips would work better.
-- 

This guy paints himself... no trick photography ... 
no photoshop ...he just paints himself... 

http://v1kram.posterous.com/liu-bolinthe-invisible-man/?
0
Pennywise
10/16/2009 5:33:14 AM
In message <a5d97e46-b242-47be-a35c-b10b5fec0bd1@12g2000pri.googlegroups.com>,
Kompu Kid wrote:
> On Oct 15, 1:08�pm, "Mike Easter" <Mi...@ster.invalid> wrote:
> > Kompu Kid wrote:
> > > When inserting the new hard drive back into the housing, the two
> > > rubber strips on the sides got dislodged.
> > > Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in place?
> >
> > There's a .pdf^1 which describes them as recessed rubber rails. �Maybe
> > they got out of their recess, which .pdf pic looks like the drive is
> > inside a 'receptacle' -- so the recesses for the rubber rails would be
> > on the sides 'down in that hole'.
> >
> > > What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer without
> > > the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber bands at
> > > the very edges?
> >
> > I would imagine that the shocks to the hdd would be increased to an
> > unknown degree -- either significantly or insignificantly.
> >
> > ^1 MacBook (13-inch) - Hard Drive Replacement Instructionshttp://manuals.=
> info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf
> >
> > --
> > Mike Easter
> 
> We did observe what the structure of the rubber rails and the housing,
> and did indeed see the receptacle. There are also holes on the side of
> the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubber
> rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seated
> properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were to
> no avail.
> 
> If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel to
> hold these rubber rail in place...
> 
> Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and expose
> the hard drive housing. We could not make out the structure of the
> computer around that area. We were also a bit hesitant. Who knows what
> other issues we would run into when we take the casing out.
> 
> Deguza
> 
> 
What a stupid design. Apple should give you a refund :)
If you can manage to get the fuckin rubber rails back in place do this:
apply talcum powder to the rails (not alot just enough to coat them) and then
try sliding the drive in place.
Ive mounted countless bike tires with talc to let the rubber tube slide on
metal rim easier.

HTH

-- 
http://www.care2.com/click-to-donate/wolves/
Proof of Americas 3rd world status:
http://www.ramusa.org/
Cash for *who*?
http://www.bartcop.com/list-the-facts.htm
http://www.pavlovianobeisance.com/

0
iso
10/16/2009 4:22:40 PM
On Oct 16, 9:22=A0am, =A7=F1=FChw=A4=A3f <snuhw...@netscape.net> wrote:
> In message <a5d97e46-b242-47be-a35c-b10b5fec0...@12g2000pri.googlegroups.=
com>,
>
>
>
> Kompu Kid wrote:
> > On Oct 15, 1:08=A0pm, "Mike Easter" <Mi...@ster.invalid> wrote:
> > > Kompu Kid wrote:
> > > > When inserting the new hard drive back into the housing, the two
> > > > rubber strips on the sides got dislodged.
> > > > Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in pla=
ce?
>
> > > There's a .pdf^1 which describes them as recessed rubber rails. =A0Ma=
ybe
> > > they got out of their recess, which .pdf pic looks like the drive is
> > > inside a 'receptacle' -- so the recesses for the rubber rails would b=
e
> > > on the sides 'down in that hole'.
>
> > > > What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer withou=
t
> > > > the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber bands=
 at
> > > > the very edges?
>
> > > I would imagine that the shocks to the hdd would be increased to an
> > > unknown degree -- either significantly or insignificantly.
>
> > > ^1 MacBook (13-inch) - Hard Drive Replacement Instructionshttp://manu=
als.=3D
> > info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf
>
> > > --
> > > Mike Easter
>
> > We did observe what the structure of the rubber rails and the housing,
> > and did indeed see the receptacle. There are also holes on the side of
> > the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubber
> > rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seated
> > properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were to
> > no avail.
>
> > If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel to
> > hold these rubber rail in place...
>
> > Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and expose
> > the hard drive housing. We could not make out the structure of the
> > computer around that area. We were also a bit hesitant. Who knows what
> > other issues we would run into when we take the casing out.
>
> > Deguza
>
> What a stupid design. Apple should give you a refund :)
> If you can manage to get the fuckin rubber rails back in place do this:
> apply talcum powder to the rails (not alot just enough to coat them) and =
then
> try sliding the drive in place.
> Ive mounted countless bike tires with talc to let the rubber tube slide o=
n
> metal rim easier.
>
> HTH
>
> --http://www.care2.com/click-to-donate/wolves/
> Proof of Americas 3rd world status:http://www.ramusa.org/
> Cash for *who*?http://www.bartcop.com/list-the-facts.htmhttp://www.pavlov=
ianobeisance.com/

Thanks for the suggestion.

I used a lubricant which I think has less of a coefficient of friction
than talcum powder. It did not work. The heads of the torx screws
protruding on the sides of the hard drive seems to bite into the
rubber rails, so the lubricant does not seem to do its job. I doubt
that talcum powder will work, either.

Regards
0
topraka
10/16/2009 11:29:15 PM
In article 
<a5d97e46-b242-47be-a35c-b10b5fec0bd1@12g2000pri.googlegroups.com>,
> > --
> > Mike Easter
> 
> We did observe what the structure of the rubber rails and the housing,
> and did indeed see the receptacle. There are also holes on the side of
> the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubber
> rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seated
> properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were to
> no avail.
> 
> If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel to
> hold these rubber rail in place...
> 
> Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and expose
> the hard drive housing. We could not make out the structure of the
> computer around that area. We were also a bit hesitant. Who knows what
> other issues we would run into when we take the casing out.
> 
> Deguza

Dont take this too seriousely if it seems unworkable, but have you tried 
cutting a couple of pieces of thin plastic/pvc/ or such the same length 
as the the drive - sitting those bits of plastic either side of the gap 
against the rubber, then squishing the drive in between those plastic 
strips - ie they act as a guide for the drive as it goes in, and stop 
the rubber strips from moving

David
0
David
10/17/2009 11:15:46 AM
In message <954935f0-29f4-4b8b-9dd9-90b0c6c08c79@m33g2000pri.googlegroups.com>,
"topraka@gmail.com" wrote:
> On Oct 16, 9:22�am, ���hw��f <snuhw...@netscape.net> wrote:
> > In message <a5d97e46-b242-47be-a35c-b10b5fec0...@12g2000pri.googlegroups.=
> com>,
> >
> >
> >
> > Kompu Kid wrote:
> > > On Oct 15, 1:08�pm, "Mike Easter" <Mi...@ster.invalid> wrote:
> > > > Kompu Kid wrote:
> > > > > When inserting the new hard drive back into the housing, the two
> > > > > rubber strips on the sides got dislodged.
> > > > > Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in pla=
> ce?
> >
> > > > There's a .pdf^1 which describes them as recessed rubber rails. �Ma=
> ybe
> > > > they got out of their recess, which .pdf pic looks like the drive is
> > > > inside a 'receptacle' -- so the recesses for the rubber rails would b=
> e
> > > > on the sides 'down in that hole'.
> >
> > > > > What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer withou=
> t
> > > > > the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber bands=
>  at
> > > > > the very edges?
> >
> > > > I would imagine that the shocks to the hdd would be increased to an
> > > > unknown degree -- either significantly or insignificantly.
> >
> > > > ^1 MacBook (13-inch) - Hard Drive Replacement Instructionshttp://manu=
> als.=
> > > info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf
> >
> > > > --
> > > > Mike Easter
> >
> > > We did observe what the structure of the rubber rails and the housing,
> > > and did indeed see the receptacle. There are also holes on the side of
> > > the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubber
> > > rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seated
> > > properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were to
> > > no avail.
> >
> > > If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel to
> > > hold these rubber rail in place...
> >
> > > Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and expose
> > > the hard drive housing. We could not make out the structure of the
> > > computer around that area. We were also a bit hesitant. Who knows what
> > > other issues we would run into when we take the casing out.
> >
> > > Deguza
> >
> > What a stupid design. Apple should give you a refund :)
> > If you can manage to get the fuckin rubber rails back in place do this:
> > apply talcum powder to the rails (not alot just enough to coat them) and =
> then
> > try sliding the drive in place.
> > Ive mounted countless bike tires with talc to let the rubber tube slide o=
> n
> > metal rim easier.
> >
> > HTH
> 
> Thanks for the suggestion.
> 
> I used a lubricant which I think has less of a coefficient of friction
> than talcum powder. It did not work. The heads of the torx screws
> protruding on the sides of the hard drive seems to bite into the
> rubber rails, so the lubricant does not seem to do its job. I doubt
> that talcum powder will work, either.
> 
> Regards

Use different screws?

^_^

-- 
http://www.care2.com/click-to-donate/wolves/
Proof of Americas 3rd world status:
http://www.ramusa.org/
Cash for *who*?
http://www.bartcop.com/list-the-facts.htm
http://www.pavlovianobeisance.com/

0
iso
10/17/2009 3:04:38 PM
On Oct 17, 4:15=A0am, David <posti...@REMOVE-TO-REPLYconfidential-
counselling.com> wrote:
> In article
> <a5d97e46-b242-47be-a35c-b10b5fec0...@12g2000pri.googlegroups.com>,
>
>
>
> > > --
> > > Mike Easter
>
> > We did observe what the structure of the rubber rails and the housing,
> > and did indeed see the receptacle. There are also holes on the side of
> > the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubber
> > rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seated
> > properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were to
> > no avail.
>
> > If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel to
> > hold these rubber rail in place...
>
> > Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and expose
> > the hard drive housing. We could not make out the structure of the
> > computer around that area. We were also a bit hesitant. Who knows what
> > other issues we would run into when we take the casing out.
>
> > Deguza
>
> Dont take this too seriousely if it seems unworkable, but have you tried
> cutting a couple of pieces of thin plastic/pvc/ or such the same length
> as the the drive - sitting those bits of plastic either side of the gap
> against the rubber, then squishing the drive in between those plastic
> strips - ie they act as a guide for the drive as it goes in, and stop
> the rubber strips from moving
>
> David

I was thinking of this. I am looking for Teflon strips. They are
sometimes used as  insulators on wires. Kapton tape may also work.

Deguza
0
Kompu
10/17/2009 7:30:12 PM
On Oct 17, 8:04=A0am, =A7=F1=FChw=A4=A3f <snuhw...@netscape.net> wrote:
> In message <954935f0-29f4-4b8b-9dd9-90b0c6c08...@m33g2000pri.googlegroups=
..com>,
>
>
>
> "topr...@gmail.com" wrote:
> > On Oct 16, 9:22=A0am, =A7=F1=FChw=A4=A3f <snuhw...@netscape.net> wrote:
> > > In message <a5d97e46-b242-47be-a35c-b10b5fec0...@12g2000pri.googlegro=
ups.=3D
> > com>,
>
> > > Kompu Kid wrote:
> > > > On Oct 15, 1:08=A0pm, "Mike Easter" <Mi...@ster.invalid> wrote:
> > > > > Kompu Kid wrote:
> > > > > > When inserting the new hard drive back into the housing, the tw=
o
> > > > > > rubber strips on the sides got dislodged.
> > > > > > Any suggestions as to how to hold the original rubber strips in=
 pla=3D
> > ce?
>
> > > > > There's a .pdf^1 which describes them as recessed rubber rails. =
=A0Ma=3D
> > ybe
> > > > > they got out of their recess, which .pdf pic looks like the drive=
 is
> > > > > inside a 'receptacle' -- so the recesses for the rubber rails wou=
ld b=3D
> > e
> > > > > on the sides 'down in that hole'.
>
> > > > > > What would happen if my friend were to operate this computer wi=
thou=3D
> > t
> > > > > > the original rubber strips but just with the strips of rubber b=
ands=3D
> > =A0at
> > > > > > the very edges?
>
> > > > > I would imagine that the shocks to the hdd would be increased to =
an
> > > > > unknown degree -- either significantly or insignificantly.
>
> > > > > ^1 MacBook (13-inch) - Hard Drive Replacement Instructionshttp://=
manu=3D
> > als.=3D
> > > > info.apple.com/en_US/MacBook_13inch_HardDrive_DIY.pdf
>
> > > > > --
> > > > > Mike Easter
>
> > > > We did observe what the structure of the rubber rails and the housi=
ng,
> > > > and did indeed see the receptacle. There are also holes on the side=
 of
> > > > the housing that a number protrusions on the back side of the rubbe=
r
> > > > rails would engage in. We made sure that the rubber railing is seat=
ed
> > > > properly, and the protrusions are in the holes. However, these were=
 to
> > > > no avail.
>
> > > > If I had a machine shop, I would make a tool from very thin steel t=
o
> > > > hold these rubber rail in place...
>
> > > > Alternately, I wonder if we can take the plastic casing out and exp=
ose
> > > > the hard drive housing. We could not make out the structure of the
> > > > computer around that area. We were also a bit hesitant. Who knows w=
hat
> > > > other issues we would run into when we take the casing out.
>
> > > > Deguza
>
> > > What a stupid design. Apple should give you a refund :)
> > > If you can manage to get the fuckin rubber rails back in place do thi=
s:
> > > apply talcum powder to the rails (not alot just enough to coat them) =
and =3D
> > then
> > > try sliding the drive in place.
> > > Ive mounted countless bike tires with talc to let the rubber tube sli=
de o=3D
> > n
> > > metal rim easier.
>
> > > HTH
>
> > Thanks for the suggestion.
>
> > I used a lubricant which I think has less of a coefficient of friction
> > than talcum powder. It did not work. The heads of the torx screws
> > protruding on the sides of the hard drive seems to bite into the
> > rubber rails, so the lubricant does not seem to do its job. I doubt
> > that talcum powder will work, either.
>
> > Regards
>
> Use different screws?
>
> ^_^
>
> --http://www.care2.com/click-to-donate/wolves/
> Proof of Americas 3rd world status:http://www.ramusa.org/
> Cash for *who*?http://www.bartcop.com/list-the-facts.htmhttp://www.pavlov=
ianobeisance.com/

A pan head screw would be ideal to use. I will check the local
hardware store. I wonder if Fry's Electronics would be better...

Deguza
0
Kompu
10/17/2009 7:36:44 PM
Reply: